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Sample records for blood chemistry exercise

  1. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  2. The Effects of Varying Concentrations of Dietary Protein and Fat on Blood Gas, Hematologic Serum Chemistry, and Body Temperature Before and After Exercise in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, John; Gillette, Robert L; Angle, Thomas Craig; Haney, Pamela; Fletcher, Daniel J; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Optimal dietary protocols for the athletic canine are often defined by requirements for endurance athletes that do not always translate into optimal dietary interventions for all canine athletes. Prior research studying detection dogs suggests that dietary fat sources can influence olfaction; however, as fat is added to the diet the protein calories can be diminished potentially resulting in decreased red blood cell counts or albumin status. Optimal macronutrient profile for detection dogs may be different considering the unique work they engage in. To study a calorically low protein: high fat (18:57% ME), high protein: high fat (27:57% ME), and high protein: low fat (27:32% ME) approach to feeding, 17 dogs were provided various diets in a 3 × 3 cross over design. Dogs were exercised on a treadmill and blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 10- and 20-min post-exercise to assess complete blood count, serum chemistry, blood gases, and cortisol; as well as rectal and core body temperature. Exercise induced a decrease in serum phosphorus, potassium, and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cortisol typical of moderate exercise bouts. A complete and balanced high protein: high-fat diet (27:57% ME) induced decreases in serum cortisol and alkaline phosphatase. Corn oil top dressed low protein: high-fat diet (18:57% ME) induced a slightly better thermal recovery than a complete and balanced high protein: high fat diet and a high protein: low fat (27%:32% ME) diet suggesting some mild advantages when using the low protein: high fat diet that warrant further investigation regarding optimal protein and fat calories and thermal recovery.

  3. The effects of varying concentrations of dietary protein and fat on d blood gas, hematologic, serum chemistry and body temperature before and after strenuous exercise in Labrador Retreivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Wakshlag

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimal dietary protocols for the athletic canine are often defined by requirements for endurance athletes, that do not always translate into optimal dietary interventions for all canine athletes. Prior research studying detection dogs suggests that dietary fat sources can influence olfaction; however, as fat is added to the diet the protein calories can be diminished potentially resulting in decreased red blood cell counts or albumin status. Optimal macronutrient profile for detection dogs may be different considering the unique work they engage in. To study a calorically high protein: low fat (18:57% ME, high protein: high fat (27:57% ME, and high protein: low fat (27:32% ME approach to feeding, 17 dogs were provided various diets in a 3 x 3 cross over design. Dogs were exercised on a treadmill and blood was taken pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise, 10 minutes and 20 minutes post-exercise to assess complete blood count, serum chemistry, blood gases, and cortisol; as well as rectal and core body temperature. Exercise induced a decrease in serum phosphorus, potassium, and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cortisol typical of moderate exercise bouts. A complete and balanced high protein: high fat diet (27:57% ME induced decreases in serum cortisol and alkaline phosphatase. Corn oil top dressed low protein: high fat diet (18:57% ME induced a slightly better thermal recovery than a complete and balanced high fat: high protein diet and a low fat: high protein (32:27% ME diet suggesting some mild advantages when using the high fat: low protein diet that warrant further investigation regarding optimal protein and fat calories and thermal recovery.

  4. Predictors of sudden death and death from pump failure in congestive heart failure are different. Analysis of 24 h Holter monitoring, clinical variables, blood chemistry, exercise test and radionuclide angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, B K; Rasmussen, Verner; Hansen, J F

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and ninety consecutive patients discharged with congestive heart failure were examined with clinical evaluation, blood chemistry, 24 h Holter monitoring, exercise test and radionuclide angiography. Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.30, 46% were in New York Heart...

  5. Chemistry of Blood Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, William F.

    2005-01-01

    The molecule of December 2005 comes from the paper by Rose, Palcic and Evans on structural factors determining the blood type. The structure was previously reported by Palcic and Evans and is presented without the water molecule that is determined in the crystal structure.

  6. BLOOD CHEMISTRY AND PLATELET SEROTONIN UPTAKE AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the blood chemistry and platelet serotonin uptake as alternative method of determining HIV disease stage in HIV/AIDS patients. Whole blood was taken from subjects at the Human Virology of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. Subjects were judged suitable for ...

  7. Lecture Notes and Exercises for Course 21240 (Basic Analytical Chemistry)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The publication contains notes dealing with difficult topics in analytical chemistry (cfr. Course Descriptions, DTU), relevant exercises as well as final examination problems from the last years.......The publication contains notes dealing with difficult topics in analytical chemistry (cfr. Course Descriptions, DTU), relevant exercises as well as final examination problems from the last years....

  8. Lecture Notes and Exercises for Course 21240 (Basic Analytical Chemistry)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    The publication contains notes dealing with difficult topics in analytical chemistry (cfr. Course Descriptions, DTU), relevant exercises as well as final examination problems from the last years.......The publication contains notes dealing with difficult topics in analytical chemistry (cfr. Course Descriptions, DTU), relevant exercises as well as final examination problems from the last years....

  9. Regulation of exercise blood flow: Role of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Broxterman, Ryan M; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-09-01

    During exercise, oxygen and nutrient rich blood must be delivered to the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain through the complex and highly regulated integration of central and peripheral hemodynamic factors. Indeed, even minor alterations in blood flow to these organs have profound consequences on exercise capacity by modifying the development of fatigue. Therefore, the fine-tuning of blood flow is critical for optimal physical performance. At the level of the peripheral circulation, blood flow is regulated by a balance between the mechanisms responsible for vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Once thought of as toxic by-products of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are now recognized as important signaling molecules that exert potent vasoactive responses that are dependent upon the underlying balance between oxidation-reduction reactions or redox balance. Under normal healthy conditions with low levels of oxidative stress, free radicals promote vasodilation, which is attenuated with exogenous antioxidant administration. Conversely, with advancing age and disease where background oxidative stress is elevated, an exercise-induced increase in free radicals can further shift the redox balance to a pro-oxidant state, impairing vasodilation and attenuating blood flow. Under these conditions, exogenous antioxidants improve vasodilatory capacity and augment blood flow by restoring an "optimal" redox balance. Interestingly, while the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain all have unique functions during exercise, the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to the regulation of blood flow is remarkably preserved across each of these varied target organs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Exercise-induced blood lactate increase does not change red blood cell deformability in cyclists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Simmonds

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of exercise-induced lactate production on red blood cell deformability and other blood rheological changes is controversial, given heavy-exercise induces biochemical processes (e.g., oxidative stress known to perturb haemorheology. The aim of the present study was to examine the haemorheological response to a short-duration cycling protocol designed to increase blood lactate concentration, but of duration insufficient to induce significant oxidative stress. METHODS: Male cyclists and triathletes (n = 6; 27±7 yr; body mass index: 23.7±3.0 kg/m²; peak oxygen uptake 4.02±0.51 L/min performed unloaded (0 W, moderate-intensity, and heavy-intensity cycling. Blood was sampled at rest and during the final minute of each cycling bout. Blood chemistry, blood viscosity, red blood cell aggregation and red blood cell deformability were measured. RESULTS: Blood lactate concentration increased significantly during heavy-intensity cycling, when compared with all other conditions. Methaemoglobin fraction did not change during any exercise bout when compared with rest. Blood viscosity at native haematocrit increased during heavy-intensity cycling at higher-shear rates when compared with rest, unloaded and moderate-intensity cycling. Heavy-intensity exercise increased the amplitude of red blood cell aggregation in native haematocrit samples when compared with all other conditions. Red blood cell deformability was not changed by exercise. CONCLUSION: Acute exercise perturbs haemorheology in an intensity dose-response fashion; however, many of the haemorheological effects appear to be secondary to haemoconcentration, rather than increased lactate concentration.

  11. Solutions to selected exercise problems in quantum chemistry and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162).......Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162)....

  12. From Metalloproteins to Coordination Chemistry: A Learning Exercise to Teach Transition Metal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglinski, John; Graham, Duncan; Kennedy, Alan R.; Gibson, Lorraine T.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise is organized to reinforce the fundamental rules of coordination chemistry through a biological study of metalloproteins. The work, which is divided into four well-defined activities, involves a major application of computer databases to address chemical problems.

  13. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  14. Leg blood flow during static exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Persson, J

    1982-01-01

    Leg blood flow was studied with the constant infusion dye technique during static exercise of the thigh muscles (quadriceps) and during hand-grips at 15 and 25-30% of MVC. Blood flow and oxygen uptake in the leg increased in quadriceps exercise and reached their highest values (around 1.21/min and 165 ml/min respectively) at 25-30% of MVC, whereas leg vascular resistance decreased. Regional circulatory adaptations and the oxygen uptake - leg blood flow relationship were in close agreement with the responses found in dynamic leg exercise. In view of the marked rise in intramuscular pressure previously observed during quadriceps contractions, a restriction of blood flow and an increased vascular resistance had been expected. Involuntary activation of leg muscles other than the quadriceps may explain the finding. Contractions of the contralateral quadriceps induced a slight increase in leg blood flow, whereas hand-grips had no influence on blood flow or vascular resistance in the leg. The distribution of the cardiac output during static contractions is discussed, and it is concluded that during hand-grips the increase in blood flow is predominantly distributed to the upper part of the body.

  15. Diabetes and Exercise: When to Monitor Your Blood Sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and exercise: When to monitor your blood sugar Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid ... testing your blood sugar before, during and after exercise may be just as important as the exercise itself. Grant RW, et al. ...

  16. Lifeblood : Chemistry of Blood in Eighteenth-Century Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwaal, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Was early eighteenth-century chemistry merely a handmaid to medicine? This paper aims to reassess assumptions about the relation between chemistry and medicine in the early modern period and argues that chemistry played a central role in medicine. The fluid and flow of blood can serve as a starting

  17. Effect of Marijuana Smoking on Blood Chemistry and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of marijuana smoking on blood chemistry and serum biogenic amines concentrations in humans was investigated. Eighty Marijuana addicts and twenty non- marijuana smokers were used in the study. Blood chemistry and serum biogenic amines concentrations of the marijuana addicts and controls, were ...

  18. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Exercise, training and red blood cell turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J A

    1995-01-01

    Endurance training can lead to what has been termed 'sports anaemia'. Although under normal conditions, red blood cells (RBCs) have a lifespan of about 120 days, the rate of aging may increase during intensive training. However, RBC deficiency is rare in athletes, and sports anaemia is probably due to an expanded plasma volume. Cycling, running and swimming have been shown to cause RBC damage. While most investigators measure indices of haemolysis (for example, plasma haemoglobin or haptoglobin), RBC removal is normally an extravascular process that does not involve haemolysis. Attention is now turning to cellular indices (such as antioxidant depletion, or protein or lipid damage) that may be more indicative of exercise-induced damage. RBCs are vulnerable to oxidative damage because of their continuous exposure to oxygen and their high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids and haem iron. As oxidative stress may be proportional to oxygen uptake, it is not surprising that antioxidants in muscle, liver and RBCs can be depleted during exercise. Oxidative damage to RBCs can also perturb ionic homeostasis and facilitate cellular dehydration. These changes impair RBC deformability which can, in turn, impede the passage of RBCs through the microcirculation. This may lead to hypoxia in working muscle during single episodes of exercise and possibly an increased rate of RBC destruction with long term exercise. Providing RBC destruction does not exceed the rate of RBC production, no detrimental effect to athletic performance should occur. An increased rate of RBC turnover may be advantageous because young cells are more efficient in transporting oxygen. Because most techniques examine the RBC population as a whole, more sophisticated methods which analyse cells individually are required to determine the mechanisms involved in exercise-induced damage of RBCs.

  20. Blood flow restricted exercise and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Okita, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR) leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  1. Blood Flow Restricted Exercise and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  2. Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeo, Fernando; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H

    2012-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is broadly recommended by current European and American hypertension guidelines. It remains elusive, however, whether exercise leads to a reduction of blood pressure in resistant hypertension as well. The present randomized controlled trial examines the cardiovascular effects of aerobic exercise on resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension was defined as a blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg in spite of 3 antihypertensive agents or a blood pressure controlled by ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Fifty subjects with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to participate or not to participate in an 8- to 12-week treadmill exercise program (target lactate, 2.0±0.5 mmol/L). Blood pressure was assessed by 24-hour monitoring. Arterial compliance and cardiac index were measured by pulse wave analysis. The training program was well tolerated by all of the patients. Exercise significantly decreased systolic and diastolic daytime ambulatory blood pressure by 6±12 and 3±7 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.03 each). Regular exercise reduced blood pressure on exertion and increased physical performance as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake and lactate curves. Arterial compliance and cardiac index remained unchanged. Physical exercise is able to decrease blood pressure even in subjects with low responsiveness to medical treatment. It should be included in the therapeutic approach to resistant hypertension.

  3. Blood chemistry and hematocrit of captive and wild canvasbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M.C.; Obrecht, H.H.; Williams, B.K.; Kuenzel, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Blood chemistry and packed cell volume (PCV) did not vary among groups of captive canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) maintained ad libitum on 5 diets varying in metabolizable energy (ME) and protein. Ducks fed low quality diets increased their consumption so that all ducks were obtaining similar amounts of energy and protein. Some variables, including cholesterol, were found to differ between the sexes and ages of captive ducks. Seasonal differences were detected in the blood chemistry of captive canvasbacks. Four of the 5 enzyme values increased from October to January and then declined to April. PCV increased from 45 in October to 51 in April. Overall, blood chemistry values and PCV's were highly variable and did not appear to be good discriminators for age, sex, and diet of captive canvasbacks. Differences detected between captive and wild canvasbacks were attributed to increased stress of wild ducks during handling.

  4. Respiratory ammonia output and blood ammonia concentration during incremental exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Kort, E; van der Mark, TW; Grevink, RG; Verkerke, GJ

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the increase of ammonia concentration and lactate concentration in blood was accompanied by an increased expiration of ammonia during graded exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test. Blood ammonia, blood lactate

  5. Blood temperature and perfusion to exercising and non-exercising human limbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Alonso, José; Calbet, José A. L.; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    increased in association with elevations in TB and limb V̇O2, whereas ABF, arm TB and V̇O2 remained largely unchanged. During incremental arm exercise, both ABF and LBF increased in relationship to similar increases in V̇O2. In 12 trained males, increases in femoral TB and LBF during incremental leg......NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? Temperature-sensitive mechanisms are thought to contribute to blood-flow regulation, but the relationship between exercising and non-exercising limb perfusion and blood temperature is not established. What is the main finding and its...... importance? The close coupling among perfusion, blood temperature and aerobic metabolism in exercising and non-exercising extremities across different exercise modalities and activity levels and the tight association between limb vasodilatation and increases in plasma ATP suggest that both temperature...

  6. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Zar A.; Karimi F.; Hovanloo F.; Ansian A.; Piraki P.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC) and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons.Methods: Ten male judo...

  7. Acute effect on ambulatory blood pressure from aerobic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Line; Linander Henriksen, Marie

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: High occupational physical activity (OPA) is shown to increase the risk for elevated blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and mortality. Conversely, aerobic exercise acutely lowers the blood pressure up to 25 h post exercise. However, it is unknown if this beneficial effect also apply...... for workers exposed to high levels of OPA. Cleaners constitute a relevant occupational group for this investigation because of a high prevalence of OPA and cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the objective was to investigate the acute effects on ambulatory blood pressure from a single aerobic exercise...... session among female cleaners. METHODS: Twenty-two female cleaners were randomised to a cross-over study with a reference and an aerobic exercise session. Differences in 24-h, work hours, leisure time, and sleep ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) were evaluated using repeated measure 2 × 2 mixed...

  8. Hypertension, and blood pressure response to graded exercise in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension, and blood pressure response to graded exercise in young obese and non- athletic Nigerian university students. ... onset of hypertension and thus other cardiovascular diseases and less tolerant to physical exercises. Our results add to the evidence that hypertension is common among obese young adults.

  9. Effects of Triphasic Exercise on Blood Rheology and Pathophysiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to study the relevance of physiology and pathophysiology in blood rheology as effects of triphasic exercise. Regular exercise which has been established as life prolonging has led to decrease in both peripheral vascular and coronary morbidity that has been associated with certain improvements in ...

  10. Cutaneous blood flow rate in areas with and without arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M.; Sejrsen, Per

    1998-01-01

    Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow......Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow...

  11. Effect Of Exogenous Progesterone On Blood Chemistry Of Large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exogenous hormones are major economic factors in swine production. This study evaluate the effects of exogenous administration of progesterone on the blood chemistry of pigs.Experiment involved weekly injections of progesterone to 24 pigs (12 males and 12 females)from day old to 24 weeks and only corn oil to another ...

  12. Blood chemistry, haematological indices and nutrient digestibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56-days experiment was carried out to study the effect of replacing macaroni waste meal (MWM) with maize on nutrient digestibility and blood chemistry of indigenous turkey starter. Ninety-six indigenous turkey poults with an average weight of 52 g were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments containing macaroni ...

  13. Blood temperature and perfusion to exercising and non-exercising human limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, José; Calbet, José A L; Boushel, Robert; Helge, Jørn W; Søndergaard, Hans; Munch-Andersen, Thor; van Hall, Gerrit; Mortensen, Stefan P; Secher, Niels H

    2015-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? Temperature-sensitive mechanisms are thought to contribute to blood-flow regulation, but the relationship between exercising and non-exercising limb perfusion and blood temperature is not established. What is the main finding and its importance? The close coupling among perfusion, blood temperature and aerobic metabolism in exercising and non-exercising extremities across different exercise modalities and activity levels and the tight association between limb vasodilatation and increases in plasma ATP suggest that both temperature- and metabolism-sensitive mechanisms are important for the control of human limb perfusion, possibly by activating ATP release from the erythrocytes. Temperature-sensitive mechanisms may contribute to blood-flow regulation, but the influence of temperature on perfusion to exercising and non-exercising human limbs is not established. Blood temperature (TB ), blood flow and oxygen uptake (V̇O2) in the legs and arms were measured in 16 healthy humans during 90 min of leg and arm exercise and during exhaustive incremental leg or arm exercise. During prolonged exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was fourfold higher than arm blood flow (ABF) in association with higher TB and limb V̇O2. Leg and arm vascular conductance during exercise compared with rest was related closely to TB (r(2) = 0.91; P incremental leg exercise, LBF increased in association with elevations in TB and limb V̇O2, whereas ABF, arm TB and V̇O2 remained largely unchanged. During incremental arm exercise, both ABF and LBF increased in relationship to similar increases in V̇O2. In 12 trained males, increases in femoral TB and LBF during incremental leg exercise were mirrored by similar pulmonary artery TB and cardiac output dynamics, suggesting that processes in active limbs dominate central temperature and perfusion responses. The present data reveal a close coupling among perfusion, TB and aerobic metabolism in exercising and non-exercising

  14. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zar A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons.Methods: Ten male judoists after obtaining informed consent were included in the study. The athletes took part in a session of moderate-intensity exercise (60 minutes running on a treadmill at 60% of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were drawn at rest immediately after the exercise. Blood neutrophil count and percentage of Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA stimulated neutrophils in whole blood were assessed [as a marker of oxidative burst (OB quality]. Athletes were asked about any signs of upper respiratory infections 24 hours after the exercise and during sport seasons. Paired-t test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at p<0.05.Results: BNC were in normal range at rest, and meaningfully increased immediately after the exercise (p<0.05. At rest, the OB activity was in normal range, and increased immediately after the exercise (not significant. During 24 hours after the exercise, athletes showed no signs of upper respiratory system infections. Also they mentioned no history of increased susceptibility of upper respiratory infections during sport seasons. Conclusion: Continuous judo exercises have no negative effects on BNC and OB activity. This finding is in accordance with the absence of self-reported upper respiratory infections in judoists during sport seasons. Significant increase in BNC after a session of exercise was a predictable event as a normal response of immune system to exercise stress. Normal OB activity after the exercise was

  15. Theoretical Hammett Plot for the Gas-Phase Ionization of Benzoic Acid versus Phenol: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Blake E.

    2013-01-01

    Computational chemistry undergraduate laboratory courses are now part of the chemistry curriculum at many universities. However, there remains a lack of computational chemistry exercises available to instructors. This exercise is presented for students to develop skills using computational chemistry software while supplementing their knowledge of…

  16. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    2001-01-01

    -blockade group vs. the control group, hormones, metabolites, VO(2), and RER followed the same pattern of changes in ACE-blockade and control groups during exercise. Splanchnic blood flow (at rest: 1.67 +/- 0.12, ACE blockade; 1.59 +/- 0.18 l/min, control) decreased during moderate exercise (0.78 +/- 0.07, ACE......, no differences in the pattern of change of splanchnic blood flow and splanchnic glucose production were observed during ACE blockade compared with controls. This study demonstrates that the normal increase in ANG II levels observed during prolonged exercise in humans does not play a major role in the regulation......The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin...

  17. Blood temperature and perfusion to exercising and non‐exercising human limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbet, José A. L.; Boushel, Robert; Helge, Jørn W.; Søndergaard, Hans; Munch‐Andersen, Thor; van Hall, Gerrit; Mortensen, Stefan P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Temperature‐sensitive mechanisms are thought to contribute to blood‐flow regulation, but the relationship between exercising and non‐exercising limb perfusion and blood temperature is not established. What is the main finding and its importance? The close coupling among perfusion, blood temperature and aerobic metabolism in exercising and non‐exercising extremities across different exercise modalities and activity levels and the tight association between limb vasodilatation and increases in plasma ATP suggest that both temperature‐ and metabolism‐sensitive mechanisms are important for the control of human limb perfusion, possibly by activating ATP release from the erythrocytes. Temperature‐sensitive mechanisms may contribute to blood‐flow regulation, but the influence of temperature on perfusion to exercising and non‐exercising human limbs is not established. Blood temperature (T B), blood flow and oxygen uptake (V˙O2) in the legs and arms were measured in 16 healthy humans during 90 min of leg and arm exercise and during exhaustive incremental leg or arm exercise. During prolonged exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was fourfold higher than arm blood flow (ABF) in association with higher T B and limb V˙O2. Leg and arm vascular conductance during exercise compared with rest was related closely to T B (r 2 = 0.91; P incremental leg exercise, LBF increased in association with elevations in T B and limb V˙O2, whereas ABF, arm T B and V˙O2 remained largely unchanged. During incremental arm exercise, both ABF and LBF increased in relationship to similar increases in V˙O2. In 12 trained males, increases in femoral T B and LBF during incremental leg exercise were mirrored by similar pulmonary artery T B and cardiac output dynamics, suggesting that processes in active limbs dominate central temperature and perfusion responses. The present data reveal a close coupling among perfusion, T B and

  18. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons. Methods: Ten male judoists after obtaining informed consent were included in the study. The athletes took part in a session of moderate-intensity exercise (60 minutes running on a treadmill at 60% of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were drawn at rest immediately after the exercise. Blood neutrophil count and percentage of Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA stimulated neutrophils in whole blood were assessed [as a marker of oxidative burst (OB quality]. Athletes were asked about any signs of upper respiratory infections 24 hours after the exercise and during sport seasons. Paired-t test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: BNC were in normal range at rest, and meaningfully increased immediately after the exercise (p<0.05. At rest, the OB activity was in normal range, and increased immediately after the exercise (not significant. During 24 hours after the exercise, athletes showed no signs of upper respiratory system infections. Also they mentioned no history of increased susceptibility of upper respiratory infections during sport seasons. Conclusion: Continuous judo exercises have no negative effects on BNC and OB activity. This finding is in accordance with the absence of self-reported upper respiratory infections in judoists during sport seasons. Significant increase in BNC after a session of exercise was a

  20. Uranium chemistry in blood and aqueous media. Techniques of studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scapolan, St.

    1996-11-01

    The object of this report in a first step, is to understand the chemistry of uranium in aqueous phase by specifying the behavior of this element in function of several parameters such PH, concentration of present species, temperature, ionic force. In a second step, investigation techniques are reviewed: X rays diffraction, potentiometric titrations, polarography, spectrophotometry, NMR of 13 C, 31 P, 17 O, capillary electrophoresis, laser detection. The third part brings elements to understand the uranium complexation in blood medium

  1. Blood composition of the reindeer . II. Blood chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Nieminen

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available The blood chemical composition of 578 semi-domestic reindeer were investigated in respect to age, season, calving and nutrition in Northern Finland during 1973-79. The weight gain was maximally 400 g/day at an age of 4-8 weeks as also reflected by high serum thyroxine (T4, alkaline phosphatase (SAP, creatine phosphokinase (CPK and blood glucose values. Low SAP activity in winter indicated a cessation of growth. The pH of the venous blood was 7.35 and the clotting activity very high (21 sec, 100 % in summer and autumn. 15 protein bands and 15 fatty acids were discernible in reindeer serum. The total serum protein was 58 g/1 in the 20-day-old calf and 87 g/1 in adult hind in the autumn, the difference being caused by changes in globulins. The neonatal fluctuation of immunoglobulins suggests that the calf acquires its passive immunity soon after birth by the intestinal absorption of proteins and that its endogenous synthesis of gamma globulins begins in the 4th week of life. The serum total lipids (2.9 g/1, triglycerides (0.29 mmol/1 and cholesterol (1.6 mmol/1 were low in newborn calves and reached their adult levels at the age of 5 months (average 5.1 g/1, 0.4 mmol/1, 2.7 mmol/1, respectively. The young calves had higher serum cholesterol, total and free fatty acid, myristic acid and palmitic acid, but lower stearic and oleic acid values than adult hinds. The reindeer calf liberates considerable amounts of catecholamines during the first days after birth, but the postpartum dopamine-B-hydroxylase activity was rather low. The means of blood glucose (3.4-4.6 mmol/1, total serum proteins (63 - 87 g/1, albumin (39 - 43 g/1, total globulins (23 - 44 g/1, urea (5.7-9 mmol/1, total lipids (2.7 - 5.2 g/1, triglycerides (0.17 - 0.33 mmol/1, total fatty acids (0.89 - 1.54 g/1, calcium (2.2 - 2.6 mmol/1, inorganic phosphorus (1.6 - 2.2 mmol/1, magnesium (0.8 - 1.2 mmol/1 and copper (6.7 - 18 |Jmol/l of free-grazing adult hinds were highest in summer and

  2. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    A Zar

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC) and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours ...

  3. Acute effects of cycling exercise on post-exercise blood pressure in individuals with down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezerra Maria Edilma Da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Studies have shown that even a single session of physical exercise lowers blood pressure after its completion. This phenomenon is called post-exercise hypotension (PEH and has been considered as a non-pharmacological treatment to control blood pressure. However, there are no studies regarding the occurrence of PEH after acute exercise in individuals with Down syndrome (DS. This study aimed to analyse the occurrence of PEH in these subjects and the possible role of exercise intensity. Methods. Ten individuals with DS, of both genders, participated in the study (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass, 60.7 ± 9 kg; height, 1.48 ± 0.11 m; BMI, 27.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. The volunteers randomly underwent 2 sessions of exercise on a stationary bike for 20 minutes and 1 control session. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were measured after 15 minutes of resting, in the 20th minute of each exercise session or control, and in the 15th, 30th, and 45th minute of postexercise recovery. Results. Both moderate and intense exercise performed acutely increased SBP (p < 0.001, p < 0.01, respectively, with no effect on DBP in individuals with DS. Neither the moderate nor the intense exercise was enough to elicit PEH. Conclusions. The results indicated that individuals with DS may not present PEH for the intensities, duration, and exercise mode as applied in the present investigation. While additional studies with different exercise strategies are needed, our findings contribute to the body of literature regarding the PEH responses in adults with DS.

  4. Effects of exercise training with blood flow restriction on blood pressure in medicated hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Cezar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of non-pharmacological approaches to hypertension (HA is critical for both prevention and treatment. This study examined the hemodynamic and biochemical responses of medicated hypertensive women to resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (vascular occlusion. Twenty-three women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: High intensity strength training (n = 8; low-intensity resistance exercise with occlusion (n = 8; and control (n = 7. The first two groups underwent eight weeks of training performed twice a week, including three series of wrist flexion exercises with or without vascular occlusion. The exercised with occlusion group showed pre- to post-test reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and double product, whereas the other groups showed no significant hemodynamic changes. In conclusion, resistance exercise during 8 weeks was effective in lowering blood pressure in medicated hypertensive subjects.

  5. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and plasma catecholamines during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pott, F; Jensen, K; Hansen, H

    1996-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, mean blood velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) demonstrates a graded increase to work rate and reflects regional cerebral blood flow. At a high work rate, however, vasoactive levels of plasma catecholamines could mediate vasoconstriction of the MCA...... and thereby elevate Vmean at a given volume flow. To evaluate transcranial Doppler-determined Vmean at high plasma catecholamine levels, seven elite cyclists performed a maximal performance test on a bicycle ergometer. Results were compared with those elicited during five incremental exercise bouts and during...

  6. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  7. The Effect of Different Doses of Aerobic Exercise Training on Exercise Blood Pressure in Overweight and Obese Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Abnormally elevated exercise blood pressure is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Aerobic exercise training has been shown to reduce exercise blood pressure. However, it is unknown if these improvements occur in a dose dependent manner. The purpose of the present study is to determine the effect of different doses of aerobic exercise training on exercise blood pressure in obese postmenopausal women. Methods Participants (n=404) were randomized to one of 4 groups: 4, 8, or 12 kilocalories per kilogram of energy expenditure per week (kcal/kg/week) or the non-exercise control group for 6 months. Exercise blood pressure was obtained during the 50 watts stage of a cycle ergometer maximal exercise test. Results There was a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at 50 watts in the 4 kcal/kg/week (−10.9 mmHg, pexercise training dose significantly reduced diastolic blood pressure (−4.3 mmHg, p= 0.033) compared to control. Additionally, resting blood pressure was not altered following exercise training (p>0.05) compared to control, and was not associated with changes in exercise systolic (r=0.09, p=0.09) or diastolic (r=0.10, p=0.08) blood pressure. Conclusions Aerobic exercise training reduces exercise blood pressure and may be more modifiable than changes in resting blood pressure. A high dose of aerobic exercise is recommended to successfully reduce both exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and therefore may attenuate the CVD risk associated with abnormally elevated exercise blood pressure. PMID:22547251

  8. Resistance exercise with different volumes: blood pressure response and forearm blood flow in the hypertensive elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito AF

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aline de Freitas Brito,1 Caio Victor Coutinho de Oliveira,2 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos,1 Amilton da Cruz Santos1 1Physical Education Department, 2Research Laboratory for Physical Training Applied to Performance and Health, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, Brazil Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sessions of resistance exercise with different volumes on post-exercise hypotension, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance in hypertensive elderly subjects.Methods: The study was conducted with ten hypertensive elderly (65±3 years, 28.7±3 kg/m2 subjected to three experimental sessions, ie, a control session, exercise with a set (S1, and exercise with three sets (S3. For each session, the subjects were evaluated before and after intervention. In the pre-intervention period, blood pressure, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance were measured after 10 minutes of rest in the supine position. Thereafter, the subjects were taken to the gym to perform their exercise sessions or remained at rest during the same time period. Both S1 and S3 comprised a set of ten repetitions of ten exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Subsequently, the measurements were again performed at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery (post-intervention in the supine position.Results: Post-exercise hypotension was greater in S3 than in S1 (systolic blood pressure, −26.5±4.2 mmHg versus −17.9±4.7 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure, −13.8±4.9 mmHg versus −7.7±5 mmHg, P<0.05. Similarly, forearm blood flow and forearm vascular resistance changed significantly in both sessions with an increase and decrease, respectively, that was more evident in S3 than in S1 (P<0.05.Conclusion: Resistance exercises with higher volume were more effective in causing post-exercise hypotension, being accompanied by an increase in forearm blood flow and a reduction of forearm vascular

  9. [Importance of the blood pressure exercise graph in the diabetic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduceau, B; Mayaudon, H; Chanudet, X; Lecoules, S; Agrumi, C; Dupuy, O; Larroque, P

    1999-08-01

    The evaluation of the real blood pressure in the diabetic population has a major interest. Arterial blood pressure measure during standardised exercise test could be a supplementary aid in this field of research. This retrospective work is based on 134 diabetic patients compared with age, sex and body mass index matched controls. All of them were tested with a standardised protocol of bicycle ergometer. In the diabetic group, 62 patients present a microalbuminuria over 30 mg/day. The heart rate and arterial pressure do not differ between diabetics and controls before, during, and after the exercise. The registered parameters at the top of the effort are exactly the same for the pulse the systolic and the diastolic blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure gradient during effort is not different between the two groups. The presence of microalbuminuria into the diabetic group do not provoke any modification of cardiac frequency or pressure during the effort. Nevertheless a decrease in systolic blood pressure gradient is noted into the microalbuminuria group despite their older age is in favour of an increase in this parameter. Exercise test has a main place to track down coronary disease and the field of interest is the same that non diabetic patients to find white coat hypertension, to value arterial pressure reactivity during effort of hypertensive athletes or border line hypertensives. The signification and interest of the modification of systolic blood pressure gradient should to be evaluated by other works.

  10. Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity In Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Study. ... Tropical Journal of Health Sciences ... The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of interval training program on MAP in black African subjects with hypertension. Two hundred ...

  11. Aortic and peripheral blood pressure during isometric and dynamic exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, V.; Carrière, E.G.J.; Kolsters, W.; Mosterd, W.L.; Schiereck, P.; Wesseling, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare aortic blood pressure (AOR) to peripheral measurements by the Riva-Rocci/Korotkov (RRK) and Finapres continuous finger pressure (FIN) methods during dynamic and static exercise. A tip manometer was introduced in the ascending aorta after coronary angiography

  12. Relation of serum uric acid to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure response to exercise testing in men with normotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Yeon Soo; Touyz, Rhian M; Park, Jeong Bae; Franklin, Barry A

    2018-03-01

    The authors investigated the hypothesis that high serum uric acid concentrations may be related to an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of potential confounding variables. In 4640 healthy men with normotension who underwent maximal treadmill exercise testing and fasting blood chemistry studies, including serum uric acid concentrations, an exaggerated SBP response, defined as SBP ≥ 210 mm Hg, was detected in 152 men (3.3%). After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest quartile of serum uric acid (>6.6 mg/dL) had a higher odds ratio of demonstrating an exaggerated SBP to maximal exercise (odds ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-3.86) compared with participants in the lowest quartile of serum uric acid (response to maximal exercise testing in men with normotension, independent of established coronary risk factors. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow Responses to Aquatic Treadmill Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Rhodri; Hensman, Marianne Y; Lucas, Samuel J E

    2017-07-01

    Aquatic treadmills are used as a rehabilitation method for conditions such as spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, and stroke, and can facilitate an earlier return to exercise training for athletes. However, their effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses has not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that aquatic treadmill exercise would augment CBF and lower HR compared with land-based treadmill exercise. Eleven participants completed incremental exercise (crossover design) starting from walking pace (4 km·h, immersed to iliac crest [aquatic], 6 km·h [land]) and increasing 1 km·h every 2 min up to 10 km·h for aquatic (maximum belt speed) or 12 km·h for land. After this, participants completed two 2-min bouts of exercise immersed to midthigh and midchest at constant submaximal speed (aquatic), or were ramped to exhaustion (land; increased gradient 2° every min). Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv) and HR were measured throughout, and the initial 10 min of each protocol and responses at each immersion level were compared. Compared with land-based treadmill, MCAvmean increased more from baseline for aquatic exercise (21% vs 12%, P aquatic walking compared with land-based moderate intensity running (~10 cm·s, P = 0.56). Greater water immersion lowered HR (139 vs 178 bpm for midchest vs midthigh), whereas MCAvmean remained constant (P = 0.37). Findings illustrate the potential for aquatic treadmill exercise to enhance exercise-induced elevations in CBF and thus optimize shear stress-mediated adaptation of the cerebrovasculature.

  14. Exercise: A Drug-Free Approach to Lowering High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise: A drug-free approach to lowering high blood pressure Having high blood pressure and not getting enough exercise are closely related. Discover how small changes in your daily routine can make a ...

  15. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...... to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... by muscle contraction to vasodilatory signals in the local vascular bed remains an important area of study....

  16. Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wielemborek-Musial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The assessment of blood pressure (BP response during exercise test is an important diagnostic instrument in cardiovascular system evaluation. The study aim was to determine normal values of BP response to submaximal, multistage exercise test in healthy adults with regard to their age, gender, and workload. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in randomly selected normotensive subjects (n=1015, 512 females and 498 males, aged 18–64 years (mean age 42.1 ± 12.7 years divided into five age groups. All subjects were clinically healthy with no chronic diseases diagnosed. Exercise stress tests were performed using Monark bicycle ergometer until a minimum of 85% of physical capacity was reached. BP was measured at rest and at peak of each exercise test stage. Results. The relations between BP, age, and workload during exercise test were determined by linear regression analysis and can be illustrated by the equations: systolic BP (mmHg = 0.346 × load (W + 135.76 for males and systolic BP (mmHg = 0.103 × load (W + 155.72 for females. Conclusions. Systolic BP increases significantly and proportionally to workload increase during exercise test in healthy adults. The relation can be described by linear equation which can be useful in diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Effect of immersion cryotherapy on blood lactate clearance after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Manfredini Baroni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of immersion cryotherapy on blood lactate removal, an important physiological parameter related to muscle fatigue, after high-intensity exercise. Fifteen soccer athletes (15 to 17 years were randomized into an immer-sion group (IG, n=7 and a control group (CG, n=8. The athletes were subjected to a muscle fatigue inducer protocol (PIFM on a cycle ergometer. Next, GI athletes underwent immersion cryotherapy for 10 minutes, with the lower limbs being immersed at 5±1º C, whereas CG athletes rested for 10 minutes. Blood samples were collected for the determination of lactate concentration before the PIFM and 3, 15 and 25 minutes after the end of exercise (post-3, post-15 and post-25, respectively. The PIFM resulted in a significant increase of blood lactate concentration in the athletes, which was similar in two groups. During the recovery period, lactate concentration decreased by 13.6% at post-15 and by 15.3% at post-25 in IG, whereas GC presented a decrease of 14.6% and 28.5% decrease at post-15 and post-25, respectively. Passive recovery resulted in a significant decrease of lactate concent rat ion, whereas the same was not observed for cryotherapy. These results suggest that, for the parameters used in this study, immersion cryotherapy was less effective than rest in the removal of blood lactate after high-intensity exercise.

  18. Repeated Plyometric Exercise Attenuates Blood Glucose in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillas, Saldiam R; Watkins, Casey M; Wong, Megan A; Dobbs, Ian J; Archer, David C; Munger, Cameron N; Galpin, Andrew J; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E

    2017-01-01

    Plyometric exercise is popular in commercial exercise programs aiming to maximize energy expenditure for weight loss. However, the effect of plyometric exercise on blood glucose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of relatively high intensity plyometric exercise on blood glucose. Thirteen subjects (6 females age= 21.8 ± 1.0 yrs.; height= 163.7 ± 7.8 cm; mass= 60.8 ± 6.7 kg and 7 males age= 22.0 ± 2.6 yrs.; height= 182.3 ± 3.6 cm; mass= 87.4 ± 12.5 kg) volunteered to participate. Subjects completed two random conditions on two separate days, consisting of either five sets of 10 maximal effort countermovement squat jumps (SJ) with 50 seconds' rest between sets or quiet sitting (SIT) for the time equated to the SJ duration (~4min). Immediately after each condition, subjects drank 75g of anhydrous glucose (CHO) in 100ml of water. Blood glucose measurements were taken via finger prick pre and immediately post SJ or SIT, and 5, 15, 30, and 60 min post. A 2×6 (condition × time) ANOVA revealed a significant interaction where SJ blood glucose was lower at 15 (114.0 ± 14.6 mg/dl) and 30 (142.1 ± 22.5 mg/dl) min compared to SIT (15min 130.8 ± 14.0 mg/dl and 30min 159.3 ± 21.0 mg/dl). The current plyometric protocol attenuated CHO-induced blood glucose at 15 and 30 min. This may be due to increased physiological stress applied to the muscles, thus increasing muscular glucose uptake.

  19. Blood Pressure Response during Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'Giovine, Zachary J; Solomon, Nicole; DeVore, Adam D; Wojdyla, Daniel; Patel, Chetan B; Rogers, Joseph G

    2018-02-21

    The prognostic value of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope measured during cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing has been well established in patients with advanced heart failure, but blood pressure response to exercise is less well characterized. We retrospectively studied 151 outpatients who underwent CPX testing as part of an advanced heart failure (HF) evaluation. The outcome of interest was failure of medical management, defined by death, cardiac transplantation, or left ventricular assist device placement. Patients were stratified into tertiles by change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ( 20 mmHg were associated with an increased hazard (HR 1.046, 95% CI 1.018, 1.075). In conclusion, changes in SBP during CPX testing provide additional prognostic information above standard clinical variables. The peculiar increase in risk noted in those with a rise in SBP > 20 mmHg is less clear and needs to be investigated further.

  20. Mesenteric, coeliac and splanchnic blood flow in humans during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nielsen, H B; Skak, C

    1998-01-01

    1. Exercise reduces splanchnic blood flow, but the mesenteric contribution to this response is uncertain. 2. In nineteen humans, superior mesenteric and coeliac artery flows were determined by duplex ultrasonography during fasting and postprandial submaximal cycling and compared with the splanchnic...... blood flow as assessed by the Indocyanine Green dye-elimination technique. 3. Cycling increased arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output, while it reduced total vascular resistance. These responses were not altered in the postprandial state. During fasting, cycling increased mesenteric, coeliac...... the coeliac circulation was not influenced. Postprandial cycling did not influence the mesenteric resistance significantly, but its blood flow decreased by 22 % (0.46 +/- 0.28 l min-1). Coeliac and splanchnic resistance increased by 150 and 63 %, respectively, and the corresponding regional blood flow...

  1. Baroreflex regulation of blood pressure during dynamic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, P. B.; Potts, J. T.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    From the work of Potts et al. Papelier et al. and Shi et al. it is readily apparent that the arterial (aortic and carotid) baroreflexes are reset to function at the prevailing ABP of exercise. The blood pressure of exercise is the result of the hemodynamic (cardiac output and TPR) responses, which appear to be regulated by two redundant neural control systems, "Central Command" and the "exercise pressor reflex". Central Command is a feed-forward neural control system that operates in parallel with the neural regulation of the locomotor system and appears to establish the hemodynamic response to exercise. Within the central nervous system it appears that the HLR may be the operational site for Central Command. Specific neural sites within the HLR have been demonstrated in animals to be active during exercise. With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the anatomical areas of the human brain related to Central Command are being mapped. It also appears that the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius and the ventrolateral medulla may serve as an integrating site as they receive neural information from the working muscles via the group III/IV muscle afferents as well as from higher brain centers. This anatomical site within the CNS is now the focus of many investigations in which arterial baroreflex function, Central Command and the "exercise pressor reflex" appear to demonstrate inhibitory or facilitatory interaction. The concept of whether Central Command is the prime mover in the resetting of the arterial baroreceptors to function at the exercising ABP or whether the resetting is an integration of the "exercise pressor reflex" information with that of Central Command is now under intense investigation. However, it would be justified to conclude, from the data of Bevegard and Shepherd, Dicarlo and Bishop, Potts et al., and Papelier et al. that the act of exercise results in the resetting of the arterial baroreflex

  2. Growth and blood chemistry of ducklings reared on acidified wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.; Linder, G.; Chu, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is one factor that may be responsible for the decline of some waterfowl populations. Growth and physiological condition were monitored in captive-reared black ducks (Anas rubripes) exposed for 10-day trials (day 11-20 of life) on control (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 5.0) man-made emergent wetlands. Impaired growth (body weight, culmen and tarsus length) and increased mortality (50%) were apparent in broods (hen + 4 ducklings) reared on acidified wetIands. Ducklings exbibiting poor growth had reduced hematocrit, plasma protein and cholesterol levels. This subset of birds had elevated plasma uric acid concentration and creatine kinase activity (perhaps due to enhanced protein and nucleotide catabolism). and elevated pIasma K+ levels. Based upon overt appearance, growth and blood chemistry, ducklings exposed to acidified wetlands were concluded to be in poorer condittion than those exposed on circumneutral pH wetlands.

  3. Combining remote ischemic preconditioning and aerobic exercise: a novel adaptation of blood flow restriction exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprick, Justin D; Rickards, Caroline A

    2017-11-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) can attenuate tissue damage sustained by ischemia-reperfusion injury. Blood flow restriction exercise (BFRE) restricts blood flow to exercising muscles. We implemented a novel approach to BFRE with cyclical bouts of blood flow restriction-reperfusion, reflecting the RIPC model. A concern about BFRE, however, is potential amplification of the exercise pressor reflex, which could be unsafe in at-risk populations. We hypothesized that cyclical BFRE would elicit greater increases in sympathetic outflow and arterial pressure than conventional exercise (CE) when performed at the same relative intensity. We also assessed the cerebrovascular responses due to potential implementation of BFRE in stroke rehabilitation. Fourteen subjects performed treadmill exercise at 65-70% maximal heart rate with and without intermittent BFR (4 × 5-min intervals of bilateral thigh-cuff pressure followed by 5-min reperfusion periods). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and middle and posterior cerebral artery velocities (MCAv and PCAv) were compared between trials. As expected, BFRE elicited higher concentration NE compared with CE (1249 ± 170 vs. 962 ± 114 pg/ml; P = 0.06). Unexpectedly, however, there were no differences in MAP between conditions (overall P = 0.33), and MAP was 4-5 mmHg lower with BFRE versus CE during the reperfusion periods ( P ≤ 0.05 for reperfusion periods 3 and 4 ). There were no differences in MCAv or PCAv between trials ( P ≥ 0.22), suggesting equivalent cerebrometabolic demand. The exaggerated sympathoexcitatory response with BFRE was not accompanied by higher MAP, likely because of the cyclical reperfusions. This cyclical BFRE paradigm could be adapted to cardiac or stroke rehabilitation, where exercising patients could benefit from the cardio and cerebro protection associated with RIPC. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Empowering Girls with Chemistry, Exercise and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Emily D.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.; Clapham, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that a girl's career interests in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) declines between grades 6 and 8. Similarly, in middle school, there is a decrease in physical activity among girls. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island (URI) conducted a chemistry-based science camp that took place…

  5. Effect of recovery mode on exercise time to exhaustion, cardiorespiratory responses, and blood lactate after prior, intermittent supramaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imed; Temfemo, Abdou; Mandengué, Samuel H; Ahmaidi, Said

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of 3 different recovery modes (passive [PR], active [AR], and dynamic stretching [SR]) on exercise time to exhaustion (Tlim) and cardiorespiratory and blood lactate responses during supramaximal exercise. Exercise sessions consisted of 2 series of 4 repeated, intermittent supramaximal cycling exercise interspersed in random order with PR, AR, or SR before the supramaximal continuous cycling time limit (Tlim) exercise test performed at 120% of maximal aerobic power. Ten healthy volunteer soccer athletes aged 25.7 ± 2.4 years participated in this study. During each exercise session, heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption V(O2)), blood lactate concentration, and Tlim exercise performance were recorded. Higher values were obtained in HR (p recovery mode to enhance performance and cardiorespiratory and lactate responses during intermittent supramaximal cycling exercise.

  6. Exercise blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzemos, N; Lim, P O; MacDonald, T M

    2009-02-01

    Hypertensive patients with persistent endothelial dysfunction have adverse cardiovascular prognosis. However, current methods aimed to assess endothelial dysfunction in those patients who possess clinical applicability. We hypothesised that such individuals could potentially be identified by an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (BP) response to a submaximal exercise. We studied 22 male patients with essential hypertension who were categorised into two age-matched groups depending on their exercise systolic BP (ExSBP) rise during the 3-min exercise step test; the exaggerated ExSBP group [hyper-responders (> or = 40 mmHg)] and the low ExSBP responder group [hypo-responders (healthy volunteers matched for age were used as control. Clinic and daytime ambulatory BP were assessed after 14 days of anti-hypertensive treatment withdrawal, which were not significantly different between groups. Vascular reactivity in response to intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine, N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) and sodium nitroprusside was assessed using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography. The hyper-responder group had significantly less forearm vasodilatation to acetylcholine compared with the hypo-responder group [percentage change in the forearm blood flow 125 (17) vs. 260 (28), mean (SEM); p routine clinical practice to aid risk stratification in hypertensive patients.

  7. Students' Cognitive Focus during a Chemistry Laboratory Exercise: Effects of a Computer-Simulated Prelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, T. Mikael; Berg, C. Anders R.

    2007-01-01

    To enhance the learning outcomes achieved by students, learners undertook a computer-simulated activity based on an acid-base titration prior to a university-level chemistry laboratory activity. Students were categorized with respect to their attitudes toward learning. During the laboratory exercise, questions that students asked their assistant…

  8. Effects of parental smoking on exercise systolic blood pressure in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Claudia; Weisser, Burkhard

    2015-05-11

    In adults, exercise blood pressure seems to be more closely related to cardiovascular risk than resting blood pressure; however, few data are available on the effects of familial risk factors, including smoking habits, on exercise blood pressure in adolescents. Blood pressure at rest and during exercise, parental smoking, and other familial risk factors were investigated in 532 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years (14.6±1.5 years) in the Kiel EX.PRESS. (EXercise PRESSure) Study. Exercise blood pressure was determined at 1.5 W/kg body weight using a standardized submaximal cycle ergometer test. Mean resting blood pressure was 113.1±12.8/57.2±7.1 mm Hg, and exercise blood pressure was 149.9±19.8/54.2±8.6 mm Hg. Parental smoking increased exercise systolic blood pressure (+4.0 mm Hg, 3.1 to 4.9; P=0.03) but not resting blood pressure of the subjects (adjusted for age, sex, height, body mass index percentile, fitness). Parental overweight and familial hypertension were related to both higher resting and exercise systolic blood pressure values, whereas associations with an inactive lifestyle and a low educational level of the parents were found only with adolescents' blood pressure during exercise. The cumulative effect of familial risk factors on exercise systolic blood pressure was more pronounced than on blood pressure at rest. Parental smoking might be a novel risk factor for higher blood pressure, especially during exercise. In addition, systolic blood pressure during a submaximal exercise test was more closely associated with familial risk factors than was resting blood pressure, even in adolescents. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise: implications for fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T.; Lieshout, J.J. van; Secher, Niels

    2008-01-01

    During exercise: the Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) does not change because the jugular vein is collapsed in the upright position. In contrast, when CBF is evaluated by (133)Xe clearance, by flow in the internal carotid artery, or by flow velocity in basal cerebral arteries......, a approximately 25% increase is detected with a parallel increase in metabolism. During activation, an increase in cerebral O(2) supply is required because there is no capillary recruitment within the brain and increased metabolism becomes dependent on an enhanced gradient for oxygen diffusion. During maximal......, and data support the theory that glycogen depletion in astrocytes limits the ability of the brain to accelerate its metabolism during activation. The release of interleukin-6 from the brain when exercise is prolonged may represent a signaling pathway in matching the metabolic response of the brain...

  10. Effects of dynamic exercise and its intensity on ocular blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Naoyuki; Ikemura, Tsukasa; Someya, Nami

    2011-10-01

    Visual performance is impaired when the ocular blood flow decreases, indicating that ocular blood flow plays a role in maintaining visual performance during exercise. We examined the ocular blood flow response to incremental cycling exercise to test the hypothesis that ocular blood flow is relatively stable during dynamic exercise because of its autoregulatory nature. The blood flow in the inferior and superior temporal retinal arterioles (ITRA and STRA, respectively) and retinal and choroidal vessels (RCV), mean arterial pressure, and heart rate (HR) were measured at rest and during leg cycling in nine young and healthy subjects (26 ± 5 years, mean ± SD). Ocular blood flow was measured by laser speckle flowmetry. The exercise intensity was incremented by 30 W every 3 min until the subject was unable to maintain a position appropriate for measuring ocular blood flow. Blood flow data obtained during cycling exercise were categorized based on HR as follows: 120 bpm. Blood flow in the RCV increased with the exercise intensity: by 16 ± 8, 32 ± 13, and 40 ± 19% from baseline, respectively. However, blood flow and vascular conductance in the ITRA and STRA did not change significantly with exercise. These findings demonstrate for the first time that ocular blood flow increases in the retina and choroid, but not in the arterioles, with increasing exercise intensity during dynamic exercise.

  11. Arterialized and venous blood lactate concentration difference during different exercise intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Felippe

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest a delayed lactate appearance in the venous blood, which is accentuated at higher exercise intensities. The lactate measured in arterialized and venous blood is interchangeable only when blood samples are collected at least 10 minutes after the exercise starts.

  12. Blood pressure dynamics during exercise rehabilitation in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Idan; Arad, Michael; Freimark, Dov; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Background Patients suffering from heart failure (HF) may demonstrate an abnormal blood pressure response to exercise (ABPRE), which may revert to a normal one following medical treatment. It is assumed that this change correlates positively with prognosis and functional aspects. The aim of this study was to characterize patients with ABPRE and assess ABPRE normalization and the correlation with clinical and functional outcomes. Methods In the study, 651 patients with HF who underwent cardiac rehabilitation (CR) were examined. Patients who presented an ABPRE during stress testing were identified and divided into those who corrected their initial ABPRE following CR and those who did not. Results Pre-rehabilitation ABPRE was present in 27% of patients, 68% of whom normalized their ABPRE following CR. Two parameters were independently predictive of failure to normalize the blood pressure response: female gender (odds ratio (OR) 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-9.0) and decreased systolic function (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-9.4). Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy demonstrated higher rates of ABPRE normalization than patients with other causes of HF (93% vs. 62%, respectively, P = 0.03). The research population exhibited an average improvement in exercise capacity (4.7 to 6.4 metabolic equivalents (METS), P failure to correct the ABPRE, while patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy demonstrated exceptionally high rates of normalization.

  13. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  14. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstom, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling was studied. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased in erythrocyte count (r=0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. It was concluded that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume

  15. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Sardari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG.Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent standard symptom-limited exercise testing immediately before and also after the completion of the CR sessions. rSBP was defined as the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at 3 minutes in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise.Results: An abnormal baseline rSBP after exercise was a strong predictor of exercise parameters in the last session, including metabolic equivalents (β = -0.617, SE = 0.127, p value < 0.001 and peak O2 consumption (β = -1.950, SE = 0.363, p value < 0.001 measured in the last session adjusted for baseline exercise characteristics, demographics, function class, and left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusion: The current study strongly emphasizes the predictive role of baseline rSBP after exercise in evaluating exercise parameters following CR. This baseline index can predict abnormal METs value, peak O2 consumption, post-exercise heart rate, and heart rate recovery after a 24-session CR program.

  16. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...

  17. Students' Perception of Self-Efficacy Following Medicinal Chemistry Skills Laboratory Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Roche, Victoria F; Qi, Yongyue

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To analyze student perceptions of self-efficacy in meeting medicinal chemistry course related educational outcomes and skills following a medicinal chemistry skills laboratory. Methods. Four activities were implemented in a pharmacy skills laboratory (PSL) for second-year pharmacy students. Students (n=121) worked individually on exercises for three of the four activities. Pre/post-laboratory surveys on self-efficacy were administered. The McNemar test was performed to evaluate students' self-efficacy above 70% related to course outcomes before and after the exercises in each activity. An independent t test was conducted to compare the mean of students' responses on meeting course outcomes based on the 70% anchor for the perspective confidence on meeting course outcomes. Results. The post-PSL scores on all self-efficacy questions improved. The majority of students reported skill development in all exercises. Students and clinical faculty qualitative responses indicated they felt exercises were effective. Conclusion. A PSL can serve as a valuable opportunity to address course related educational outcomes and specific skill development and can help students assess their self-efficacy in meeting them.

  18. Optical measurement of blood flow in exercising skeletal muscle: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Detian; Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Zhu, Liguo; Li, Zeren; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2017-07-01

    Blood flow monitoring during rhythm exercising is very important for sports medicine and muscle dieases. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy(DCS) is a relative new invasive way to monitor blood flow but suffering from muscle fiber motion. In this study we focus on how to remove exercise driven artifacts and obtain accurate estimates of the increase in blood flow from exercise. Using a novel fast software correlator, we measured blood flow in forearm flexor muscles of N=2 healthy adults during handgrip exercise, at a sampling rate of 20 Hz. Combining the blood flow and acceleration data, we resolved the motion artifact in the DCS signal induced by muscle fiber motion, and isolated the blood flow component of the signal from the motion artifact. The results show that muscle fiber motion strongly affects the DCS signal, and if not accounted for, will result in an overestimate of blood flow more than 1000%. Our measurements indicate rapid dilation of arterioles following exercise onset, which enabled blood flow to increase to a plateau of 200% in 10s. The blood flow also rapidly recovered to baseline following exercise in 10s. Finally, preliminary results on the dependence of blood flow from exercise intensity changes will be discussed.

  19. Effects of yogic exercises on life stress and blood glucose levels in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Dol

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the effects of yogic exercises on life stress and blood glucose levels in nursing students. [Subjects and Methods] The study was a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-seven undergraduate nursing students were randomly selected, with 12 assigned to an exercise group and 15 assigned to a control group. The yogic exercises intervention was undertaken for 60 minutes one day a week for 12 weeks. It consisted of physical exercise (surya namaskara) combined with relaxation and meditation (shavasana and yoga nidra). Life stress was measured by the Life Stress Scale for College Students, and postprandial blood glucose levels were measured with a digital glucometer. [Results] The exercise group measurements were significantly decreased in both life stress and postprandial blood glucose levels compared with the control group. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that yogic exercises would reduce life stress and lower postprandial blood glucose levels in nursing students.

  20. Obesity promotes oxidative stress and exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption after high-intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Tae Roh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study suggests that episodic vigorous exercise can increase oxidative stress and blood neurotrophic factor levels and induce disruption of the BBB. Moreover, high levels of neurotrophic factor in the blood after exercise in the obese group may be due to BBB disruption, and it is assumed that oxidative stress was the main cause of this BBB disruption.

  1. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise...... with a rise in leg vascular conductance and microvascular haemoglobin volume, despite elevated systemic vascular resistance. 4. The parallel rise in calf muscle and peritendinous blood flow and fall in O2 saturation during exercise indicate that blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism in both tissue......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...

  2. mRNA profiling for the identification of blood-Results of a collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Cordula; Hanson, E; Bär, W

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative exercise on mRNA profiling for the identification of blood was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Seven blood samples and one blood dilution series were analyzed by the participating laboratories for the reportedly blood-specific markers HBB, SPTB and PBGD, usi...

  3. Effect of modified fasting therapy on body weight, fat and muscle mass, and blood chemistry in patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Koh-Woon; Song, Mi-Yeon; Chung, Seok-Hee; Chung, Won-Seok

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and safety of modified fasting therapy using fermented medicinal herbs and exercise on body weight, fat and muscle mass, and blood chemistry in obese subjects. Twenty-six patients participated in a 14-day fast, during which they ingested a supplement made from fermented medicinal herbs and carbohydrates (intake: 400-600 kcal/d). The schedule included 7 prefasting relief days and 14 days of stepwise reintroduction of food. The patients also took part in an exercise program that incorporated Qigong, weight training, and walking exercises. The efficacy of treatments was observed by assessing body fat mass and muscle mass, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), cholesterol, and triglycerides in each study period. Specific symptoms or side effects were reported. Body weight and body fat mass both decreased significantly by (5.16 ± 0.95) and (3.89 ± 0.79) kg (both P fasting therapy using fermented medicinal herbs and exercise could be effective and safe on obese patients.

  4. Effects of Yogic Exercises on Life Stress and Blood Glucose Levels in Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Dol

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the effects of yogic exercises on life stress and blood glucose levels in nursing students. [Subjects and Methods] The study was a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-seven undergraduate nursing students were randomly selected, with 12 assigned to an exercise group and 15 assigned to a control group. The yogic exercises intervention was undertaken for 60 minutes one day a week for 12 weeks. It consisted of physical exercise (surya namaskara) c...

  5. The distribution of blood flow in the carotid and vertebral arteries during dynamic exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Oue, Anna; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism underlying the plateau or relative decrease in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during maximal incremental dynamic exercise remains unclear. We hypothesized that cerebral perfusion is limited during high-intensity dynamic exercise due to a redistribution of carotid artery blood flow. To identify the distribution of blood flow among the arteries supplying the head and brain, we evaluated common carotid artery (CCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA) and vertebral artery (VA) blood flow during dynamic exercise using Doppler ultrasound. Ten subjects performed graded cycling exercise in a semi-supine position at 40, 60 and 80% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) for 5 min at each workload. The ICA blood flow increased by 23.0 ± 4.6% (mean ± SE) from rest to exercise at 60% (VO2 peak). However, at 80% (VO2 peak), ICA blood flow returned towards near resting levels (9.6 ± 4.7% vs. rest). In contrast, ECA, CCA and VA blood flow increased proportionally with workload. The change in ICA blood flow during graded exercise was correlated with end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (r = 0.72). The change in ICA blood flow from 60% (VO2 peak) to 80% (VO2 peak) was negatively correlated with the change in ECA blood flow (r = −0.77). Moreover, there was a significant correlation between forehead cutaneous vascular conductance and ECA blood flow during exercise (r = 0.79). These results suggest that during high-intensity dynamic exercise the plateau or decrease in ICA blood flow is partly due to a large increase in ECA blood flow, which is selectively increased to prioritize thermoregulation.

  6. Flow-mediated dilation and exercise blood pressure in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, Maya J; Dorn, Joan; Thurston, Rebecca C; Roemmich, James N

    2014-07-01

    Exercise blood pressure is a robust predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in development of cardiovascular disease and is associated with greater exercise blood pressure in adults. However, it is not yet clear whether endothelial function is associated with exercise blood pressure in youth. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between endothelial function, indexed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, and submaximal exercise blood pressure in healthy adolescents. Cross-sectional study. Adolescents (N=45) completed a graded submaximal treadmill test. Blood pressure was measured during rest and each exercise stage. Ultrasound measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was completed on a separate visit. Pearson correlations and multiple regression were used to assess the unadjusted and multivariate adjusted associations between flow-mediated dilation and exercise blood pressure, respectively. Lower flow-mediated dilation was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (r=0.37, p=0.01) and greater pulse pressure (r=-0.38, p=0.01) during exercise. The significance did not change when adjusting for age, gender, fitness, or resting blood pressure. Exploratory analyses suggest that flow-mediated dilation was associated with exercise diastolic blood pressure primarily among adolescents with low resting diastolic blood pressure. Studies in youth are important to understand the early pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Findings from this study suggest that endothelial function may play a role in regulating blood pressure responses during submaximal exercise in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood pressure morning surge, exercise blood pressure response and autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanindi, Asli; Ugurlu, Murat; Tore, Hasan Fehmi

    2015-08-01

    We investigated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise with respect to BP morning surge (MS), and the association between MS, exercise treadmill test (ETT) and heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Eighty-four healthy subjects without hypertension were enrolled. Ambulatory BP monitoring and 24-hour Holter recordings were obtained for sleep-trough MS and HRV indices: low-frequency (LF) component, high-frequency (HF) component and LF/HF ratio. ETT was performed, and BPs were obtained at rest, end of each stage, and recovery. Third-minute heart rate recovery (HRR) and BP recovery ratio (BPRR) were calculated. When analysed in quartiles of MS, systolic BP at low workloads was higher in the highest than in the lowest quartile, although maximum BPs at maximum exercise were not significantly different. BPRR was highest in the highest quartile in contrast to HRR, which was lowest in the highest quartile. LF/HF was highest during both at daytime and night-time in the highest quartile. BPRR and LF/HF were positively, and HRR was inversely associated with MS. Subjects with a high MS have higher BP at low workloads, at which most daily activities are performed, and impairment in some indices, which indirectly reflect the autonomic nervous system.

  8. Exercise blood pressure and the risk for future hypertension among normotensive middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Assaf; Grossman, Ehud; Katz, Moshe; Kivity, Shaye; Klempfner, Robert; Segev, Shlomo; Goldenberg, Ilan; Sidi, Yehezkel; Maor, Elad

    2015-04-22

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether exercise blood pressure can be used to predict the development of hypertension in normotensive middle-aged adults. We investigated 7082 normotensive subjects who were annually screened in a tertiary medical center and completed maximal treadmill exercise tests at each visit. After the initial 3 years, subjects were divided into approximate quartiles according to their average exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses (≤158; 158 to 170; 170 to 183; ≥183 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and ≤73; 73 to 77; 77 to 82; ≥82 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure). Mean age of the study population was 48 ± 9 years and 73% were men. Average baseline resting blood pressure was 120/77 ± 12/7 mm Hg. During a follow-up of 5 ± 3 years, 1036 (14.6%) subjects developed hypertension. The cumulative probability of new-onset hypertension at 5 years was significantly increased with increasing quartiles of exercise systolic blood pressure (5%, 9%, 17%, and 35%, respectively; Pblood pressure. After adjustment for baseline resting blood pressure and clinical parameters, each 5-mm Hg increments in exercise either systolic or diastolic blood pressures were independently associated with respective 11% (Phypertension. In normotensive middle-aged individuals, blood pressure response to exercise is associated with future development of hypertension. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. General Chemistry Exercises Focused on the Professional Profile on Nuclear Careers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau-González, Maritza; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises; Corona-Hernández, José Ángel; Santamaría-Arbona, María Teresa; Abreu-Díaz, Aidamary

    2016-01-01

    The subject General Chemistry is part of the base curriculum of the nuclear profile careers: Radiochemistry Careers and Engineering on Nuclear Technologies and Energetics. It has as main objectives the complementing, the deep analysis and integration of the basic principles of chemistry as a science, and due to its content, it constitutes an excellent platform to settle inter-subject relationships with those of the nuclear specialties. The aim of this paper is presenting linking examples among the subjects, through exercises that are supported in the Moodle Platform, conceived for the independent work of students, which besides facilitating the consolidation of the received knowledge in high school, and those ones in the first year of the career, allow them to be familiar with the future of their profession. (author)

  10. Postaerobic Exercise Blood Pressure Reduction in Very Old Persons With Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana; Mesquita-Bastos, José; Argel de Melo, Cristina; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A single bout of aerobic exercise acutely decreases blood pressure, even in older adults with hypertension. Nonetheless, blood pressure responses to aerobic exercise in very old adults with hypertension have not yet been documented. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effect of a single session of aerobic exercise on postexercise blood pressure in very old adults with hypertension. Eighteen older adults with essential hypertension were randomized into exercise (N = 9, age: 83.4 ± 3.2 years old) or control (N = 9, age: 82.7 ± 2.5 years old) groups. The exercise group performed a session of aerobic exercise constituting 2 periods of 10 minutes of walking at an intensity of 40% to 60% of the heart rate reserve. The control group rested for the same period of time. Anthropometric variables and medication status were evaluated at baseline. Heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured at baseline, after exercise, and at 20 and 40 minutes postexercise. Systolic blood pressure showed a significant interaction for group × time (F3,24 = 6.698; P = .002; ηp(2) = 0.153). In the exercise group, the systolic blood pressure at 20 (127.3 ± 20.9 mm Hg) and 40 minutes (123.7 ± 21.0 mm Hg) postexercise was significantly lower in comparison with baseline (135.6 ± 20.6 mm Hg). Diastolic blood pressure did not change. Heart rate was significantly higher after the exercise session. In the control group, no significant differences were observed. A single session of aerobic exercise acutely reduces blood pressure in very old adults with hypertension and may be considered an important nonpharmacological strategy to control hypertension in this age group.

  11. Automatic evaluation and data generation for analytical chemistry instrumental analysis exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenio Muñoz de la Peña

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, laboratory activities are costly in terms of time, space, and money. As such, the ability to provide realistically simulated laboratory data that enables students to practice data analysis techniques as a complementary activity would be expected to reduce these costs while opening up very interesting possibilities. In the present work, a novel methodology is presented for design of analytical chemistry instrumental analysis exercises that can be automatically personalized for each student and the results evaluated immediately. The proposed system provides each student with a different set of experimental data generated randomly while satisfying a set of constraints, rather than using data obtained from actual laboratory work. This allows the instructor to provide students with a set of practical problems to complement their regular laboratory work along with the corresponding feedback provided by the system's automatic evaluation process. To this end, the Goodle Grading Management System (GMS, an innovative web-based educational tool for automating the collection and assessment of practical exercises for engineering and scientific courses, was developed. The proposed methodology takes full advantage of the Goodle GMS fusion code architecture. The design of a particular exercise is provided ad hoc by the instructor and requires basic Matlab knowledge. The system has been employed with satisfactory results in several university courses. To demonstrate the automatic evaluation process, three exercises are presented in detail. The first exercise involves a linear regression analysis of data and the calculation of the quality parameters of an instrumental analysis method. The second and third exercises address two different comparison tests, a comparison test of the mean and a t-paired test.

  12. Blood flow patterns during incremental and steady-state aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coovert, Daniel; Evans, LeVisa D; Jarrett, Steven; Lima, Carla; Lima, Natalia; Gurovich, Alvaro N

    2017-05-30

    Endothelial shear stress (ESS) is a physiological stimulus for vascular homeostasis, highly dependent on blood flow patterns. Exercise-induced ESS might be beneficial on vascular health. However, it is unclear what type of ESS aerobic exercise (AX) produces. The aims of this study are to characterize exercise-induced blood flow patterns during incremental and steady-state AX. We expect blood flow pattern during exercise will be intensity-dependent and bidirectional. Six college-aged students (2 males and 4 females) were recruited to perform 2 exercise tests on cycleergometer. First, an 8-12-min incremental test (Test 1) where oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and blood lactate (La) were measured at rest and after each 2-min step. Then, at least 48-hr. after the first test, a 3-step steady state exercise test (Test 2) was performed measuring VO2, HR, BP, and La. The three steps were performed at the following exercise intensities according to La: 0-2 mmol/L, 2-4 mmol/L, and 4-6 mmol/L. During both tests, blood flow patterns were determined by high-definition ultrasound and Doppler on the brachial artery. These measurements allowed to determine blood flow velocities and directions during exercise. On Test 1 VO2, HR, BP, La, and antegrade blood flow velocity significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner (repeated measures ANOVA, pblood flow velocity did not significantly change during Test 1. On Test 2 all the previous variables significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner (repeated measures ANOVA, pblood flow patterns during incremental and steady-state exercises include both antegrade and retrograde blood flows.

  13. Habitual exercise decreases systolic blood pressure during low-intensity resistance exercise in healthy middle-aged and older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Kotato, Takahiro; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako

    2016-10-01

    Since aerobic exercise (e.g., walking) and resistance exercise (e.g., lifting objects and mopping) are both parts of the activities of daily living, an exaggerated elevation in systolic blood pressure (SBP) during aerobic and resistance exercise is an early marker of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effects of habitual exercise on SBP during low-intensity resistance exercise using both cross-sectional and interventional approaches. First, in 57 normotensive women (61.9 ± 1.0 yr of age), daily physical activity level, as assessed by triaxial accelerometry, was correlated with SBP during resistance exercise at 20 and 40% of the 1 repetition maximum (r = -0.408 and r = -0.348, respectively). Maximal oxygen uptake was correlated with SBP during exercise at 20% (r = -0.385) and 40% (r = -0.457). Physical activity level or maximal oxygen uptake was identified as a predictor of SBP during the exercise in stepwise regression analysis, independent of SBP at rest and other factors (R 2 = 0.729-0.781). Second, 66 men and women (64.6 ± 0.9 yr of age) participated in a 6-wk intervention as a part of the training (walking, 4.3 ± 0.3 days/wk, 55.6 ± 4.1 min/day, 70.7 ± 1.2% of maximal heart rate) or control group. SBP during resistance exercise in the training group decreased after the intervention (before vs. after: 20%, 143 ± 4 vs. 128 ± 4 mmHg; and 40%, 148 ± 5 vs. 134 ± 4 mmHg). In the control group, there were no significant differences in SBP before and after the intervention. SBP during resistance exercise after the intervention was lower in the training group relative to the control group. These results suggest that habitual exercise decreases SBP during low-intensity resistance exercise. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during exercise in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial vascular function and capacity to increase cardiac output during exercise are impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested the hypothesis that the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise is also blunted and, therefore, that cerebral oxygenation becomes...... cerebral artery blood flow velocity. Cerebral oxygenation and metabolism were evaluated from the arterial-to-venous differences for oxygen, glucose, and lactate. Blood pressure was comparable during exercise between the two groups. However, the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide was lower...

  15. Cyclical blood flow restriction resistance exercise: a potential parallel to remote ischemic preconditioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprick, Justin D; Rickards, Caroline A

    2017-11-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is characterized by the cyclical application of limb blood flow restriction and reperfusion and has been shown to protect vital organs during a subsequent ischemic insult. Blood flow restriction exercise (BFRE) similarly combines bouts of blood flow restriction with low-intensity exercise and thus could potentially emulate the protection demonstrated by RIPC. One concern with BFRE, however, is the potential for an augmented rise in sympathetic outflow due to greater activation of the exercise pressor reflex. Because of the use of lower workloads, however, we hypothesized that BFRE would elicit an attenuated increase in sympathetic outflow [assessed via plasma norepinephrine (NE) and mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) when compared with conventional exercise (CE). Fifteen subjects underwent two leg press exercise interventions: 1 ) BFRE-220 mmHg bilateral thigh occlusion at 20% 1 rep-max (1RM), and 2 ) CE-65% 1RM without occlusion. Each condition consisted of 4 × 5-min cycles of exercise, with 3 × 10-reps in each cycle. Five minutes of rest and reperfusion (for BFRE) followed each cycle. MAP increased with exercise ( P exercise ( P exercise only ( P = 0.07). Plasma NE concentration increased with CE only ( P exercise ( P ≤ 0.02). The attenuated sympathetic response, combined with similar cerebrovascular responses, suggest that cyclical BFRE could be explored as an alternative to CE in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Exercise timing and blood lactate concentrations in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heden, Timothy D; Liu, Ying; Kanaley, Jill A

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize how resistance exercise prior to or after a meal alters fasting and postprandial blood lactate concentrations in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Obese individuals with type 2 diabetes (N = 12) completed three 2-day trials, including (i) no exercise (NoEx), (ii) resistance exercise prior to dinner (Ex-M), and (iii) resistance exercise beginning at 45 min postdinner (M-Ex). During day 1 of each trial, fasting and postprandial blood lactate concentrations, perceived exertion, and substrate oxidation were measured, and subsequently on day 2 the following morning fasting blood lactate was measured. The premeal lactate incremental area under the curve (iAUC) during Ex-M (109 ± 66 mmol·L -1 ·1.6 h -1 ) was over 100-fold greater (P 0.05). Perceived exertion, substrate oxidation, or fasting blood lactate concentrations the day after testing were not different between trials. Blood lactate concentrations during acute resistance exercise are greater when exercise is performed in the postprandial period. Acute resistance exercise performed the night prior does not alter fasting blood lactate concentrations the following morning.

  17. Regulation of Increased Blood Flow (Hyperemia) to Muscles During Exercise: A Hierarchy of Competing Physiological Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J.; Casey, Darren P.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on how blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles is regulated during exercise in humans. The idea is that blood flow to the contracting muscles links oxygen in the atmosphere with the contracting muscles where it is consumed. In this context, we take a top down approach and review the basics of oxygen consumption at rest and during exercise in humans, how these values change with training, and the systemic hemodynamic adaptations that support them. We highlight the very high muscle blood flow responses to exercise discovered in the 1980s. We also discuss the vasodilating factors in the contracting muscles responsible for these very high flows. Finally, the competition between demand for blood flow by contracting muscles and maximum systemic cardiac output is discussed as a potential challenge to blood pressure regulation during heavy large muscle mass or whole body exercise in humans. At this time, no one dominant dilator mechanism accounts for exercise hyperemia. Additionally, complex interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and the microcirculation facilitate high levels of systemic oxygen extraction and permit just enough sympathetic control of blood flow to contracting muscles to regulate blood pressure during large muscle mass exercise in humans. PMID:25834232

  18. Abrupt changes in mixed venous blood gas composition after the onset of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, R; Daly, J; Hansen, J E; Effros, R M

    1989-09-01

    It has been assumed that increases in both O2 uptake and ventilation occurring within the first few seconds after the onset of exercise cannot be the result of changes in blood gas composition reaching the central circulation because of the circulatory delay from the exercising limbs (A. Krogh and J. Lindhard, J. Physiol. Lond. 42: 112-136, 1913). We sought to validate this assumption by measuring the time course of pulmonary arterial blood gases during the transition from rest to exercise. Six healthy men underwent pulmonary arterial catheterization and then performed transitions from rest to moderate cycle ergometer exercise. An anaerobic sampling manifold withdrew 19 samples of blood during the rest-to-exercise transition; sampling interval was usually 4 s. Blood gas analysis showed that, on average, from rest-to-steady-state exercise, O2 saturation (Svo2) fell from 71 to 41% and mixed venous PCO2 (PvCO2) rose from 42 to 59 Torr. Contrary to our expectations, Svo2 decreased and PvCO2 increased with no discernible latency after exercise onset (by 10% and 2 Torr, respectively, within 6 s). The half time for the Svo2 decrease was 32 s, whereas for the PvCO2 increase it was 80 s. The time course of superior vena cava blood gas composition was determined in several experiments; no rapid changes after exercise onset were found. We conclude that at exercise onset there is a rapid fall in Svo2 and rise in PvCO2 well in advance of arrival of blood produced by exercising legs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The impact of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, O Peter

    2013-01-01

    O Peter AdamsFaculty of Medical Sciences, the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, St Michael, BarbadosBackground: Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG), but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE) protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up) of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief ...

  20. Muscle blood flow and muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bodil; Savard, G; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on blood flow and metabolism in an exercising leg was studied in seven subjects walking uphill (12-17%) at 5 km/h on a treadmill for 90 min or until exhaustion. The first 30 min of exercise were performed in a cool environment (18-21 degrees C); then subjects moved...

  1. Exercise performance, red blood cell deformability, and lipid peroxidation: effects of fish oil and vitamin E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrug, G. S.; Mensink, R. P.; Hardeman, M. R.; de Vries, T.; Brouns, F.; Hornstra, G.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that fish oil supplementation increases red blood cell (RBC) deformability, which may improve exercise performance. Exercise alone, or in combination with an increase in fatty acid unsaturation, however, may enhance lipid peroxidation. Effects of a bicycle time trial

  2. Effects of Metoprolol and Nebivolol on Exercise Blood Pressure in Patients with Mild Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Ugur Yazici

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We planned to compare the impact of two beta blockers, metoprolol and nebivolol, on arterial blood pressure during exercise in patients with mild hypertension. Methods. A total of 60 patients (13 males, 47 females; mean age: years were enrolled in the present study. The patients were randomly selected to receive either nebivolol 5 mg/day ( or metoprolol 50 mg/day ( for 8 weeks. At the end of the 8th week, each of the patients received exercise stress test according to Bruce protocol and their blood pressures were remeasured after rest, exercise, and recovery. Results. Blood pressures were determined to be similar between metoprolol and nebivolol groups during rest, exercise, and recovery periods. Metoprolol and nebivolol achieved similar reductions in blood pressures during rest and exercise. However, five patients in nebivolol group and four patients in metoprolol group developed exaggerated BP response to exercise but the difference between metoprolol and nebivolol was not meaningful (. Conclusion. The results of the present study showed that metoprolol and nebivolol established comparable effects on the control of blood pressures during exercise in the patients with mild hypertensions.

  3. Regional blood flow during exercise in humans measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J

    2000-01-01

    Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the tracer indocyanine green (ICG), we quantified blood flow in calf muscle and around the Achilles tendon during plantar flexion (1-9 W). For comparison, blood flow in calf muscle was determined by dye dilution in combination with magnetic resonance...... NIRS and ICG to quantify regional tissue blood flow during exercise in humans. Due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, the technique may be useful for determining regional blood flow distribution and regulation during exercise in humans....

  4. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  5. Acute post-exercise change in blood pressure and exercise training response in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti M Kiviniemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acute post-exercise change in blood pressure (BP may predict exercise training responses in BP in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Patients with CAD (n=116, age 62±5 years, 85 men underwent BP assessments at rest and during 10-min recovery following a symptom-limited exercise test before and after the 6-month training intervention (one strength and 3-4 aerobic moderate-intensity exercises weekly. Post-exercise change in systolic BP (SBP was calculated by subtracting resting SBP from lowest post-exercise SBP. The training-induced change in resting SBP was -2±13 mmHg (p=0.064, ranging from -42 to 35 mmHg. Larger post-exercise decrease in SBP and baseline resting SBP predicted a larger training-induced decrement in SBP (β=0.46 and β=-0.44, respectively, p<0.001 for both. Acute post-exercise decrease in SBP provided additive value to baseline resting SBP in the prediction of training-induced change in resting SBP (R squared from 0.20 to 0.26, p=0.002. After further adjustments for other potential confounders (sex, age, baseline body mass index, realized training load, post-exercise decrease in SBP still predicted the training response in resting SBP (β=0.26, p=0.015. Acute post-exercise change in SBP was associated with training-induced change in resting SBP in patients with CAD, providing significant predictive information beyond baseline resting SBP.

  6. Multicomponent exercise decreases blood pressure, heart rate and double product in normotensive and hypertensive older patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Júnior, Hélio José; Asano, Ricardo Yukio; Gonçalvez, Ivan de Oliveira; Brietzke, Cayque; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-02-26

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program on blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of uncontrolled and controlled normotensive and hypertensive older patients. The study included 183 subjects, 97 normotensives, of which 53 were controlled normotensives (CNS), and 44 uncontrolled normotensives (UNS), as well as 86 hypertensives, of which 43 were controlled hypertensives (CHS), and 43 uncontrolled hypertensives (UHS). Volunteers were recruited and blood pressure and heart rate measurements were made before and after a 6-month multicomponent exercise program. The program of physical exercise was performed twice a week for 26 weeks. The physical exercises program was based on functional and walking exercises. Exercise sessions were performed at moderate intensity. The results indicated that UHS showed a marked decrease in systolic (-8.0mmHg), diastolic (-11.1mmHg), mean (-10.1mmHg), and pulse pressures, heart rate (-6.8bpm), and double product (-1640bpmmmHg), when compared to baseline. Similarly, diastolic (-5.5mmHg) and mean arterial (-4.8mmHg) pressures were significantly decreased in UNS. Concomitantly, significant changes could be observed in the body mass index (-0.9kg/m 2 ; -1.5kg/m 2 ) and waist circumference (-3.3cm; only UHS) of UNS and UHS, which may be associated with the changes observed in blood pressure. In conclusion, the data of the present study indicate that a 6-month multicomponent exercise program may lead to significant reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of normotensive and hypertensive patients with high blood pressure values. Copyright © 2018 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of Oral Ubiquinol on Blood Oxidative Stress and Exercise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Bloomer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 plays an important role in bioenergetic processes and has antioxidant activity. Fifteen exercise-trained individuals (10 men and 5 women; 30–65 years received reduced CoQ10 (Kaneka QH ubiquinol; 300 mg per day or a placebo for four weeks in a random order, double blind, cross-over design (3 week washout. After each four-week period, a graded exercise treadmill test and a repeated cycle sprint test were performed (separated by 48 hours. Blood samples were collected before and immediately following both exercise tests and analyzed for lactate, malondialdehyde, and hydrogen peroxide. Resting blood samples were analyzed for CoQ10 (ubiquinone and ubiquinol profile before and after each treatment period. Treatment with CoQ10 resulted in a significant increase in total blood CoQ10 (138%; P=0.02 and reduced blood CoQ10 (168%; P=0.02, but did not improve exercise performance (with the exception of selected individuals or impact oxidative stress. The relationship between the percentage change in total blood CoQ10 and the cycle sprint total work (R2=0.6009 was noted to be moderate to strong. We conclude that treatment with CoQ10 in healthy, exercise-trained subjects increases total and reduced blood CoQ10, but this increase does not translate into improved exercise performance or decreased oxidative stress.

  8. A qualitative case study of instructional support for web-based simulated laboratory exercises in online college chemistry laboratory courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Kathleen M.

    This study fills a gap in the research literature regarding the types of instructional support provided by instructors in online introductory chemistry laboratory courses that employ chemistry simulations as laboratory exercises. It also provides information regarding students' perceptions of the effectiveness of that instructional support. A multiple case study methodology was used to carry out the research. Two online introductory chemistry courses were studied at two community colleges. Data for this study was collected using phone interviews with faculty and student participants, surveys completed by students, and direct observation of the instructional designs of instructional support in the online Blackboard web sites and the chemistry simulations used by the participating institutions. The results indicated that the instructors provided multiple types of instructional support that correlated with forms of effective instructional support identified in the research literature, such as timely detailed feedback, detailed instructions for the laboratory experiments, and consistency in the instructional design of lecture and laboratory course materials, including the chemistry lab simulation environment. The students in one of these courses identified the following as the most effective types of instructional support provided: the instructor's feedback, opportunities to apply chemistry knowledge in the chemistry lab exercises, detailed procedures for the simulated laboratory exercises, the organization of the course Blackboard sites and the chemistry lab simulation web sites, and the textbook homework web sites. Students also identified components of instructional support they felt were missing. These included a desire for more interaction with the instructor, more support for the simulated laboratory exercises from the instructor and the developer of the chemistry simulations, and faster help with questions about the laboratory exercises or experimental

  9. Combined exercise circuit session acutely attenuates stress-induced blood pressure reactivity in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Sérgio R.; Lima, Ricardo M.; Silva, Karina E. S.; Simões, Herbert G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the blood pressure (BP) responses to cardiovascular stress test after a combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity. Method Twenty individuals (10 male/10 fem; 33.4± 6.9 years; 70.2± 15.8 kg; 170.4± 11.5 cm; 22.3± 6.8% body fat) were randomized in a different days to control session with no exercise or exercise session consisting of 3 laps of the following circuit: knee extension, bench press, knee flexion, rowing in the prone position, squats, shoulder press, and 5 min of aerobic exercise at 75-85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate and/or 13 on the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion [scale of 6 to 20]. The sets of resistance exercise consisted of 15 repetitions at ~50% of the estimated 1 repetition maximum test. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured at rest and during 1h of recovery in both experimental sessions. After that, blood pressure reactivity (BPR) was evaluated using the Cold Pressor Test. Results During 1h of exercise recovery, there was a reduction in SBP (3-6 mmHg) and DBP (2-5 mmHg) in relation to pre-session rest (p<0.01), while this reduction was not observed in the control session. A decline in BPR (4-7 mmHg; p<0.01) was observed 1h post-exercise session, but not in the control session. Post-exercise reductions in SBP and DBP were significantly correlated with BPR reductions (r=0.50-0.45; p<0.05). Conclusion A combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity promoted subsequent post-exercise hypotension and acutely attenuated BPR in response to a cardiovascular stress test. In addition, the post-exercise BP reduction was correlated with BPR attenuation in healthy adults of both genders. PMID:24675911

  10. Combined exercise circuit session acutely attenuates stress-induced blood pressure reactivity in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio R. Moreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the blood pressure (BP responses to cardiovascular stress test after a combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity. Method: Twenty individuals (10 male/10 fem; 33.4± 6.9 years; 70.2± 15.8 kg; 170.4± 11.5 cm; 22.3± 6.8% body fat were randomized in a different days to control session with no exercise or exercise session consisting of 3 laps of the following circuit: knee extension, bench press, knee flexion, rowing in the prone position, squats, shoulder press, and 5 min of aerobic exercise at 75-85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate and/or 13 on the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion [scale of 6 to 20]. The sets of resistance exercise consisted of 15 repetitions at ~50% of the estimated 1 repetition maximum test. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were measured at rest and during 1h of recovery in both experimental sessions. After that, blood pressure reactivity (BPR was evaluated using the Cold Pressor Test. Results: During 1h of exercise recovery, there was a reduction in SBP (3-6 mmHg and DBP (2-5 mmHg in relation to pre-session rest (p<0.01, while this reduction was not observed in the control session. A decline in BPR (4-7 mmHg; p<0.01 was observed 1h post-exercise session, but not in the control session. Post-exercise reductions in SBP and DBP were significantly correlated with BPR reductions (r=0.50-0.45; p<0.05. Conclusion: A combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity promoted subsequent post-exercise hypotension and acutely attenuated BPR in response to a cardiovascular stress test. In addition, the post-exercise BP reduction was correlated with BPR attenuation in healthy adults of both genders.

  11. The Nature of Blood : Debating Haematology and Blood Chemistry in the Eighteenth-Century Dutch Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwaal, Ruben E.

    2017-01-01

    What is blood? Despite William Harvey’s discovery of the circulation of blood, many questions about blood itself remained unanswered. This article asks how and why Dutch medical men in the early eighteenth century initiated studies to understand the properties of blood. Medical professors analysed

  12. Exercise-induced increase in dog adipose tissue blood flow before and after denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow was examined during rest and exercise in the inguinal fat pads of four female dogs using the Xe wash-out technique. The experiments were performed before and after denervation of one of the pads. No difference between the resting flows in the two pads could...... be demonstrated either before or after denervation. The flow increased about two-fold on average from rest to exercise. This response was similar before and after denervation. It is concluded that direct sympathetic innervation is not involved in the regulation of adipose tissue blood flow during exercise....

  13. Standardized intermittent static exercise increases peritendinous blood flow in human leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1999-01-01

    . The radioactive isotope xenon-133 was injected just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 5 cm proximal to the tendon's insertion on the calcaneous. The disappearance of 133Xe was used to determine blood flow during intermittent static exercise of the calf muscle (1.5 s exercise/1.5 s rest) for 30 min at a workload.......05). The exercise induced an average increase in blood flow (3.4-fold) equivalent to results previously obtained during regular dynamic heel raises (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the method is well suited to study the influence of standardized workload on the physiology and pathophysiology of the tissue around...

  14. Active Recovery between Interval Bouts Reduces Blood Lactate While Improving Subsequent Exercise Performance in Trained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harutiun M. Nalbandian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the blood lactate and blood pH kinetics during high-intensity interval training. Seventeen well-trained athletes exercised on two different occasions. Exercises consisted of three 30 s bouts at a constant intensity (90% of peak power with 4 min recovery between bouts followed by a Wingate test (WT. The recoveries were either active recovery (at 60% of the lactate threshold intensity or passive recovery (resting at sitting position. During the exercise, blood samples were taken to determine blood gasses, blood lactate, and blood pH, and peak and average power were calculated for the WT. When performing the active recovery trials, blood pH was significantly higher (p < 0.01 and blood lactate was significantly lower (p < 0.01 compared with the passive recovery trials. WT performance was significantly higher in the active recovery trials: peak power was 671 ± 88 and 715 ± 108 watts, and average power was 510 ± 70 and 548 ± 73 watts (passive and active respectively; p < 0.01. However, no statistically significant correlations were found between the increased pH and the increased performance in the active recovery trials. These results suggest that active recovery performed during high-intensity interval exercise favors the performance in a following WT. Moreover, the blood pH variations associated with active recovery did not explain the enhanced performance.

  15. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of...... of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.......The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P

  16. Post-exercise blood flow restriction attenuates hyperemia similarly in males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankel, Scott J; Mouser, J Grant; Jessee, Matthew B; Mattocks, Kevin T; Buckner, Samuel L; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-08-01

    Our laboratory recently demonstrated that post-exercise blood flow restriction attenuated muscle hypertrophy only in females, which we hypothesized may be due to alterations in post-exercise blood flow. The aim of this study is to test our previous hypothesis that sex differences in blood flow would exist when employing the same protocol. Twenty-two untrained individuals (12 females; 10 males) performed two exercise sessions, each involving one set of elbow flexion exercise to volitional failure on the right arm. The experimental condition had blood flow restriction applied for a 3 min post-exercise period, whereas the control condition did not. Blood flow was measured using an ultrasound at the brachial artery and was taken 1 and 4 min post-exercise. This corresponded to 1 min post inflation and 1 min post deflation in the experimental condition. There were no differences in the alterations in blood flow between the control and experimental conditions when examined across sex. Increases in blood flow [mean (standard deviation)] were as follows: males 1 min [control 764 (577) %; experimental 113 (108) %], males 4 min [control 346 (313) %; experimental 449 (371) %], females 1 min [control 558 (367) %; experimental 87 (105) %], and females 4 min [control 191 (183) %; experimental 328 (223) %]. It does not appear that the sex-specific attenuation of muscle hypertrophy we observed previously can be attributed to different alterations in post-exercise blood flow. Future studies may wish to replicate our previous training study, or examine alternative mechanisms which may be sex specific.

  17. Face cooling with mist water increases cerebral blood flow during exercise: Effect of changes in facial skin blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki eMiyazawa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial cooling (FC increases cerebral blood flow (CBF at rest and during exercise; however, the mechanism of this response remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to test our hypothesis that FC causes facial vasoconstriction that diverts skin blood flow (SkBFface towards the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean at rest and to a greater extent during exercise. Nine healthy young subjects (20 ± 2 yrs. underwent 3 minutes of FC by fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cold water (~4˚C at rest and during steady-state exercise (heart rate of 120 bpm. We focused on the difference between the averaged data acquired from 1 min immediately before FC and last 1 min of FC. SkBFface, MCA Vmean and MAP were higher during exercise than at rest. As hypothesized, FC decreased SkBFface at rest (-32 ± 4 % and to a greater extent during exercise (-64 ± 10%, P=0.012. Although MCA Vmean was increased by FC (Rest, +1.4 ± 0.5 cm/s; Exercise, +1.4 ± 0.6 cm/s, the amount of the FC-evoked changes in MCA Vmean at rest and during exercise differed among subjects. In addition, changes in MCA Vmean with FC did not correlate with concomitant changes in SkBFface (r=0.095, P=0.709. MAP was also increased by FC (Rest, +6.2 ± 1.4 mmHg; Exercise, +4.2 ± 1.2 mmHg. These findings suggest that the FC induced increase in CBF during exercise could not be explained only by change in SkBFface.

  18. Exercise Effects on Adipose Tissue Postprandial Lipolysis and Blood Flow in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huimin; Pierce, Joseph R; Myers, Kimberly B; DuBose, Katrina D; Dubis, Gabriel S; Tanner, Charles J; Hickner, Robert C

    2018-01-30

    Poor suppression of lipolysis and blunted increase in blood flow following meal ingestion in obese adults may indicate resistance to the antilipolytic action of insulin. Exercise may be used to normalize lipolytic responses to food intake by increasing insulin sensitivity. To determine if acute bouts of aerobic exercise and/or excise training alter lipolytic and blood flow responses to food intake in lean (LN) and obese (OB) children. Sixty-five children (9-11 yrs) were randomized into acute exercise (EX: 16 LN and 28 OB) or control (CON: 9 LN and 12 OB) groups that exercised (EX), or rested (CON) between standardized breakfast and lunch. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue to monitor interstitial glycerol (lipolysis) and blood flow. Changes in interstitial glycerol and nutritive flow were calculated from dialysate samples before and after each meal. A subgroup (OB=15 and LN=9) from the acute exercise group underwent 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Poor suppression of lipolysis and a blunted increase in adipose tissue nutritive blood flow in response to breakfast was associated with BMI percentile (r=0.3, p<0.05). These responses were normalized at lunch in the OB in the EX (p<0.05), but not in OB in the CON. Sixteen weeks of exercise training did not improve meal-induced blood flow, and marginally altered the antilipolytic response to the two meals (p=0.06). Daily bouts of acute aerobic exercise should be used to improve the antilipolytic and nutritive blood flow response to a subsequent meal in obese children.

  19. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  20. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity depends on cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ide, K.; Pott, F.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Secher, N. H.

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological reduction of the increase in cardiac output during dynamic exercise with a large muscle mass would influence the cerebral blood velocity/perfusion. We studied the relationship between changes in cerebral blood velocity (transcranial Doppler), rectus

  1. The Chronic and Acute Effects of Exercise Upon Selected Blood Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitman, J. L.; Brewer, J. P.

    This study investigated the effects of chronic and acute exercise upon selected blood measures and indices. Nine male cross-country runners were studied. Red blood count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured using standard laboratory techniques; mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin…

  2. Physical exercise decreases the number of fetal cells in maternal blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Kirkegaard, Ida; Christensen, Connie Britta

    Physical exercise decreases the number of fetal cells in maternal blood J. M. Schlütter1, I. Kirkegaard1, B. Christensen2, S. Kølvraa3, N. Uldbjerg1 1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. 2. FCMB ApS, Vejle, Denmark. 3. Department...... and 10-15 % have no cells in 30 mL, which is a challenge for the implementation of the method for prenatal diagnostic purposes. Considering the assumed fragility of circulating fetal cells we wondered if physical exercise prior to blood sampling might influence the number of fcmb. The objective...... in maternal blood. The explanation might be increased clearance of fcmb from the circulation during exercise. If analysis of fcmb is introduced as a clinical parameter pregnant women should avoid extensive physical activity 24 hours prior to blood sampling....

  3. Vasoactive enzymes and blood flow responses to passive and active exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Meegan A.; Høier, Birgitte; Walker, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by impaired leg blood flow, which contributes to claudication and reduced exercise capacity. This study investigated to what extent vasoactive enzymes might contribute to altered blood flow in PAD (Fontaine stage II). Methods: We...... than CON (1.04 ± 0.19 vs 0.50 ± 0.06 AU, P = 0.02), with no differences for other enzymes. Leg blood flow during exercise was correlated with prostacyclin synthase (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Elevated NADPH oxidase indicates that oxidative stress may be a primary cause of low nitric oxide availability...... compared femoral artery blood flow during reactive hyperaemia, leg-extension exercise and passive leg movement, and determined the level of vasoactive enzymes in skeletal muscle samples from the vastus lateralis in PAD (n = 10, 68.5 ± 6.5 years) and healthy controls (CON, n = 9, 62.1 ± 12.3 years). Leg...

  4. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Teresa L; Phillips, Susan R; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2016-12-13

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, light-driven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes that provide a sterically bulky, photolabile moiety for transiently "caging" biologically active molecules. Photouncaging involves the use of visible (1-photon) or near-IR (2-photon) light to break one or more bonds between ruthenium and coordinated ligand(s), which can occur on short time scales and in high quantum yields. In this work we demonstrate the use of a model "caged" acetonitrile complex, Ru(2,2'-bipyridine) 2 (acetonitrile) 2 , or RuMeCN in an advanced synthesis and physical chemistry laboratory. Students made RuMeCN in an advanced synthesis laboratory course and performed UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The following semester students investigated RuMeCN photolysis kinetics in a physical chemistry laboratory. These two exercises may also be combined to create a 2-week module in an advanced undergraduate laboratory course.

  5. Role of adenosine in the regulation of coronary blood flow in swine at rest and during treadmill exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); R. Stubenitsky (René); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA pivotal role for adenosine in the regulation of coronary blood flow is still controversial. Consequently, we investigated its role in the regulation of coronary vasomotor tone in swine at rest and during graded treadmill exercise. During exercise,

  6. [The effect of blood AST, ALT and lactate after short and middle distance exercise training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, C C; Chen, W C; Lee, S Y; Wang, K T

    1996-09-01

    Twenty-four nursing college students aged 16 and 17 years were selected as research subjects and divided into two groups. Group A comprised 12 individuals who were trained for short distance running (5km/day) over a four-week period, while group B was trained for middle distance running (7km/day) during the same period. Blood AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase) and lactate were performed at rest (before training) and after exercise every week. After both short and middle distance exercise training, the lactate values after 1-3 week(s) training period were persistently higher than those before training and the differences between then are significant. However, the lactate value after 4 weeks training period is lower than that after the third week training. There are significant differences between the AST values after 1-4 week(s) training period and those before exercise in short distance exercise training. There are no significant differences between the AST values after training and those before exercise in middle distance exercise training. The ALT values after 1-4 week(s) training period were lower than those before exercise in short and middle distance exercise training. In conclusion, after 4 weeks training, the lactate and AST values can't reduce to those before training in middle distance exercise training, and the lactate value in short distance exercise training is the same as former. Further investigation is needed.

  7. Blood Pressure Control at Rest and during Exercise in Obese Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Dipla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic responses to exercise have been studied to a great extent over the past decades, and an exaggerated blood pressure response during an acute exercise bout has been considered as an indicator of cardiovascular risk. Obesity is a major factor influencing the blood pressure response to exercise since evidence indicates that the arterial pressure response to exercise is exacerbated in obese compared with lean adults. Signs of augmented responses (such as an exaggerated blood pressure response to physical exertion appear early in life (from the prepubertal years in obese individuals. Understanding the mechanisms that drive the altered hemodynamic responses during exercise in obese individuals and prevent the progression to hypertension is vitally important. This paper focuses on the evidence linking obesity with alterations of the autonomic nervous system and discusses the potential mechanisms and consequences of the altered sympathetic nervous system behavior in obese individuals at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, this paper presents the alterations in the reflex regulatory mechanisms (“exercise pressor reflex” and baroreflex in obese children and adults and addresses the effects of training on obesity-related disturbances.

  8. Hemodynamic responses to strength exercise with blood flow restriction during different phases of the menstrual cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rodrigues Neto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the influence of low-load (LL resistance exercise (RE with blood flow restriction (BFR on systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean blood pressure (MBP, heart rate (HR, double product (DP and oxygen saturation (SpO2 during the phases of the menstrual cycle (MC. Thirty untrained women were randomly and proportionally divided into three groups: HI = high-intensity exercises (80% of one-repetition maximum (1RM; LL = low-load exercises (20% of 1RM; and LL+BFR = LL exercises combined with BFR. The exercise sessions were performed during the 3rd-4th days (follicular phase, 16th day (ovulatory phase and the 24th-26th days (luteal phase of the MC. Before and immediately after the exercises, SBP, DBP, HR and SpO2 were evaluated. We observed an increase in SBP, HR and DP in the three phases of the MC for all groups (p 0.05. There was a significant effect of the MC phases on HR and DP (p < 0.05. We conclude that the three groups exhibited increased SBP, HR and DP; however, SpO2 was not different. Furthermore, groups LL and LL+BFR exhibited greater increases in hemodynamics, and the MC phases seem to influence only HR and DP.

  9. Low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of i....... Additionally, prostanoids and/or NO appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise. Key words: Oxygen delivery, oxygen extraction, nitric oxide, prostanoids.......The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; L-NMMA) and cyclooxygenase (COX; indomethacin) in order to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, respectively.. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50 % lower (P

  10. Profiling of exercise-induced transcripts in the peripheral blood cells of Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Teruaki; Kikuchi, Mio; Kakoi, Hironaga; Hirota, Kei-Ichi; Mukai, Kazutaka; Aida, Hiroko; Nakamura, Seiji; Nagata, Shun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses based on DNA microarray technology have been used to investigate gene expression profiles in horses. In this study, we aimed to identify exercise-induced changes in the expression profiles of genes in the peripheral blood of Thoroughbred horses using DNA microarray technology (15,429 genes on 43,603 probes). Blood samples from the jugular vein were collected from six horses before and 1 min, 4 hr, and 24 hr after all-out running on a treadmill. After the normalization of microarray data, a total of 26,830 probes were clustered into four groups and 11 subgroups showing similar expression changes based on k-mean clustering. The expression level of inflammation-related genes, including interleukin-1 receptor type II (IL-1R2), matrix metallopeptidase 8 (MMP8), protein S100-A8 (S100-A8), and serum amyloid A (SAA), increased at 4 hr after exercise, whereas that of c-Fos (FOS) increased at 1 min after exercise. These results indicated that the inflammatory response increased in the peripheral blood cells after exercise. Our study also revealed the presence of genes that may not be affected by all-out exercise. In conclusion, transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood cells could be used to monitor physiological changes induced by various external stress factors, including exercise, in Thoroughbred racehorses.

  11. The effect of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yutaka; Nogami, Yoshie

    2018-01-01

    Background No meta-analysis has examined the effect of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure. Design A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods Databases were searched for literature published up to April 2017. The randomized controlled trials analysed involved healthy adults, an intervention group that only performed aquatic exercise and a control group that did not exercise, no other intervention, and trials indicated mean systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure. The net change in blood pressure was calculated from each trial, and the changes in blood pressure were pooled by a random effects model, and the risk of heterogeneity was evaluated. Subgroup analysis of subjects with hypertension, subjects who performed endurance exercise (or not), and subjects who only swam (or not) was performed, and the net changes in blood pressure were pooled. Results The meta-analysis examined 14 trials involving 452 subjects. Pooled net changes in blood pressure improved significantly (systolic blood pressure -8.4 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure -3.3 mmHg) and the changes in systolic blood pressure contained significant heterogeneity. When subjects were limited to those with hypertension, those who performed endurance exercise and subjects who did not swim, pooled net changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly, but the heterogeneity of systolic blood pressure did not improve. Conclusion Like exercise on land, aquatic exercise should have a beneficial effect by lowering blood pressure. In addition, aquatic exercise should lower the blood pressure of subjects with hypertension, and other forms of aquatic exercise besides swimming should also lower blood pressure.

  12. Study of safflower on blood lactate concentration and exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exercise function of mice was evaluated by a calculation of the rolling-stick time, swimming endurance time and hypoxia tolerance time. The results showed that both rolling-stick and swimming endurance time of mice in the experimental groups were significantly prolonged (p < 0.05) with regards to the control groups.

  13. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Fernanda R.; Soci, Ursula Paula Renó; De Angelis, Katia; Coelho, Marcele A.; Furstenau, Cristina R.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Oliveira, Edilamar M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C) and trained (T). An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05). RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 5′-nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion. PMID:22189737

  14. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda R. Roque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C and trained (T. An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05. RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 59- nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion.

  15. Effects of meal ingestion on blood pressure and regional hemodynamic responses after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masako Yamaoka; Fujihara, Chizuko; Miura, Akira; Kashima, Hideaki; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the combined effects of consuming a meal during postexercise hypotension (PEH) on hemodynamics. Nine healthy young male subjects performed each of three trials in random order: 1) cycling at 50% of heart rate reserve for 60 min, 2) oral ingestion of a carbohydrate liquid meal (75 g glucose), or 3) carbohydrate ingestion at 40 min after cycling exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and blood flow in the superior mesenteric (SMA), brachial, and popliteal arteries were measured continuously before and after each trial. Regional vascular conductance (VC) was calculated as blood flow/mean arterial pressure. Blood pressure decreased relative to baseline values (P < 0.05) after exercise cessation. Blood flow and VC in the calf and arm increased after exercise, whereas blood flow and VC in the SMA did not. Blood pressure did not change after meal ingestion; however, blood flow and VC significantly decreased in the brachial and popliteal arteries and increased in the SMA for 120 min after the meal (P < 0.05). When the meal was ingested during PEH, blood pressure decreased below PEH levels and remained decreased for 40 min before returning to postexercise levels. The sustained increase in blood flow and VC in the limbs after exercise was reduced to baseline resting levels immediately after the meal, postprandial cardiac output was unchanged by the increased blood flow in the SMA, and total VC and SMA VC increased. Healthy young subjects can suppress severe hypotension by vasoconstriction of the limbs even when carbohydrate is ingested during PEH. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. A comparison between pre- and posthibernation morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry in viperid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Christopher J; Taylor, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Snakes from temperate climates are often made to hibernate in zoos to stimulate reproduction. Unfortunately, deaths have occurred during and after hibernation. This study evaluated the health status, pre- and posthibernation, of 31 adult viperid snakes. It included morphometric measurements, hematology, and blood chemistry. No differences were seen in body weights and weight to length ratios between pre- and posthibernation examinations, suggesting that the overall condition of the snakes did not change. No differences were seen in hematologic and blood chemistry parameters, except that bile acids (3alpha-hydroxybile acids) decreased, the implications of which are unknown. Three individuals had markedly high plasma uric acid levels posthibernation; of these, two individuals died from extensive visceral gout and one recovered with fluid therapy. Viperid snakes should be clinically healthy, well hydrated, and in good body condition when they are put into hibernation. They should be maintained in an environment with sufficient humidity and should have access to water. Blood samples should be collected on arousal for measuring plasma uric acid levels. Changes in morphometry, hematology, and blood chemistry appear to be abnormal and should be investigated thoroughly.

  17. Age related blood flow around the Achilles tendon during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J; Skovgaard, D

    2001-01-01

    Injuries due to the overuse of tendons increase with age, and it has been suggested that this correlates with hypovascularity of the tendon. In the present study, the peritendinous blood flow was determined using xenon-133 washout at rest and during standardised intermittent exercise of the calf-...... that the peritendinous blood flow to the zone of the tendon with the highest incidence of injury from overuse is unaltered by age during exercise, and indicates that factors other than blood flow are important for the increased incidence with age of injuries from overuse.......Injuries due to the overuse of tendons increase with age, and it has been suggested that this correlates with hypovascularity of the tendon. In the present study, the peritendinous blood flow was determined using xenon-133 washout at rest and during standardised intermittent exercise of the calf......-muscle (1.5 s contraction, 1.5 s rest, 40 min) in young (n = 6; 26 years), middle-aged (n = 6; 48 years), and older (n = 6; 74 years) individuals. At rest, the older individuals had a lower peritendinous blood flow compared with the two other age groups. During exercise, blood flow in all three groups rose...

  18. Irisin in blood increases transiently after single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Håvard; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Vegge, Geir; Hollan, Ivana; Whist, Jon Elling; Strand, Tor; Rønnestad, Bent R; Ellefsen, Stian

    2015-01-01

    Irisin is a recently identified exercise-induced hormone that increases energy expenditure, at least in rodents. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Irisin increases acutely in blood after singular sessions of intense endurance exercise (END) and heavy strength training (STR). Secondary, we wanted to explore the relationship between body composition and exercise-induced effects on irisin, and the effect of END and STR on muscular expression of the irisin gene FNDC5. Nine moderately trained healthy subjects performed three test days using a randomized and standardized crossover design: one day with 60 minutes of END, one day with 60 minutes of STR, and one day without exercise (CON). Venous blood was sampled over a period of 24h on the exercise days. Both END and STR led to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood, peaking immediately after END and one hour after STR, before gradually returning to baseline. Irisin responses to STR, but not END, showed a consistently strong negative correlation with proportions of lean body mass. Neither END nor STR affected expression of FNDC5, measured 4h after training sessions, though both protocols led to pronounced increases in PGC-1α expression, which is involved in transcriptional control of FNDC5. The results strongly suggest that single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training lead to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood. This was not accompanied by increased FNDC5 expression, measured 4h post-exercise. The results suggest that irisin responses to resistance exercise are higher in individuals with lower proportions of lean body mass.

  19. Acute effect of resistance, aerobic and combined exercise circuits on blood pressure of hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Carpio Rivera

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Carpio-Rivera, E. y Solera-Herrera, A. (2012. Acute effect of resistance, aerobic and combined exercise circuits on blood pressure of hypertensive women. Pensar en Movimiento: Revista de Ciencias del Ejercicio y la Salud, 10 (2, 1-12. The purpose of this study was to observe the acute effect of different exercises executed in circuit on the resting blood pressure of hypertensive women. Nine trained persons (aged 53.22 ± 4.67 years, hypertensive but medicated with enalapril, participated in four training treatments, each carried out on different days under a randomized repeated measures design: (1 A: aerobic training condition (steps training; (2 R: resistance training condition (machine training (3 AR: aerobic and resistance training condition (alternating aerobic and resistance training every 30 seconds (4 C: control condition (30 minutes resting. Exercise conditions were performed during 30 minutes at 70% of maximum heart rate and resting blood pressure was measured 5 minutes before and immediately after each condition. A two-way analysis of variance detected a significant interaction between conditions and measurements (p<0.05 on systolic blood pressure (sBP. Tukey Post-hoc analyses showed a significant increase of sBP following the three exercise conditions (A: +19 mmHg; R: +28 mmHg; AR: +22 mmHg, while the sBP remained unchanged during the control condition. In contrast, there was no significant effect of any type of exercise on diastolic blood pressure (dBP. In conclusion, the acute elevation in sBP following this type of resistance exercise was similar to the increase produced by aerobic exercise.

  20. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher ( P exercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater ( P exercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Influence of high altitude on cerebral blood flow and fuel utilization during exercise and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K J; MacLeod, D; Willie, C K; Lewis, N C S; Hoiland, R L; Ikeda, K; Tymko, M M; Donnelly, J; Day, T A; MacLeod, N; Lucas, S J E; Ainslie, P N

    2014-01-01

    We examined the hypotheses that: (1) during incremental exercise and recovery following 4–6 days at high altitude (HA) global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) increases to preserve cerebral oxygen delivery () in excess of that required by an increasing cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (); (2) the trans-cerebral exchange of oxygen vs. carbohydrates (OCI; carbohydrates = glucose + ½lactate) would be similar during exercise and recovery at HA and sea level (SL). Global CBF, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities, extra-cranial blood flows, and arterial–jugular venous substrate differences were measured during progressive steady-state exercise (20, 40, 60, 80, 100% maximum workload (Wmax)) and through 30 min of recovery. Measurements (n = 8) were made at SL and following partial acclimatization to 5050 m. At HA, absolute Wmax was reduced by ∼50%. During submaximal exercise workloads (20–60% Wmax), despite an elevated absolute gCBF (∼20%, P exercise and recovery at HA serve to maintain . Despite adequate at HA the brain appears to increase non-oxidative metabolism during exercise and recovery. PMID:25362150

  2. Mean Blood Pressure Assessment during Post-Exercise: Result from Two Different Methods of Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Sainas, Raffaele Milia, Girolamo Palazzolo, Gianfranco Ibba, Elisabetta Marongiu, Silvana Roberto, Virginia Pinna, Giovanna Ghiani, Filippo Tocco, Antonio Crisafulli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At rest the proportion between systolic and diastolic periods of the cardiac cycle is about 1/3 and 2/3 respectively. Therefore, mean blood pressure (MBP is usually calculated with a standard formula (SF as follows: MBP = diastolic blood pressure (DBP + 1/3 [systolic blood pressure (SBP – DBP]. However, during exercise this proportion is lost because of tachycardia, which shortens diastole more than systole. We analysed the difference in MBP calculation between the SF and a corrected formula (CF which takes into account changes in the diastolic and systolic periods caused by exercise-induced tachycardia. Our hypothesis was that the SF potentially induce a systematic error in MBP assessment during recovery after exercise. Ten healthy males underwent two exercise-recovery tests on a cycle-ergometer at mild-moderate and moderate-heavy workloads. Hemodynamics and MBP were monitored for 30 minutes after exercise bouts. The main result was that the SF on average underestimated MBP by –4.1 mmHg with respect to the CF. Moreover, in the period immediately after exercise, when sustained tachycardia occurred, the difference between SF and CF was large (in the order of -20-30 mmHg. Likewise, a systematic error in systemic vascular resistance assessment was present. It was concluded that the SF introduces a substantial error in MBP estimation in the period immediately following effort. This equation should not be used in this situation.

  3. Effect of furosemide on pulmonary blood flow distribution in resting and exercising horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, H. H.; Bernard, S. L.; Glenny, R. W.; Fedde, M. R.; Polissar, N. L.; Basaraba, R. J.; Walther, S. M.; Gaughan, E. M.; McMurphy, R.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    We determined the spatial distribution of pulmonary blood flow (PBF) with 15-micron fluorescent-labeled microspheres during rest and exercise in five Thoroughbred horses before and 4 h after furosemide administration (0.5 mg/kg iv). The primary finding of this study was that PBF redistribution occurred from rest to exercise, both with and without furosemide. However, there was less blood flow to the dorsal portion of the lung during exercise postfurosemide compared with prefurosemide. Furosemide did alter the resting perfusion distribution by increasing the flow to the ventral regions of the lung; however, that increase in flow was abated with exercise. Other findings included 1) unchanged gas exchange and cardiac output during rest and exercise after vs. before furosemide, 2) a decrease in pulmonary arterial pressure after furosemide, 3) an increase in the slope of the relationship of PBF vs. vertical height up the lung during exercise, both with and without furosemide, and 4) a decrease in blood flow to the dorsal region of the lung at rest after furosemide. Pulmonary perfusion variability within the lung may be a function of the anatomy of the pulmonary vessels that results in a predominantly fixed spatial pattern of flow distribution.

  4. Cerebral blood flow during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, H B; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1990-01-01

    voluntary contraction (MVC) and utilized alternate legs. CBF (measured by the 133Xe clearance technique) was expressed by a noncompartmental flow index (ISI). Heart rate and mean arterial pressure increased from resting values of 73 (55-80) beats/min and 88 (74-104) mmHg to 106 (86-138) beats/min and 124...... (102-146) mmHg, respectively (P less than 0.0005), during the contraction at 32% MVC. Arterial PCO2 and central venous pressure did not change. Corrected to the average resting PCO2, CBF during control was 55 (35-73) ml.100 g-1.min-1 and remained constant during contractions. Cerebral vascular...... resistance increased from 1.5 (1.0-2.2) to 2.4 (1.4-3.0) mmHg. 100 g.min.ml-1 (P less than 0.025) at 32% of MVC. There was no difference in CBF between the two hemispheres at rest or during exercise. In contrast to dynamic leg exercise, static leg exercise is not associated with an increase in global CBF...

  5. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee......-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate...

  6. Effects of pre-meal and post-meal mild physical exercises on blood glucose level

    OpenAIRE

    中島, 英洋; 吉江, 弘樹; 中澤, 翔太; 赤土, 知佳; 海尻, 真里; 松尾, 加澄美; 吉岡, 由佳里; 吉崎, 結城

    2010-01-01

     The aim of this study is to compare changes in blood glucose level in response to a mild physical exercise for 25 minutes either in the fasted state or 30 minutes after a standardized meal.  Seven healthy university students (2 males and 5 females, 21 years of age) were studied in a crossover design to compare three conditions: no exercise (control), pre-meal and post-meal exercises.  The three trials conducted on separate days consisted of a rest day when the subjects consumed the standardi...

  7. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....... was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release...

  8. Leg blood flow is impaired during small muscle mass exercise in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Munch, Gregers Druedal Wibe; Rugbjerg, Mette

    2017-01-01

    -extensor exercise, and during arterial infusions of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and acetylcholine (ACh), respectively. Ten patients with moderate to severe COPD and eight age- and sex matched healthy controls were studied. During knee-extensor exercise (10 W), leg blood flow was lower in the patients compared...... the formation of interstitial prostacyclin (vasodilator) was only increased in the controls. There was no difference between groups in the nitrite/nitrate levels (vasodilator) in plasma or interstitial fluid during exercise. Moreover, patients and controls showed similar vasodilatory capacity in response...

  9. Impact of Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue Development and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Florian; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Bruhn, Sven; Zschorlich, Volker; Behrens, Martin

    2018-03-01

    The present study was designed to provide mechanistic insight into the time course and etiology of muscle fatigue development and recovery during and after low-intensity exercise when it is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR). Seventeen resistance-trained males completed four sets of low-intensity isotonic resistance exercise under two experimental conditions: knee extension exercise (i) with BFR and (ii) without BFR (CON). Neuromuscular tests were performed before, during (immediately after each set of knee extension exercise), and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min after each experimental condition. Maximal voluntary torque, quadriceps twitch torque in response to paired electrical stimuli at 10 Hz (PS10) and 100 Hz (PS100), PS10·PS100 ratio as an index of low-frequency fatigue, and voluntary activation were measured under isometric conditions. Perceptual and EMG data were recorded during each exercise condition. After the first set of exercise, BFR induced significantly greater reductions in maximal voluntary torque, PS100, and PS10·PS100 ratio compared with CON. These parameters progressively declined throughout the BFR protocol but recovered substantially within 2 min postexercise when blood flow was restored. Neither a progressive decline in the course of the exercise protocol nor a substantial recovery of these parameters occurred during and after CON. Only at exercise termination, voluntary activation differed significantly between BFR and CON with greater reductions during BFR. At the early stage of exercise, BFR exacerbated the development of muscle fatigue mainly due to a pronounced impairment in contractile function. Despite the high level of muscle fatigue during BFR exercise, the effect of BFR on muscle fatigue was diminished after 2 min of reperfusion, suggesting that BFR has a strong but short-lasting effect on neuromuscular function.

  10. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness and Perceived Exertion After Blood Flow Restriction Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-11-01

    Brandner, CR, and Warmington, SA. Delayed onset muscle soreness and perceived exertion after blood flow restriction exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3101-3108, 2017-The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with heavy loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]), light loads (20% 1RM), or light loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited because of increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study. After 4 sets of elbow-flexion exercise, participants reported ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), with DOMS also recorded for 7 days after each trial. Delayed onset muscle soreness was significantly greater for low-pressure continuous BFR (until 48 hours postexercise) and high-pressure intermittent BFR (until 72 hours postexercise) than for traditional heavy-load resistance exercise and light-load resistance exercise. In addition, RPE was higher for heavy-load resistance exercise and high-pressure intermittent BFR than for low-pressure continuous BFR, with all trials greater than light-load resistance exercise. For practitioners working with untrained participants, this study provides evidence to suggest that to minimize the perception of effort and postexercise muscle soreness associated with BFR resistance exercise, continuous low-pressure application may be more preferential than intermittent high-pressure application. Importantly, these perceptual responses are relatively short-lived (∼2 days) and have previously been shown to subside after a few exercise sessions. Combined with smaller initial training volumes (set × repetitions), this may limit RPE and DOMS to strengthen uptake and adherence and assist in program progression for muscle hypertrophy and gains in strength.

  11. The effect of manual acupuncture on blood neutrophil counts in moderate intensity exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciang, C. Y.; Simadibrata, C.; Tobing, A.; Srilestari, A.

    2017-08-01

    Exercise, even though it has a beneficial effect, can cause muscle damage and trigger inflammatory responses, as evidenced by increased neutrophils in the blood. Acupuncture is a therapeutic modality that is expected to reduce acute inflammatory responses due to exercise. Thirty untrained men were divided randomly into two groups. The manual acupuncture group (n = 15) received stimulation at acupoints ST36 and SP6 bilateral by needle insertion, while the placebo group (n = 15) received insertion of needles on plaster without penetrating the skin. Therapy was done once for 30 minutes immediately after the subjects completed the exercise. Blood neutrophil counts were assessed before exercise and one hour after exercise ended. The results show there is a statistically significant difference in the number of neutrophils before and after exercise between the manual acupuncture group and the placebo group (0.08±0.91 and 0.97±0.70 p = 0.006). Acupuncture therapy effectively mitigates the acute inflammatory response triggered by exercise.

  12. Reproducibility of exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise in healthy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Y; Almer, Z; Hanin, A; Messerli, F H; Ben-Cnaan, R; Grossman, E

    2001-06-01

    An exaggerated blood pressure response (ExBPR) to exercise has been shown to be predictive of future hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to test the reproducibility over time of ExBPR and to better characterize patients who consistently respond in this manner. During periodical health examination, patients underwent routine treadmill exercise testing. ExBPR was said to be present if systolic blood pressure and/or diastolic blood pressure at peak exercise exceeded 200 mm Hg and 100 mm Hg, respectively. Over the past 25 years, 117 healthy patients with ExBPR performed 2 to 7 consecutive treadmill exercise tests. According to subsequent ExBPR, these patients were divided into a concordant group-those who had at least two-thirds repetitions of the ExBPR-and a discordant group-those who had less than two-thirds repetitions. For comparison, we identified patients who did not have ExBPR (control group). Of the 117 patients who had ExBPR, only 18 (15.4%) were in the concordant group in subsequent tests. No clinical features were found to characterize patients in the concordant group. In the two study groups, the variability of blood pressure measurements during stress was significantly greater than in the control group. Also, systolic blood pressure measurements at rest and after 3 minutes of recovery were significantly lower in the control group. ExBPR to exercise is rarely reproducible, and there are no clinical findings characterizing those who consistently respond in this manner. Thus the prognostic importance of blood pressure response to exercise should be reconsidered.

  13. EXERCISE, BLOOD PRESSURE AND MORTALITY: FINDINGS OF EIGHT YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Camilo Turi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In the last decades, unhealthy habits, such as low levels of physical activity and poor diet, have increased. Consequently, the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and mortality has increased significantly among adults. However, it is known that regular physical exercises help to improve health outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of eight years of regular participation in an exercise program on blood pressure and mortality in the Brazilian public health system. Methods: The sample consisted of 34 participants with hypertension and/or type II diabetes who were followed up for eight years. They were paired by age, body mass index and chronic disease in two groups: exercise and control. During the follow-up period, medical records were used to assess systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as number of medical appointments and the occurrence of deaths. Results: In the follow-up period, five participants died in the control group and none in the exercise group. The Kaplan-Meier analysis identified 29.4% lower mortality among active participants (Fisher's exact test with p = 0.044. The number of medical appointments and the values of diastolic blood pressure were significantly lower for active participants. Conclusion: After a follow-up of eight years, participants in the exercise group attended fewer medical appointments, had better blood pressure control and a lower occurrence of deaths.

  14. EFFECT OF TURMERIC (CURCUMA LONGA SUPPLEMENTATION ON GROWTH AND BLOOD CHEMISTRY OF BROILERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamdev Sethy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To access the effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa supplementation on growth and blood chemistry of broiler chickens, seventy five day old straight run coloured synthetic broiler chicks were randomly divided into 3 groups (25 chicks per group. Group I served as control (without any supplementation, where as birds in groups II and III were supplemented with 0.5% and 1.0% Curcuma longa powder respectively and the trail was lasted for 7 weeks, during which weekly body weight changes were recorded. Blood samples were collected at the end of the experiment to study the blood profile of birds. The results indicated that addition of Curcuma longa powder caused significant (P0.05 effect on blood biochemical parameters of bird. The present results confirmed the beneficial effects of dietary Curcuma longa powder to improve body weight and Hb concentration of broiler chickens.

  15. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow was quanti......The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....

  16. Cross-disciplinary thermoregulation and sweat analysis laboratory experiences for undergraduate Chemistry and Exercise Science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Gregory; Taylor, Nichole; Glen, Mary; Tomlin, Dona; Gaul, Catherine A

    2011-06-01

    Cross-disciplinary (CD) learning experiences benefit student understanding of concepts and curriculum by offering opportunities to explore topics from the perspectives of alternate fields of study. This report involves a qualitative evaluation of CD health sciences undergraduate laboratory experiences in which concepts and students from two distinct disciplines [chemistry (CHEM) and exercise physiology (EPHE)] combined to study exercise thermoregulation and sweat analysis. Twenty-eight senior BSc Kinesiology (EPHE) students and 42 senior BSc CHEM students participated as part of their mutually exclusive, respective courses. The effectiveness of this laboratory environment was evaluated qualitatively using written comments collected from all students as well as from formal focus groups conducted after the CD laboratory with a representative cohort from each class (n = 16 CHEM students and 9 EPHE students). An open coding strategy was used to analyze the data from written feedback and focus group transcripts. Coding topics were generated and used to develop five themes found to be consistent for both groups of students. These themes reflected the common student perceptions that the CD experience was valuable and that students enjoyed being able to apply academic concepts to practical situations as well as the opportunity to interact with students from another discipline of study. However, students also reported some challenges throughout this experience that stemmed from the combination of laboratory groups from different disciplines with limited modification to the design of the original, pre-CD, learning environments. The results indicate that this laboratory created an effective learning opportunity that fostered student interest and enthusiasm for learning. The findings also provide information that could inform subsequent design and implementation of similar CD experiences to enhance engagement of all students and improve instructor efficacy.

  17. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robert W.; Somerville, Stephen E.; Guillette, Matthew P.; Botha, Hannes; Hoffman, Andre; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J.; Smit, Willem J.; Lebepe, Jeffrey; Myburgh, Jan; Govender, Danny; Tucker, Jonathan; Boggs, Ashley S. P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various “outbreaks” of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River. PMID:27115488

  18. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Bowden

    Full Text Available One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various "outbreaks" of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin, in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River.

  19. Resistance exercise performed with repetitions until failure affects nocturnal blood pressure decreases in hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia de Almeida Correia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that resistance exercise reduces 24-hour blood pressure to levels below resting values, although this is not a universal finding. The number of repetitions has been shown to influence this response. Thus, the aim of the study was to analyze the effects of resistance exercise performed until failure (UF on 24-hour blood pressure in hypertensive women. Thirteen hypertensive women underwent three experimental sessions in random order: UF, resistance exercise with repetitions before concentric failure (BF and control (C. Prior to and up to 24 hours after the sessions, cardiovascular variables, as well as the nocturnal fall in blood pressure, the morning surge, and the presence or absence of a blood pressure dip pattern were established using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. In both wakefulness and sleep there was no significant difference among the three groups. However, after UF and C fewer patients presented a dip in blood pressure (46% and 38%, respectively compared BF (77%, p=0.047. In conclusion, the UF attenuated blood pressure dips at night in hypertensive patients.

  20. Brachial artery blood flow responses to different modalities of lower limb exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; Black, Mark A; Hopman, Maria T E; Cable, Nigel T; Green, Daniel J

    2009-05-01

    Cycling is associated with a reproducible systolic anterograde and diastolic retrograde flow pattern in the brachial artery (BA) of the inactive upper limb, which results in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of different types and intensities of lower limb exercise on the BA flow pattern. We examined BA blood flow and shear rate patterns during cycling, leg kicking, and walking exercise in 12 young subjects (24 +/- 3 yr). BA diameter, blood flow, and shear rate were assessed at baseline (1 min) and at three incremental intensity levels of cycling (60, 80, and 120 W), bilateral leg kicking (5, 7.5, and 10 kg), and walking (3, 4, and 5 km x h(-1)), performed for 3 min each. Edge detection and wall tracking of high-resolution B-mode arterial ultrasound images, combined with synchronized Doppler waveform envelope analysis, were used to calculate conduit artery diameter and anterograde/retrograde blood flow and shear rate continuously across the cardiac cycle. BA mean blood flow and shear rate increased significantly throughout each exercise protocol (P < 0.001), and BA anterograde blood flow and shear rate showed comparable increases throughout each protocol (P < 0.001). Retrograde blood flow and shear rate, however, demonstrated a significant increase during cycling and walking (P < 0.001) but not during leg kicking. Rhythmic lower limb exercise (cycling and walking) results in an increase in BA systolic anterograde blood flow and shear rate, directly followed by a large retrograde flow and shear rate. This typical pattern, previously linked with endothelial NO release, is not present during a different type of exercise such as leg kicking.

  1. Effects of exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Kimberly; Cartner, Ben; Alley, Jessica R; Curry, Chelsea D; Dickinson, David L; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    During nocturnal sleep, blood pressure (BP) "dips" compared to diurnal BP, reducing stress on the cardiovascular system. Both the hypotensive response elicited by acute aerobic exercise and sleep quality can impact this dipping response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise timing on circadian BP changes and sleep architecture. Twenty prehypertensive subjects completed the study. During four test sessions, participants first completed a graded exercise test to exhaustion and then performed 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 7 am (7A), 1 pm (1P), and 7 pm (7P) in a random, counterbalanced order at 65% of the heart rate obtained at peak oxygen uptake. An ambulatory cuff was used to monitor BP responses during 24 hours following exercise, and an ambulatory sleep-monitoring headband was worn during sleep following each session. Aerobic exercise at 7A invoked a greater dip in nocturnal systolic BP than exercise at 1P or 7P, although the greatest dip in nocturnal diastolic BP occurred following 7P. Compared to 1P, 7A also invoked greater time spent in deep sleep. These data indicate that early morning may be the most beneficial time to engage in aerobic exercise to enhance nocturnal BP changes and quality of sleep.

  2. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstam, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effect of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased during exercise in all 13 subjects. Percent increase in activity correlated with percent increase in erythrocyte count (r . -0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. We conclude that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume

  3. Knowledge, attitude and practice of exercise for plasma blood glucose control among patients with type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awotidebe, Taofeek O; Adedoyin, Rufus A; Afolabi, Mubaraq A; Opiyo, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Exercise plays significant role in the health outcomes of patients with diabetes, however, little is known about patients' knowledge of exercise for plasma blood glucose control among patients with type-2 diabetes (T2D). This study investigated knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of exercise for plasma blood glucose control among patients with T2D. This cross-sectional study recruited 299 patients with T2D (male=105; female=194) from selected government hospitals in Osun State, Nigeria using purposive sampling technique. Validated questionnaires were used to assess of exercise for plasma blood glucose control and socioeconomic status (SES) of the patients. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Alpha level was set at exercise whilst 269(90.0%) had negative attitude to exercise practice. Less than a third, 82(27.4%) engaged in exercise practice for plasma blood glucose control. There was significant association between knowledge and practice of exercise ((2)=12.535; p=0.002). Furthermore, significant associations were found between knowledge and gender ((2)=11.453; p=0.003), and socioeconomic status ((2)=29.127, p=0.001) but not associated with attitude towards exercise (p>0.05). Patients with demonstrated good knowledge of exercise for plasma blood glucose control but reported negative attitude and poor practice of exercise. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Impact of Endogenous and Exogenous Interferences on Clinical Chemistry Parameters Measured on Blood Gas Analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieme, Caleb V; Voss, Dena R; Davis, Scott R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia (HIL) was determined for residual whole blood specimens analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on blood gas analyzers. The frequency and potential impact of exogenous interference from iodide, salicylate, and thiocyanate (metabolite of sodium nitroprusside) on analysis of whole blood chloride was also assessed. Over an approximately two month period at an academic medical center, indices for HIL were determined on Roche cobas c502 analyzers for 1,986 residual whole blood specimens that had been previously analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on Radiometer ABL90 FLEX blood gas analyzers. To examine exogenous interferences, retrospective analysis was performed over multiple years to ascertain whether patient samples analyzed for whole blood chloride were potentially affected by interference from iodide, salicylate, or thiocyanate. Some degree of hemolysis (defined as hemolysis index of greater than 60) was present in 9.7% of the whole blood specimens. Increasing rates of hemolysis were associated with higher whole blood potassium concentrations. Nearly 60% of specimens with potassium concentrations between 6.0 and 6.9 mEq/L had hemolysis indices of 100 or greater, and 75% of specimens with a potassium concentration of 7.0 mEq/L or greater were severely hemolyzed (hemolysis index of 300 or greater). In contrast to the hemolysis results, icterus and lipemia were determined to have minimal impact on patient results. For the exogenous interferences, we did not identify any patient samples where elevated salicylate levels or pharmaceutical iodide administration overlapped with whole blood chloride analysis (out of 75,887 and 169,229 total chloride measurements, respectively). We did, however, find that for patients receiving nitroprusside therapy in the inpatient setting, whole blood chloride concentrations were significantly higher during nitroprusside therapy [106.7 +/- 6.2 mEq/L (mean, SD)] compared to before

  5. Blood flow and muscle oxygen uptake at the onset and end of moderate and heavy dynamic forearm exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekvelt, M.C.P. van; Shoemaker, J.K.; Tschakovsky, M.E.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Hughson, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that forearm blood flow (FBF) during moderate intensity dynamic exercise would meet the demands of the exercise and that postexercise FBF would quickly recover. In contrast, during heavy exercise, FBF would be inadequate causing a marked postexercise hyperemia and sustained increase

  6. Laboratory Exercise: Study of Digestive and Regulatory Processes through the Exploration of Fasted and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari K.; Maurer, Luke W.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology laboratory exercises often explore the regulation of enzyme action rather than systems physiology. This laboratory exercise provides a systems approach to digestive and regulatory processes through the exploration of postprandial blood glucose levels. In the present exercise, students enrolled in an undergraduate animal…

  7. Reduced blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise in lowlanders acclimatizing to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Lindsey M; Lovering, Andrew T; Tymko, Michael M; Day, Trevor A; Stembridge, Mike; Nguyen, Trang Anh; Ainslie, Philip N; Foster, Glen E

    2017-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine, using the technique of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, whether exercise after 4-7 days at 5050 m would affect blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (Q̇IPAVA) compared with exercise at sea level. What is the main finding and its importance? Despite a significant increase in both cardiac output and pulmonary pressure during exercise at high altitude, there is very little Q̇IPAVA at rest or during exercise after 4-7 days of acclimatization. Mathematical modelling suggests that bubble instability at high altitude is an unlikely explanation for the reduced Q̇IPAVA. Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (Q̇IPAVA) is elevated during exercise at sea level (SL) and at rest in acute normobaric hypoxia. After high altitude (HA) acclimatization, resting Q̇IPAVA is similar to that at SL, but it is unknown whether this is true during exercise at HA. We reasoned that exercise at HA (5050 m) would exacerbate Q̇IPAVA as a result of heightened pulmonary arterial pressure. Using a supine cycle ergometer, seven healthy adults free from intracardiac shunts underwent an incremental exercise test at SL [25, 50 and 75% of SL peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2 peak )] and at HA (25 and 50% of SL V̇O2 peak ). Echocardiography was used to determine cardiac output (Q̇) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and agitated saline contrast was used to determine Q̇IPAVA (bubble score; 0-5). The principal findings were as follows: (i) Q̇ was similar at SL rest (3.9 ± 0.47 l min -1 ) compared with HA rest (4.5 ± 0.49 l min -1 ; P = 0.382), but increased from rest during both SL and HA exercise (P exercise (P = 0.003); (iii) Q̇IPAVA was increased from SL rest (0) to HA rest (median = 1; P = 0.04) and increased from resting values during SL exercise (P exercise (P = 0.91), despite significant increases in Q̇ and PASP. Theoretical

  8. Exercise induced pulmonary, hepatic and splenic blood volume changes in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubashar, M.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise induced blood volume changes in visceral organs were determined by scintillation gamma camera imaging in 11 normal healthy male volunteers and 15 NIDDM male diabetics without clinical signs of neuropathy. After in-vivo labelling of red cells with Technetium-99m, the data was acquired in the supine position at rest and immediately after graded upright ergometer bicycle exercise. From rest to peak exercise, pulmonary blood volume increased 19% and 75% in normal volunteers of less than and more than 40 years of age respectively. A decrease of 18% and 42% was noted in the hepatic and splenic blood volume respectively, regardless of the age, in the normal subjects. In contrast to normals, the diabetic patients showed in response to peak exercise as compared to age-matched controls. A significant difference in the drop in pulmonary blood volume 82.37% and 90% was observed between diabetics of more than and less than 7 years duration respectively. The liver and spleen of the diabetic subjects revealed a lesser decrease of 87.6% and 71.33% respectively in response to peak stress in comparison to the age matched controls. The reduction in the hepatic and splenic blood volume was equally evident in diabetics of more than or less than 50 years of age and it was statistically nonsignificant. This study demonstrates that the normal pattern of redistribution of blood volume in response to maximum exercise in diabetics is altered such that there is restricted pulmonary perfusion and diminished vasoconstriction of the hepato splenic vascular bed and the changes in the pulmonary circulation are related to the duration of the diabetics rather than the age of the patient. (author)

  9. Effects of exercise and respiration on blood flow in total cavopulmonary connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, V. E.; Emmertsen, K.; Stenbøg, E

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about blood flow and its relationship to respiration during exercise in patients with total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 11 patients 12.4+/-4.6 years (mean+/-SD) of age 5.9+/-2.8 years (mean+/-SD) after TCPC operation. Real-time MRI ......: In the TCPC, circulation IVC and aortic but not SVC flows increase with supine leg exercise. Inspiration facilitates IVC flow at rest but less so during exercise, when the peripheral pump seems to be more important.......BACKGROUND: Little is known about blood flow and its relationship to respiration during exercise in patients with total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 11 patients 12.4+/-4.6 years (mean+/-SD) of age 5.9+/-2.8 years (mean+/-SD) after TCPC operation. Real-time MRI...... was used to measure blood flow in the superior vena cava (SVC), inferior vena cava (IVC), and ascending aorta under inspiration and expiration during supine lower-limb exercise (rest, 0.5 and 1.0 W/kg) on an ergometer bicycle. IVC and aortic flow increased from 1.60+/-0.52 and 2.99+/-0.83 L/min per m2...

  10. INCREASES IN CORE TEMPERATURE COUNTERBALANCE EFFECTS OF HEMOCONCENTRATION ON BLOOD VISCOSITY DURING PROLONGED EXERCISE IN THE HEAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Michael J.; Krippes, Taylor; Kolkhorst, Fred W.; Williams, Alexander T.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that blood viscosity is significantly increased following exercise. However, these studies measured both pre- and post-exercise blood viscosity at 37 °C even though core and blood temperatures would be expected to have increased during the exercise. Consequently, the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on mitigating change in blood viscosity may have been missed. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration and hyperthermia, as well as determine their combined effects, on blood viscosity. Nine subjects performed 2 h of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat (37 °C, 40% rH), which resulted in significant increases from pre-exercise values for rectal temperature (37.11 ± 0.35 °C to 38.76 ± 0.13 °C), hemoconcentration (hematocrit = 43.6 ± 3.6% to 45.6 ± 3.5%), and dehydration (Δbody weight = −3.6 ± 0.7%). Exercise-induced hemoconcentration significantly (P viscosity by 9% (3.97 to 4.30 cP at 300 s−1) while exercise-induced hyperthermia significantly decreased blood viscosity by 7% (3.97 to 3.70 cP at 300 s−1). However, when both factors were considered together, there was no overall change in blood viscosity (3.97 to 4.03 cP at 300 s−1). The effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration, increased plasma viscosity, and increased red blood cell aggregation, all of which increased blood viscosity, were counterbalanced by increased RBC deformability (e.g., RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and elongation index) caused by the hyperthermia. Thus, blood viscosity remained unchanged following prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in the heat. PMID:26682653

  11. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Blood Values (Establishing hematology and serum chemistry reference ranges for wild Hawaiian Monk Seals)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hematology and serum chemistry evaluations are essential to a patients comprehensive health exam by providing measures of organ function, blood cell volume and...

  12. Systematic Review of Chinese Traditional Exercise Baduanjin Modulating the Blood Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Mei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Baduanjin exercise is considered to be beneficial to modulate the blood lipid metabolism. The purpose of the systematic review was to assess the potential efficacy and safety of Baduanjin exercise. Methods. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, VIP, Chinese Important Conference Papers Database, and Chinese Dissertation Database were searched for all prospective-controlled trials of Baduanjin exercise from their inception to December 31, 2011. Results. A total of 14 studies were included. Comparing with no treatment, Baduanjin exercise significantly reduced the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C in plasma, and elevated plasma HDL-C level for healthy participants, and the pooled MD (95% confidence interval, CI was −0.58 mmol/L (−0.86, −0.30 mmol/L, −0.22 mmol/L (−0.31, −0.13 mmol/L, −0.35 mmol/L (−0.54, −0.17 mmol/L, 0.13 mmol/L (0.06, 0.21 mmol/L, respectively. Baduanjin exercise also obviously decreased the levels of TG, LDL-C in plasma comparing with no treatment for patients, and the pooled MD (95% CI was −0.30 mmol/L (−0.40, −0.19 mmol/L, −0.38 mmol/L (−0.63, −0.13 mmol/L, but there was not obvious to decrease plasma TC level or elevate plasma HDL-C level in patients with the pooled MD (95%CI, −0.39 mmol/L (−1.09, 0.31 mmol/L and 0.22 mmol/L (−0.11, 0.55 mmol/L, respectively. In addition, the obvious advantage was not observed to modulate the blood lipid metabolism in comparing Baduanjin exercise with other exercises, regardless for health participants or patients. Conclusion. Studies indicated that Baduanjin exercise could significantly decrease the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C levels in plasma and elevate plasma HDL-C level for the healthy people. It also was helpful that Baduanjin exercise modulated the blood lipid metabolism for patients. Moreover, the Baduanjin exercise did not have an obvious advantage on modulating the lipid metabolism comparing with other exercises. But the

  13. Oscillatory blood pressure response to the onset of cycling exercise in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Thales C; Fernandes, Igor A; Magalhães-Jr, Nisval

    2015-01-01

    to this pattern is unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate that attenuation of group III/IV muscle afferent feedback by spinal fentanyl impairs the pressor response after 10 s of moderate leg cycling exercise, but this afferent feedback does not appear to be necessary for induction...... of the oscillatory pattern of blood pressure at the onset of exercise. We investigated whether attenuation of the central projections of group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents via lumbar intrathecal administration of the μ-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl affects the oscillatory blood pressure (BP) response...... to the onset of dynamic exercise. Eight healthy, recreationally active men (28 ± 3 years old) performed 40 s of cycling at 80 W (60 r.p.m.) before (control) and after fentanyl administration, while heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic, mean and diastolic BP and total vascular conductance were...

  14. Acute Effects of Exercise on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analytic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Carpio-Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypertension affects 25% of the world's population and is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and other diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the evidence regarding the acute effect of exercise on blood pressure (BP using meta-analytic measures. Sixty-five studies were compared using effect sizes (ES, and heterogeneity and Z tests to determine whether the ES were different from zero. The mean corrected global ES for exercise conditions were -0.56 (-4.80 mmHg for systolic BP (sBP and -0.44 (-3.19 mmHg for diastolic BP (dBP; z ≠ 0 for all; p < 0.05. The reduction in BP was significant regardless of the participant's initial BP level, gender, physical activity level, antihypertensive drug intake, type of BP measurement, time of day in which the BP was measured, type of exercise performed, and exercise training program (p < 0.05 for all. ANOVA tests revealed that BP reductions were greater if participants were males, not receiving antihypertensive medication, physically active, and if the exercise performed was jogging. A significant inverse correlation was found between age and BP ES, body mass index (BMI and sBP ES, duration of the exercise's session and sBP ES, and between the number of sets performed in the resistance exercise program and sBP ES (p < 0.05. Regardless of the characteristics of the participants and exercise, there was a reduction in BP in the hours following an exercise session. However, the hypotensive effect was greater when the exercise was performed as a preventive strategy in those physically active and without antihypertensive medication.

  15. Reference Values for Exercise Systolic Blood Pressure in 12- to 17-Year-Old Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Claudia; Weisser, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    In adults, blood pressure (BP) during exercise has prognostic advantages compared to resting BP, whereas its relevance for children has not been revealed as clearly. Because exercise BP among young subjects might be of clinical importance, we sought to determine reference values in adolescents. BP recordings at rest and during a cycle ergometer test (1.5W/kg) were assessed in 492 teenagers (12-17 years) in the Kiel EX.PRESS. Study (EXercise and PRESSure). The resting systolic BP (SBP) values at the 90th and 95th percentile of the German reference population were applied on our resting SBP distribution. The resulting resting SBP percentiles were then used to propose exercise SBP limits. Of our group, 12.4% exhibited a resting SBP ≥ 90th reference percentile, with 7.9% ≥ 95th percentile. The corresponding age group- and sex-specific percentiles were assigned to the exercise SBP distribution resulting in reference values for high normal and elevated SBP (upper limit, girls/boys, mm Hg): 172/172 for 12-13 years, 174.7/177.3 for 14-15 years, 178.5/201.3 for 16-17 years). Using these limits, exercise SBP values were elevated in 8.1%, 5.5% were within the high normal range. Normal resting SBP but at least high normal exercise SBP was found in 7.7%. In contrast, 7.4% were high normal or hypertensive at rest but normotensive during exercise. Exercise BP is expected to be of additional use for the evaluation of BP in younger age groups. As long as prognostic data for exercise BP in adolescents are not available, the limits proposed might be considered in clinical practice. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effects of exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure in prehypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbrother K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly Fairbrother,1 Ben Cartner,1 Jessica R Alley,1 Chelsea D Curry,1, David L Dickinson,2 David M Morris,1 Scott R Collier1 1Vascular Biology and Autonomic Studies Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, 2Department of Economics, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA Background: During nocturnal sleep, blood pressure (BP “dips” compared to diurnal BP, reducing stress on the cardiovascular system. Both the hypotensive response elicited by acute aerobic exercise and sleep quality can impact this dipping response. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise timing on circadian BP changes and sleep architecture. Materials and methods: Twenty prehypertensive subjects completed the study. During four test sessions, participants first completed a graded exercise test to exhaustion and then performed 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 7 am (7A, 1 pm (1P, and 7 pm (7P in a random, counterbalanced order at 65% of the heart rate obtained at peak oxygen uptake. An ambulatory cuff was used to monitor BP responses during 24 hours following exercise, and an ambulatory sleep-monitoring headband was worn during sleep following each session. Results: Aerobic exercise at 7A invoked a greater dip in nocturnal systolic BP than exercise at 1P or 7P, although the greatest dip in nocturnal diastolic BP occurred following 7P. Compared to 1P, 7A also invoked greater time spent in deep sleep. Conclusion: These data indicate that early morning may be the most beneficial time to engage in aerobic exercise to enhance nocturnal BP changes and quality of sleep. Keywords: nocturnal dipping, prehypertension, aerobic exercise

  17. Effect of healthy Qigong “WuQinXi” exercise on peripheral blood T ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “WuQinXi” is becoming a popular exercise among elders. This study measured the peripheral blood Tcell subgroups in elderly “WuQinXi” practitioners. Fifty healthy Chinese people (male 15, female 35), aged between 50 and 69, attended a 135 min Tai Chi practice session four times a week for three months. The results ...

  18. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CB...

  19. Potential effects of whole-body vibration exercises on blood flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feasible clinical strategies such as whole-body vibration exercise (WBVE) are being used without a clear understanding of its effects. The aim of the present study is to review the effects of the WBVE on blood flow kinetics and its feasibility in different populations. Material and Methods: The level of evidence (LE) of selected ...

  20. Systolic blood pressure reactivity during submaximal exercise and acute psychological stress in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Studies in youth show an association between systolic blood-pressure (SBP) reactivity to acute psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). However, it has not yet been determined whether SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise is also associated with CIMT i...

  1. Effects of aerobic exercise and drug therapy on blood pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although aerobic exercise has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in human beings, its additive BPreducing effect on antihypertensive drug therapy seems to have been investigated in only laboratory animals. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of aerobic dance combined with ...

  2. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during intense static exercise is dominated by a Valsalva maneuver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Frank; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Ide, Kojiro; Madsen, Per; Secher, Niels H.

    2003-01-01

    Lifting of a heavy weight may lead to "blackout" and occasionally also to cerebral hemorrhage, indicating pronounced consequences for the blood flow through the brain. We hypothesized that especially strenuous respiratory straining (a Valsalva-like maneuver) associated with intense static exercise

  3. CALF BLOOD-FLOW AND POSTURE - DOPPLER ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS DURING AND AFTER EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLEEUWEN, BE; BARENDSEN, GJ; LUBBERS, J; DEPATER, L

    To investigate the joint effects of body posture and calf muscle pump, the calf blood flow of eight healthy volunteers was measured with pulsed Doppler equipment during and after 3 min of rhythmic exercise on a calf ergometer in the supine, sitting, and standing postures. Muscle contractions

  4. Effect of healthy Qigong “WuQinXi” exercise on peripheral blood T ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    male 15, female ... The results showed significant (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) differences in peripheral blood T-cell subgroups between before and after exercise. ..... Invariant NKT and NKT-like lymphocytes: Two different T cell subsets ...

  5. Lactate and ammonia concentration in blood and sweat during incremental cycle ergometer exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Mook, GA; Gips, CH; Verkerke, GJ

    It is known that the concentrations of ammonia and lactate in blood increase during incremental exercise. Sweat also contains lactate and ammonia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological response of lactate and ammonia in plasma and sweat during a stepwise incremental cycle

  6. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C......The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle......; control) or when severe hyperthermia had developed (core temperature = 39.5 degrees C; hyperthermia). The gCBF was similar after 15 min in the two trials, and it remained stable throughout control. In contrast, during hyperthermia gCBF decreased by 18% and was therefore lower in hyperthermia compared...

  7. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    , but not by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Furthermore, endurance training appears to lower the cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake and preserve cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. This is possibly related to an attenuated catecholamine response. Finally, exercise promotes brain health as evidenced......This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... as evidenced by pharmacological manipulation of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Cholinergic blockade by glycopyrrolate blocks the exercise-induced increase in the transcranial Doppler determined mean flow velocity (MCA Vmean). Conversely, alpha-adrenergic activation increases that expression of cerebral...

  8. Effects of blood transfusion on exercise capacity in thalassemia major patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedetto

    Full Text Available Anemia has an important role in exercise performance. However, the direct link between rapid changes of hemoglobin and exercise performance is still unknown.To find out more on this topic, we studied 18 beta-thalassemia major patients free of relevant cardiac dysfunction (age 33.5±7.2 years,males = 10. Patients performed a maximal cardiopulmolmonary exercise test (cycloergometer, personalized ramp protocol, breath-by-breath measurements of expired gases before and the day after blood transfusion (500 cc of red cell concentrates. After blood transfusion, hemoglobin increased from 10.5±0.8 g/dL to 12.1±1.2 (p<0.001, peak VO2 from 1408 to 1546mL/min (p<0.05, and VO2 at anaerobic threshold from 965 to 1024mL/min (p<0.05. No major changes were observed as regards heart and respiratory rates either at peak exercise or at anaerobic threshold. Similarly, no relevant changes were observed in ventilation efficiency, as evaluated by the ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production relationship, or in O2 delivery to the periphery as analyzed by the VO2 vs. workload relationship. The relationship between hemoglobin and VO2 changes showed, for each g/dL of hemoglobin increase, a VO2 increase = 82.5 mL/min and 35 mL/min, at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. In beta-thalassemia major patients, an acute albeit partial anemia correction by blood transfusion determinates a relevant increase of exercise performance, observed both at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold.

  9. Impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during exercise in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice; Rasmussen, Peter; Vaag, Allan; Nielsen, Henning B; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial vascular function and capacity to increase cardiac output during exercise are impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested the hypothesis that the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise is also blunted and, therefore, that cerebral oxygenation becomes affected and perceived exertion increased in T2DM patients. We quantified cerebrovascular besides systemic hemodynamic responses to incremental ergometer cycling exercise in eight male T2DM and seven control subjects. CBF was assessed from the Fick equation and by transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity. Cerebral oxygenation and metabolism were evaluated from the arterial-to-venous differences for oxygen, glucose, and lactate. Blood pressure was comparable during exercise between the two groups. However, the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide was lower at higher workloads in T2DM patients and their work capacity and increase in cardiac output were only ~80% of that established in the control subjects. CBF and cerebral oxygenation were reduced during exercise in T2DM patients (P < 0.05), and they expressed a higher rating of perceived exertion (P < 0.05). In contrast, CBF increased ~20% during exercise in the control group while the brain uptake of lactate and glucose was similar in the two groups. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired CBF and oxygenation responses to exercise in T2DM patients may relate to limited ability to increase cardiac output and to reduced vasodilatory capacity and could contribute to their high perceived exertion. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  10. Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Decreases Blood Pressure in COPD Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael J.; Justus, Nicholas W.; Hauser, Jordan I.; Case, Ashlee H.; Helms, Christine C.; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T.; Miller, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3− ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient’s maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3− and nitrite (NO2−) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3− by 938% and NO2− by 379%. Median (+ interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 sec., respectively). Compared to placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3− supplementation can elevate plasma NO3− and NO2− concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients. PMID:25445634

  11. Use of intraosseous blood to assess blood chemistries and hemoglobin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation with drug infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Kissoon, N; Fiallos, M; Abdelmoneim, T; Murphy, S

    1999-06-01

    To compare intraosseous with central venous blood samples for biochemical analyses and hemoglobin levels during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and during cardiopulmonary resuscitation with infusion of sodium bicarbonate, epinephrine, and saline boluses through the intraosseous site. Prospective, complete repeated measures study. An animal laboratory at a university medical center. Thirty-two piglets (mean weight, 30 [range, 24-35] kg). Animals were anesthetized, instrumented, and subjected to hypoxic cardiac arrest. An intraosseous cannula was inserted into the tibia, and animals were randomly assigned to one of five groups: heparinized saline (n = 6), epinephrine infusions only (n = 6), saline infusions only (n = 6), sodium bicarbonate infusions only (n = 8), and epinephrine, saline, and sodium bicarbonate infusions through the same site (n = 6). CPR (chest compressions and mechanical ventilation) was performed in all groups. Simultaneous blood samples were taken from the central venous and intraosseous sites before arrest and after 5 and 30 mins of CPR. There were no differences (p CPR with infusions through the intraosseous cannula. At 30 mins, differences were apparent in magnesium, potassium, and sodium values between groups when the intraosseous cannula was used for infusions as well as sampling. Intraosseous potassium, glucose, and magnesium values were lower and sodium values were higher than central venous blood levels. No differences were seen at all sampling intervals if small-volume heparinized saline was given through the intraosseous site. Hemoglobin values were lower in the intraosseous group after 30 mins of CPR and infusions through the intraosseous site. After 30 mins of CPR, all hemoglobin values from the intraosseous site were CPR and infusions through the intraosseous site. Laboratory values may be erroneous when intraosseous blood is used during periods of resuscitation of >5 mins if drugs and fluid boluses have also been infused through

  12. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez G, H.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description about the development and activities executed in chemistry, in the Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, during the last years is presented. The plans and feasibility of nuclear techniques in Colombia are also described

  13. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Romeu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twentythree healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1 a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics; 2 aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics; 3 resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min; and 4 a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises; totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (-10.83 ± 2.13 vs. -2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009, 20th min (-11.26 ± 2.13 vs. -3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009 and 30th min of recovery (-10.87 ± 2.39 vs. -0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004. A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion.

  14. Response of blood pressure to maximum exercise in hypertensive patients under different therapeutic programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carreira Maria Angela Magalhães de Queiroz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the behavior of blood pressure during exercise in patients with hypertension controlled by frontline antihypertension drugs. METHODS: From 979ergometric tests we retrospectively selected 49 hipertensive patients (19 males. The age was 53±12 years old and normal range rest arterial pressure ( or = 10 mmHg/MET; or increase of diastolic pressure greater than 15 mmHg. RESULTS: Physiologic response of arterial blood pressure occurred in 50% of patients on beta blockers, the best one (p<0.05, in 36% and 31% on calcium antagonists and on diuretics, respectively, and in 20% on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, the later the leastr one (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Beta-blockers were more effective than calcium antagonists, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in controlling blood pressure during exercise, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors the least effective drugs.

  15. Comparison of a human portable blood glucose meter, veterinary portable blood glucose meter, and automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Beth M; Fry, Michael M; Flatland, Bente; Kirk, Claudia A

    2009-12-01

    To compare blood glucose concentrations measured with 2 portable blood glucose meters (PBGMs) validated for use in dogs (PBGM-D) and humans (PBGM-H) and an automated chemistry analyzer. Validation study. 92 samples of fresh whole blood and plasma from 83 dogs with various diseases. Each PBGM was used to measure whole blood glucose concentration, and the automated analyzer was used to measure plasma glucose concentration. Passing-Bablok linear regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine correlations and bias between the PBGMs and the automated analyzer. Calculated acceptability limits based on combined inherent instrument imprecision were used with Bland-Altman plots to determine agreement. Clinical relevance was assessed via error grid analysis. Although correlation between results of both PBGMs and the standard analyzer was > 0.90, disagreement was greater than could be explained by instrument imprecision alone. Mean difference between PBGM-H and chemistry-analyzer values was -15.8 mg/dL. Mean difference between PBGM-D and chemistry-analyzer values was 2.4 mg/dL. Linear regression analysis revealed proportional bias of PBGM-H (greater disagreement at higher glucose concentrations); no proportional bias was detected for PBGM-D. No constant bias was detected for either PBGM. Error grid analysis revealed all measurements from both PBGMs were within zones without an anticipated effect on clinical outcome. Neither PBGM had exact agreement with the automated analyzer; however, the disagreement detected did not have serious clinical consequences. Our findings stressed the importance of using the same device for monitoring trends in dogs and using instrument-specific reference ranges.

  16. Effects of exercise training on calf muscle oxygen extraction and blood flow in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B; Li, Zhe; Schenkel, Steven S; Chandra, Malavika; Busch, David R; Englund, Erin K; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Yodh, Arjun G; Floyd, Thomas F; Mohler, Emile R

    2017-12-01

    We employed near-infrared optical techniques, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) to test the hypothesis that supervised exercise training increases skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow and oxygen extraction in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who experience claudication. PAD patients ( n = 64) were randomly assigned to exercise and control groups. Patients in the exercise group received 3 mo of supervised exercise training. Calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction were optically monitored before, during, and after performance of a graded treadmill protocol at baseline and at 3 mo in both groups. Additionally, measurements of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and peak walking time (PWT) to maximal claudication were made during each patient visit. Supervised exercise training was found to increase the maximal calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction levels during treadmill exercise by 29% (13%, 50%) and 8% (1%, 12%), respectively [ P group population were significantly higher than corresponding changes in the control group ( P training also increased PWT by 49% (18%, 101%) ( P = 0.01). However, within statistical error, the ABI, resting calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction, and the recovery half-time for hemoglobin\\myoglobin desaturation following cessation of maximal exercise were not altered by exercise training. The concurrent monitoring of both blood flow and oxygen extraction with the hybrid DCS/FD-NIRS instrument revealed enhanced muscle oxidative metabolism during physical activity from exercise training, which could be an underlying mechanism for the observed improvement in PWT. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report on noninvasive optical measurements of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction dynamics before/during/after treadmill exercise in peripheral artery disease patients who experience claudication. The measurements tracked the effects of a 3-mo supervised

  17. Prior Exercise Lowers Blood Pressure During Simulated Night-Work With Different Meal Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullick, Sarah; Morris, Chris; Jones, Helen; Atkinson, Greg

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Shift-work and a sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for raised blood pressure (BP). Exercise can reduce BP in diurnally-active individuals, but it is unknown whether postexercise hypotension persists when people are active and eating at night. We present the first investigation into the acute effects of exercise on BP monitored during simulated night-work. METHODS Nine normotensive participants, aged 20–42 years, completed at least two crossover trials beginning at 1800 hours. Between 1900 and 2000 hours, participants either rested or exercised at 50% peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and then remained awake throughout the night, completing various tasks until 0515 hours. Six participants completed a total of four trials in which they exercised or rested, whereas either one standardized (60 kJ/kg) meal at 2200 hours or two smaller (30 kJ/kg) meals at 2200 and 0200 hours were eaten. Systolic and diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and wrist activity were recorded every 30 min. RESULTS Following exercise, MAP was significantly (P < 0.0005) lower throughout the night-shift compared with no prior exercise (95% confidence limits for reduction: 4–7 mm Hg). The postexercise reductions in systolic BP and MAP were not moderated by diet, but the reduction in diastolic BP was slightly greater when only one meal was eaten (P < 0.0005). BP was lower even though wrist activity and HR were significantly higher following exercise (P < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that prior exercise lowers BP throughout a subsequent 8-h night-shift in healthy individuals within the normotensive range. Therefore, regular low-intensity exercise might moderate the well-known association between shift-work participation and raised BP. PMID:19556971

  18. Occlusion of blood flow attenuates exercise-induced hypoalgesia in the occluded limb of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew D; Taylor, Janet L; Barry, Benjamin K

    2017-05-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated an important role of peripheral mechanisms as contributors to exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). Whether these same mechanisms contribute to EIH in humans is not known. In the current study, pain thresholds were assessed in healthy volunteers ( n = 36) before and after 5 min of high-intensity leg cycling exercise and an equivalent period of quiet rest. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the rectus femoris muscle of one leg and first dorsal interosseous muscles (FDIs) of both arms. Blood flow to one arm was occluded by a cuff throughout the 5-min period of exercise (or rest) and postexercise (or rest) assessments. Ratings of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness during occlusion were also measured. Pain ratings during occlusion increased over time (range, 1.5 to 3.5/10, all d > 0.63, P exercise conditions ( d 0.4). PPTs at all sites were unchanged following rest (range, -1.3% to +0.9%, all d 0.51). Consistent with EIH, exercise significantly increased PPT at the leg (+29%, d = 0.69, P exercise attenuates EIH, suggesting that peripheral factors contribute to EIH in healthy adults. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first demonstration in humans that a factor carried by the circulation and acting at the periphery is important for exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide new insight to pain relief with exercise as well as potential interactions between analgesic medications and exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Cardiac Autonomic and Blood Pressure Responses to an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexei; Nordvall, Michael; Walters-Edwards, Michelle; Lastova, Kevin; Francavillo, Gwendolyn; Summerfield, Liane; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos

    2017-10-07

    Kettlebell (KB) training has become an extremely popular exercise program for improving both muscle strength and aerobic fitness. However, the cardiac autonomic modulation and blood pressure (BP) responses induced by an acute KB exercise session are currently unknown. Understanding the impact of this exercise modality on the post-exercise autonomic modulation and BP would facilitate appropriate exercise prescription in susceptible populations. The present study evaluated the effects of an acute session of KB exercise on heart rate variability (HRV) and BP responses in healthy individuals. Seventeen (M=10, F=7) healthy subjects completed either a KB or non-exercise control trial in randomized order. HRV and BP measurements were collected at baseline, 3, 10 and 30 min after each trial. There were significant increases (P < 0.01) in heart rate, markers of sympathetic activity (nLF) and sympathovagal balance (nLF/nHF) for 30 min after the trial KB trial, while no changes from baseline were observed after the control trial. There were also significant decreases (P < 0.01) in markers of vagal tone (RMMSD, nHF) for 30 min as well as (P < 0.01) systolic BP and diastolic BP at 10 and 30 min after the trial KB trial while no changes from baseline were observed after the control trial. Our findings indicate that KB exercise increases sympathovagal balance for 30 min post-intervention which is concurrent with an important hypotensive effect. Further research is warranted to evaluate the potential clinical application of KB training in populations that might benefit from post-exercise hypotension, such as hypertensives.

  20. Effect of a precompetition bodybuilding diet and training regimen on body composition and blood chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, D; Wakayama, E J; Locati, L L; Landwer, G E

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to document the effect of a 10-wk precompetition bodybuilding diet and training, on blood chemistry and body composition. One adult male, steroid and drug free, preparing for a first competition. Average daily dietary intake consisted of 2263 calories (71% protein, 16% carbohydrate, 13% fats), with a protein intake of 5.0 gm.kg-1 body mass (BM). Initial body weight of 76.3 kgf (16% body fat) decreased to 63.4 kgf (4.4% body fat). Blood samples for electrolytes, TP, Alb, bilirubin, LDL-C, TG, UA, and amylase were normal. HDL-C levels increased from 65 to 89 mg.dL-1. Decreased glucose levels (< 50 mg.dL-1), indicated hypoglycemia. Increased Mg, LD, and CK levels indicated intense training. Increased inorganic phosphorus from 3.7 to 8.2 mg.dL-1 suggested lactic acidosis. Increased BUN levels from 16 to 53 mg.dL-1 and creatinine from 1.1 to 1.8 mg.dL-1 may be attributed to a high protein diet. However, heart muscle enzyme (CK-MB) was not elevated. Substantial changes in body composition and blood chemistry suggest adequate nutrition be ensured, and caution taken to avoid excessive physiologic stresses on the body during precompetition diet and training.

  1. Effects of Heat Stress on Ocular Blood Flow During Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ikemura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that heat stress reduces the ocular blood flow response to exhaustive exercise was tested by measuring ocular blood flow, blood pressure, and end- tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2 in 12 healthy males while they performed cycle ergometer exercise at 75% of the maximal heart rate at ambient temperatures of 20°C (control condition and 35°C (heat condition, until exhaustion. The blood flows in the retinal and choroidal vasculature (RCV, the superior temporal retinal arteriole (STRA and the superior nasal retinal arteriole (SNRA were recorded at rest and at 6 and 16 min after the start of exercise period and at exhaustion [after 16 ± 2 min (mean ± SE and 24 ± 3 min of exercise in the heat and control condition, respectively]. The mean arterial pressure at exhaustion was significantly lower in the heat condition than in the control condition at both 16 min and exhaustion. The degree of PETCO2 reduction did not differ significantly between the two thermal conditions at either 16 min or exhaustion. The blood flow velocity in the RCV significantly increased from the resting baseline value at 6 min in both thermal conditions (32 ± 6% and 25 ± 5% at 20°C and 35°C, respectively. However, at 16 min the increase in RCV blood flow velocity had returned to the resting baseline level only in the heat condition. At exhaustion, the blood flows in the STRA and SNRA had decreased significantly from the resting baseline value in the heat condition (STRA: -19 ± 5% and SNRA: -30 ± 6%, and SNRA blood flow was lower than that in the control condition (-14 ± 6% vs -30 ± 6% at 20°C and 35°C, respectively, despite the finding that both thermal conditions induced the same reductions in PETCO2 and vascular conductance. These findings suggested that the heat condition decreases or suppresses ocular blood flow via attenuation of pressor response during exhaustive exercise.

  2. Blood flow occlusion pressure at rest and immediately after a bout of low load exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Brian E; Dankel, Scott J; Counts, Brittany R; Nooe, Allison L; Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether arm circumference is predictive of arterial occlusion in the standing position and to determine the change in pressure before and immediately after exercise. Thirty-one participants had their arm circumference, blood pressure and standing arterial occlusion determined before exercise. Participants then completed elbow flexions at 40% of resting arterial occlusion at 30% of their one repetition maximum (1RM). The goal repetitions for the exercise included one set of 30 repetitions followed by 3 sets of 15, with 30s rest between sets. Immediately following the last set, postexercise arterial occlusion was determined. Two different models of hierarchical linear regression were used to determine the greatest predictor of standing arterial occlusion. Our final model explained 69% of the variance in arterial occlusion with arm circumference (β = 0·639, part = 0·568) explaining more than brachial systolic blood pressure (β = 0·312, part = 0·277). Standing arterial occlusion increased from pre- [138 (15) mmHg] to post- [169 (20) mmHg] exercise (Pexercise decreases the relative arterial occlusion pressure. In addition, we confirm previous data that circumference explains the most unique variance in arterial occlusion pressure in the upper body. These findings are important as they provide additional insight into making the pressure more uniform between participants throughout exercise. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Haemodynamics of aerobic and resistance blood flow restriction exercise in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Craig A; May, Anthony K; Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2015-11-01

    Light-load blood flow restriction exercise (BFRE) may provide a novel training method to limit the effects of age-related muscle atrophy in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the haemodynamic response to resistance and aerobic BFRE between young adults (YA; n = 11; 22 ± 1 years) and older adults (OA; n = 13; 69 ± 1 years). On two occasions, participants completed BFRE or control exercise (CON). One occasion was leg press (LP; 20 % 1-RM) and the other was treadmill walking (TM; 4 km h(-1)). Haemodynamic responses (HR, Q, SV and BP) were recorded during baseline and exercise. At baseline, YA and OA were different for some haemodynamic parameters (e.g. BP, SV). The relative responses to BFRE were similar between YA and OA. Blood pressures increased more with BFRE, and also for LP over TM. Q increased similarly for BFRE and CON (in both LP and TM), but with elevated HR and reduced SV (TM only). While BFR conferred slightly greater haemodynamic stress than CON, this was lower for walking than leg-press exercise. Given similar response magnitudes between YA and OA, these data support aerobic exercise being a more appropriate BFRE for prescription in older adults that may contribute to limiting the effects of age-related muscle atrophy.

  4. Repeated increases in blood flow, independent of exercise, enhance conduit artery vasodilator function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Louise H; Carter, Howard; FitzSimons, Matthew G; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2011-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the importance of repeated increases in blood flow to conduit artery adaptation, using an exercise-independent repeated episodic stimulus. Recent studies suggest that exercise training improves vasodilator function of conduit arteries via shear stress-mediated mechanisms. However, exercise is a complex stimulus that may induce shear-independent adaptations. Nine healthy men immersed their forearms in water at 42°C for three 30-min sessions/wk across 8 wk. During each session, a pneumatic pressure cuff was inflated around one forearm to unilaterally modulate heating-induced increases in shear. Forearm heating was associated with an increase in brachial artery blood flow (P<0.001) and shear rate (P<0.001) in the uncuffed forearm; this response was attenuated in the cuffed limb (P<0.005). Repeated episodic exposure to bilateral heating induced an increase in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to 5-min ischemic (P<0.05) and ischemic handgrip exercise (P<0.005) stimuli in the uncuffed forearm, whereas the 8-wk heating intervention did not influence dilation to either stimulus in the cuffed limb. Endothelium-independent glyceryl trinitrate responses were not altered in either limb. Repeated heating increases blood flow to levels that enhance endothelium-mediated vasodilator function in humans. These findings reinforce the importance of the direct impacts of shear stress on the vascular endothelium in humans.

  5. Oral antioxidants improve leg blood flow during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Matthew J; Trinity, Joel D; Garten, Ryan S; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; Bledsoe, Amber D; Morgan, David E; Runnels, Sean; Reese, Van R; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-09-01

    The consequence of elevated oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle blood flow as well as the transport and utilization of O2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well understood. The present study examined the impact of an oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC) on leg blood flow (LBF) and O2 consumption during dynamic exercise in 16 patients with COPD and 16 healthy subjects. Subjects performed submaximal (3, 6, and 9 W) single-leg knee extensor exercise while LBF (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure, leg vascular conductance, arterial O2 saturation, leg arterial-venous O2 difference, and leg O2 consumption (direct Fick) were evaluated under control conditions and after AOC administration. AOC administration increased LBF (3 W: 1,604 ± 100 vs. 1,798 ± 128 ml/min, 6 W: 1,832 ± 109 vs. 1,992 ± 120 ml/min, and 9W: 2,035 ± 114 vs. 2,187 ± 136 ml/min, P leg vascular conductance, and leg O2 consumption (3 W: 173 ± 12 vs. 210 ± 15 ml O2/min, 6 W: 217 ± 14 vs. 237 ± 15 ml O2/min, and 9 W: 244 ± 16 vs 260 ± 18 ml O2/min, P < 0.05, control vs. AOC, respectively) during exercise in COPD, whereas no effect was observed in healthy subjects. In addition, the AOC afforded a small, but significant, improvement in arterial O2 saturation only in patients with COPD. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel beneficial role of AOC administration on exercising LBF, O2 consumption, and arterial O2 saturation in patients with COPD, implicating oxidative stress as a potential therapeutic target for impaired exercise capacity in this population. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The Impact of the Progressive Efficiency Test on a Rowing Ergometer on White Blood Cells Distribution and Clinical Chemistry Changes in Paralympic Rowers During the Preparatory Stage Before the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Robert; Buryta, Rafał; Krupecki, Krzysztof; Zając, Tomasz; Zawartka, Marek; Proia, Patrizia; Kostrzewa-Nowak, Dorota

    2017-12-01

    There is a large gap in knowledge regarding research on post-exercise blood changes in disabled athletes. There are relatively few data on adaptive mechanisms to exercise in disabled athletes, including disabled rowers. Two rowers from a Polish adaptive rowing settle TAMix2x that qualified for the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 took part in this study. They performed a progressive test on a rowing ergometer until exhaustion. The cardiorespiratory fitness measures, complete blood count, white blood cells' distribution and 30 clinical chemistry variables describing laboratory diagnostic profiles and general health were determined. The extreme effort induced changes in all studied metabolites (glucose, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total and direct bilirubin), albumin, total protein levels in both participants. Furthermore, a post-exercise increase in aspartate transaminase activity, yet a 2-fold decrease during the recovery time in both rowers were found. White blood cell count increased 2-fold after the test. The percentages of natural killer cells were higher and total T lymphocytes were lower after the exercise protocol. There were higher percentages of suppressor/cytotoxic and lower percentages of helper/inducer T lymphocyte subsets in both studied rowers. No changes in B lymphocytes distribution were observed. Lack of inflammatory symptoms during the experiment suggests a high level of rowers' biological adaptation to the physical effort. The different changes in physiological, biochemical and immunological variables are related to the adaptive mechanism to physical exercise allowing for improvement of performance.

  7. The Impact of the Progressive Efficiency Test on a Rowing Ergometer on White Blood Cells Distribution and Clinical Chemistry Changes in Paralympic Rowers During the Preparatory Stage Before the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 – A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Robert; Buryta, Rafał; Krupecki, Krzysztof; Zając, Tomasz; Zawartka, Marek; Proia, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is a large gap in knowledge regarding research on post-exercise blood changes in disabled athletes. There are relatively few data on adaptive mechanisms to exercise in disabled athletes, including disabled rowers. Two rowers from a Polish adaptive rowing settle TAMix2x that qualified for the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 took part in this study. They performed a progressive test on a rowing ergometer until exhaustion. The cardiorespiratory fitness measures, complete blood count, white blood cells’ distribution and 30 clinical chemistry variables describing laboratory diagnostic profiles and general health were determined. The extreme effort induced changes in all studied metabolites (glucose, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total and direct bilirubin), albumin, total protein levels in both participants. Furthermore, a post-exercise increase in aspartate transaminase activity, yet a 2-fold decrease during the recovery time in both rowers were found. White blood cell count increased 2-fold after the test. The percentages of natural killer cells were higher and total T lymphocytes were lower after the exercise protocol. There were higher percentages of suppressor/cytotoxic and lower percentages of helper/inducer T lymphocyte subsets in both studied rowers. No changes in B lymphocytes distribution were observed. Lack of inflammatory symptoms during the experiment suggests a high level of rowers’ biological adaptation to the physical effort. The different changes in physiological, biochemical and immunological variables are related to the adaptive mechanism to physical exercise allowing for improvement of performance. PMID:29340006

  8. The Impact of the Progressive Efficiency Test on a Rowing Ergometer on White Blood Cells Distribution and Clinical Chemistry Changes in Paralympic Rowers During the Preparatory Stage Before the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Robert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a large gap in knowledge regarding research on post-exercise blood changes in disabled athletes. There are relatively few data on adaptive mechanisms to exercise in disabled athletes, including disabled rowers. Two rowers from a Polish adaptive rowing settle TAMix2x that qualified for the Paralympic Games in Rio, 2016 took part in this study. They performed a progressive test on a rowing ergometer until exhaustion. The cardiorespiratory fitness measures, complete blood count, white blood cells’ distribution and 30 clinical chemistry variables describing laboratory diagnostic profiles and general health were determined. The extreme effort induced changes in all studied metabolites (glucose, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total and direct bilirubin, albumin, total protein levels in both participants. Furthermore, a post-exercise increase in aspartate transaminase activity, yet a 2-fold decrease during the recovery time in both rowers were found. White blood cell count increased 2-fold after the test. The percentages of natural killer cells were higher and total T lymphocytes were lower after the exercise protocol. There were higher percentages of suppressor/cytotoxic and lower percentages of helper/inducer T lymphocyte subsets in both studied rowers. No changes in B lymphocytes distribution were observed. Lack of inflammatory symptoms during the experiment suggests a high level of rowers’ biological adaptation to the physical effort. The different changes in physiological, biochemical and immunological variables are related to the adaptive mechanism to physical exercise allowing for improvement of performance.

  9. Exercise-induced albuminuria and circadian blood pressure abnormalities in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankeu, Aurel T; Kaze, François Folefack; Noubiap, Jean Jacques; Chelo, David; Dehayem, Mesmin Yefou; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between circadian variations in blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria at rest, and during exercise in non-hypertensive type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in well controlled T2D patients, non-hypertensive, without clinical proteinuria and normal creatinine clearance. In each participant, we recorded the BP using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for 24-h, and albuminuria at rest and after a standardized treadmill exercise. RESULTS We enrolled 27 type 2 patients with a median age of 52; and a mean duration of diabetes and HbA1c of 3.6 ± 0.8 years and 6.3% ± 0.5% respectively. Using a 24-h ABPM, we recorded a mean diurnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 128 ± 17 mmHg vs nocturnal of 123 ± 19 mmHg (P = 0.004), and mean diurnal diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 83 ± 11 mmHg vs nocturnal 78 ± 14 mmHg (P = 0.002). There was a significant difference between albuminuria at rest [median = 23 mg, interquartile range (IQR) = 10-51] and after exercise (median = 35 mg, IQR = 23-80, P albuminuria had an increase in nocturnal BP values on all three components (128 mmHg vs 110 mmHg, P = 0.03 for SBP; 83 mmHg vs 66 mmHg, P = 0.04; 106 vs 83, P = 0.02 for mean arterial pressure), as well as albuminuric patients at rest. Moreover, exercise induced albuminuria detect a less increase in nocturnal DBP (83 vs 86, P = 0.03) than resting albuminuria. CONCLUSION Exercise induced albuminuria is associated with an increase in nocturnal BP values in T2D patients. PMID:28729969

  10. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    . To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...

  11. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats

  12. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendonça Mota

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8; sedentary diabetic (n = 8; and trained diabetic (n = 8. Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2% and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3% without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05 in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  13. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão [Departamento de Educação Física - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  14. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  15. The role of obesity, salt and exercise on blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papakatsika, Sofia; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2011-06-01

    The increasing trends of blood pressure (BP) in children and adolescents pose great concern for the burden of hypertension-related cardiovascular disease. Although primary hypertension in childhood is commonly associated with obesity, it seems that other factors, such as dietary sodium and exercise, also influence BP levels in children and adolescents. Several studies support that sympathetic nervous system imbalance, impairment of the physiological mechanism of pressure natriuresis, hyperinsulinemia and early vascular changes are involved in the mechanisms causing elevated BP in obese children and adolescents. Under the current evidence on the association of salt intake and BP, dietary sodium restriction appears to be a rational step in the prevention of hypertension in genetically predisposed children and adolescents. Finally, interventional studies show that regular aerobic exercise can significantly reduce BP and restore vascular changes in obese with hypertensive pediatric patients. This article aims to summarize previous studies on the role of obesity, salt intake and exercise on BP in children and adolescents.

  16. Sustained strenuous exercise in sled dogs depresses three blood copper enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSilvestro, R A; Hinchcliff, K W; Blostein-Fujii, A

    2005-01-01

    Studies show mixed conclusions about acute responses of copper status to strenuous exercise. Because copper function involves metalloenzyme activities, which might take days to change, the present study examined the response of three copper metalloenzyme activities to sustained strenuous exercise in sled dogs. A race lasting 12-15 d depressed activities for both plasma ceruloplasmin and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase in dogs consuming commercial dog foods and meats. A shorter, 3-d training run for dogs fed a commercial balanced diet also depressed ceruloplasmin activities but not superoxide dismutase activities. Dogs fed the same diet but that did not run showed no changes in either parameter. Activities of a third copper enzyme, plasma diamine oxidase, also decreased after a 3-d training run. In summary, blood activities of three copper enzymes were depressed by sustained strenuous exercise in sled dogs.

  17. Cerebral blood flow during submaximal and maximal dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, S N; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans was measured at rest and during dynamic exercise on a cycle ergometer corresponding to 56% (range 27-85) of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Exercise bouts were performed by 16 male and female subjects, lasted 15 min each, and were carried out in a semisupine position...... not differ significantly between work loads from 32 (24-33) to 86% (74-96) of VO2max (n = 10). During exercise, mean arterial pressure increased from 84 (60-100) to 101 (78-124) Torr (P less than 0.01) and PCO2 remained unchanged [5.1 (4.6-5.6) vs. 5.4 (4.4-6.3) kPa, n = 6]. These results demonstrate...

  18. Attenuation of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and blood cortisol level with forced exercise in comparison with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Bangash, Mohammad Yasan; Motaghinejad, Ozra

    2015-01-01

    Relieving withdrawal and post-abstinence syndrome of alcoholism is one of the major strategies in the treatment of alcohol addicted patients. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and topiramate are the approved medications that were used for this object. To assess the role of non-pharmacologic therapy in the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, we analyzed effects of forced exercise by treadmill on alcohol dependent mice as an animal model. A total of 60 adult male mice were divided into 5 groups, from which 4 groups became dependent to alcohol (2 g/kg/day) for 15 days. From day 16, treatment groups were treated by diazepam (0.5mg/kg), forced exercise, and diazepam (0.5 mg/kg) concurrent with forced exercise for two weeks; And the positive control group received same dose of alcohol (2 g/kg/day) for two weeks. The negative control group received normal saline for four weeks. Finally, on day 31, all animals were observed for withdrawal signs, and Alcohol Total Withdrawal Score (ATWS) was determined. Blood cortisol levels were measured in non-fasting situations as well. Present findings showed that ATWS significantly decrease in all treatment groups in comparison with positive control group (Pdiazepam and treated by forced exercise and Pdiazepam + forced exercise). Moreover, blood cortisol level significantly decreased in all treatment groups (P<0.001). This study suggested that forced exercise and physical activity can be useful as adjunct therapy in alcoholism and can ameliorate side effects and stress situation of withdrawal syndrome periods.

  19. The impact of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams OP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O Peter AdamsFaculty of Medical Sciences, the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, St Michael, BarbadosBackground: Moderate-intensity exercise improves blood glucose (BG, but most people fail to achieve the required exercise volume. High-intensity exercise (HIE protocols vary. Maximal cycle ergometer sprint interval training typically requires only 2.5 minutes of HIE and a total training time commitment (including rest and warm up of 25 minutes per session. The effect of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels of people with and without diabetes is reviewed.Methods: HIE (≥80% maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max studies with ≤15 minutes HIE per session were reviewed.Results: Six studies of nondiabetics (51 males, 14 females requiring 7.5 to 20 minutes/week of HIE are reviewed. Two weeks of sprint interval training increased insulin sensitivity up to 3 days postintervention. Twelve weeks near maximal interval running (total exercise time 40 minutes/week improved BG to a similar extent as running at 65% VO2max for 150 minutes/week. Eight studies of diabetics (41 type 1 and 22 type 2 subjects were reviewed. Six were of a single exercise session with 44 seconds to 13 minutes of HIE, and the others were 2 and 7 weeks duration with 20 and 2 minutes/week HIE, respectively. With type 1 and 2 diabetes, BG was generally higher during and up to 2 hours after HIE compared to controls. With type 1 diabetics, BG decreased from midnight to 6 AM following HIE the previous morning. With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for 24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at 48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%.Conclusion: Very brief HIE improves BG 1 to 3 days postexercise in both diabetics and nondiabetics. HIE is unlikely to cause hypoglycemia during and immediately after exercise. Larger and longer randomized studies are needed to determine the safety, acceptability, long

  20. Contribution of respiratory muscle blood flow to exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow. Seven trained cyclists completed three constant load 5 min...... exercise tests at inspired O(2) fractions (FIO2) of 0.13, 0.21 and 1.00 in balanced order. Work rates were selected to produce the same tidal volume, breathing frequency and respiratory muscle load at each FIO2 (63 +/- 1, 78 +/- 1 and 87 +/- 1% of normoxic maximal work rate, respectively). Intercostals...... and quadriceps muscle blood flow (IMBF and QMBF, respectively) were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy over the left 7th intercostal space and the left vastus lateralis muscle, respectively, using indocyanine green dye. The mean pressure time product of the diaphragm and the work of breathing did not differ...

  1. Substitution of Fingertip Blood for Venous Blood in the Measurement of Hematocrit and Hemoglobin Following Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Thomas D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results from comparative testing indicate that fingertip blood is a valid indicator of antecubital venous hematocrit (hct) and hemoglobin (hgb), and that hct ratios determined on the Coulter counter are comparable to those found by the microhematocrit method. (MB)

  2. Muscle blood flow and muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bodil; Savard, G; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    environment a steady state was reached at 30 min. When the subjects were shifted to the hot room, the core temperature and heart rate started to rise and reached values greater than 39 degrees C and near-maximal values, respectively, at the termination of the exercise. The leg blood flow (thermodilution......The effect of heat stress on blood flow and metabolism in an exercising leg was studied in seven subjects walking uphill (12-17%) at 5 km/h on a treadmill for 90 min or until exhaustion. The first 30 min of exercise were performed in a cool environment (18-21 degrees C); then subjects moved...... to an adjacent room at 40 degrees C and continued to exercise at the same speed and inclination for a further 60 min or to exhaustion, whichever occurred first. The rate of O2 consumption, 2.6 l/min (1.8-3.3) (average from cool and hot conditions), corresponded to 55-77% of their individual maximums. In the cool...

  3. The significance of abnormal systolic blood pressure response during supine ergometer exercise and postexercise in ischemic heart disease, studied by exercise radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Masuoka, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Abnormal response to blood pressure (BP) during exercise and postexercise was examined in 169 patients with ischemic heart disease. The patients underwent supine ergometer exercise gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography and coronary arteriography. When BP during exercise did not increase by at least 11 mmHg or initially increased but later decreased by more than 10 mmHg, the BP response was defined as abnormal during exercise. A postexercise BP increase of more than 10 mmHg above the peak exercise BP was defined as abnormal during postexercise. Fifteen-one patients (30%) were classified as abnormal (group 1) and the other 118 as normal (group 2). Abnormal BP response fell into three types: (1a) exercise hypotension (n=11), (1b) postexercise hypertension (n=30), and (1c) exercise hypotension with postexercise hypertension (n=10). Both average exercise duration and peak heart rate were significantly lower in groups 1a, 1b, and 1c than group 2. Exercise ST-segment depression was more noticeable in groups 1b and 1c than group 2. However, there was no significant difference in the severitiy of exercise ST-segment depression between groups 1a and 2. A decline in ejection fraction occurred more frequently in groups 1b and 1c than group 2. Patients in groups 1a, 1b, and 1c had more extensive coronary artery disease than did patients in group 2. Medically managed patients having an abnormal BP response had a poorer prognosis than those with a normal BP response. An abnormal BP response during both supine exercise and postexercise was infrequent. The abnormal BP during exercise may be usually associated with impaired exercise tolerance and severe coronary artery disease; and that during postexercise may be closely associated with myocardial ischemia and global left ventricular dysfunction. Postexercise hypertension may be of the same value as exercise hypotension in predicting poor prognosis. (Namekawa, K)

  4. Effects of High-Intensity Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Gabriel R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Strength training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR have been used to improve the levels of muscle adaptation. The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effect of high intensity squats with and without blood flow restriction on muscular fatigue levels. Twelve athletes (aged 25.95 ± 0.84 years were randomized into two groups: without Blood Flow Restriction (NFR, n = 6 and With Blood Flow Restriction (WFR, n = 6 that performed a series of free weight squats with 80% 1-RM until concentric failure. The strength of the quadriceps extensors was assessed in a maximum voluntary isometric contraction integrated to signals from the surface electromyogram. The average frequency showed significant reductions in the WFR group for the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles, and intergroup only for the vastus medialis. In conclusion, a set of squats at high intensity with BFR could compromise muscle strength immediately after exercise, however, differences were not significant between groups.

  5. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Punia, Sonu; Kulandaivelan, Sivachidambaram; Singh, Varun; Punia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian su...

  6. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Joamira P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and the heart rate (HR before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR. In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to identify significant variables (2 x 5; group x time. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity.

  7. Influence of physical exercise on interleukin-17, cortisol and melatonin levels in serum, whole blood and mitogen activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei M.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assay the effect of two months exercise and two months silent on the levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17, melatonin and cortisol in serum, whole blood (WB and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs cultures. Thirteen male non-athletic health volunteers participated in a two months moderate exercise program (running %50-%65 VO2 max. The blood samples were collected in three stages, 24 hours before to start exercise, 48 hours and two months after the last session of the training. WB and PBMCs were cultured with mitogens phytohemagglutinin and lipopolysaccharides for 48 hours. The serum and supernatants of WB and PBMCs were analyzed for IL-17, melatonin and cortisol by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Red blood cells (RBC variables were also measured. IL-17 secretion by PBMCs in the post-exercise stage (51.14±5.43 pg/ml compared with pre-exercise (36.74±6.98 pg/ml was increased. But, the amount of melatonin produced by PBMCs in the post- exercise (7.94±0.35 pg/ml, and 2-month silent (6.05±0.27 pg/ml stages compared with pre-exercise (9.16±0.19 pg/ml were decreased. Regardless of the effect of the exercise, PBMcs had more ability to produce IL-17 than WB. As well as, level of cortisol in WB was higher than in serum and PBMCs culture. Mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration RBCs were also increased in post- exercise stage. The other measured parameters were not changed during exercise and recovery. Moderate exercise caused to higher in vitro production of IL-17 and lower production of melatonin by PBMCs.

  8. Determinants of abnormal blood pressure response to exercise in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakki, A.H.; Munley, B.M.; Hadjimiltiades, S.; Meissner, M.D.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study assessed the determinants of exercise-induced abnormal systolic blood pressure (BP) response in 127 patients with documented coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy. Three types of systolic BP response to exercise were identified: an increase by more than 20 mm Hg (group I, n = 74); an increase by 20 mm Hg or less (group II, n = 36); and a decrease of at least 10 mm Hg (group III, n = 17). The 3 groups were not significantly different in age, gender or medications. The number of segments with perfusion defects was significantly higher in groups II and III than group I (group III, 2.9 +/- 1.5; group II, 2.9 +/- 2.1; and group I, 1.8 +/- 1.4, p = 0.009). Prior myocardial infarction, abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction, and multivessel CAD were more common in group III than in groups I and II. Stepwise discriminant analysis of 15 relevant clinical, angiographic and exercise scintigraphic descriptors showed that the number of thallium perfusion defects, abnormal LV ejection fraction at rest and multivessel CAD to be important predictors of hypotensive BP response. Multivariate analysis, however, showed that the number of thallium perfusion defects was the only important predictor of the hypotensive response. Thus, it is the functional significance of CAD assessed by the extent of thallium perfusion abnormalities rather than the extent of CAD or left ventricular dysfunction at rest that determines the systolic BP response to exercise

  9. Responses of blood pressure and lactate levels to various aquatic exercise movements in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, K-Y; Chen, W-C; Kan, N-W; Hsu, M-C; Lee, S-L

    2015-12-01

    Middle-aged and elderly women represent the main attending group in head-out aquatic exercise (HOAE). Blood pressure (BP) significantly increases both during water immersion and aquatic walking. Based on risk concerns, it is important to evaluate BP responses in postmenopausal women doing HOAE. The aim of this study was to determine BP, lactate levels, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) changes associated with performing 3 different movements at 3 levels of exercise intensity in water. Twelve postmenopausal women (59.9±0.6 years old) participated in 3 aquatic trials involving running (RU), rocking (RO), and scissor kicks (SK) on separate days. Systolic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), lactate levels, RPE, and motion cadence were measured at rest; upon reaching 50%, 65%, and 80% of heart rate reserve for 6 minutes; and 10 and 30 minutes after exercise. Under similar RPE responses at 3 levels of intensity, SK resulted in higher systolic BP, MAP, and lactate levels than RO at 10 minutes after exercise (Pexercise (Pexercise intensity (Pexercise. These findings suggest that RO movement in aquatic exercises is more suitable for people at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  10. Regular aerobic exercise and blood pressure in East Asians: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yutaka; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Maeda, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of regular aerobic exercise on blood pressure in East Asians. The inclusion criteria of the randomized controlled trials were healthy East Asian adults, exercise group performing regular aerobic exercise and control group not exercising, and a description of the mean systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure at rest. This study included 31 study groups and 1994 subjects. Pooled changes in blood pressure showed significant reductions (systolic blood pressure: -4.7 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure: -3.2 mmHg). In subgroup analyses, the change in systolic blood pressure for randomized controlled trials meeting the America Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for physical activity to maintain health was significantly larger than in randomized controlled trials not meeting the guidelines. In addition, meta-regression indicated that the change in systolic blood pressure was significantly related to "exercise time × exercise frequency." The ideal volume of exercise is that for a long time at a high frequency, such as the volume recommended in the America Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines: moderate intensity and >150 min per week. List of abbreviations: BP: blood pressure; BMI: body mass index; SBP: systolic blood pressure; DBP: diastolic blood pressure; RCT: randomized controlled trial; AHA: America Heart Association; ACSM: America College of Sports Medicine; SD: standard deviation; HDL-C: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-C: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; TC: total cholesterol; TG: triglycerides; PEDro: Physiotherapy Evidence Database; CI: confidence intervals; %HR max : percentage of maximal heart rate.

  11. Radionuclide-determined change in pulmonary blood volume with exercise. Improved sensitivity of multigated blood-pool scanning in detecting coronary-artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Pohost, G.M.; Kirshenbaum, H.D.; Kushner, F.G.; Boucher, C.A.; Block, P.C.; Strauss, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    To assess the clinical usefulness of radionuclide-determined changes in pulmonary blood volume in patients with or without substantial coronary-artery disease, we determined the ratio of pulmonary blood volume at rest as compared with that during exercise. We used multigated blood-pool images obtained at rest and during supine exercise to determine the blood-volume ratio in patients subsequently undergoing coronary arteriography for evaluation of chest pain. Exercise tests were performed by use of a submaximal-workload protocol, although all tests were limited according to each patient's symptoms. The mean exercise/rest pulmonary-blood-volume ratios were lower for persons without coronary-artery disease (0.94 +- 0.06 [S.D.], 10 patients) and for those with disease confined to the right coronary artery (0.99 +- 0.12, five patients), as compared with all others with coronary-artery disease (1.14 +- 0.15, 37 patients) (P < 0.01). A pulmonary-blood-volume ratio equal to or greater than 1.06 had a sensitivity of 79%. Patients with coronary-artery disease not confined to the right coronary artery usually show an increase in pulmonary blood volume during supine exercise. No such change occurs in persons without coronary-artery disease

  12. Conformational Analysis of Drug Molecules: A Practical Exercise in the Medicinal Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuriev, Elizabeth; Chalmers, David; Capuano, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is a specialized, scientific discipline. Computational chemistry and structure-based drug design constitute important themes in the education of medicinal chemists. This problem-based task is associated with structure-based drug design lectures. It requires students to use computational techniques to investigate conformational…

  13. Intuitive Judgments Govern Students' Answering Patterns in Multiple-Choice Exercises in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graulich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Research in chemistry education has revealed that students going through their undergraduate and graduate studies in organic chemistry have a fragmented conceptual knowledge of the subject. Rote memorization, rule-based reasoning, and heuristic strategies seem to strongly influence students' performances. There appears to be a gap between what we…

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Calixarene Tetraethers: An Exercise in Supramolecular Chemistry for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbert, Stefan L.; Hoh, Bradley D.; Dulak, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment for an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry lab, students tetraalkylate tertbutylcalix[4]arene, a bowl-shaped macrocyclic oligophenol, and examine the supramolecular chemistry of the tetraether product by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Complexation with a sodium ion reduces the conformational…

  15. The relationship between blood potassium, blood lactate, and electromyography signals related to fatigue in a progressive cycling exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S; McMurray, Robert G; Blackburn, B Troy; McGrath, Melanie; Leppert, Kyle

    2011-02-01

    Local muscle fatigue may be related to potassium efflux from the muscle cell and/or lactate accumulation within the muscle. Local fatigue causes a decrease in median frequency (MPF) of the electromyogram's power spectrum during isometric contractions but its relationship to changes in potassium and lactate during dynamic exercise is equivocal. Thus, this investigation evaluated relationships between changes in the MPF from the vastus lateralis and blood levels of lactate and potassium during an incremental cycling test and recovery. Trained cyclists (n=8) completed a discontinuous, graded cycle test to exhaustion under normal and glycogen-reduced conditions. The glycogen reduced condition promoted an environment of lower lactate production while permitting a consistent potassium response. Blood samples and maximal isometric EMG data were collected at the end of each stage and during recovery. Maximal lactate levels were ∼ 60% lower in the glycogen reduced condition; potassium was similar between trials. MPF did not change significantly at volitional fatigue. Further, MPF was not significantly related to lactate (p>0.27) or potassium (p>0.16) in either condition. Though both lactate and potassium have been implicated as factors relating to local muscle fatigue, neither is significantly related to changes in MPF during or after progressive exercise on a cycle ergometer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Atypical blood glucose response to continuous and interval exercise in a person with type 1 diabetes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Othmar; Tschakert, Gerhard; Mueller, Alexander; Groeschl, Werner; Pieber, Thomas R; Koehler, Gerd; Eckstein, Max L; Bracken, Richard M; Hofmann, Peter

    2017-06-30

    Therapy must be adapted for people with type 1 diabetes to avoid exercise-induced hypoglycemia caused by increased exercise-related glucose uptake into muscles. Therefore, to avoid hypoglycemia, the preexercise short-acting insulin dose must be reduced for safety reasons. We report a case of a man with long-lasting type 1 diabetes in whom no blood glucose decrease during different types of exercise with varying exercise intensities and modes was found, despite physiological hormone responses. A Caucasian man diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for 24 years performed three different continuous high-intensity interval cycle ergometer exercises as part of a clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02075567). Intensities for both modes of exercises were set at 5% below and 5% above the first lactate turn point and 5% below the second lactate turn point. Short-acting insulin doses were reduced by 25%, 50%, and 75%, respectively. Measurements taken included blood glucose, blood lactate, gas exchange, heart rate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Unexpectedly, no significant blood glucose decreases were observed during all exercise sessions (start versus end, 12.97 ± 2.12 versus 12.61 ± 2.66 mmol L -1 , p = 0.259). All hormones showed the expected response, dependent on the different intensities and modes of exercises. People with type 1 diabetes typically experience a decrease in blood glucose levels, particularly during low- and moderate-intensity exercises. In our patient, we clearly found no decline in blood glucose, despite a normal hormone response and no history of any insulin insensitivity. This report indicates that there might be patients for whom the recommended preexercise therapy adaptation to avoid exercise-induced hypoglycemia needs to be questioned because this could increase the risk of severe hyperglycemia and ketosis.

  17. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  18. The measurement of peripheral blood volume reactions to tilt test by the electrical impedance technique after exercise in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, A A; Popov, S G; Vikulov, A D; Nikolaev, D V

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the distribution of peripheral blood volumes in different regions of the body in response to the tilt-test in endurance trained athletes after aerobic exercise. Distribution of peripheral blood volumes (ml/beat) simultaneously in six regions of the body (two legs, two hands, abdomen, neck and ECG) was assessed in response to the tilt-test using the impedance method (the impedance change rate (dZ/dT). Before and after exercise session cardiac stroke (CSV) and blood volumes in legs, arms and neck were higher in athletes both in lying and standing positions. Before exercise the increase of heart rate and the decrease of a neck blood volume in response to tilting was lower (p <0.05) but the decrease of leg blood volumes was higher (p<0.001) in athletes. The reactions in arms and abdomen blood volumes were similar. Also, the neck blood volumes as percentage of CSV (%/CSV) did not change in the control but increased in athletes (p <0.05) in response to the tilt test. After (10 min recovery) the aerobic bicycle exercise (mean HR = 156±8 beat/min, duration 30 min) blood volumes in neck and arms in response to the tilting were reduced equally, but abdomen (p<0.05) and leg blood volumes (p <0.001) were lowered more significantly in athletes. The neck blood flow (%/CSV) did not change in athletes but decreased in control (p<0.01), which was offset by higher tachycardia in response to tilt-test in controls after exercise. The data demonstrate greater orthostatic tolerance in athletes both before and after exercise during fatigue which is due to effective distribution of blood flows aimed at maintaining cerebral blood flow.

  19. The effects of squat exercises in postures for toilet use on blood flow velocity of the leg vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jun Ho; Chung, Sin Ho; Shim, Jae Hun

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of squat exercises performed in toilet-using postures on the blood flow velocity of the lower extremities for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis. [Subjects] The subjects were 28 students who were attending B University in Cheonan. They were divided into a group of 14 subjects of sitting toilet users and a group of 14 subjects of squat toilet users. [Methods] The subjects performed squat exercises in different toilet-using postures and we investigated the changes in blood flow velocity. [Results] The variations in blood flow velocities before and after the exercises showed significant differences in both groups but the differences between the two groups were not significant. [Conclusion] Based on the results of this study, we consider squat exercises are effective at improving the variation in lower-extremity blood flow velocity when using a toilet.

  20. Exposure to white spirit. I. Concentration in alveolar air and blood during rest and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrand, I; Kilbom, A; Ovrum, P

    1975-03-01

    Fifteen healthy male subjects were exposed to 1,250 and 2,500 mg/m3 of white spirit in inspiratory air during rest and excercise on a bicycle ergometer. The white spirit contained approximately 83% aliphatic and 17% aromatic components. The duration of each exposure period was 30 minutes. The pulmonary ventilation, the cardiac output, and the concentration of white spirit (subdivided into aromatic and aliphatic components) in alveolar air, arterial blood, and venous blood were determined during and after exposure. The concentration of aliphatic and aromatic components in alveolar air tended to level off towards the close of each period. The resting level of the aromatic components increased approximately 2.0 times, and that of aliphatic components about 2.5 times, during exercise with increased intensities. The concentration of aliphatic components in arterial and venous blood increased at the start of each exposure period but tended to level off towards the close of the period. The resting value increased fourfold in work at the highest intensity. However, the concentration of aromatic components rose sharply during each period. The arterial blood concentration was about 15 times higher at the end of exposure during the heaviest exercise intensity than at rest. Pulmonary ventilation appeared to be more important to uptake in arterial blood than to circulation. The results are believed to be due to the differing solubilities of aliphatic and aromatic components in blood. Measurement of the concentration of white spirit in venous or arterial capillary blood is suggested as a biological check on exposure.

  1. Exercise lowers blood pressure in university professors during subsequent teaching and sleeping hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fabiana Ribeiro1, Carmen S Grubert Campbell1, Gisele Mendes1, Gisela Arsa1,3, Sérgio R Moreira2, Francisco M da Silva1, Jonato Prestes1, Rafael da Costa Sotero1, Herbert Gustavo Simões1 1Graduate Program on Physical Education and Health, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia; 2Federal University of Vale do São Francisco, Petrolina, 3Graduate Program on Physical Education, Nine of July University, São Paulo SP, Brazil Background: University professors are subjected to psychological stress that contributes to blood pressure (BP reactivity and development of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on BP in university professors during teaching and sleeping hours. Methods: Twelve normotensive professors (42.2 ± 10.8 years, 74.2 ± 11.2 kg, 172.8 ± 10.4 cm, 20.1% ± 6.7% body fat randomly underwent control (CONT and exercise (EX30 sessions before initiating their daily activities. EX30 consisted of 30 minutes of cycling at 80%–85% of heart rate reserve. Ambulatory BP was monitored for 24 hours following both sessions. Results: BP increased in comparison with pre-session resting values during teaching after CONT (P < 0.05 but not after EX30. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial BP showed a more pronounced nocturnal dip following EX30 (approximately -14.7, -12.7, and -9.6 mmHg, respectively when compared with CONT (approximately -6, -5 and -3 mmHg. Conclusion: Exercise induced a BP reduction in university professors, with the main effects being observed during subsequent teaching and sleeping hours. Keywords: post-exercise blood pressure, aerobic exercise, activities of daily living

  2. Differences in Blood Urea and Creatinine Concentrations in Earthed and Unearthed Subjects during Cycling Exercise and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sokal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact of humans with the earth, either directly (e.g., with bare feet or using a metal conductor, changes their biochemical parameters. The effects of earthing during physical exercise are unknown. This study was carried out to evaluate selected biochemical parameters in subjects who were earthed during cycling. In a double-blind, crossover study, 42 participants were divided into two groups and earthed during exercise and recovery. One group was earthed in the first week during 30 minutes of cycling exercise and during recovery, and a second group was earthed in the second week. A double-blind technique was applied. Blood samples were obtained before each training session, after 15 and 30 minutes of exercise, and after 40 minutes of recovery. Significantly lower blood urea levels were observed in subjects earthed during exercise and relaxation. These significant differences were noted in both groups earthed at the beginning of exercise (P<0.0001, after 15 (P<0.0001 and 30 minutes (P<0.0001 of exercise, and after 40 minutes of relaxation (P<0.0001. Creatinine concentrations in earthed subjects during exercise were unchanged. Conclusions. Earthing during exercise lowers blood urea concentrations and may inhibit hepatic protein catabolism or increase renal urea excretion. Exertion under earthing may result in a positive protein balance.

  3. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, E; Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Larsen, R G; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2018-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise, but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result in accumulated algesic substances being a part of the sensitization in DOMS. Twelve healthy subjects (five women) performed dorsiflexion exercise (five sets of 10 repeated eccentric contractions) in one leg, while the contralateral leg was the control. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the tibialis anterior muscle was recorded. Blood flow was assessed by ultrasound Doppler on the anterior tibialis artery (ATA) and within the anterior tibialis muscle tissue before and immediately after 1-second MVC, 5-seconds MVC, and 5-minutes thigh cuff occlusion. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on the tibialis anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day 0 (pre-exercise), day 2, and day 6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day 1 and day 2 compared with day 0 (Pcontraction/occlusion blood flow (~16%, Peccentric contractions decreased vessel diameter, impaired the blood flow response, and promoted hyperalgesia. Thus, the results suggest that the blood flow reduction may be involved in the increased pain response after eccentric exercise. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on exercise blood pressure, heart rate, and capacity in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix; Linz, Dominik; Pöss, Janine; Cremers, Bodo; Kindermann, Ingrid; Laufs, Ulrich; Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Renal denervation reduces office blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation on blood pressure, heart rate, and chronotropic index at rest, during exercise, and at recovery in 60 patients (renal denervation group=50, control group=10) with resistant hypertension using a standardized bicycle exercise test protocol performed 6 and 12 months after renal denervation. After renal denervation, exercise blood pressure at rest was reduced from 158±3/90±2 to 141±3/84±4 mm Hg (Pblood pressure/P=0.007 for diastolic blood pressure) after 6 months and 139±3/83±4 mm Hg (Pblood pressure tended to be lower at all stages of exercise at 6- and 12-month follow-up in patients undergoing renal denervation, although reaching statistical significance only at mild-to-moderate exercise levels (75-100 W). At recovery after 1 minute, blood pressure decreased from 201±4/95±2 to 177±4/88±2 (Pblood pressure and heart rate during exercise, improved mean workload, and increased exercise time without impairing chronotropic competence.

  5. Effects of resistance exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Jessica R; Mazzochi, John W; Smith, Caroline J; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

    2015-05-01

    Short sleep duration and poor quality of sleep have been associated with health risks including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Prior research has suggested that regular aerobic exercise improves the quality of sleep; however, less is known regarding resistance exercise (RE) and how RE may affect sleep architecture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of timing of RE on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure. College-aged subjects engaged in 5 laboratory visits. Visits 1 (C) and 2 provided a non-RE control day and established the 10-repetition maximum on each of 9 RE machines, respectively. During visits 3-5, the subjects reported at 0700 hours (7A), 1300 hours (1P), and 1900 hours (7P) in a randomized order to perform 30 minutes of RE. Ambulatory blood pressure and sleep-monitoring devices were worn during sleep after C, 7A, 1P, and 7P. Time to fall asleep was significantly different between RE conditions 7A and 1P and between 7A and 7P. All exercise conditions exhibited significantly fewer times woken than the non-RE control day, with 7P resulting in significantly less time awake after initially falling asleep as compared with C. Although timing of RE does not seem to statistically impact sleep stages or nocturnal blood pressure, these data indicate that engaging in RE at any time of the day may improve quality of sleep as compared with no RE. Resistance exercise may offer additional benefits regarding the ability to fall asleep and stay asleep to populations with osteoporosis, sarcopenia, anxiety, or depression.

  6. Enhanced muscle blood flow with intermittent pneumatic compression of the lower leg during plantar flexion exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuj, K A; Prince, C N; Hughson, R L; Peterson, S D

    2018-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that intermittent compression of the lower limb would increase blood flow during exercise and postexercise recovery. Data were collected from 12 healthy individuals (8 men) who performed 3 min of standing plantar flexion exercise. The following three conditions were tested: no applied compression (NoComp), compression during the exercise period only (ExComp), and compression during 2 min of standing postexercise recovery. Doppler ultrasound was used to determine superficial femoral artery (SFA) blood flow responses. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac stroke volume (SV) were assessed using finger photoplethysmography, with vascular conductance (VC) calculated as VC = SFA flow/MAP. Compared with the NoComp condition, compression resulted in increased MAP during exercise [+3.5 ± 4.1 mmHg (mean ± SD)] but not during postexercise recovery (+1.6 ± 5.9 mmHg). SV increased with compression during both exercise (+4.8 ± 5.1 ml) and recovery (+8.0 ± 6.6 ml) compared with NoComp. There was a greater increase in SFA flow with compression during exercise (+52.1 ± 57.2 ml/min) and during recovery (+58.6 ± 56.7 ml/min). VC immediately following exercise was also significantly greater in the ExComp condition compared with the NoComp condition (+0.57 ± 0.42 ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 ), suggesting the observed increase in blood flow during exercise was in part because of changes in VC. Results from this study support the hypothesis that intermittent compression applied during exercise and recovery from exercise results in increased limb blood flow, potentially contributing to changes in exercise performance and recovery. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Blood flow to working skeletal muscle is achieved in part through the rhythmic actions of the skeletal muscle pump. This study demonstrated that the application of intermittent pneumatic compression during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle, to mimic the mechanical

  7. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Punia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High blood pressure (BP is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian subcontinent. Objective. Our objective is to systematically review and report the articles from India in aerobic exercise on blood pressure. Methodology. Study was done in March 2016 in Google Scholar using search terms “Aerobic exercise” AND “Training” AND “Blood pressure” AND “India.” This search produced 3210 titles. Results. 24 articles were identified for this review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Total of 1107 subjects participated with median of 25 subjects. Studies vary in duration from +3 weeks to 12 months with each session lasting 15–60 minutes and frequency varies from 3 to 8 times/week. The results suggest that there was mean reduction of −05.00 mmHg in SBP and −03.09 mmHg in DBP after aerobic training. Conclusion. Aerobic training reduces the blood pressure in Indians.

  8. Predicting Blood Lactate Concentration and Oxygen Uptake from sEMG Data during Fatiguing Cycling Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Ražanskas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the relationship between electromyographic (EMG signals from vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles, collected during fatiguing cycling exercises, and other physiological measurements, such as blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the usual practice of picking one particular characteristic of the signal, e.g., the median or mean frequency, multiple variables were used to obtain a thorough characterization of EMG signals in the spectral domain. Based on these variables, linear and non-linear (random forest models were built to predict blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. The results showed that mean and median frequencies are sub-optimal choices for predicting these physiological quantities in dynamic exercises, as they did not exhibit significant changes over the course of our protocol and only weakly correlated with blood lactate concentration or oxygen uptake. Instead, the root mean square of the original signal and backward difference, as well as parameters describing the tails of the EMG power distribution were the most important variables for these models. Coefficients of determination ranging from R2 = 0:77 to R2 = 0:98 (for blood lactate and from R2 = 0:81 to R2 = 0:97 (for oxygen uptake were obtained when using random forest regressors.

  9. Predicting Blood Lactate Concentration and Oxygen Uptake from sEMG Data during Fatiguing Cycling Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ražanskas, Petras; Verikas, Antanas; Olsson, Charlotte; Viberg, Per-Arne

    2015-08-19

    This article presents a study of the relationship between electromyographic (EMG) signals from vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles, collected during fatiguing cycling exercises, and other physiological measurements, such as blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the usual practice of picking one particular characteristic of the signal, e.g., the median or mean frequency, multiple variables were used to obtain a thorough characterization of EMG signals in the spectral domain. Based on these variables, linear and non-linear (random forest) models were built to predict blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. The results showed that mean and median frequencies are sub-optimal choices for predicting these physiological quantities in dynamic exercises, as they did not exhibit significant changes over the course of our protocol and only weakly correlated with blood lactate concentration or oxygen uptake. Instead, the root mean square of the original signal and backward difference, as well as parameters describing the tails of the EMG power distribution were the most important variables for these models. Coefficients of determination ranging from R(2) = 0:77 to R(2) = 0:98 (for blood lactate) and from R(2) = 0:81 to R(2) = 0:97 (for oxygen uptake) were obtained when using random forest regressors.

  10. Comparison of Interstitial Fluid pH, PCO2, PO2 with Venous Blood Values During Repetitive Handgrip Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Soller, Babs R.; Shear, Michael; Walz, Matthias; Landry, Michelle; Heard, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the use of a small, fiber optic sensor to measure pH, PCO2 and PO2 from forearm muscle interstitial fluid (IF) during handgrip dynamometry. PURPOSE: Compare pH, PCO2 and PO2 values obtained from venous blood with those from the IF of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) during three levels of exercise intensity. METHODS: Six subjects (5M/1F), average age 29+/-5 yrs, participated in the study. A venous catheter was placed in the retrograde direction in the antecubital space and a fiber optic sensor (Paratrend, Diametrics Medical, Inc.) was placed through a 22 G catheter into the FDS muscle under ultrasound guidance. After a 45 min rest period, subjects performed three 5-min bouts of repetitive handgrip exercise (2s contraction/1 s relaxation) at attempted levels of 15%, 30% and 45% of maximal voluntary contraction. The order of the exercise bouts was random with the second and third bouts started after blood lactate had returned to baseline. Venous blood was sampled every minute during exercise and analyzed with an I-Stat CG-4+ cartridge, while IF fiber optic sensor measurements were obtained every 2 s. Change from pre-exercise baseline to end of exercise was computed for pH, PCO2 and PO2. Blood and IF values were compared with a paired t-test. RESULTS: Baseline values for pH, PCO2 and PO2 were 7.37+/-0.02, 46+/-4 mm Hg, and 36+/-6 mm Hg respectively in blood and 7.39+/-0.02, 44+/-6 mm Hg, and 35+/-14 mm Hg in IF. Average changes over all exercise levels are noted in the Table below. For each parameter the exercise-induced change was at least twice as great in IF as in blood. In blood and IF, pH and PCO2 increases were directly related to exercise intensity. Change in venous PO2 was unrelated to exercise intensity, while IF PO2 decreased with increases in exercise intensity. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of IF pH, PCO2 and PO2 is more sensitive to exercise intensity than measurement of the same parameters in venous blood and provides continuous

  11. THE DIFFERENCE IN RESPIRATORY AND BLOOD GAS VALUES DURING RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE WITH SPONTANEOUS VERSUS REDUCED BREATHING FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kapus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapolation from post-exercise measurements has been used to estimate respiratory and blood gas parameters during exercise. This may not be accurate in exercise with reduced breathing frequency (RBF, since spontaneous breathing usually follows exercise. This study was performed to ascertain whether measurement of oxygen saturation and blood gases immediately after exercise accurately reflected their values during exercise with RBF. Eight healthy male subjects performed an incremental cycling test with RBF at 10 breaths per minute. A constant load test with RBF (B10 was then performed to exhaustion at the peak power output obtained during the incremental test. Finally, the subjects repeated the constant load test with spontaneous breathing (SB using the same protocol as B10. Pulmonary ventilation (VE, end-tidal oxygen (PETO2, and carbon dioxide pressures (PETCO2 and oxygen saturation (SaO2 were measured during both constant load tests. The partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 in capillary blood were measured during the last minute of exercise, immediately following exercise and during the third minute of recovery. At the end of exercise RBF resulted in lower PETO2, SaO2 and PO2, and higher PETCO2 and PCO2 when compared to spontaneous breathing during exercise. Lower SaO2 and PETO2 were detected only for the first 16s and 20s of recovery after B10 compared to the corresponding period in SB. There were no significant differences in PO2 between SB and B10 measured immediately after the exercise. During recovery from exercise, PETCO2 remained elevated for the first 120s in the B10 trial. There were also significant differences between SB and B10 in PCO2 immediately after exercise. We conclude that RBF during high intensity exercise results in hypoxia; however, due to post-exercise hyperpnoea, measurements of blood gas parameters taken 15s after cessation of exercise did not reflect the changes in PO2 and SaO2 seen during

  12. Blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal to the calc......This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal....... Lymph drainage from the area was found to be negligible both during rest and exercise. We conclude that dynamical calf muscle contractions result in increased peritendinous blood flow at the Achilles tendon in humans....

  13. Chronic oral lactate supplementation does not affect lactate disappearance from blood after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouns, F; Fogelholm, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    1995-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that a 3-week oral lactate supplementation affects postexercise blood lactate disappearance in untrained male subjects. Fifteen men were randomly assigned to either a lactate supplementation (n = 8) or a placebo (n = 7) treatment. During the treatment period...... they drank an oral lactate or a maltodextrin (placebo) supplement twice a day. The lactate drink contained 10 g of lactate as calcium, sodium, and potassium salts. Blood lactate concentrations were studied before, during, and immediately after three exercise tests, both pre- and posttreatment. Peak lactate...... during the long (30- to 45-min) recovery periods amounted to / 10 mmol/L. Blood lactate changes were highly reproducible. However, a 3-week oral lactate supplementation did not result in differences in lactate disappearance. This study does not support the hypothesis that regular oral lactate intake...

  14. Benefits of exercise training on coronary blood flow in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Sturek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Every 34 seconds an American experiences a myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Approximately 80% of these coronary artery disease (CAD)-related deaths are attributable to modifiable behaviors, such as a lack of physical exercise training (ET). Regular ET decreases CAD morbidity and mortality through systemic and cardiac-specific adaptations. ET increases myocardial oxygen demand acting as a stimulus to increase coronary blood flow and thus myocardial oxygen supply, which reduces myocardial infarction and angina. ET augments coronary blood flow through direct actions on the vasculature that improve endothelial and coronary smooth muscle function, enhancing coronary vasodilation. Additionally, ET promotes collateralization, thereby, increasing blood flow to ischemic myocardium and also treats macrovascular CAD by attenuating the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and restenosis, potentially through stabilization of atherosclerotic lesions. In summary, ET can be used as a relatively safe and inexpensive way to prevent and treat CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geographic clustering of elderly people with above-norm anthropometric measurements and blood chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The global percentage of people over 60 is strongly increasing and estimated to exceed 20% by 20,150, which means that there will be an increase in many pathological conditions related to aging. Mapping of the location of aging people and identification of their needs can be extremely valuable from a social-economic point of view. Participants in this study were 148 randomly selected adults from Talca City, Chile aged 60-74 at baseline. Geographic information systems (GIS analyses were performed using ArcGIS software through its module Spatial Autocorrelation. In this study, we demonstrated that elderly people show geographic clustering according to above-norm results of anthropometric measurements and blood chemistry. The spatial identifications found would facilitate exploring the impact of treatment programmes in communities where many aging people live, thereby improving their quality of life as well as reducing overall costs.

  16. Effects of exercise and custom-made orthotics on blood pressure and heart rate variability: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study is to use randomized controlled research design to investigate the effect of an exercise program and custom-made flexible orthotics on heart rate variability and blood pressure at varying stages of exercise over a 5-month period. Thirteen ping-pong players were recruited and randomly assigned into control and experimental groups. Both groups had the same exercise program, and only the experimental group wore custom-made flexible orthotics. Exercise effects were compared before and after the training using heart rate variability and blood pressure. The study lasted 5 months with 1 data collection per month except in the fourth month. Ten male players (6 in the experimental group) completed the study. The average age of the participants was 44 +/- 16 years. The blood pressure in the experimental group significantly decreased after the 5-month study period and after each exercise session. The blood pressure did not change significantly after each exercise session in the control group. The heart rate was significantly increased immediately after exercise and remained at a higher level after the 20 minutes of rest at the end of each day's exercise session. The average resting heart rate decreased from 69.7 +/- 1.708 to 66.8 +/- 4.480 (P .05) in the control group. The total power reflecting the total autonomic activity was significantly decreased immediately after exercise and after the 20-minute rest period at the end of the exercise session in both the control and experimental groups. There were positive changes in cardiac and vascular autonomic regulations with exercise training when combined with foot orthotics.

  17. Black grape extract supplementation attenuates blood oxidative stress in response to acute exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Skarpańska-Stejnborn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The flavonoid-rich active compound in grapes is claimed to be one of the most important natural products. Hence, the objective of our research was to study parameters of the prooxidative-antioxidative balance in athletes supplied with Panace-Vid 2000® preparation consisting of black wine grape extract (Vitis vinifera. The study was carried out on 22 male rowers. The subjects from the supplemented group (n=10 were given one gelatin capsule containing Panace-Vid 2000® three times a day, for six weeks, while the control group (n=12 was given placebo. Before and after the supplementation period, the athletes performed a physical exercise test on the rowing ergometer; varying between 40 and 90% of maximal aerobic power. Each 3-min exercise session was followed by thirty seconds of rest. Blood was sampled from the rowers before the exercise test, one minute after its completion, and after a 24-h recovery period. The activity of antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase was determined and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was measured in the hemolysate of red blood cells. The Total Antioxidant Capacity was determined in the blood plasma. The concentration of lactic acid was measured in the whole blood. An analysis of the results revealed that the supply of grape extract, in the form of Panace-Vid 2000® preparation, contributed to a significant increase in plasma antioxidative capacity and to an insignificant increase in superoxide dismutase, as well as a lower activity of glutathione peroxidase and reduced concentration of lipid peroxidation product levels.

  18. Evaluation of factor analysis and other functional images in exercise gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunari, Ichiro; Bunko, Hisashi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Taki, Junichi; Shiire, Yasushi; Hisada, Kinichi

    1990-01-01

    Factor analysis, a new method of functional imaging, has been applied to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. Because of the difficulty of its interpretation, it has not been popular as a method for detecting abnormal wall motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of factor analysis in exercise gated blood-pool study in patients with ischemic heart disease. In our factor analysis, left ventricular region of interest (LVROI) was extracted to exclude the surrounding radioactivities. The new method was compared with the conventional factor analysis using whole region (whole ROI method), and the other functional images, i.e. stroke volume, ejection fraction and phase images. At first we tried 3-factor analysis of the LVROI method, which resulted in many uninterpretable factors. Whereas in 2-factor analysis no uninterpretable factors were extracted. In comparison with cine-mode display, the LVROI method with 2-factor analysis showed the best sensitivity (85%) and specificity (100%). In exercise gated blood-pool study, it became easier to detect abnormal wall motion by comparing the factor image at exercise with resting image. In conclusion, the 2-factor analysis using the LVROI method greatly improved the limitation of conventional factor analysis, and will be useful in detecting wall motion abnormality in patients with ischemic heart disase. (author)

  19. Effects of Walking with Blood Flow Restriction on Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, G V; Vaz, J R; Pezarat-Correia, P; Fernhall, B

    2015-02-09

    This study determined the influence of walking with blood flow restriction (BFR) on the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of healthy young men. 17 healthy young men (22.1±2.9 years) performed graded treadmill exercise to assess VO 2peak . In a randomized fashion, each participant performed 5 sets of 3-min treadmill exercise at their optimal walking speed with 1-min interval either with or without BFR. Participants were then seated in a chair and remained there for 30 min of recovery. Expired gases were continuously monitored during exercise and recovery. BFR increased the O 2 cost of walking as well as its relative intensity and cumulative O 2 deficit (pEPOC magnitude after walking with BFR was greater than in the non-BFR condition (pEPOC. The EPOC magnitude was no longer different between conditions after controlling for the differences in relative intensity and in the cumulative O 2 deficit (p>0.05). These data indicate that walking with BFR increases the magnitude of EPOC. Moreover, they also demonstrate that such increment in EPOC is likely explained by the effects of BFR on walking relative intensity and cumulative O 2 deficit. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Influence of blood flow occlusion on the development of peripheral and central fatigue during small muscle mass handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, R M; Craig, J C; Smith, J R; Wilcox, S L; Jia, C; Warren, S; Barstow, T J

    2015-09-01

    Critical power represents an important threshold for neuromuscular fatigue development and may, therefore, dictate intensities for which exercise tolerance is determined by the magnitude of fatigue accrued. Peripheral fatigue appears to be constant across O2 delivery conditions for large muscle mass exercise, but this consistency is equivocal for smaller muscle mass exercise. We sought to determine the influence of blood flow occlusion during handgrip exercise on neuromuscular fatigue development and to examine the relationship between neuromuscular fatigue development and W '. Blood flow occlusion influenced the development of both peripheral and central fatigue, thus providing further evidence that the magnitude of peripheral fatigue is not constant across O2 delivery conditions for small muscle mass exercise. W ' appears to be related to the magnitude of fatigue accrued during exercise, which may explain the reported consistency of intramuscular metabolic perturbations and work performed for severe-intensity exercise. The influence of the muscle metabolic milieu on peripheral and central fatigue is currently unclear. Moreover, the relationships between peripheral and central fatigue and the curvature constant (W ') have not been investigated. Six men (age: 25 ± 4 years, body mass: 82 ± 10 kg, height: 179 ± 4 cm) completed four constant power handgrip tests to exhaustion under conditions of control exercise (Con), blood flow occlusion exercise (Occ), Con with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Con + Occ), and Occ with 5 min post-exercise blood flow occlusion (Occ + Occ). Neuromuscular fatigue measurements and W ' were obtained for each subject. Each trial resulted in significant peripheral and central fatigue. Significantly greater peripheral (79.7 ± 5.1% vs. 22.7 ± 6.0%) and central (42.6 ± 3.9% vs. 4.9 ± 2.0%) fatigue occurred for Occ than for Con. In addition, significantly greater peripheral (83.0 ± 4.2% vs. 69.0 ± 6.2%) and central

  1. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one...... conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade...

  2. Differences in Blood Urea and Creatinine Concentrations in Earthed and Unearthed Subjects during Cycling Exercise and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Paweł; Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Jaskulska, Ewelina; Sokal, Karol; Jastrzębska, Maria; Radzimiński, Lukasz; Dargiewicz, Robert; Zieliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Contact of humans with the earth, either directly (e.g., with bare feet) or using a metal conductor, changes their biochemical parameters. The effects of earthing during physical exercise are unknown. This study was carried out to evaluate selected biochemical parameters in subjects who were earthed during cycling. In a double-blind, crossover study, 42 participants were divided into two groups and earthed during exercise and recovery. One group was earthed in the first week during 30 minutes of cycling exercise and during recovery, and a second group was earthed in the second week. A double-blind technique was applied. Blood samples were obtained before each training session, after 15 and 30 minutes of exercise, and after 40 minutes of recovery. Significantly lower blood urea levels were observed in subjects earthed during exercise and relaxation. These significant differences were noted in both groups earthed at the beginning of exercise (P 30 minutes (P minutes of relaxation (P < 0.0001). Creatinine concentrations in earthed subjects during exercise were unchanged. Conclusions. Earthing during exercise lowers blood urea concentrations and may inhibit hepatic protein catabolism or increase renal urea excretion. Exertion under earthing may result in a positive protein balance.

  3. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P ... 180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P breath hold diverts blood toward the brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...

  4. Decreased blood levels of lactic acid and urinary excretion of 3-methylhistidine after exercise by chronic taurine treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Sachinobu; Kurroda, Ikuyo; Okada, Kazuko; Morishima, Masaki; Okamoto, Miki; Harada, Nagakatsu; Takahashi, Akira; Sakai, Kentaro; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2003-12-01

    Taurine is reported to increase contractility of skeletal muscle and cardiac myocyte, which can increase exercise performance. The present study aimed to clarify taurine's effect on chronic endurance exercise, especially accumulation of lactic acid (LA), a marker of fatigue and ability of aerobic exercise, and urinary secretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), a marker of muscle breakdown in rats. After exercise blood levels of LA and urinary excretion of 3-MH were significantly increased and this increase was significantly less in those with chronic treatment of taurine. Taurine treatment also significantly decreased fat accumulation and blood levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, which might improve insulin resistance and utilization of fat and glucose. These results indicate taurine treatment is useful for reducing physical fatigue and muscle damage during exercise training in rats, presumably due to antioxidant property and improvement of muscle and cardiac functions by taurine.

  5. Exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and coronary blood flow velocity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Hiroki; Umamoto, Ikuo; Harada, Yoshiaki (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)) (and others)

    1992-03-01

    In 22 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not associated with coronary stenosis, findings of exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy were reviewed in relation to coronary blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity of the left antero-inferior segment was recorded by using a Doppler catheter. From time velocity integration in systolic and diastolic phases, both % systolic fraction (%SF) and %diastolic 1st third fraction (%d1F) were obtained. A decreased perfusion was visually assessed on exercise Tl-201 myocardial images. In addition, transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity was quantitatively assessed by expressing it as a transient dilation index (TDI) for subendocardial ischemia. Coronary blood flow velocity was characterized by a decrease in both %SF and %d1F and negative systolic flow. Both %SF and %d1F were inversely correlated with TDI. Coronary negative systolic flow was frequently associated with a decreased perfusion. These results suggest factors such as left ventricular relaxation impairment, other than coronary small vessel lesions, may also be involved in the occurrence of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (N.K.).

  6. Variation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume after Moderate Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217±32 min/week who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC, reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV; mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR; RBC distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV. No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease.

  7. Chronic endurance exercise training: a condition of inadequate blood pressure regulation and reduced tolerance to LBNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, P B; Pawelczyk, J A

    1993-06-01

    We review the hypotheses presented to account for the anecdotal and literature-based reports that chronic endurance exercise training reduces orthostatic tolerance. The findings from cross-sectional investigations of unfit subjects and endurance athletes are examined, as well as limited data from recent investigations of the changes in orthostatic tolerance and blood pressure regulation that occur after 8 d to 8 months of endurance exercise training. Statistical models have not found wide variations in maximal aerobic power (VO2max) to contribute to the prediction of orthostatic responses. However, research data are generally consistent that the orthostatic tolerance of athletes whose VO2max exceeds 65 ml.kg-1.min-1 is lower than that of sedentary control subjects. These two findings suggest that it is exercise training, rather than VO2max, that reduces orthostatic tolerance. Findings from a recent longitudinal investigation corroborate this theory. We conclude that at least four factors associated with exercise training contribute to the development of orthostatic intolerance. These include: a) increased limb compliance (although its effect is likely to be trivial), b) eccentric ventricular hypertrophy, and c) increases in total blood volume, which may attenuate cardiopulmonary baroreflex responsiveness, shift ventricular function to a steeper portion of the ventricular compliance curve, and increase the inhibitory effect of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors on carotid baroreflex responsiveness; and d) an independent effect that reduces carotid and aortic baroreflex responsiveness. These mechanisms mimic changes observed in pathological states such as heart failure and hypertension. Our conclusions are best summarized by Greenleaf et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 51:298-305, 1981): "Trained men can run, but they cannot stand.''

  8. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Departments Clinical Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a Question Reviewed by Barry J. Make, ...

  9. Evaluation of left ventricular function during exercise in patients with ischemic heart disease using multigated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Yoshiaki; Kanoh, Yasushi; Shiotani, Hideyuki; Fujitani, Kazuhiro; Fukuzaki, Hisashi; Kajiya, Teishi; Nakashima, Yoshiharu; Maeda, Kazumi.

    1985-01-01

    Multigated blood pool scintigraphy (exercise RI ventriculography) and exercise stress thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy were performed in 44 ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients (16 with angina pectoris and 28 with old myocardial infarction) and 11 healthy persons. Furthermore, blood circulation was examined in 38 of the subjects. Work load was significantly greater, and the number of diseased vessels and the incidence of indicators for transient ischemia during exercise were significantly lower in the group with a remarkably increased left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) during exercise than in the group with a remarkably decreased EF. In the group with unchanged EF, reginal left ventricular wall movement could be assessed using phase analysis. In IHD patients with a remarkably decreased EF at rest, EF was scarcely changed during exercise, and indicators for transient ischemia were not observed frequently. There was a highly significnat correlation between EF during exercise and pulmonary artery wedge pressure or cardiac index during exercise, suggesting that EF is a noninvasive indicator for coronary circulation during exercise. Exercise RI ventriculography was considered useful for evaluating the physiology of IHD. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Influence of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 uptake on-kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew M; Krustrup, Peter; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Berger, Nicolas J; Calbet, José A; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Following the start of low-intensity exercise in healthy humans, it has been established that the kinetics of skeletal muscle O2 delivery is faster than, and does not limit, the kinetics of muscle O2 uptake (). Direct data are lacking, however, on the question of whether O2 delivery might limit kinetics during high-intensity exercise. Using multiple exercise transitions to enhance confidence in parameter estimation, we therefore investigated the kinetics of, and inter-relationships between, muscle blood flow (), a– difference and following the onset of low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) exercise. Seven healthy males completed four 6 min bouts of LI and four 6 min bouts of HI single-legged knee-extension exercise. Blood was frequently drawn from the femoral artery and vein during exercise and , a– difference and were calculated and subsequently modelled using non-linear regression techniques. For LI, the fundamental component mean response time (MRTp) for kinetics was significantly shorter than kinetics (mean ± SEM, 18 ± 4 vs. 30 ± 4 s; P exercise intensities; however, the MRTp for a– difference was significantly shorter for HI compared with LI (17 ± 3 vs. 28 ± 4 s; P exercise and remained unaltered thereafter, with no differences between LI and HI. These results indicate that bulk O2 delivery does not limit kinetics following the onset of LI or HI knee-extension exercise. PMID:22711961

  11. Decreasing vitamin premix on chicken carcass composition and blood chemistry in floor and battery cage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Shivazad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted the to compare the effect of a decreasing amount of vitamin premix in diets inbroilers from 29 to 42 days of age on carcass composition and blood chemistry in floor (Experiment 1 and battery cage (Experiment 2 systems. At 35 and 42 days of ages, one bird of each replicate was slaughtered and carcass composition was measured. Blood concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Ca were used to diagnose vitamin D3 deficiency and enzymes aspartate amino transferase (AST to identify vitamin E deficiency. Floor raised birds showed that vitamin premix reduction/withdrawal at 29 days of age did not impair body weight (BW, carcass composition, ALP and Ca during the final rearing period. However, diet without vitamin premix (T1 had a higher AST at 42 days of age than the other diets. Birds reared in cages were slightly more sensitive to vitamin premix reduction/withdrawal, probably due to the impracticality of performing coprophagy. Diet without vitamin premix (T1 had a lower BW, carcass breast and thigh yield at 42 days of age; also serum ALP, AST and Ca were impaired. In conclusion, the withdrawal of vitamins is not a reasonable option but it is possible to reduce vitamin premix in finisher broilers’ diets without negative effects on performance and on some metabolic traits during the finisher period with both methods of rearing.

  12. Effects of dairy products consumption on weight loss and blood chemistry in premenopausal obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Neslihan; Inanc, Neriman

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effects of dairy calcium on changes in body weight and body fat mass in obese women on a weight-loss diet. The non-randomised controlled study was conducted at Sivas Government Hospital, Turkey, between January and March 2010, and comprised obese women outpatients coming to the Nutrition and Diet Clinic. The participants were assigned to three groups according to their intake of dairy products as control, low dairy and high dairy groups. Measurements of anthropometry, blood pressure and analysis of blood chemistry were done before and after the intervention. The mean age of the 65 women was 33.10±6.18 years. There were 20(30.7%) women in control group, 22(33.8%) in high dairy group and 23(35.3%) in low dairy group. At the end of the study, body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, waist/hip ratio, body fat percentage, and fat mass significantly decreased within the groups (pweight-loss programme, increasing the amount of dairy products was not effective in improving weight-loss compared to calorie restriction alone.

  13. Height and blood chemistry in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    of the mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants in Japan in 1955. OBJECTIVES: The purpose was to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and physical stature and routine blood chemistry reflecting major organ functions more than 50 years later. METHODS: The study sample consisted...

  14. The A[subscript 1c] Blood Test: An Illustration of Principles from General and Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    The glycated hemoglobin blood test, usually designated as the A[subscript 1c] test, is a key measure of the effectiveness of glucose control in diabetics. The chemistry of glucose in the bloodstream, which underlies the test and its impact, provides an illustration of the importance of chemical equilibrium and kinetics to a major health problem.…

  15. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza-Silva, Eduardo; Wittrup Christensen, Steffan; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occur within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result...... anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day-0 (pre-exercise), day-2 and day-6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Results: Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day-1 and day-2 compared with day-0 (P... in accumulated algesic substances being a part of the sensitization in DOMS. Methods: Twelve healthy subjects (5 women) performed dorsiflexion exercise (5 sets of 10 repeated eccentric contractions) in one leg, while the contralateral leg was the control. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the tibialis...

  16. Coupling between the blood lactate-to-pyruvate ratio and MCA Vmean at the onset of exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Madsen, Camilla A; Nielsen, Henning B

    2009-01-01

    Activation-induced increase in cerebral blood flow is coupled to enhanced metabolic activity, maybe with brain tissue redox state and oxygen tension as key modulators. To evaluate this hypothesis at the onset of exercise in humans, blood was sampled at 0.1 to 0.2 Hz from the radial artery and right...... internal jugular vein, while middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) was recorded. Both the arterial and venous lactate-to-pyruvate ratio increased after 10 s (P capillary...... state and oxygenation as potential modulators of an increase in cerebral blood flow at the onset of exercise....

  17. COMPARISON OF WHOLE BLOOD AND PLASMA GLUCOSE CONCENTRATIONS IN GREEN TURTLES ( CHELONIA MYDAS) DETERMINED USING A GLUCOMETER AND A DRY CHEMISTRY ANALYZER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Justin R; Bresette, Michael J; Mott, Cody R; Stacy, Nicole I

    2018-01-01

    :  We compared glucose concentrations in whole blood and plasma from green turtles ( Chelonia mydas) using a glucometer with plasma glucose analyzed by dry chemistry analyzer. Whole blood glucose (glucometer) and plasma glucose (dry chemistry) had the best agreement ( r s =0.85) and a small negative bias (-0.08 mmol/L).

  18. The effects of mindfulness eating and yoga exercise on blood sugar levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngwanichsetha, Sununta; Phumdoung, Sasitorn; Ingkathawornwong, Thitiporn

    2014-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial was carried out to investigate the effect of mindfulness eating and yoga exercise on blood sugar levels among pregnant Thai women with GDM. Interventions promoting achievement of good glycemic control result in desired pregnancy outcomes. Little is known about the health benefits of mindfulness eating and yoga exercise on blood sugar levels among pregnant with GDM. A randomized controlled trial was carried out. Main outcome measures were capillary fasting plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial blood glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. The intervention group showed significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the intervention group (pMindfulness eating and yoga exercise had health benefits on glycemic control in pregnant women with GDM. It should be recommended in clinical and community health services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of aerobic exercise and barley β-glucan on blood glucose, body composition and blood pressure of diabetic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mokhtari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of type 2 diabetes increases with aging, unhealthy diets, obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The aim of this study was to investigate the combinational effect of a 12-week aerobic exercise and barley β-glucan (BBG on blood glucose, body composition and blood pressure in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 24 women with the mean age of 49 years and a blood glucose level of 110-280 mg/dl were purposefully selected and randomly divided into three groups: a group of aerobic exercise with diet (n=8, b diet group (n=8 c control group (n=8. The diet group consumed one barley bread, containing 4 g of β glucan, each day for 12 weeks. The group of aerobic exercise, who was on diet, participated in a progressive walking program with the intensity of %60-70% of maximal heart rate in addition to diet program (barley bread. Blood glucose, weight, fat percentage, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were measured in pre-and post-training. Results: Results showed a significant decrease in the blood glucose level in the experimental groups compared to the control group, while no major changes were observed in body composition and blood pressure. Conclusion: It seems that the combined program (aerobic training with diet or consumption of β-glucan alone can decrease blood glucose in patients with diabetes.

  20. Acute effects of resistance exercise and intermittent intense aerobic exercise on blood cell count and oxidative stress in trained middle-aged women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, A.M.; Bagatini, M.D.; Roth, M.A.; Martins, C.C.; Rezer, J.F.P.; Mello, F.F.; Lopes, L.F.D.; Morsch, V.M.; Schetinger, M.R.C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an intermittent intense aerobic exercise session and a resistance exercise session on blood cell counts and oxidative stress parameters in middle-aged women. Thirty-four women were selected and divided into three groups: RE group (performing 60 min of resistance exercises, N = 12), spinning group (performing 60 min of spinning, N = 12), and control group (not exercising regularly, N = 10). In both exercise groups, lymphocytes and monocytes decreased after 1-h recuperation (post-exercise) compared to immediately after exercise (P < 0.05). Immediately after exercise, in both exercised groups, a significant increase in TBARS (from 16.5 ± 2 to 25 ± 2 for the spinning group and from 18.6 ± 1 to 28.2 ± 3 nmol MDA/mL serum for the RE group) and protein carbonyl (from 1.0 ± 0.3 to 1.6 ± 0.2 for the spinning group and from 0.9 ± 0.2 to 1.5 ± 0.2 nmol/mg protein for the RE group) was observed (P < 0.05). A decrease in antioxidant activities (non-protein sulfhydryl, superoxide dismutase, catalase) was also demonstrated with a negative correlation between damage markers and antioxidant body defenses (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an acute bout of intermittent or anaerobic exercise induces immune suppression and increases the production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress in middle-aged and trained women. Furthermore, we demonstrated that trained women show improved antioxidant capacity and lower oxidative damage than sedentary ones, demonstrating the benefits of chronic regular physical activity

  1. Acute effects of resistance exercise and intermittent intense aerobic exercise on blood cell count and oxidative stress in trained middle-aged women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an intermittent intense aerobic exercise session and a resistance exercise session on blood cell counts and oxidative stress parameters in middle-aged women. Thirty-four women were selected and divided into three groups: RE group (performing 60 min of resistance exercises, N = 12, spinning group (performing 60 min of spinning, N = 12, and control group (not exercising regularly, N = 10. In both exercise groups, lymphocytes and monocytes decreased after 1-h recuperation (post-exercise compared to immediately after exercise (P < 0.05. Immediately after exercise, in both exercised groups, a significant increase in TBARS (from 16.5 ± 2 to 25 ± 2 for the spinning group and from 18.6 ± 1 to 28.2 ± 3 nmol MDA/mL serum for the RE group and protein carbonyl (from 1.0 ± 0.3 to 1.6 ± 0.2 for the spinning group and from 0.9 ± 0.2 to 1.5 ± 0.2 nmol/mg protein for the RE group was observed (P < 0.05. A decrease in antioxidant activities (non-protein sulfhydryl, superoxide dismutase, catalase was also demonstrated with a negative correlation between damage markers and antioxidant body defenses (P < 0.05. These results indicate that an acute bout of intermittent or anaerobic exercise induces immune suppression and increases the production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress in middle-aged and trained women. Furthermore, we demonstrated that trained women show improved antioxidant capacity and lower oxidative damage than sedentary ones, demonstrating the benefits of chronic regular physical activity.

  2. Acute effects of resistance exercise and intermittent intense aerobic exercise on blood cell count and oxidative stress in trained middle-aged women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, A.M. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bagatini, M.D. [Curso de Enfermagem, Campus Chapecó, Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Chapecó, SC (Brazil); Roth, M.A. [Departamento de Desportos Individuais, Centro de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Martins, C.C.; Rezer, J.F.P. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Mello, F.F. [Departamento de Desportos Individuais, Centro de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Lopes, L.F.D. [Departamento de Administração, Centro de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Morsch, V.M.; Schetinger, M.R.C. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2012-10-26

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an intermittent intense aerobic exercise session and a resistance exercise session on blood cell counts and oxidative stress parameters in middle-aged women. Thirty-four women were selected and divided into three groups: RE group (performing 60 min of resistance exercises, N = 12), spinning group (performing 60 min of spinning, N = 12), and control group (not exercising regularly, N = 10). In both exercise groups, lymphocytes and monocytes decreased after 1-h recuperation (post-exercise) compared to immediately after exercise (P < 0.05). Immediately after exercise, in both exercised groups, a significant increase in TBARS (from 16.5 ± 2 to 25 ± 2 for the spinning group and from 18.6 ± 1 to 28.2 ± 3 nmol MDA/mL serum for the RE group) and protein carbonyl (from 1.0 ± 0.3 to 1.6 ± 0.2 for the spinning group and from 0.9 ± 0.2 to 1.5 ± 0.2 nmol/mg protein for the RE group) was observed (P < 0.05). A decrease in antioxidant activities (non-protein sulfhydryl, superoxide dismutase, catalase) was also demonstrated with a negative correlation between damage markers and antioxidant body defenses (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an acute bout of intermittent or anaerobic exercise induces immune suppression and increases the production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress in middle-aged and trained women. Furthermore, we demonstrated that trained women show improved antioxidant capacity and lower oxidative damage than sedentary ones, demonstrating the benefits of chronic regular physical activity.

  3. Effect of Exercise Training on Red Blood Cell Distribution Width as a Marker of Impaired Exercise Tolerance in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Niiyama, Hiroshi; Harada, Haruhito; Katou, Atsushi; Yoshida, Noriko; Ikeda, Hisao

    2016-09-28

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) can predict mortality in cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of the beneficial prognostic marker remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the RDW is related to impaired exercise tolerance and exercise training (ET) effect on RDW in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Seventy-eight patients who underwent ET by supervised bicycle ergometer during 3 weeks served as the ET group whereas 30 patients who did not undergo ET were the control group. Exercise stress test with cardiopulmonary analysis was performed in the ET group. Peak oxygen uptake (from 14.1 ± 4.0 to 15.1 ± 3.8 mL/kg/minute, P exercise tolerance and decreases RDW in association with increased oxygen uptake in patients with CAD.

  4. No Evidence of Racial Differences in Endothelial Function and Exercise Blood Flow in Young, Healthy Males Following Acute Antioxidant Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Rebecca M; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Rosenberg, Alexander J; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute antioxidant supplementation on endothelial function, exercise blood flow and oxidative stress biomarkers in 9 young African American compared to 10 Caucasian males (25.7±1.2 years). We hypothesized that African American males would have lower exercise blood flow and endothelial responsiveness compared to Caucasian males, and these responses would be improved following antioxidant supplementation. Ultrasonography was used to measure blood flow during handgrip exercise. Endothelial function was assessed using flow-mediated dilation, and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring levels of malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. African American males exhibited lower endothelial function than Caucasians at baseline (8.3±1.7 vs. 12.2±1.7%) and the difference was ameliorated with antioxidant supplementation (10.7±1.9% vs. 10.8±1.8%), but the interaction was not significant (p=0.10). There were no significant changes in malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances following antioxidant supplementation. There was a significant increase in brachial blood flow and forearm vascular conductance with exercise but no differences with antioxidant supplementation. There were no group differences in exercise responses and no differences with antioxidant supplementation, suggesting a lack of influence of oxidative stress during exercise in this cohort. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Comparison of pneumatic tube system with manual transport for routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupek, Alex; Matthewson, Beverly; Whitman, Erin; Fullarton, Rachel; Chen, Yu

    2017-08-28

    The pneumatic tube system (PTS) is commonly used in modern clinical laboratories to provide quick specimen delivery. However, its impact on sample integrity and laboratory testing results are still debatable. In addition, each PTS installation and configuration is unique to its institution. We sought to validate our Swisslog PTS by comparing routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas test results and sample integrity indices between duplicate samples transported either manually or by PTS. Duplicate samples were delivered to the core laboratory manually by human courier or via the Swisslog PTS. Head-to-head comparisons of 48 routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas laboratory tests, and three sample integrity indices were conducted on 41 healthy volunteers and 61 adult patients. The PTS showed no impact on sample hemolysis, lipemia, or icterus indices (all pcoagulation and blood gas (in syringe and capillary tube) laboratory tests.

  6. Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry at Course "Nature and Techniques I - Water"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The course is newly establised one aimed at public school teachers in order to stimulate increased interests for science amongst the pupils. The exercises comprise determination of pH, phosphate, nitrite, nitrate and total hardness, executed partly by chemical experiments and partly by means...

  7. Effects of exercise and other nonpharmacological measures on blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, G; Dart, A; Meredith, I; Korner, P; Laufer, E; Dewar, E

    1991-01-01

    Reversal of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an important target of antihypertensive therapy. Nonpharmacological approaches such as weight reduction and exercise training have favorable effects on other risk factors. However, there are few data on their effects on LVH. Athletes have eccentric rather than concentric LVH. A 12-month exercise program in 13 unmedicated hypertensive subjects altered LV geometry, reducing LV wall thickness and increasing LV internal diameters (LVID). LV mass was unchanged, and the thickness/radius fell by 9%. Shorter-term studies have shown that the cardiac structural changes with a moderate exercise program occur rapidly and their onset lags only about 2 weeks behind blood pressure (BP) effects. Assessment of weight loss effects on LVH is complicated by the strong relationship between body weight and ventricular wall thickness. LVID, and LV mass. To some extent, this can be overcome by arbitrarily indexing to body surface area or height. The wall thickness/radius ratio is not related to body size. Weight reduction reduces BP and thickness/radius by 10% in controlled trials. Small studies have also reported reduction in LV mass after sodium restriction in hypertensive subjects. Studies with other nonpharmacological measures could make a substantial contribution to knowledge of their efficacy.

  8. Blood glucose monitoring during aerobic and anaerobic physical exercise using a new artificial pancreas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Bertachi, Arthur; Giménez, Marga; Biagi, Lyvia; Viaplana, Judith; Viñals, Clara; Vehí, Josep; Conget, Ignacio; Bondia, Jorge

    2018-02-23

    To assess an artificial pancreas system during aerobic (AeE) and anaerobic exercise (AnE). A pilot clinical trial on five subjects with type 1 diabetes (4 males) aged 37±10.9 years, diabetes diagnosed 21.2±12.2 years before, insulin pump users, and with a mean HbA 1c level of 7.8±0.5%. Every subject did three AeE and three AnE sessions. Blood glucose levels were monitored by the artificial pancreas system during exercise and up to four hours later. Before the start of exercise, 23g of carbohydrates were administered orally. The mean glucose level was 124.0±25.1mg/dL in the AeE studies and 152.1±34.1mg/dL in the AnE studies. Percent times in the different glucose ranges of 70-180, >180 and y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationships between V̇O2 and blood lactate responses after all-out running exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; Turnes, Tiago; Pereira, Kayo Leonardo; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    To verify the effects of training status and blood lactate concentration (BLC) responses on the early excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), 8 sprinters, 7 endurance runners, and 7 untrained subjects performed an incremental test to determine maximal oxygen uptake and a 1-min all-out test to determine BLC and oxygen uptake recovery curves. BLC kinetics was evaluated to assess the quantity of lactate accumulated during exercise (QlaA), lactate removal ability (k2), and quantity of lactate removed from 0 to 10 min postexercise (QlaR). Oxygen uptake off-kinetics was evaluated to assess the decay time constants (τ1 and τ2); moreover, EPOC was measured during the first 10 min after exercise. While sprinters had 98%-100% and 94%-100% likelihood of having the highest EPOC and decay time constants, endurance runners had 98%-100% and 95%-100% likelihood of having the lowest EPOC and decay time constants. EPOC was correlated with QlaA (r = 0.74) and QlaR (r = 0.61). τ1 and τ2 were correlated with maximal oxygen uptake (r > -0.57), k2 (r > -0.48), and QlaR relative to QlaA (r > -0.60). Our findings indicate that oxygen uptake recovery is associated with fast lactate removal and aerobic training. Furthermore, the metabolites derived from anaerobic energy production seem to induce a greater EPOC after all-out exercise.

  10. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Training on Vascular Health and Blood Pressure in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feairheller, Deborah L.; Diaz, Keith M.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Thakkar, Sunny R.; Veerabhadrappa, Praveen; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Ling, Chenyi; Williamson, Sheara T.; Kretzschmar, Jan; Lee, Hojun; Grimm, Heather; Babbitt, Dianne M.; Vin, Charmie; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Crabbe, Deborah L.; Brown, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    As healthcare progresses toward individualized medicine, understanding how different racial groups respond to lifestyle interventions is valuable. It is established that African Americans have disproportionate levels of cardiovascular disease and impaired vascular health, and clinical practice guidelines suggest lifestyle interventions as the first line of treatment. Recently, we reported six months of aerobic exercise improved inflammatory markers, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and levels of circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) in African American adults. This study is a subgroup analysis of the aerobic exercise-induced changes in vascular health and blood pressure (BP) measures; carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD), ambulatory BP, and office BP. Sedentary African American adults (53.4±6.2yrs;21F,5M) showed improved vascular health, but no change in BP. Carotid artery IMT decreased 6.4%, plasma NO levels increased 76.6%, plasma EMP levels decreased, percent FMD increased 59.6%, and FMD/NMD ratio increased 36.2% (P aerobic exercise training is sufficient to elicit improvements in vascular structure and function in African Americans, even without improvements in BP measures or NMD (i.e., smooth muscle function). To our knowledge, this is the first study to report such findings in African Americans. PMID:24779748

  11. Prior exercise training increases collateral-dependent blood flow in rats after acute femoral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H T; Laughlin, M H; Terjung, R L

    2000-10-01

    We evaluated whether prior training would improve collateral blood flow (BF) to the calf muscles after acute-onset occlusion of the femoral artery. Exercise training was performed in the absence of any vascular occlusion. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ( approximately 325 g) were kept sedentary (n = 14), limited to cage activity, or exercise trained (n = 14) for 6 wk by treadmill running. Early in the day of measurement, animals were surgically prepared for BF determination, and the femoral arteries were occluded bilaterally. Four to five hours later, collateral BF was determined twice during treadmill running with the use of (141)Ce and (85)Sr microspheres: first, at a demanding speed and, second, after a brief rest and at a higher speed. The absence of any further increase in BF at the higher speed indicated that maximal collateral BF was measured. Prior training increased calf muscle BF by approximately 70% compared with sedentary animals; however, absolute BF remained below values previously observed in animals with a well-developed collateral vascular tree. Thus prior training appeared to optimize the use of the existing collateral circuit. This implies that altered vasoresponsiveness induced in normal nonoccluded vessels with exercise training serves to improve collateral BF to the periphery.

  12. Health benefits of Tai Chi exercise: improved balance and blood pressure in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Everard W; Sykes, Kevin S; Tang, Wai K

    2004-03-01

    Tai Chi has been widely practiced as a Chinese martial art that focuses on slow sequential movements, providing a smooth, continuous and low intensity activity. It has been promoted to improve balance and strength and to reduce falls in the elderly, especially those 'at risk'. The potential benefits in healthy younger age cohorts and for wider aspects of health have received less attention. The present study documented prospective changes in balance and vascular responses for a community sample of middle-aged women. Seventeen relatively sedentary but healthy normotensive women aged 33-55 years were recruited into a three times per week, 12-week Tai Chi exercise programme. A further 17 sedentary subjects matched for age and body size were recruited as a control group. Dynamic balance measured by the Functional Reach Test was significantly improved following Tai Chi, with significant decreases in both mean systolic (9.71 mmHg) and diastolic (7.53 mmHg) blood pressure. The data confirm that Tai Chi exercise can be a good choice of exercise for middle-aged adults, with potential benefits for ageing as well as the aged.

  13. Less invasive blood sampling in the animal laboratory: clinical chemistry and haematology of blood obtained by the Triatominae bug Dipetalogaster maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvardsen, S N; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M; Ritz, C; Sørensen, D B

    2012-04-01

    Dipetalogaster maximus (Dipmax), a blood-sucking bug belonging to the family Reduviidae, has been used to obtain blood samples, for example for clinical chemistry and haematology, in a variety of zoo animals and wildlife. Using this bug allows stress-free blood sampling as the bug is able to draw blood without the mammal noticing the bug. In laboratory animal science, the need for blood samples from unstressed animals may arise, especially in animal behaviour research. The use of Dipmax bugs may prove a valuable tool for this purpose. To validate the method, we compared an array of standard blood parameters sampled from New Zealand White rabbits, sampled either by the use of bugs or by the conventional method; puncture of vena auricularis caudalis. The overall hypothesis was that there was no significant difference in clinical chemistry and haematological parameters between the bug method and the conventional method. A total of 17 clinical parameters as well as 12 haematological parameters were measured and compared in New Zealand White rabbits. The results showed that for 13 of these 29 analysed parameters, the bug method and the conventional method did not give significantly different results, and the obtained results were thus directly comparable. For the remaining parameters the obtained results were significantly different. However, all parameters were measurable in the bug samples. The influences of the bug metabolism on these parameters are discussed.

  14. Effect of Qigong exercise on cognitive function, blood pressure and cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy middle-aged subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladawan, Suphannika; Klarod, Kultida; Philippe, Marc; Menz, Verena; Versen, Inga; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-08-01

    To investigate effects of Qigong exercise on cognitive function, blood pressure and cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy middle-aged subjects. Study part 1 examined the effects of Qigong exercise in 12 subjects (5 males, 7 females, aged 52.2±7.1years) who performed Qigong for 8 weeks (60min sessions, 3 times/week). Study part 2 evaluated the detraining effects 12 weeks after cessation of Qigong. Cognitive function (Digit Span Forward and Backward Test, Trail Making Tests part A and B), blood pressure, and exercise performance were determined at baseline, immediately after the training programme, and after the detraining period. Qigong exercise showed a significant improvement of Trail Making Tests part A (p=0.04), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.005), mean arterial pressure (pQigong exercise effectively improved attention, brain processing speed, blood pressure and maximal workload. However, these improvements disappeared 12 weeks after cessation of Qigong. Consequently, performing Qigong regularly is important to maintain related health effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Excessive blood pressure increase with exercise and risk of all-cause mortality and cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzas-Mosquera, María C; Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Peteiro, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    The association of an excessive blood pressure increase with exercise (EBPIE) on cardiovascular outcomes remains controversial. We sought to assess its impact on the risk of all-cause mortality and major cardiac events in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for stress testing. Exercise echocardiography was performed in 10 047 patients with known or suspected CAD. An EBPIE was defined as an increase in systolic blood pressure with exercise ≥ 80 mmHg. The endpoints were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events (MACE), including cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Overall, 573 patients exhibited an EBPIE during the tests. Over a mean follow-up of 4·8 years, there were 1950 deaths (including 725 cardiac deaths), 1477 MI and 1900 MACE. The cumulative 10-year rates of all-cause mortality, cardiac death, nonfatal MI and MACE were 32·9%, 13·1%, 26·9% and 33% in patients who did not develop an EBPIE vs. 18·9%, 4·7%, 17·5% and 20·7% in those experiencing an EBPIE, respectively (P mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0·73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·59-0·91, P = 0·004), cardiac death (HR 0·67, 95% CI 0·46-0·98, P = 0·04), MI (HR 0·67, 95% CI 0·52-0·86, P = 0·002) and MACE (HR 0·69, 95% CI 0·56-0·86, P = 0·001). An EBPIE was associated with a significantly lower risk of mortality and MACE in patients with known or suspected CAD referred for stress testing. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  16. The Effect of Concurrent Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise on Stress, Anxiety, Depressive Symptoms, and Blood Pressure in Renal Transplant Female Patients: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shakoor

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and high blood pressure are known to be important issues among renal transplant patients. Objective: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of selected exercises on blood pressure, stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure among renal transplant patients. Method: Thirty two women patients (aged, 20-50 years with 2 to 3 years post renal transplantation history were voluntarily and objectively recruited. Participants were randomly divided into two groups, exercise (n=16 and control (n=16. The exercise group performed 10 weeks of exercise 3 days per week, and for 60-90 minutes per session. The control group involved no exercise. The DASS21 questionnaire was used to collect psychological data, and blood pressure was measured before and after 10 weeks of exercise. Data analysis was conducted using dependent and independent t-tests. Results: Concurrent exercise significantly reduced anxiety, stress, depressive symptoms, and systolic blood pressure in the exercise group only (p=0.000. Conclusion: Ten weeks of low-intensity exercise can be an effective measure to improve the stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure in renal transplant patients. Our results suggest that a regular pattern of selected exercises can be effective on stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure and may be beneficial for renal transplant patients. Keywords: Selected exercise, Stress, Anxiety, Depressive symptoms, Renal transplant

  17. Effectiveness of blood flow restricted exercise compared with standard exercise in patients with recurrent low back pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Shinichi; Ludin, Arimi Fitri Mat; Clift, Rachel; Nakazawa, Masato; Law, Timothy D; Rush, Laura J; Manini, Todd M; Thomas, James S; Russ, David W; Clark, Brian C

    2016-02-12

    Low back pain is a highly prevalent condition in the United States and has a staggeringly negative impact on society in terms of expenses and disability. It has previously been suggested that rehabilitation strategies for persons with recurrent low back pain should be directed to the medial back muscles as these muscles provide functional support of the lumbar region. However, many individuals with low back pain cannot safely and effectively induce trunk muscle adaptation using traditional high-load resistance exercise, and no viable low-load protocols to induce trunk extensor muscle adaptation exist. Herein, we present the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial that will investigate the "cross-transfer" of effects of a novel exercise modality, blood flow restricted exercise, on cross-sectional area (primary outcome), strength and endurance (secondary outcomes) of trunk extensor muscles, as well as the pain, disability, and rate of recurrence of low back pain (tertiary outcomes). This is a single-blinded, single-site, randomized controlled trial. A minimum of 32 (and up to 40) subjects aged 18 to 50 years with recurrent low back pain and poor trunk extensor muscle endurance will be recruited, enrolled and randomized. After completion of baseline assessments, participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive a 10-week resistance exercise training program with blood flow restriction (BFR exercise group) or without blood flow restriction (control exercise group). Repeat assessments will be taken immediately post intervention and at 12 weeks after the completion of the exercise program. Furthermore, once every 4 weeks during a 36-week follow-up period, participants will be asked to rate their perceived disability and back pain over the past 14 days. This study will examine the potential for blood flow restricted exercise applied to appendicular muscles to result in a "cross-transfer" of therapeutic effect to the lumbar musculature in individuals with

  18. Effect of aerobic exercise on blood lipid levels in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiem Mawi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High blood total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and triglycerides (TG, and low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C are related to risk for coronary heart disease (CHD development. Growing evidence indicates that physical exercise can prevent at least some of the negative effects on health associated with post. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of regular aerobic exercise for 12 weeks on the levels of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and triglycerides. An experimental study was conducted comprising 62 postmenopausal women, aged 50-70 years, not on hormonal therapy, consuming a regular diet, living in East and South Jakarta, and willing to perform aerobic exercises regularly. The results of this study showed that all four lipid levels differed significantly between the control group and the intervention group, the respective mean levels ± SD for TC being 228.0 ± 39.7 mg/dL vs. 171.6 ± 18.4 mg/dL, (p = 0.000; for LDL-C 149.0 ± 36.9 mg/dL vs. 97.7 ± 17.8 mg/dL, (p = 0.000; for HDL-C 50.9 ± 3.9 mg/dL vs. 71.5 ± 6.7 mg/dL, (p = 0.000; and for triglycerides 150.5 ± 67.5 mg/dL vs. 95.0 ± 37.8 mg/dL (p = 0.000. Thus practitioners recommending exercise for coronary artery disease risk reduction in postmenopausal women.

  19. Actin Immobilization on Chitin for Purifying Myosin II: A Laboratory Exercise That Integrates Concepts of Molecular Cell Biology and Protein Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Marcelle Gomes; Grossi, Andre Luiz; Pereira, Elisangela Lima Bastos; da Cruz, Carolina Oliveira; Mendes, Fernanda Machado; Cameron, Luiz Claudio; Paiva, Carmen Lucia Antao

    2008-01-01

    This article presents our experience on teaching biochemical sciences through an innovative approach that integrates concepts of molecular cell biology and protein chemistry. This original laboratory exercise is based on the preparation of an affinity chromatography column containing F-actin molecules immobilized on chitin particles for purifying…

  20. Is the beneficial effect of prior exercise on postprandial lipaemia partly due to redistribution of blood flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Nicholas M; Balanos, George M; Blannin, Andrew K

    2011-06-01

    Preprandial aerobic exercise lowers postprandial lipaemia (a risk factor for coronary heart disease); however, the mechanisms responsible are still not clear. The present study investigated whether blood flow to skeletal muscle and/or the liver was increased in the postprandial period after exercise, relative to a control trial, and whether this resulted from increased cardiac output or redistribution of flow. Eight overweight inactive males, aged 49.4±10.5 years (mean±S.D.), acted as their own controls in a counterbalanced design, either walking briskly for 90 min at 60% V̇O2max (maximal oxygen uptake), or resting in the lab, on the evening of day 1. The following morning, a fasting blood sample was collected, participants consumed a high-fat breakfast, and further venous blood samples were drawn hourly for 6 h. Immediately after blood sampling, Doppler ultrasound was used to measure cardiac output and blood flow through both the femoral artery of one leg and the hepatic portal vein, with the ultrasonographer blinded to trial order. The total postprandial triacylglycerol response was 22% lower after exercise (P=0.001). Blood flow through the femoral artery and the hepatic portal vein was increased by 19% (Ppostprandial period following exercise; however, postprandial cardiac output did not differ between trials (P=0.065). Redistribution of blood flow, to both exercised skeletal muscle and the liver, may therefore play a role in reducing the plasma triacylglycerol response to a high-fat meal on the day after an exercise bout.

  1. Defatted Soy Flour Supplementation of Wheat Bread ameliorates Blood Chemistry and Oxidative Stress in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebuehi, O A T; Okafor, H K

    2015-01-01

    Bread is a convenience food made from wheat flour, which is derived from wheat and whose technology of which dates back to the ancient Egyptians. It is therefore of economic advantage if wheat importation to Nigeria can be reduced by substitution with other suitable materials. This led to the whole idea of composite flour, which is a mixture of wheat with other materials to form suitable flour for baking'purposes. The study is to ascertain the effect of supplementation of bread with defatted soy flour on blood chemistry and oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Wheat flour mixed with high quality defatted Soy flour at several ratios: 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40. The 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40 flour mixtures were used to prepare 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% Soya bread, respectively. The control bread (100%) was prepared with 100% wheat flour. Bread produced with these blends compared with regular 100% wheat bread and was tested for chemical and. organoleptic characteristics. Sixteen rats were randomly given codes and allocated to 2 different groups via tables with random numbers to feed on the 100% wheat blend and soy supplemented bread (90% wheat flour/10% soy flour) for 28 days. The weights and feedintake of the rats were computed on dailybasis. Blood was taken for biochemical assays and liver was used for antioxidant assay, that is activities of catalase, super oxider dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathine level. The activities of serum SOD and catalase were significantly increase (pbread as compared to the control, (wheat bread) and a significant decrease (pbread as compared to the control. There was a significant decrease (pbread.

  2. Effects of pentobarbital, isoflurane, or medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol anesthesia on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood chemistry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Toshio; Oshima, Yutaka; Hashizume, Naoki; Nakai, Makoto; Ajimi, Shozo; Imatanaka, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) is commonly examined for pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. Two common means of anesthesia before euthanasia and bronchoalveolar lavage in rats are intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital and inhalation of isoflurane. Medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol is an alternative anesthesia to pentobarbital for animal welfare; however, the effect of this combination on BALF and blood chemistry is unknown. Here, we compared the effects of anesthesia by intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital or one of two combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol (dose, 0.375-2.0-2.5 or 0.15-2.0-2.5 mg/kg) or by inhalation of isoflurane on BALF and blood chemistry in rats with or without pulmonary inflammation. In BALF, we determined total protein, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count and neutrophil count. In serum, we conducted a general chemistry screen. After anesthesia with pentobarbital or isoflurane, there were no significant differences between any of the BALF or blood chemistry parameters with or without inflammation. After anesthesia with either of the combinations of medetomidine-midazolam-butorphanol, lactate dehydrogenase, total cell count, neutrophil count, and almost all of the blood chemistry parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane; however, BALF albumin and serum glucose were significantly increased in rats without inflammation. After the combination of low-dose medetomidine in rats with inflammation, BALF parameters were comparable with those observed after pentobarbital or isoflurane. Our results show that, of the anesthetics examined, inhalation of isoflurane is the most appropriate means of anesthesia when examining BALF or serum for toxicity studies in rats.

  3. Human adipose tissue blood flow during prolonged exercise, III. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade, nicotinic acid and glucose infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J

    1981-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured in six male subjects by the 133Xe-washout technique during 3-4 h of exercise at a work load corresponding to an oxygen uptake of about 1.71/min. The measurements were done during control conditions, during blockade of lipolysis by nicotinic...... with the hypothesis that adipose tissue vasodilation during exercise is secondary to metabolic events connected to lipolysis....

  4. Oral L-arginine modulates blood lactate and interleukin-6 after exercise in HIV-infected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, G N; Tavares, A M V; Vieira, P J C; Sprinz, E; Ribeiro, J P

    2014-04-01

    The acute administration of L-arginine (L-arg), a nitric oxide (NO) precursor, reduces lactate (LAC) concentration after exercise in healthy individuals. Lower concentration of L-arg may enhance the action of some inflammatory cytokines in HIV-1 infected patients. We tested the hypothesis that acute L-arg administration may reduce post-exercise blood LAC and inflammatory cytokines levels in HIV-infected patients. 10 HIV-infected men performed 2 maximal incremental cardiopulmonary exercise tests, separated by one week. 30 min before each test, patients received oral placebo or 20 g of L-arg, in random order. Blood LAC, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were measured before and up to 60 min after exercise. L-arg administration had no significant effect on exercise performance. Compared to placebo, L-arg administration reduced maximal post-exercise blood LAC from 8.7±0.6 to 6.9±0.4 mmol.L-1 (p<0.05). L-arg administration had no significant effect on TNF-alpha or IL-10 concentrations, but increased post-exercise IL-6 (placebo=19±3pg.mL-1; L-arg=63±8 pg.mL-1; p<0.05). In HIV-1 infected men, acute administration of L-arg reduces post-exercise blood LAC and increases IL-6 levels, suggesting the activation of the L-arg-NO pathway, with possible anti-inflammatory consequences. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Effects of 100-μT extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields exposure on hematograms and blood chemistry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Yemao; Zhang, Jiangong; Liu, Xingfa; Ruan, Guoran; Chaugai, Sandip; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) affect health or not. Here, we constructed a 100-μT/50 Hz electromagnetic field atmosphere. A total of 128 rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the ELF EMF group and the sham group. The ELF EMF group was exposed to 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF for 20 h per day for three months; at the same time the other group was exposed to a sham device without ELF EMF. During the three months, the weight was recorded every 2 weeks, and the water intake and food intake of the animals were recorded weekly. The hematologic parameters were detected before and after the exposure, whereas blood chemistry analysis was performed every 4 weeks. The general condition of the exposed rats was not affected by ELF EMF. Compared with the sham group, the hematograms were not significantly altered in the ELF EMF group. Similarly, the blood chemistry (including lipid profile, blood glucose, liver function and renal function of rats) from the ELF EMF group showed no difference compared with rats from the control group during the three months exposure. The present study indicated that short-term exposure of 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF may not affect hematograms and blood chemistry in rats. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Does aerobic exercise increase 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure among workers with high occupational physical activity? - A RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Krause, Niklas; Clays, Els

    2017-01-01

    .9–3.8). Cleaners with high aerobic workload exhibited particularly high 24-hour ABP increases: systolic 6.0 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4–9.6), and diastolic 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI 1.3–6.4). CONCLUSION Aerobic exercise increased 24-hour ABP among cleaners. This adverse effect raises questions about the safety and intended benefits......OBJECTIVE High occupational physical activity (OPA) increases cardiovascular risk and aerobic exercise has been recommended for reducing this risk. This paper investigates the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among cleaners with high OPA....... METHODS Hundred and sixteen cleaners between 18 and 65 years were randomized. During the 4-month intervention period, the aerobic exercise group (AE) (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (2 × 30 minutes/week), while the reference group (REF) (n = 59) attended lectures. Between-group differences...

  7. Low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise has no transient effect on blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessler, Karla; Buys, Roselien; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces blood pressure (BP). However, less is known about the transient effect of a single bout of exercise on BP. Isometric handgrip exercise has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic tool to lower BP. We aimed to investigate the acute effect of isometric handgrip exercise on BP in CAD patients. Twenty-one male CAD patients were included. All patients completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control and one low-intensity isometric handgrip session. BP was measured by means of a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor preintervention, for 1 hour in the office and subsequently for 24 hours. Our results suggest that isometric handgrip exercise performed at low intensity is safe in patients with CAD but does not induce a transient reduction in BP. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise training improves blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle of older men via enhanced cGMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Peter Bergmann; Smith Jørgensen, Tue; Egelund, Jon

    2018-01-01

    -induced adaptations in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxidative metabolism during exercise in aging humans. We measured leg hemodynamics and oxidative metabolism during exercise engaging the knee-extensor muscles in young (n=15, 25 ± 1 years) and older (n=15, 72 ± 1 years) subjects before and after...... group; however, these effects of PDE5 inhibition were not detected after training. These findings suggest a role for enhanced cGMP signaling in the training-induced improvement of regulation of blood flow in contracting skeletal muscle of older men.......Physical activity has the potential to offset age-related impairments in the regulation of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect of physical activity remain poorly understood. The present study examined the role of cGMP in training...

  9. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Lin Fan

    Full Text Available Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF. We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF, [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10 with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2. During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (P0.05. The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05. We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that, during exercise below RC, chemoreception is responsive, while above RC the ventilatory response to CO2 is blunted.

  10. Single Sodium Pyruvate Ingestion Modifies Blood Acid-Base Status and Post-Exercise Lactate Concentration in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Olek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg−1 of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% O2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05 and remained elevated (nonsignificant after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise.

  11. Evaluation of venous blood gas levels, blood chemistry and haemocytometric parameters in milk fed veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambelluca, S; Fiore, E; Sadocco, A; Gianesella, M; Vazzana, I; Orefice, T; Morgante, M

    2016-12-01

    An evaluation of blood chemistry profile in relation to specific stages of livestock cycle can help better understand variations in physiological conditions in order to adjust management systems to animal needs. In addition to basal hematological investigation, the acid-base balance and blood gases are essential tools in evaluating metabolism in calves. The relationship between blood gas parameters, diet and growth should be further investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in acid-base status, blood gases, serum chemistry and hematological parameters in veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle. One hundred twenty-eight healthy cross breeding calves were enrolled in a farm in North-East Italy. Blood samplings were carried out from the jugular vein on day 1 (t1), 60 (t2) and 150 (t3) after arrival. Blood gas analysis was performed and hematological parameters were evaluated. One-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test were performed to assess differences between blood parameter values at the different periods. The main differences in blood gas parameter levels during the livestock cycle concerned pH, Base Excess and HCO3 with higher values recorded in t3. Urea, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and bilirubin mean values were significantly higher in t1 than in t2 and t3. Aspartate aminotransferase increased from t1 to t2 and t3. Alkaline Phosphatase was higher in t2. Fe levels severely dropped in t2 and in t3, and the decrease led to a restrained but significant reduction in haemoglobin values. A correspondent decrease in the other haemocytometric parameters was found.

  12. Changes in the lipid composition of blood under the influence of a single submaximal exercise capacity (experimental research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva E.N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In acute physical exercise, there is a change in oxygen delivery working tissues, blood gas transport function and efficiency of the use of oxygen by cells in the process of metabolism, which is the basis for compensation for physical activities. Lipid metabolism plays an important role in the energy supply of muscle activity. The aim of our research is to study the effect of a single submaximal exercise capacity by changing the lipid profile of peripheral blood. Materials and Methods. The study was performed on 18 white rats. Model of acute exercise: animals swam 4 minutes with a load weighing 20% of body weight. Blood sampling was performed by intracardiac way, right after exercise. The blood lipid profile was determined. Results. In the experiment reported an increase in triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoproteins, but the atherogenic ratio is maintained at the control values, due to a significant increase in the level of high-density lipoprotein. Conclusion. Acute submaximal exercise capacity by untrained body has an atherogenic effect. Working muscles during physical activity is a major consumer of free fatty acids, which are the source of atherogenic lipoprotein form of the very low and low density.

  13. Nitric oxide and prostaglandins influence local skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in humans: coupling between local substrate uptake and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Langberg, Henning; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine

    2006-01-01

    -legged dynamic knee-extension exercise. Local blockade was produced by infusing nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin directly in the muscle via a microdialysis catheter. Blood flow and glucose uptake were measured in the region of blockade and in two additional regions of vastus lateralis muscle 1...

  14. The effect of varying protein levels on blood chemistry, food consumption, and behavior of captive seaducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Perry, M.C.; Olsen, Glenn H.

    2005-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is a primary wintering area for scoters and the long-tailed ducks (Clangia hyemalis) that migrate along the Atlantic Flyway. Recently, the Chesapeake Bay had undergone an ecosystem shift and little is known about how this is affecting the seaduck populations. We are determining what are the preferred food sources of the seaducks wintering on the Bay and analyzing the factors influencing prey selection whether it is prey composition, energy assimilated, prey availability, or a combination of any or all of these factors. We have established a captive colony of surf (Melanitta perspicillata) and white-winged scoters (Melanitta fusca) as well as long-tailed ducks at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to allow us to examine these factors in a more controlled environment. This project contains a multitude of experiments and the resultant data will be compiled into a compartmental model on the feeding ecology of seaducks wintering on the Bay. The first experiment entailed feeding groups of each species (four ducks per pen of equal sex ratio, if possible, and four pens per species) three diets varying in percent protein levels from November to February. Each diet was randomly assigned to each pen and the amount of food consumed was recorded each day. New feed was given when all existing food was consumed. Behavioral trials and blood profiles were completed on all study birds to determine the effects of the varying diets. There were no significant differences in food consumption, blood chemistry, and behavior detected at the 5% level among the diets for all three species of interest. There was a seasonal effect determined based on the food consumption data for white-winged scoters, but not for surf scoters or long-tailed ducks. The blood profiles of the surf scoters were compared to blood profiles of wild surf scoters and a there was no difference detected at the 5% level. As a health check of the ducks an aspergillosis test was run on the blood obtained

  15. Acute ingestion of dietary nitrate increases muscle blood flow via local vasodilation during handgrip exercise in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Jennifer C.; Racine, Matthew L.; Hearon, Christopher M.; Kunkel, Megan; Luckasen, Gary J.; Larson, Dennis G.; Allen, Jason D.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Dietary nitrate ( NO 3 − ) is converted to nitrite ( NO 2 − ) and can be further reduced to the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) amid a low O2 environment. Accordingly, dietary NO 3 − increases hind limb blood flow in rats during treadmill exercise; however, the evidence of such an effect in humans is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that acute dietary NO 3 − (via beetroot [BR] juice) increases forearm blood flow (FBF) via local vasodilation during handgrip exercise in young adults (n ...

  16. Linear relationship between in distribution of thallium-201 and blood flow in ischemic and nonischemic myocardium during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, A.P.; Morris, K.G.; Murdock, R.; Bruno, F.P.; Cobb, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the myocardial distribution of thallium-201 and regional myocrdial blood flow during ischemia and the physiologic stress of exercise. Studies were carried out in six dogs with chronically implanted catheters in the atrium and aorta and a snare on the circumflex coronary artery distal to the first marginal branch. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured during quiet, resting conditions using 7 to 10 ] of radioisotope-labeled microspheres. Each dog was then exercised on a treadmill at speeds of 5 to 9 mph at a 5/sup o/ incline. (After 1 minute of exercise the cirumflex coronary artery was occluded and thallium-201 and a second label of microspheres were injected. Exercise was continued for 5 minutes. The dogs were then sacrificed and the left ventricle was sectioned into approximately 80 1-2-g samples to compare thallium-201 activity and regional myocardial blood flow. The maximum increase in blood flow ranged from 3.3 to 7.2 times resting control values. Each dog had myocardial samples in which blood flow was markedly reduced, to less than 0.10 ml/min/g. In each dog there was a close linear relationship between thallium-201 distribution and direct measurements of regional myocardial blood flow. Linear regression analyses demonstrated a correlation coefficient of 0.98 or greater in each dog. These data indicate that during the physiologic stress of exercise, the myocardial distribution of thallium activity is linearly related to regional myocardial blood flow in both the ischemic and nonischemic regions

  17. Effects of pomegranate extract on blood flow and vessel diameter after high-intensity exercise in young, healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erica J; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Trexler, Eric T; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2017-04-01

    The effects of pomegranate extract (PE) supplementation were evaluated on high-intensity exercise performance, blood flow, vessel diameter, oxygen saturation (SPO 2 ), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP). In a randomized, crossover design, nineteen recreationally resistance-trained participants were randomly assigned to PE (1000 mg) or placebo (PL), which were consumed 30 min prior to a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) on bench and leg press. The RSA consisted of ten six-second sprints on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer with 30 s recovery. Brachial artery blood flow and vessel diameter were assessed by ultrasound. Blood flow, vessel diameter, SPO 2 , HR, and BP were assessed at baseline, 30 min post ingestion, immediately post exercise (IPost), and 30 min post exercise (30minPost). With PE, blood flow significantly increased IPost RSA (mean difference = 18.49 mL min -1 ; P exercise performance enhancement from increased delivery of substrates and oxygen. The acute timing and capsule form of PE may be advantageous to athletic populations due to ergogenic effects, taste, and convenience.

  18. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Higher physical fatigue predicts adherence to a 12-week exercise intervention in women with elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadja, Julie; Tomfohr, Lianne; Jiménez, Jessica A; Edwards, Kate M; Rock, Cheryl L; Calfas, Karen; Mills, Paul J

    2012-03-01

    To investigate predictors of exercise adherence to a 12-week exercise intervention for sedentary women and men with elevated blood pressure (BP). Fifty-one otherwise healthy and unmedicated adults (27 women and 24 men) with elevated BP (≥120/80 mmHg but social support. Regression analysis revealed that mean exercise minutes/week were predicted by higher age (p higher cardiorespiratory fitness (p higher physical fatigue prior to the intervention spent more time exercising during the 12-week intervention than those with lower levels of physical fatigue. This relationship persisted after controlling for age, BMI, cardiorespiratory fitness, level of habitual physical activity prior to the intervention, self-efficacy for exercise habits, and social support (p < .01). The gender by physical fatigue interaction explained 13.9% of the variance in mean minutes exercised/week above and beyond the effects of covariates. Both gender and fatigue should be considered when developing exercise interventions, such that more initial physical fatigue in women is associated with a tendency to devote greater amounts of time to exercising.

  20. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P After the intervention period, the magnitude and pattern of this phenomenon for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were similar between groups (TG -8.8, -4.1, and -5.7 mmHg, respectively; P exercise promotes reduction in post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  1. Recovery After High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise in Elite Soccer Players Using VEINOPLUS Sport Technology for Blood-Flow Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieuzen, François; Pournot, Hervé; Roulland, Rémy; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Context Electric muscle stimulation has been suggested to enhance recovery after exhaustive exercise by inducing an increase in blood flow to the stimulated area. Previous studies have failed to support this hypothesis. We hypothesized that the lack of effect shown in previous studies could be attributed to the technique or device used. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of a recovery intervention using an electric blood-flow stimulator on anaerobic performance and muscle damage in professional soccer players after intermittent, exhaustive exercise. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting National Institute of Sport, Expertise, and Performance (INSEP). Patients or Other Participants Twenty-six healthy professional male soccer players. Intervention(s) The athletes performed an intermittent fatiguing exercise followed by a 1-hour recovery period, either passive or using an electric blood-flow stimulator (VEINOPLUS). Participants were randomly assigned to a group before the experiment started. Main Outcome Measures(s) Performances during a 30-second all-out exercise test, maximal vertical countermovement jump, and maximal voluntary contraction of the knee extensor muscles were measured at rest, immediately after the exercise, and 1 hour and 24 hours later. Muscle enzymes indicating muscle damage (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase) and hematologic profiles were analyzed before and 1 hour and 24 hours after the intermittent fatigue exercise. Results The electric-stimulation group had better 30-second all-out performances at 1 hour after exercise (P = .03) in comparison with the passive-recovery group. However, no differences were observed in muscle damage markers, maximal vertical countermovement jump, or maximal voluntary contraction between groups (P > .05). Conclusions Compared with passive recovery, electric stimulation using this blood-flow stimulator improved anaerobic performance at 1 hour postintervention. No changes in muscle damage

  2. Statistical methods for estimating normal blood chemistry ranges and variance in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), Shasta Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Nelson, Nancy C.

    1975-01-01

    Gaussian and nonparametric (percentile estimate and tolerance interval) statistical methods were used to estimate normal ranges for blood chemistry (bicarbonate, bilirubin, calcium, hematocrit, hemoglobin, magnesium, mean cell hemoglobin concentration, osmolality, inorganic phosphorus, and pH for juvenile rainbow (Salmo gairdneri, Shasta strain) trout held under defined environmental conditions. The percentile estimate and Gaussian methods gave similar normal ranges, whereas the tolerance interval method gave consistently wider ranges for all blood variables except hemoglobin. If the underlying frequency distribution is unknown, the percentile estimate procedure would be the method of choice.

  3. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements in Adults: A Review on the Effects of Dietary Factors and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Joris

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Improving cerebrovascular function may be a key mechanism whereby a healthy lifestyle, of which a healthy diet combined with increased physical activity levels is a cornerstone, protects against cognitive impairments. In this respect, effects on cerebral blood flow (CBF—a sensitive physiological marker of cerebrovascular function—are of major interest. This review summarizes the impact of specific dietary determinants and physical exercise on CBF in adults and discusses the relation between these effects with potential changes in cognitive function. A limited number of randomized controlled trials have already demonstrated the beneficial effects of an acute intake of nitrate and polyphenols on CBF, but evidence for a relationship between these effects as well as improvements in cognitive functioning is limited. Moreover, long-term trans-resveratrol supplementation has been shown to increase CBF in populations at increased risk of accelerated cognitive decline. Long-term supplementation of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids may also increase CBF, but related effects on cognitive performance have not yet been found. Significant decreases in cerebral perfusion were observed by commonly consumed amounts of caffeine, while alcohol intake was shown to increase CBF in a dose-dependent way. However, the long-term effects are not clear. Finally, long-term exercise training may be a promising approach to improve CBF, as increases in perfusion may contribute to the beneficial effects on cognitive functioning observed following increased physical activity levels.

  4. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-07-15

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  5. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled...... to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples...... to baseline with progressive dehydration (P metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P

  6. The Effects of 8-Weeks Aerobic Exercise Program on Blood Lipids and Cholesterol Profile of Smokers vs. Non Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taifour, Akef; AL-Shishani, Ahmad; Khasawneh, Aman; AL-Nawaiseh, Ali; Bakeer, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-week aerobic exercise program on blood lipids and cholesterol profile of smoker's vs. non-smokers. A total of 34 male subjects (18 non-smokers and 16 smokers) took part in this study. Both groups were pre- and post tested in their blood-lipids and cholesterol profile before and after the 8-week…

  7. Individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in peripheral artery disease patients: Are the mean values describing what is happening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aluísio H R A; Miranda, Alessandra S; Correia, Marilia A; Soares, Antônio H G; Cucato, Gabriel G; Sobral Filho, Dario C; Gomes, Silvana L; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the average and individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in patients with peripheral artery disease. Thirteen patients underwent three experimental sessions: walking exercise, resistance exercise, and control. Ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were obtained before and until 24 hours after sessions. The mean cardiovascular values during 24 hours, awake, and sleep periods were similar (P > 0.05) after the three experimental sessions. The analysis of individual data revealed that during 24 hours, eight of 13 patients reduced systolic or diastolic blood pressure in ≥4.0 mm Hg in at least one of the exercise session; furthermore, most of these patients presented greater responses after resistance exercise. The clinical characteristics of patients seem to influence the blood pressure responses after exercises. Individual data showed that part of patients presented clinically significant decreases in blood pressure, showing that these patients have acute cardiovascular benefits after performing an acute bout of exercise. Although, in average, a bout of walking or resistance exercise did not decrease ambulatory blood pressure in peripheral artery disease patients, the individual data revealed that most patients presented clinically relevant blood pressure reductions, especially after resistance exercise. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of pre-exercise ingestion of corinthian currant on endurance performance and blood redox status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Papanikolaou, Konstantinos; Papoutsis, Alexandros; Selemekou, Maria; Karathanos, Vaios T; Draganidis, Dimitris; Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2018-02-22

    The present study investigated the effect of Corinthian currant pre-exercise supplementation on metabolism, performance and blood redox status during, and after prolonged exercise. Eleven healthy participants (21-45y) performed a 90-min constant-intensity (60-70% VO 2max ) submaximal-trial, plus a time-trial (TT) to exhaustion (95% VO 2max ) after consuming an isocaloric (1.5g CHO/kg BM) amount of randomly assigned Corinthian currant or glucose-drink, or water (control). Blood was drawn at baseline, pre-exercise, 30min, 60min, 90min of submaximal-trial, post-TT, and 1h post-TT. Post-ingestion blood glucose (GLU) under Corinthian currant was higher compared with water, and similar compared with glucose-drink throughout the study. Respiratory quotient under Corinthian currant was similar with glucose-drink and higher than water throughout the submaximal trial. Accordingly, higher CHO and lower fat oxidation were observed under Corinthian currant compared with water. The TT performance was similar between Corinthian currant, glucose-drink and water. Redox status were similar under all three conditions. Reduced glutathione (GSH) declined while total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and uric acid increased during exercise. GSH and TAC returned to baseline, while uric acid remained increased the following 1h. Corinthian currant, although did not alter exercise-mediated redox status changes and performance, was equally effective to a glucose-drink in maintaining GLU levels during prolonged cycling.

  9. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older heart failure (HF patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (aged 68 ± 10 years without large (aorta or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2, b physical function, c cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min (p = 0.01. Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p p ≤ 0.03. Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow.

  10. L-arginine increases endothelial nitric oxide production and reduces blood pressure of rest without changing the exercise pressor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Mota de Lima

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine supplementation has been proposed to improve endothelial. The hypothesis that L-arginine also improves post-exercise hypotension (PEH in hypertensive individuals was tested in this study. Physically active hypertensive women were divided into supplemented (SUP (n = 12, 50 ± 1.8 years and placebo (PLA (n = 14, 51.5 ± 1.6 years groups performing two walking sessions at moderate intensity with interval of 32 days between sessions. Blood samples were collected and blood pressure (BP was measured before and after exercise. In the period between sessions, they remained physically active and received daily 6g of L-arginine or placebo. PLA showed no change in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration and blood pressure at rest or in response to exercise. SUP showed increased basal nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration (26.6 ± 2 to 44.6 ± 4µM, p < .05, which was followed by reduction of basal BP (137/86.2 to 125.8/79mmHg, p < .05. The exercise performed before supplementation did not change the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. After supplementation, the exercise promoted increases in levels from 44.6 ± 4 to 51.8 ± 6µM (p < .05. However, it did not change the PEH. L-arginine supplementation improves the nitrite/nitrate production and decreases the resting BP, but does not change the PEH in hypertensive middle-aged women.

  11. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whistler, Toni; Jones, James F; Unger, Elizabeth R; Vernon, Suzanne D

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS. PMID:15790422

  12. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Elizabeth R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  13. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130∘C prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise, and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise. The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P<0.001. After WBC exercise, the level of IL-6 and IL-1β was also lower (P<0.001 than after control exercise. The obtained results may suggest that cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC.

  14. Blood flow MRI of the human retina/choroid during rest and isometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; San Emeterio Nateras, Oscar; Peng, Qi; Rosende, Carlos A; Duong, Timothy Q

    2012-06-28

    To investigate blood flow (BF) in the human retina/choroid during rest and handgrip isometric exercise using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Four healthy volunteers (25-36 years old) in multiple sessions (1-3) on different days. MRI studies were performed on a 3-Tesla scanner using a custom-made surface coil (7×5cm in diameter) at the spatial resolution of 0.5×0.8×6.0 mm. BF was measured using the pseudo-continuous arterial-spin-labeling technique with background suppression and turbo-spin-echo acquisition. During MRI, subjects rested for 1 minute followed by 1 minute of handgrip, repeating three times, while maintaining stable eye fixation on a target with cued eye blinks at the end of each data acquisition (every 4.6 seconds). Robust BF of the unanesthetized human retina/choroid was detected. Basal BF in the posterior retina/choroid was 149±48 mL/100 mL/min with a mean heart rate of 60±5 beats per minute, mean arterial pressure of 78±5 mm Hg, ocular perfusion pressure of 67±4 mm Hg at rest (mean±SD, n=4 subjects). Handgrip significantly increased retina/choroid BF by 25%±7%, heart rate by 19%±8%, mean arterial pressure by 22%±5% (measured at the middle of the handgrip task), and ocular perfusion pressure by 25%±6% (averaged across the entire handgrip task) (P0.05). This study demonstrates a novel MRI application to image quantitative BF of the human retina/choroid during rest and isometric exercise. Retina/choroid BF increases during brief handgrip exercise, paralleling increases in mean arterial pressure. Handgrip exercise changes ocular perfusion pressure free of potential drug side effect and can be done in the MRI scanner. MRI offers quantitative BF with large field of view without depth limitation, potentially providing insights into retinal pathophysiology.

  15. Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Lotringen, J.H. van; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive vascular effects of exercise training are mediated by acute increases in blood flow. Type 2 diabetes patients show attenuated exercise-induced increases in blood flow, possibly mediated by the endothelin pathway, preventing an optimal stimulus for vascular adaptation. We examined the impact

  16. Potentiation of the NO-cGMP pathway and blood flow responses during dynamic exercise in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Malterer, Katherine R; Mikhail Kellawan, J; Schrage, William G; Wilkins, Brad W; Nicholson, Wayne T; Eisenach, John H; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown nitric oxide (NO) contributes to ~15% of the hyperemic response to dynamic exercise in healthy humans. This NO-mediated vasodilation occurs, in part, via increases in intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is catabolized by phosphodiesterase. We sought to examine the effect of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibition on forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to dynamic handgrip exercise in healthy humans and the role of NO. We hypothesized exercise hyperemia would be augmented by sildenafil citrate (SDF, PDE-5 inhibitor). We further hypothesized any effect of SDF on exercise hyperemia would be abolished with intra-arterial infusion of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-N G -monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA). FBF (Doppler ultrasound) was assessed at rest and during 5 min of dynamic forearm handgrip exercise at 15% of maximal voluntary contraction under control (saline) conditions and during 3 experimental protocols: (1) oral SDF (n = 10), (2) intra-arterial L-NMMA (n = 20), (3) SDF and L-NMMA (n = 10). FBF responses to intra-arterial sodium nitroprusside (NTP, NO donor) were also assessed. FBF increased with exercise (p exercise hyperemia (17 ± 1 to 15 ± 1 mL/dL/min, p exercise hyperemia (p = 0.33). Despite improving NTP-mediated vasodilation, oral SDF failed to augment exercise hyperemia in young, healthy adults. These observations reflect a minor contribution of NO and the cGMP pathway during exercise hyperemia in healthy young humans.

  17. Relative Humidity of 40% Inhibiting the Increase of Pulse Rate, Body Temperature, and Blood Lactic Acid During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Sandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive sweating of the body is a reaction to decrease the heat caused by prolonged exercise at high relative humidity (RH. This situation may cause an increase in pulse rate (PR, body temperature (BT, and blood lactic acid (BLA workout. Objective: This study aimed to prove that a RH of 40% better than a RH of 50% and 60% RH in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Methods: The study was conducted on 54 samples randomly selected from the IKIP PGRI Bali students. The samples were divided into three groups, and each group was given cycling exercise with a load of 80 Watt for 2 x 30 minutes with rest between sets for five minutes. Group-1 of cycling at 40% of RH, Group-2 at a RH of 50%, and the Group-3 at a RH of 60%. Data PR, BT, and BLA taken before and during exercise. The mean difference between groups before and during exercise were analyzed by One-way Anova and a further test used Least Significant Difference (LSD. Significance used was α = 0.05. Results: The mean of PR during exercise was significantly different between groups with p = 0.045, the mean of BT during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.006, and the mean of BLA during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.005 (p <0.05. Also found that PR, BT, and BLA during exercise at 40% RH was lower than 50% RH and 60% RH (p <0.05. Conclusion: Thus, the RH of 40% was better than RH of 50% and 60 % in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Therefore, when practiced in a closed room is expected at 40% relative humidity.

  18. Association between non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and hyper reactive blood pressure response on the exercise treadmill test

    OpenAIRE

    Laurinavicius, A.G.; Bittencourt, M.S.; Blaha, M.J.; Nary, F.C.; Kashiwagi, N.M.; Conceiçao, R.D.; Meneghelo, R.S.; Prado, R.R.; Carvalho, J.A.M.; Nasir, K.; Blumenthal, R.S.; Santos, R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis (HS) is associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk. While Blood pressure hyper-reactive response (HRR) during peak exercise indicates an increased risk of incident hypertension and increased cardiovascular risk, no data on the association of non-alcoholic HS and HRR exists. In this study, we have evaluated the association of HS with HRR.

  19. Blood glucose responses of type-2 diabetics during and after exercise performed at intensities above and below anaerobic threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolysson C. Hiyane

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n1p8 With the objective of analyzing the blood glucose responses during and after exercise performed at 90 and 110% of anaerobic threshold (AT, 10 type-2 diabetes patients (56.9±11.2years; 80.3±14.4kg performed an incremental test (IT on a cycle ergometer. After an initial IT to identify AT, the volunteers participated in three experimental sessions on three different days: 20 minutes’ of cycling at either 90 or 110% of AT, and a control session (CON. Blood glucose was measured at rest, and at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise or control condition, as well as every 15 minutes during a 2-hour postexercise recovery period (Rec. One-way ANOVA did not detect significant differences in blood glucose levels between the sessions at 90 and 110% of AT. Compared to CON, a signifi cant decrease was observed at the 20th minute of exercise, and at the 15th and 60th minutes of Rec from the 90% AT session. Significant reductions were also observed at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise and at the 15th, 30th, 45th, 60th and 90th minutes of Rec from the session at 110% AT. Exercise performed at the higher intensity (110% AT resulted in a tendency of a more pronounced and prolonged hypoglycemic effect during and after exercise, and may be an alternative intensity for glycemic control in type 2 diabetics who do not have cardiovascular complications or other contraindications to exercising at intensities above the AT.

  20. Double product response and diastolic blood pressure in treadmill, stationary bicycle and muscular circuit exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Teixeira Paranhos Lopes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the various causes for cardiovascular problems affecting the world population nowadays, the most relevant risk factors is sedentary lifestyle. Many studies have been carried out to analyse and elucidate main adaptations on the cardiovascular system stimulated by different sorts of exercises.In this way, this study had aimed at comparing the acute response of double product (DP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP after treadmill (TRM, stationary bicycle (BIC or muscle circuit training (MCT exercises. Nine individuals (6 women and 3 men exercised at 60% of heart rate reserve (HRR on the TRM and BIC and at 60% of one repetition maximum (1RM in MCT. The results showed that pre- and post-effort DP were significantly difference in all three exercises. However, DP did not differ among exercise types. The hypotensive DBP pos-effort response was greater in MCT. According to the results, it was concluded that there is no difference on the heart work demand rate estimated by DP among the three exercises and MCT at 60% 1RM provokes a greater hypotensive DBP post-effort response. . Resumo Entre as diversas causas de problemas cardiovasculares que afetam a população mundial, na atualidade, o sedentarismo é apontado como um dos fatores de risco mais relevantes. Vários estudos têm se preocupado em analisar e esclarecer as principais adaptações provocadas pelos diferentes tipos de exercícios sobre o sistema cardiovascular. Seguindo esta linha o presente trabalho teve como objetivo analisar e comparar a resposta aguda do duplo produto (DP e a pressão arterial diastólica (PAD em exercício de esteira, bicicleta estacionária e circuito na musculação. Foram avaliados nove indivíduos sendo seis mulheres e três homens, na esteira, a 60% da freqüência cardíaca de reserva (FCR, na bicicleta estacionária, a 60% FCR e circuito de musculação a 60% de 1 repetição máxima (1RM. Os resultados encontrados apresentaram diferença significativa do DP

  1. Boiling Blood : Chemistry of Vital Fluids 
in Dutch Enlightenment Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwaal, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    What is blood? Despite William Harvey’s discovery of the circulation of blood, many questions about blood itself unanswered. This paper asks how and why Dutch medical men in the eighteenth century initiated studies to understand the properties of blood. Some professor such as Herman Boerhaave and

  2. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti-Pekka E. Rissanen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb], deoxy- (Δ[HHb] and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb], and tissue saturation index (TSI. NIRS inflection points (NIP, reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds (anaerobic threshold (AT, respiratory compensation point (RC; V-slope method was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity (total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01, but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak

  3. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Kayser, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF). We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E) during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF), [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC) and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope) in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10) with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2). During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (Phypoxia, MCAv and [Formula: see text]E slope below RC during exercise were elevated, while the onset of RC occurred at lower exercise intensity (Phypoxia increased [Formula: see text]E at RC (PE slope below RC (P>0.05). The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05). We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that, during exercise below RC, chemoreception is responsive, while above RC the ventilatory response to CO2 is blunted.

  4. Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of exercise training on peripheral blood gene expression in patients with stable angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crossman David C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise training has been shown to reduce angina and promote collateral vessel development in patients with coronary artery disease. However, the mechanism whereby exercise exerts these beneficial effects is unclear. There has been increasing interest in the use of whole genome peripheral blood gene expression in a wide range of conditions to attempt to identify both novel mechanisms of disease and transcriptional biomarkers. This protocol describes a study in which we will assess the effect of a structured exercise programme on peripheral blood gene expression in patients with stable angina, and correlate this with changes in angina level, anxiety, depression, and exercise capacity. Methods/Design Sixty patients with stable angina will be recruited and randomised 1:1 to exercise training or conventional care. Patients randomised to exercise training will attend an exercise physiology laboratory up to three times weekly for supervised aerobic interval training sessions of one hour in total duration. Patients will undergo assessments of angina, anxiety, depression, and peripheral blood gene expression at baseline, after six and twelve weeks of training, and twelve weeks after formal exercise training ceases. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the effect of exercise training on peripheral blood gene expression in patients with angina. By correlating this with improvement in angina status we will identify candidate peripheral blood transcriptional markers predictive of improvements in angina level in response to exercise training. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01147952

  5. Effect of acute inspiratory muscle exercise on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs and glucose levels in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula dos Santos Corrêa

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of inspiratory loading on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Ten diabetic patients without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM, 10 patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM-CAN and 10 healthy controls (C were randomly assigned to inspiratory muscle load of 60% or 2% of maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax for approximately 5 min, while resting calf blood flow (CBF and exercising forearm blood flow (FBF were measured. Reactive hyperemia was also evaluated. From the 20 diabetic patients initially allocated, 6 wore a continuous glucose monitoring system to evaluate the glucose levels during these two sessions (2%, placebo or 60%, inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Mean age was 58 ± 8 years, and mean HbA1c, 7.8% (62 mmol/mol (DM and DM-CAN. A PImax of 60% caused reduction of CBF in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001, but not in C, whereas calf vascular resistance (CVR increased in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001, but not in C. The increase in FBF during forearm exercise was blunted during 60% of PImax in DM-CAN and DM, and augmented in C (P<0.001. Glucose levels decreased by 40 ± 18.8% (P<0.001 at 60%, but not at 2%, of PImax. A negative correlation was observed between reactive hyperemia and changes in CVR (Beta coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.034. Inspiratory muscle loading caused an exacerbation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in patients with diabetes, regardless of the presence of neuropathy, but influenced by endothelial dysfunction. High-intensity exercise that recruits the diaphragm can abruptly reduce glucose levels.

  6. Reference data for distal blood pressure in healthy elderly and middle-aged individuals measured with the strain gauge technique. Part II: Distal blood pressure after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine; Vammen, Birthe; Yoshinaka, Emmy

    2008-01-01

    collected in the early 1970s from healthy individuals in the age range 21-26 years. Our aims were to collect new reference data for DBP at ankle level after exercise based on older populations, and to compare between reference data for different age groups to find out whether the normal values are dependent...... for elderly and middle-aged persons are presented. Use of normal values based on young people may result in underestimation of DBP response and hence underestimation of the degree of possible apvd, especially in elderly individuals.......Objective. Distal blood pressure (DBP) determination after an exercise test is used on suspicion of arterial peripheral vascular disease (apvd). In our department. the average age of these patients is about 60 years. The usual reference values for pressures after exercise were based on data...

  7. The effect of exercise intensity and excess postexercise oxygen consumption on postprandial blood lipids in physically inactive men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Laurel A; Papadakis, Zacharias; Rogers, Katie M; Moncada-Jiménez, José; Taylor, J Kyle; Grandjean, Peter W

    2017-09-01

    Reductions in postprandial lipemia have been observed following aerobic exercise of sufficient energy expenditure. Increased excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) has been documented when comparing high- versus low-intensity exercise. The contribution of EPOC energy expenditure to alterations in postprandial lipemia has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low- and high-intensity exercise on postprandial lipemia in healthy, sedentary, overweight and obese men (age, 43 ± 10 years; peak oxygen consumption, 31.1 ± 7.5 mL·kg -1 ·min -1 ; body mass index, 31.8 ± 4.5 kg/m 2 ) and to determine the contribution of EPOC to reductions in postprandial lipemia. Participants completed 4 conditions: nonexercise control, low-intensity exercise at 40%-50% oxygen uptake reserve (LI), high-intensity exercise at 70%-80% oxygen uptake reserve (HI), and HI plus EPOC re-feeding (HI+EERM), where the difference in EPOC energy expenditure between LI and HI was re-fed in the form of a sports nutrition bar (Premier Nutrition Corp., Emeryville, Calif., USA). Two hours following exercise participants ingested a high-fat (1010 kcals, 99 g sat fat) test meal. Blood samples were obtained before exercise, before the test meal, and at 2, 4, and 6 h postprandially. Triglyceride incremental area under the curve was significantly reduced following LI, HI, and HI+EERM when compared with nonexercise control (p 0.05). In conclusions, prior LI and HI exercise equally attenuated postprandial triglyceride responses to the test meal. The extra energy expended during EPOC does not contribute significantly to exercise energy expenditure or to reductions in postprandial lipemia in overweight men.

  8. Exercise Training Increases Parietal Lobe Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Stroke: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Robertson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is increasingly recommended as an essential component of stroke rehabilitation, yet uncertainty remains with respect to its direct effect on the cerebral vasculature. The current study first demonstrated the repeatability of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in older adults with stroke, and then investigated the change in cerebrovascular function following a 6-month cardiovascular rehabilitation program. In the repeatability study, 12 participants at least 3 months post-stroke underwent two ASL imaging scans 1 month apart. In the prospective observational study, eight individuals underwent ASL imaging and aerobic fitness testing before and after a 6-month cardiovascular rehabilitation program. Cerebral blood flow (CBF and the spatial coefficient of variation of CBF (sCoV were quantified to characterize tissue-level perfusion and large cerebral artery transit time properties, respectively. In repeat scanning, intraclass correlation (ICC indicated moderate test-retest reliability for global gray matter CBF (ICC = 0.73 and excellent reliability for sCoV (ICC = 0.94. In the observational study, gray matter CBF increased after training (baseline: 40 ± 13 vs. 6-month: 46 ± 12 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.036. The greatest change occurred in the parietal lobe (+18 ± 12%. Gray matter sCoV, however, did not change following training (P = 0.31. This study provides preliminary evidence that exercise-based rehabilitation in chronic stroke enhances tissue-level perfusion, without changing the relative hemodynamic properties of the large cerebral arteries.

  9. Exercise Training Increases Parietal Lobe Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Stroke: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew D.; Marzolini, Susan; Middleton, Laura E.; Basile, Vincenzo S.; Oh, Paul I.; MacIntosh, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    Exercise is increasingly recommended as an essential component of stroke rehabilitation, yet uncertainty remains with respect to its direct effect on the cerebral vasculature. The current study first demonstrated the repeatability of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older adults with stroke, and then investigated the change in cerebrovascular function following a 6-month cardiovascular rehabilitation program. In the repeatability study, 12 participants at least 3 months post-stroke underwent two ASL imaging scans 1 month apart. In the prospective observational study, eight individuals underwent ASL imaging and aerobic fitness testing before and after a 6-month cardiovascular rehabilitation program. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the spatial coefficient of variation of CBF (sCoV) were quantified to characterize tissue-level perfusion and large cerebral artery transit time properties, respectively. In repeat scanning, intraclass correlation (ICC) indicated moderate test-retest reliability for global gray matter CBF (ICC = 0.73) and excellent reliability for sCoV (ICC = 0.94). In the observational study, gray matter CBF increased after training (baseline: 40 ± 13 vs. 6-month: 46 ± 12 ml·100 g−1·min−1, P = 0.036). The greatest change occurred in the parietal lobe (+18 ± 12%). Gray matter sCoV, however, did not change following training (P = 0.31). This study provides preliminary evidence that exercise-based rehabilitation in chronic stroke enhances tissue-level perfusion, without changing the relative hemodynamic properties of the large cerebral arteries. PMID:29033829

  10. Blood pressure reactivity to mental stress is attenuated following resistance exercise in older hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauche R

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rafael Gauche,1 Ricardo M Lima,1,2 Jonathan Myers,2 André B Gadelha,1 Silvia GR Neri,1 Claudia LM Forjaz,3 Lauro C Vianna1 1Faculty of Physical Education, University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil; 2Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System and Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 3School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effects of resistance exercise (RE on autonomic control and blood pressure (BP reactivity during mental stress (MS in treated older hypertensive women. Methods: Ten older hypertensive women (age =71.1±5.5 years; body mass index =24.2±3.9; mean BP [MBP] =85.4±3.5 underwent a protocol consisting of BP and heart rate variability (HRV output assessments at baseline and during MS, and these measurements were taken before and 60 minutes after two bouts of RE (traditional and circuit. MS was induced through a computerized 3-minute Stroop color–word test before and 1 hour after each exercise session; BP was measured every minute during MS, and HRV was monitored as a measure of cardiac autonomic control. Results: A significant effect of time on systolic BP (∆pre =17.4±12.8 versus ∆post =12.5±9.6; P=0.01, diastolic BP (∆pre =13.7±7.1 versus ∆post =8.8±4.5; P=0.01, and MBP (∆pre =14.0±7.7 versus ∆post =9.3±5.4; P<0.01 after RE was observed, with no differences between the two sessions. In addition, a significant effect of time on log-normalized low-frequency component of HRV (ms2; 5.3±0.8 pre-exercise MS versus 4.8±1.0 baseline value; P=0.023 was also observed, showing a significant change from baseline to MS before RE, but not after RE sessions. These results may be related to a lessened RE-mediated cardiac sympathetic activity during MS. Conclusion: RE is an effective tool to reduce BP reactivity to MS, which could therefore be associated with an acute reduction in cardiovascular risk. This

  11. Acute effects of whole-body vibration with resistance exercise on postexercise blood pressure and oxygen consumption in prehypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Zachary S; Swan, Pamela Diane

    2016-06-01

    Research on the acute health effects of whole-body vibration with resistance exercise (WBV + RE) for clinical populations is limited. This randomized crossover trial evaluated postexercise hypotension and excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in response to three conditions: WBV + RE, RE alone, and control (CON) in 11 prehypertensive (systolic/diastolic blood pressure: 120-139/80-89 mmHg) adults. Following a 12-hour fast with no exercise for the previous 24 hours, resting VO 2 and blood pressure (BP) were measured. WBV + RE was performed while standing barefoot on a vibration platform (Pneumex Pro-Vibe) and lifting a bar of 10% body weight. Fifteen repetitions of nine exercises were performed using a 1-minute-to-30-second exercise:rest ratio. RE was identical to WBV + RE but without vibration. During CON, participants remained seated for 15 minutes. Following exercise, VO 2 was measured continuously and BP every 15 minutes for 3 hours. Postexercise hypotension and EPOC were significantly different for WBV + RE compared with RE and CON ( p EPOC was significantly ( p  EPOC.

  12. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  13. Effects of oral administration of energy drinks on blood chemistry, tissue histology and brain acetylcholine in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebuehi, O A T; Ajayl, O E; Onyeulor, A L; Awelimobor, D

    2011-01-01

    Energy drinks are canned or bottled carbonated beverages that contain large amounts of caffeine and sugar with additional ingredients, such as B-Vitamins, amino acids and herbal stimulants. Previous reports have shown that consumption of large amounts of these energy drinks may result in adverse health consequences. The present study is to ascertain if oral administration of energy drinks, such as "power horse" and "red bull", may affect blood chemistry, tissue histology and acetyl choline levels in rabbits. Five ml of power horse and red bull energy drinks, caffeine and saline (control) were orally administered daily for 36 days to rabbits. Body weight, feed and water intake were measured every other day. The blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture for blood chemistry measurement and their liver, heart and brain tissues were used for histological assay. The plasma, liver, brain and heart acetylcholine levels were also determined. There were no significant differences in the body weight, feed intake and organ weights of rabbits administered energy drinks or caffeine as compared to the control. The blood chemistry results showed that the activities of the aspartate and alanine amino transferase, concentrations of plasma creatinine, uric acid and albumin were increased in the control as compared to the red bull and caffeine administered rabbits. The concentrations of total protein, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) and glucose concentrations were increased in power horse and red bull administered rabbits as compared to caffeine administered rabbits and control rabbits. The concentrations of plasma and brain acetylcholine of rabbits administered power horse and red bull were significantly higher than in the control, while it was lower in liver and heart acetyl choline levels. The histopathological findings of the brain and liver show that there were no obvious histopathological abnormalities in the

  14. Effects of qigong exercise on upper limb lymphedema and blood flow in survivors of breast cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Luk, W S; Chung, Joanne W Y; Ho, Jacqueline S C; Ying, Michael; Ma, Ada W W

    2014-01-01

    Qigong exercise is a popular method for relieving the side effects of conventional cancer treatments in survivors of breast cancer, yet its effects are not empirically assessed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of qigong exercise on upper limb lymphedema, arterial resistance, and blood flow velocity in survivors with breast cancer and mastectomy. This study was conducted as a prospective clinical trial. Eleven survivors of breast cancer with qigong experience (mean age = 58.3 ± 10.1 years) were assigned to the experimental group and 12 survivors of breast cancer without qigong experience (mean age = 53.8 ± 4.2 years) were assigned to the control group. They all had breast cancer-related lymphedema. All procedures were completed within one session. After baseline measurements were taken, the experimental group performed 18 Forms Tai Chi Internal Qigong for approximately 6 minutes while the control group rested for similar duration in a sitting position. Both groups were then reassessed. All participants were measured on their affected upper limb circumference (by using tape measures), peripheral arterial resistance, and blood flow velocities (using a Doppler ultrasound machine). The between-group differences were not significant for all outcome measures at baseline (P > .05). The circumferences of the affected upper arm, elbow, forearm and wrist decreased after qigong exercise (P .0125). In terms of vascular outcomes, the resistance index decreased and the maximum systolic arterial blood flow velocity (SV) and minimum diastolic arterial blood flow velocity (DV) increased significantly after qigong exercise (P Qigong exercise could reduce conventional cancer therapy side effects such as upper limb lymphedema and poor circulatory status in survivors of breast cancer. However, such effects may be temporary, and further studies must be conducted to explore longer term effects.

  15. Cannabis sativa (Marijuana) alters blood chemistry and the cytoarchitecture of some organs in Sprague Dawley rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abey, Nosarieme Omoregie

    2018-04-19

    There is evidence that Cannabis whose active ingredient is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the most commonly abused neuroactive substance, among young adults. This work investigated the effects of Cannabis sativa on the cytoarchitecture of some key organs and the blood chemistry of rat models. Twenty-one (21) male Sprague Dawley rats were fed different percentage of cannabis chow (0%, 5% and 10%) for a period of seven (7) weeks. Rats were subjected to intermittent cognitive function test and sacrificed after the seventh week, collecting the blood, brain and other important tissues for analysis which include; brain total protein and nitric oxide concentration, blood chemistry and histopathology. Results revealed a dose-dependent decline in the cognitive function, statistically significant decrease in the brain total protein and nitric oxide. Histopathology revealed significant hypertrophy in the heart, hypercellularity in neuronal cells, prominent sinusoids cytoarchitecture of the hepatocytes and vascular congestion in the seminiferous tubules of testes. There was a statistically significant difference in the plasma ALP, ALT, AST level between controls and the cannabis test groups. Cannabis use caused cellular damage through mediation of imbalance and altered cytoarchitecture which may affects the overall health of dependent user. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human adipose tissue blood flow during prolonged exercise, III. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade, nicotinic acid and glucose infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J

    1981-01-01

    of work. No increase in lipolysis and no increase in ATBF were found when lipolysis was blocked by nicotinic acid (0.3 g/h). Propranolol treatment (0.15 mg/kg) reduced lipolysis and nearly abolished the increase in ATBF during exercise. Intravenous administration of glucose (about 0.25 g/min) did......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured in six male subjects by the 133Xe-washout technique during 3-4 h of exercise at a work load corresponding to an oxygen uptake of about 1.71/min. The measurements were done during control conditions, during blockade of lipolysis by nicotinic...

  17. Acute ingestion of dietary nitrate increases muscle blood flow via local vasodilation during handgrip exercise in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer C; Racine, Matthew L; Hearon, Christopher M; Kunkel, Megan; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Allen, Jason D; Dinenno, Frank A

    2018-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3-) is converted to nitrite (NO2-) and can be further reduced to the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) amid a low O 2 environment. Accordingly, dietary NO3- increases hind limb blood flow in rats during treadmill exercise; however, the evidence of such an effect in humans is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that acute dietary NO3- (via beetroot [BR] juice) increases forearm blood flow (FBF) via local vasodilation during handgrip exercise in young adults (n = 11; 25 ± 2 years). FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured at rest and during graded handgrip exercise at 5%, 15%, and 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) lasting 4 min each. At the highest workload (25% MVC), systemic hypoxia (80% SaO 2 ) was induced and exercise continued for three additional minutes. Subjects ingested concentrated BR (12.6 mmol nitrate (n = 5) or 16.8 mmol nitrate (n = 6) and repeated the exercise bout either 2 (12.6 mmol) or 3 h (16.8 mmol) postconsumption. Compared to control, BR significantly increased FBF at 15% MVC (184 ± 15 vs. 164 ± 15 mL/min), 25% MVC (323 ± 27 vs. 286 ± 28 mL/min), and 25% + hypoxia (373 ± 39 vs. 343 ± 32 mL/min) and this was due to increases in vascular conductance (i.e., vasodilation). The effect of BR on hemodynamics was not different between the two doses of BR ingested. Forearm VO 2 was also elevated during exercise at 15% and 25% MVC. We conclude that acute increases in circulating NO3- and NO2- via BR increases muscle blood flow during moderate- to high-intensity handgrip exercise via local vasodilation. These findings may have important implications for aging and diseased populations that demonstrate impaired muscle perfusion and exercise intolerance. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  18. The heart rate increase at the onset of high-work intensity exercise is accelerated by central blood volume loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Oshima, Yoshitake; Ikuta, Komei; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Using a water immersion (WI) method, the combined effect of central blood volume (CBV) loading and work intensity on the time course of heart rate (HR) at the onset of upright dynamic exercise was investigated. Seven males cranked a cycle ergometer for 12 min using their un-immersed arms at low-, moderate- and high-work intensities, followed by a 12-min rest. For WI, the pre-exercise resting cardiac output increased by 36%, while HR decreased by 22% [from 76.8 (10.4) to 59.6 (9.8) beats/min]. WI also increased the high-frequency (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) component of the HR variability, suggesting an increased vagal activity. During the initial 2 min of the exercise period at low-work intensity, HR increased by 34.9 and 25.8% in the WI and control conditions, respectively. These were 117 and 73% at high-work intensity, indicating more accelerated HR with WI than the control. The plasma norepinephrine concentration increased less during high-work intensity exercise during WI, as compared to exercise during control conditions. In conclusion, the HR increase at the onset of high-work intensity exercise is accelerated by CBV loading but not at low intensity, possibly reflecting vago-sympathetic interaction and reduced baroreflex sensitivity.

  19. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Neurotrophic Factors and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Induced by Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress in Male College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee-Tae; Cho, Su-Youn; Yoon, Hyung-Gi; So, Wi-Young

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise intensity on oxidative-nitrosative stress, neurotrophic factor expression, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Fifteen healthy men performed treadmill running under low-intensity (LI), moderate-intensity (MI), and high-intensity (HI) conditions. Blood samples were collected immediately before exercise (IBE), immediately after exercise (IAE), and 60 min after exercise (60MAE) to examine oxidative-nitrosative stress (reactive oxygen species [ROS]; nitric oxide [NO]), neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]; nerve growth factor [NGF]), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability (S-100β; neuron-specific enolase). ROS concentration significantly increased IAE and following HI (4.9 ± 1.7 mM) compared with that after LI (2.8 ± 1.4 mM) exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p .05). Moderate- and/or high-intensity exercise may induce higher oxidative-nitrosative stress than may low-intensity exercise, which can increase peripheral neurotrophic factor levels by increasing BBB permeability.

  20. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szpinda, Michał; Augustyńska, Beata; Woźniak, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130°C) prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise), and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise). The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC. PMID:24489985

  1. Effect of post-exercise caffeine and green coffee bean extract consumption on blood glucose and insulin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Jason R; Gibson, Ann L; Kerksick, Chad M; Conn, Carole A; White, Ailish C; Mermier, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine and green coffee bean extract on blood glucose and insulin concentrations during a post-exercise oral glucose tolerance test. Ten male cyclists (age: 26 ± 5 y; height: 179.9 ± 5.4 cm; weight: 77.6 ± 13.3 kg; body mass index: 24 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); VO2 peak: 55.9 ± 8.4 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this study. In a randomized order, each participant completed three 30-min bouts of cycling at 60% of peak power output. Immediately after exercise, each participant consumed 75 g of dextrose with either 5 mg/kg body weight of caffeine, 10 mg/kg of green coffee bean extract (5 mg/kg chlorogenic acid), or placebo. Venous blood samples were collected immediately before and after exercise during completion of the oral glucose tolerance test. No significant time × treatment effects for blood glucose and insulin were found. Two-h glucose and insulin area under the curve values, respectively, for the caffeine (658 ± 74 mmol/L and 30,005 ± 13,304 pmol/L), green coffee bean extract (637 ± 100 mmol/L and 31,965 ± 23,586 pmol/L), and placebo (661 ± 77 mmol/L and 27,020 ± 12,339 pmol/L) trials were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Caffeine and green coffee bean extract did not significantly alter postexercise blood glucose and insulin concentrations when compared with a placebo. More human research is needed to determine the impact of these combined nutritional treatments and exercise on changes in blood glucose and insulin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of endothelin blockade on acute exercise-induced changes in blood flow and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Tim H A; van Lotringen, Jaap H; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-09-01

    Positive vascular effects of exercise training are mediated by acute increases in blood flow. Type 2 diabetes patients show attenuated exercise-induced increases in blood flow, possibly mediated by the endothelin pathway, preventing an optimal stimulus for vascular adaptation. We examined the impact of endothelin receptor blockade (bosentan) on exercise-induced blood flow in the brachial artery and on pre- and postexercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients (n = 9, 60 ± 7 years old) and control subjects (n = 10, 60 ± 5 years old). Subjects reported twice to the laboratory to perform hand-grip exercise in the presence of endothelin receptor blockade or placebo. We examined brachial artery endothelial function (via flow-mediated dilatation) before and after exercise, as well as blood flow during exercise. Endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.046), but not in control subjects (P = 0.309). Exercise increased shear rate across the exercise protocol, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Exercise did not alter brachial artery diameter in either group, but endothelin receptor blockade resulted in a larger brachial artery diameter in type 2 diabetes patients (P = 0.033). Exercise significantly increased brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in both groups, unaffected by endothelin receptor blockade. Endothelin receptor blockade increased exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in type 2 diabetes patients, but not in control subjects. Despite this effect of endothelin receptor blockade on blood flow, we found no impact on baseline or post-exercise endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients or control subjects, possibly related to normalization of the shear stimulus during exercise. The successful increase in blood flow during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients through endothelin receptor blockade may have beneficial effects in

  3. Effect of Acute Resistance Exercise on Carotid Artery Stiffness and Cerebral Blood Flow Pulsatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley K Lefferts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral flow pulsatility. Arterial stiffness increases following acute resistance exercise (RE. Whether this acute RE-induced vascular stiffening affects cerebral pulsatility remains unknown. Purpose: To investigate the effects of acute RE on common carotid artery (CCA stiffness and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv pulsatility. Methods: Eighteen healthy men (22 ± 1 yr; 23.7 ± 0.5 kg∙m-2 underwent acute RE (5 sets, 5-RM bench press, 5 sets 10-RM bicep curls with 90 s rest intervals or a time control condition (seated rest in a randomized order. CCA stiffness (β-stiffness, Elastic Modulus (Ep and hemodynamics (pulsatility index, forward wave intensity and reflected wave intensity were assessed using a combination of Doppler ultrasound, wave intensity analysis and applanation tonometry at baseline and 3 times post-RE. CBFv pulsatility index was measured with transcranial Doppler at the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Results: CCA β-stiffness, Ep and CCA pulse pressure significantly increased post-RE and remained elevated throughout post-testing (p 0.05. There were significant increases in forward wave intensity post-RE (p0.05. Conclusion: Although acute RE increases CCA stiffness and pressure pulsatility, it may not affect CCA or MCA flow pulsatility. Increases in pressure pulsatility may be due to increased forward wave intensity and not pressure from wave reflections.

  4. Cerebrovascular blood oxygenation level dependent pulsatility at baseline and following acute exercise among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theyers, Athena E; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Metcalfe, Arron Ws; Robertson, Andrew D; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2018-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is linked to cerebral small vessel damage and neurodegeneration, but barriers to accessing deep cerebrovascular anatomy limit our ability to assess the brain. This study describes an adaptation of a cardiac-related scrubbing method as a means of generating blood oxygenation level-dependent pulsatility maps based on the cardiac cycle. We examine BOLD pulsatility at rest, based on the non-parametric deviation from null metric, as well as changes following acute physiological stress from 20 min of moderate-intensity cycling in 45 healthy adolescents. We evaluate the influence of repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) using simulated and multi-echo empirical data, respectively. There were tissue-specific and voxel-wise BOLD pulsatility decreases 20 min following exercise cessation. BOLD pulsatility detection was comparable over a range of TR and TE values when scan volumes were kept constant; however, short TRs (≤500 ms) and TEs (∼14 ms) acquisitions would yield the most efficient detection. Results suggest cardiac-related BOLD pulsatility may represent a robust and easily adopted method of mapping cerebrovascular pulsatility with voxel-wise resolution.

  5. Abnormal albuminuria and blood pressure rise in incipient diabetic nephropathy induced by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of light to moderate dynamic work (450 kpm/min followed by 600 kpm/min during 20 min each) on the blood pressure and renal protein handling in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (D3) (elevated baseline albumin excretion...... but without clinical proteinuria). Fifteen male diabetic patients (D3) with a mean age of 26.5 +/- 4.8 years (SD) and a diabetes duration of 15.6 +/- 3.4 years (SD), 11 comparable diabetic patients with normal urinary albumin excretion (D2), and ten non-diabetic subjects (C) were studied. In D3 baseline....../min in D3 (193.0 mm Hg +/- 23.0) compared to D2 (170.5 +/- 17.3, 2P = 1.2%) and C (157.5 mm Hg +/- 20.9, 2P = 0.07%). Baseline albumin excretion in D3 was 82.6 micrograms/min X/ divided by 2.5 (geometric mean X/ divided by tolerance factor) and during exercise the maximal albumin excretion rose to 195...

  6. Effect of age on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume and hemoglobin to exercise in Jeju crossbreed horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Deuk Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to analyze the on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume (PCV and hemoglobin (Hb response after conducting exercise in endurance horses. Methods A total of 20 healthy 3–9-years-old Jeju crossbreed mares (5.95 ± 2.24 year of age and 312.65 ± 13.59 kg of weight currently participating the endurance competition were used. The field tests selected for the experiment was gallop (approximately 8.3 m/s along the selected 2.5 km course (a natural forest trail, not artificial road; a closed loop course. The horses were divided into three groups according to their age; 3–4 years of age (G1, 3.29 ± 0.49 year, 6–7 years of age (G2, 6.42 ± 0.53, and 8–9 years of age (G3, 8.50 ± 0.55. The measurements times for the heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV, and Hb analysis were conducted before exercise (T0, shortly after exercise (T1, 15 min after exercise (T2, and 30 min after exercise (T3, respectively. Data was analyzed using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA for repeated measures with times and groups. Results The results of the comparison depending on the passage of rest time after exercise suggest that the heart rate and blood lactate concentration of three groups at T2 significantly decreased compared to T1 (p < 0.001. PCV of the G2 and G3 groups were significantly decreased at T2 compared to T1 (p < 0.01. Hb values at G2 (p < 0.01 and G3 (p < 0.001 groups were significantly decreased at T2 as compared to T1. However, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV and Hb level at T1 showed no difference in the comparison of horses from different age groups with the exception of G3 group in terms of heart rate. Conclusion The physiologic and hematological responses of horses during recovery time after 2,500 m exercise with gallop were no significant difference among the groups. These data are useful as a response evaluation method for

  7. Blood chemistry, protein electrophoresis, and hematologic values of captive Spanish imperial eagles (Aquila adalberti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montijano, Marino; García, Alfonso; Lemus, Jesús A; Montesinos, Andrés; Canales, Rocío; Luaces, Inés; Pereira, Pablo

    2002-06-01

    Hemograms and plasma chemistry values are presented for six male and six female, adult, clinically normal, captive Spanish imperial eagles (Aquila adalberti). No value was substantially different from that which might be predicted on the basis of work in other related species. This data should prove useful for the interpretation of laboratory findings in future clinical cases of this endangered species of eagle.

  8. Effect of selected anti-malarial drugs on the blood chemistry and brain serotonin levels in male rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigbibhalu, Ukpo Grace; Albert Taiwo, Ebuehi Osaretin; Douglass, Idiakheua Akhabue; Abimbola, Efunogbon Aderonke

    2013-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine (SP), artesunate (A) and sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine - artesunate (SPA) on blood chemistry and brain serotonin in rabbits were investigated. Forty rabbits were divided into four groups of ten animals each. The group that served as the control received 2ml of distilled water while the other groups were received 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP, 3.3mg/kg body weight of A and 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP plus 3.3mg/kg body weight of A respectively by oral route daily for 3 days in a week for four weeks. At the end of each week of drug administration, three rabbits from each group were anaesthetized, blood was taken from the jugular veins using sterile needle and serum was extracted. The rabbits were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver and brain tissues were excised and homogenized. Total blood protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, albumin, creatinine and urea concentrations, creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase, ALP activities were assayed using CX5 synchron autoanalyzer. The brain and liver serotonin levels were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There were no significant differences (P levels of rabbits administered SP, A and SPA were significantly higher as compared to the control throughout the duration of the study Data of the study indicate that oral administration of SP, A or SPA in rabbits do not affect blood chemistry, but affected brain serotonin levels and could alter some neural functions.

  9. ISOMETRIC EXERCISE AND ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE, BEFORE AND AFTER TRAINING IN YOUNG HEALTHY MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Isometric exercise is a normal part of everyday activities and many occupational tasks. Preventive services are important as they give physicians an opportunity and responsibility to promote regular physical activity, reduc e high blood pressure, and help in weight control. Physical inactivity is recognized as a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Regular aerobic physical activity increases exercise capacity and plays a role in both primary and secondary prevention of ca rdiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of isometric handgrip training on Blood pressure and Heart rate in healthy young males in the age group of 18 - 22 years. MATERIALS AND METHOD : Study subjects consisted of 30 healthy adult males in the age group of 18 - 22 yrs. Age and sex matched adults who were not active in sports or in physical activities constituted the control group (n=30. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and eval uated after a defined protocol of handgrip sustained static (isometric contractions performed with the handgrip dynamometer at Rest and Post Exercise. BP and HR were recorded with the help of automated blood pressure monitor and power lab 8/30 series inst rument available in the Department of Physiology , Navodaya Medical college, Raichur. RESULTS: There was no change in Resting Blood pressure and Heart rate between the subject and control group before the training sessions. There was significant decrease in resting Blood pressure and Heart rate in trained subject group when compared to untrained control group after 5 weeks of training sessions. CONCLUSION : Isometric hand grip training is effective in lowering arterial pressure in normotensive subjects. Isome tric training may be an effective intervention in the prevention and treatment of hypertension

  10. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    as an absence of sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation during a whole-body heat stress. Upon this confirmation, adenosine was perfused through one of the microdialysis probes to increase skin blood flow similar to that of the unblocked site. After internal temperature increased approximately 0.7 degrees C......During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat...... stressed individuals occurs via a neural mechanism. An axillary nerve blockade was performed to block efferent nerve traffic to the left forearm in seven healthy subjects. Two intradermal microdialysis probes were placed within forearm skin of the blocked area. Forearm skin blood flow was measured by laser...

  11. Effects of Chronic Blood-Flow Restriction Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Size and Myogenic Satellite Cell Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Jacobsen, Mikkel; Jensen, Kasper Y.

    2016-01-01

    of continued sports activity, resulting in visible hypertrophy of his left leg. AIM: To study the effect of chronic blood-flow restricted (BFR) exercise conditions on skeletal muscle size and myogenic satellite cell (SC) expression in an arterio-venous shunt patient. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained from......-regulation in myogenic satellite cell activity within all stages of the cell cycle, which was accompanied by substantial muscle hypertrophy. Specifically, muscle fiber cross-sectional area (40%) and myonuclei number (15%) were elevated in the affected leg, together with an elevated myonuclear domain (20%). This single......-case study confirms previous result from our Lab demonstrating that blood-flow restricted muscle exercise leads to a marked activation of myogenic SCs, upregulated myonuclei number and marked myofiber hypertrophy....

  12. Prior exercise training produces NO-dependent increases in collateral blood flow after acute arterial occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H T; Ren, Jie; Laughlin, M Harold; Terjung, Ronald L

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that prior training improves collateral blood flow (BF) to the calf muscles after acute-onset occlusion of the femoral artery (Yang HT et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 279: H1890-H1897, 2000). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that increased release of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (likely endothelial NOS) contributes to the increased BF to calf muscles of trained rats after acute femoral artery occlusion. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (~325 g) were limited to cage activity and were sedentary (SED; n = 28) or exercise trained (TR; n = 30) for 6 wk by treadmill running. On the day of the investigation, rats were anesthetized with ketamine-acepromazine and instrumented for determination of BF (using (141)Ce- and (85)Sr-labeled microspheres) and distal limb arterial pressure, and femoral arteries were occluded bilaterally. Four hours after surgery, collateral BF was determined twice during treadmill running: first at a demanding speed (20 m/min, 15% grade) and second, after a brief rest and at a faster running speed (25 m/min, 15% grade). The fact that BF did not increase further at the higher running speed indicated that maximal collateral BF was measured. Approximately half of the rats in each group received 20 mg/kg body wt N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) intra-arterially 30 min before treadmill exercise and BF measurement to block production of NO by NOS. Results indicate that prior training improved collateral-dependent BF to the skeletal muscle of rats after acute femoral artery occlusion due primarily to an increase in the conductance of the upstream collateral circuit. Blockade of NOS with L-NAME produced decreased vascular conductance, both in the upstream collateral circuit and in the distal skeletal muscle microcirculation, and the difference between collateral vascular conductance in TR and SED rats was abolished. Our results indicate that the primary determinant of the increased collateral BF

  13. Exercise-induced blood prolactin variations in trained adult males: a thermic stress more than an osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, G R; Audet, A; Ledoux, M; Matton, P; Pellerin-Massicotte, J; Péronnet, F

    1986-01-01

    Blood prolactin (PRL) variations have been linked to temperature and osmotic changes in several species. The latter factors are here explored to better understand blood PRL responses frequently induced during physical exercise. Since body heat generated by exercise can lead to marked body fluid shifts, it was postulated that PRL changes observed during exercise could be associated with variations in body temperature and/or blood osmolality (OSM). A wide range (38.5-40.5 degrees C) of rectal temperatures (Tr; used here to appreciate core temperatures) were theoretically selected and randomly assigned as targets to male runners. Measured by thermistor probe, target Tr were obtained by a combination of factors: (a) increases heat production by treadmill running, and (b) decreases heat losses by appropriate clothing (decreases evaporation) in warmed (decreases radiation) and hypoventilated (decreases convection) laboratory conditions. For each subject, target Tr was attained not prior to 30 min after initiation of running, and had to be maintained for at least 10 min, for a mean (+/- SD) running time of 52.6 +/- 10.0 min. In a first protocol, hypohydration was provoked in 26 runners (23.9 +/- 4.7 years) by total restriction of water intake. In a second protocol (10 different runners: 22.3 +/- 3.3 years), euhydration was maintained by water intake (20 ml/kg body weight). Venous blood was sampled at rest before and immediately after the run. PRL was assayed by RIA; OSM was measured by freezing point depression; sodium was analyzed by flame photometry. At rest, before the heat-producing exercise, mean PRL values were 9.4 +/- 3.4 ng/ml for both eu/hypohydrated groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Enhancing effect of cerebral blood volume by mild exercise in healthy young men: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timinkul, Akkaranee; Kato, Morimasa; Omori, Takenori; Deocaris, Custer C; Ito, Akira; Kizuka, Tomohiro; Sakairi, Yosuke; Nishijima, Takeshi; Asada, Takashi; Soya, Hideaki

    2008-07-01

    A mechanism by which exercise improves brain function may be attributed to increase in cerebral blood volume (CBV) with physical activity. However, the exact exercise intensity that influences CBV is still uncertain. To clarify this issue, 10 healthy young male participants were asked to perform a graded cycling exercise to the point of exhaustion while their prefrontal cortex CBVs are being monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Overall responsive cerebral oxygenation showed a non-linear pattern with three distinct phases. The CBV-threshold (CBVT), an event where rapid oxygenation takes place, occurred at approximately 42% of the V O2max. The CBVT preceded the lactate threshold (LT), which was at approximately 55% of the V O2max. The V O2max was not predictive of the CBVT in among the subjects. Our results indicate that oxygenation of the prefrontal cortex increases during graded cycling even at exercise intensities below the LT, suggesting the potential role of mild exercise in enhancing CBV.

  15. Active recovery and post-exercise white blood cell count, free fatty acids, and hormones in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigernaes, I; Høstmark, A T; Strømme, S B; Kierulf, P; Birkeland, K

    2001-04-01

    Strenuous endurance exercise in fasted subjects is accompanied by increased plasma levels of catecholamines, leucocytosis, low insulin, and elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA). Immediately after such exercise, plasma FFA may rise to high and potentially harmful levels, whereas the white blood cell count (WBCC) rapidly decreases towards or below baseline values. The present work investigated how active recovery (AR) for 15 min at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), after 60 min of uphill running at 83% of VO2max, influenced plasma FFA, lymphocyte, neutrophil, granulocyte, and monocyte count, as well as adrenaline, noradrenaline, insulin and cortisol concentrations until 120 min post-exercise. Thirteen endurance athletes participated in the study [24.2 (3.7) years, 1.82 (0.06) m, 76.7 (7.9) kg and VO2max 69.2 (6.8) ml min-1 kg-1]. In a randomized order, the subjects completed two sets of strenuous workouts, followed by either AR or complete rest in the supine position (RR). Compared with RR, AR strongly counteracted the rapid increase in plasma FFA 5 min post-exercise. The decreases in neutrophil and monocyte counts post-exercise were nullified by AR, and the cell count stayed above resting values throughout the observation period. AR also counteracted the rapid return of hormone concentration towards baseline levels. It would appear that active recovery at low intensity after strenuous exercise can maintain sufficient adrenergic activation to counteract the post-exercise drop in WBCC. However, in spite of keeping the catecholamine concentration high and insulin levels low, AR can also maintain a low plasma FFA concentration, probably because of the continued use of FFA in muscle. It remains to be elucidated whether the observed high FFA and low WBCC values after RR have a negative effect on health. If so, AR could be a preventive measure.

  16. Six weeks of aerobic dance exercise improves blood oxidative stress status and increases interleukin-2 in previously sedentary women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Saidee, Kunteera; Pothongsunun, Prapas; Pratanaphon, Sainetee; YanKai, Araya; Bloomer, Richard J

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated the change in blood oxidative stress, blood interleukin-2, and physical performance following 6 weeks of moderate intensity and duration aerobic dance exercise in 24 sedentary women. Blood samples were collected at rest twice before (baseline) and after the 6-week intervention for analysis of protein hydroperoxide (PrOOH), malondialdehyde (MDA), total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Maximal treadmill run time (Time(max)) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) were also measured. All variables were statistically analyzed with a repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. No differences were noted in any variable during the baseline period (p > 0.05). After aerobic dance exercise, VO(2max), Time(max), TAC and IL-2 were significantly increased, whereas MDA levels were decreased significantly (p dance exercise at a moderate intensity and duration can improve physical fitness, decrease MDA, and increase TAC and IL-2 in previously sedentary women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise-induced oxidative-nitrosative stress is associated with impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Damian M; Evans, Kevin A; McEneny, Jane; Young, Ian S; Hullin, David A; James, Philip E; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Ainslie, Philip N; Lucchesi, Céline; Rockenbauer, Antal; Culcasi, Marcel; Pietri, Sylvia

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined whether dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function would become compromised as a result of exercise-induced oxidative-nitrosative stress. Eight healthy men were examined at rest and after an incremental bout of semi-recumbent cycling exercise to exhaustion. Changes in a dynamic cerebral autoregulation index were determined during recovery from continuous recordings of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) and mean arterial pressure during transiently induced hypotension. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and ozone-based chemiluminescence were employed for direct detection of spin-trapped free radicals and nitric oxide metabolites in venous blood. Neuron-specific enolase, S100β and 3-nitrotyrosine were determined by ELISA. While exercise did not alter MCAv, it caused a mild reduction in the autoregulation index (from 6.9 ± 0.6 to 5.5 ± 0.9 a.u., P brain barrier permeability without causing structural brain damage subsequent to a free radical-mediated impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

  18. Point-of-care blood gases, electrolytes, chemistries, hemoglobin, and hematocrit measurement in venous samples from pet rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care testing is an attractive option in rabbit medicine, because it permits rapid analysis of a panel of electrolytes, chemistries, blood gases, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, requiring only 65 μL of blood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a portable clinical analyzer for measurement of pH, partial pressure of CO2, Na, chloride, potassium, blood urea nitrogen, glucose, hematocrit, and hemoglobin in healthy and diseased rabbits. Blood samples obtained from 30 pet rabbits were analyzed immediately after collection by the portable clinical analyzer (PCA) and immediately thereafter (time <20 sec) by a reference analyzer. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression analysis were used to compare the results. Limits of agreement were wide for all the variables studied, with the exception of pH. Most variables presented significant proportional and/or constant bias. The current study provides sufficient evidence that the PCA presents reliability for pH, although its low agreement with a reference analyzer for the other variables does not support their interchangeability. Limits of agreement provided for each variable allow researchers to evaluate if the PCA is reliable enough for their scope. To the authors' knowledge, the present is the first report evaluating a PCA in the rabbit.

  19. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    -oxidative carbohydrate uptake during exercise. Adrenaline appears to accelerate cerebral glycolysis through a beta2-adrenergic receptor mechanism since noradrenaline is without such an effect. In addition, the exercise-induced cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake is blocked by combined beta 1/2-adrenergic blockade......, but not by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Furthermore, endurance training appears to lower the cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake and preserve cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. This is possibly related to an attenuated catecholamine response. Finally, exercise promotes brain health as evidenced...... by increased release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from the brain....

  20. Blood serum chemistry of wild Alaskan Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) with avian keratin disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    We measured serum chemistries in wild Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) from Alaska to test for potential differences associated with beak deformities characteristic of avian keratin disorder. Lower uric acid in affected birds was the only difference detected between groups, although sample sizes were small. This difference could be associated with fasting or malnutrition in birds with beak deformities, but it is challenging to interpret its biologic significance without reference values. Black-capped Chickadees had high levels of aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase relative to reference values for companion birds. However, all serum chemistry parameters from our study were within the range of values reported from other apparently healthy wild-caught birds.

  1. Nutrition Coupled with High-Load Traditional or Low-Load Blood Flow Restricted Exercise During Human Limb Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, K. J.; Everett, M.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2011-01-01

    High-load resistance exercise (HRE) and low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) exercise have demonstrated efficacy for attenuating unloading related muscle atrophy and dysfunction. In recreational exercisers, protein consumption immediately before and/or after exercise has been shown to increase the skeletal muscle anabolic response to resistance training. PURPOSE: To compare the skeletal muscle adaptations when chocolate milk intake was coupled with HRE or low-load BFR exercise [3 d/wk] during simulated lower limb weightlessness. METHODS: Eleven subjects were counterbalanced [based on age and gender] to HRE (31 +/- 14 yr, 170 +/- 13 cm, 71 +/- 18 kg, 2M/3W) or low-load BFR exercise (31 +/- 12 yr, 169 +/- 13 cm, 66 +/- 14 kg, 2M/4W) during 30 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Both HRE and BFR completed 3 sets of single leg press and calf raise exercise during ULLS. BFR exercise intensity was 20% of repetition maximum (1RM) with a cuff inflation pressure of 1.3 systolic blood pressure (143 4 mmHg). Cuff pressure was maintained during all 3 sets including rest intervals (90s). HRE intensity was 75% 1RM and was performed without cuff inflation. Immediately (<10 min) before and after exercise 8 fl oz of chocolate milk (150 kcal, 2.5g total fat, 22g total carbohydrate, 8g protein) was consumed to optimize acute exercise responses in favor of muscle anabolism. ULLS analog compliance was assessed from leg skin temperature recordings and plantar accelerometry. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) for knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle groups were determined from analysis of magnetic resonance images using ImageJ software. 1RM strength for leg press and calf raise was assessed on the Agaton exercise system. Muscular endurance during leg press and calf raise was evaluated from the maximal number of repetitions performed to volitional fatigue using 40% of pre-ULLS 1RM. RESULTS: Steps detected by plantar acceleometry declined by 98.9% during ULLS relative to an

  2. Changes in Non-Enzymatic Antioxidants in the Blood Following Anaerobic Exercise in Men and Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wiecek

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare changes in total oxidative status (TOS, total antioxidative capacity (TAC and the concentration of VitA, VitE, VitC, uric acid (UA, reduced (GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG in blood within 24 hours following anaerobic exercise (AnEx among men and women.10 women and 10 men performed a 20-second bicycle sprint (AnEx. Concentrations of oxidative stress indicators were measured before AnEx and 3, 15 and 30 minutes and 1 hour afterwards. UA, GSH and GSSH were also measured 24 hours after AnEx. Lactate and H+ concentrations were measured before and 3 minutes after AnEx.The increase in lactate and H+ concentrations following AnEx was similar in both sexes. Changes in the concentrations of all oxidative stress indicators were significant and did not differ between men and women. In both sexes, TOS, TAC, TOS/TAC and VitA and VitE concentrations were the highest 3 minutes, VitC concentration was the highest 30 minutes, and UA concentration was the highest 1 hour after AnEx. GSH concentration was significantly lower than the initial concentration from 15 minutes to 24 hour after AnEx. GSSG concentration was significantly higher, while the GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly lower than the initial values 1 hour and 24 hour after AnEx.With similar changes in lactate and H+ concentrations, AnEx induces the same changes in TAC, TOS, TOS/TAC and non-enzymatic antioxidants of low molecular weight in men and women. Oxidative stress lasted at least 24 hours after AnEx.

  3. BREATHING 100% O2 HAS NO EFFECT ON BLOOD LACTATE CONCENTRATION DURING A SHORT PASSIVE RECOVERY FROM EXHAUSTIVE EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomew Kay

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers (e.g. Coffey et al., 2004 have indicated that recovery from acute exercise induced muscular fatigue could be expedited by increased rapidity of lactate (LA- clearance from the blood. This argument is based on the following logical progression: Firstly, increased intra-myocellular LA- concentration has been proposed to exert various deleterious electrochemical influences over excitation/contraction coupling and metabolic function (e.g. Favero et al., 1997. Secondly, because LA- is extruded from the muscle cells to the blood in a concentration gradient dependent fashion (Mengual et al., 2003; lowered blood LA- concentration should therefore allow increased rapidity of myocellular LA- export. Finally, LA- accumulation is continually cited as having a causal relationship with exercise induced acidosis; and further that such acidosis is deleterious to muscular function (for review see Pedersen et al., 2004. Given that protons are co-transported out of the muscle cells with LA- at a 1:1 ratio (Mengual et al., 2003; it may appear this is another reason for suggesting increased LA- extrusion rate could be beneficial. Several challenges to the above logic can be made: Firstly, the negative effects of increased LA- concentration alluded to above are absent at physiological pH and temperature in situ: at concentrations as high as 30 mMol·L-1 (for review, see Allen and Westerblad, 2001. Secondly, at higher intra-myocellular LA- concentrations, pyruvate is imported from the blood to rebalance redox and metabolic equilibria, including the ratio of NAD+:NADH + H+ (Mengual et al., 2003. This process therefore theoretically counteracts the proposed need to remove LA- from the blood in order to facilitate continued myocellular LA- efflux. Furthermore, LA- accumulation is not causally linked to acidification (Robergs et al., 2004, and there is evidence that acidification is beneficial to muscular function in any case (Pedersen et al., 2004

  4. Hematology, blood chemistry, and bacteriology of the free-ranging Mexican beaded lizard (Heloderma horridum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Avilés, David; Salomón-Soto, Víctor Manuel; Morales-Martínez, Socorro

    2008-03-01

    Blood samples from 16 adult, wild Mexican beaded lizards were obtained for complete blood count and serum biochemical analysis. In addition, both oral and cloacal swab samples were collected and submitted for bacteriologic culture. This is the first report of hematologic and bacterial data from free-living beaded lizards. This information will serve as baseline reference values for future health assessment studies in conservation, captive breeding, and research programs.

  5. The prolonged intake of L-arginine-L-aspartate reduces blood lactate accumulation and oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Martin; Brunner, Fritz; Faulhaber, Martin; Hotter, Barbara; Likar, Rudolf

    2005-09-01

    L-arginine-L-aspartate is widely used by athletes for its potentially ergogenic properties. However, only little information on its real efficacy is available from controlled studies. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of prolonged supplementation with L-arginine-L-aspartate on metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses to submaximal exercise in healthy athletes by a double blind placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen healthy male volunteers (22 ± 3 years) performed incremental cycle spiroergometry up to 150 watts before and after intake of L-arginine-L-aspartate (3 grams per day) or placebo for a period of 3 weeks. After intake of L-arginine-L-aspartate, blood lactate at 150 watts dropped from 2.8 ± 0.8 to 2.0 ± 0.9 mmol·l(-1) (p L-arginine-L-aspartate supplementation effected an increased fat utilisation at 50 watts. L-arginine and L-aspartate seem to have induced synergistic metabolic effects. L-arginine might have reduced lactic acid production by the inhibition of glycolysis and L-aspartate may have favoured fatty acid oxidation. Besides, the results indicate improved work efficiency after L-arginine-L-aspartate intake. The resulting increases of submaximal work capacity and exercise tolerance may have important implications for athletes as well as patients. Key PointsAmino acids are among the most common nutritional supplements taken by athletes. They are involved in numerous metabolic pathways that affect exercise metabolism.Three weeks of L-arginine-L-aspartate supplementation resulted in lower blood lactate concentrations and oxygen consumption, diminished glucose and enhanced fat oxidation, and reduced heart rate and ventilation during submaximal cycle exercise.This implies increased submaximal work capacity and exercise tolerance, which may have important implications for both athletes as well as patients.

  6. Does Aerobic Exercise Increase 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Among Workers With High Occupational Physical Activity?-A RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshøj, Mette; Krause, Niklas; Clays, Els; Søgaard, Karen; Krustrup, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    High occupational physical activity (OPA) increases cardiovascular risk and aerobic exercise has been recommended for reducing this risk. This paper investigates the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among cleaners with high OPA. Hundred and sixteen cleaners between 18 and 65 years were randomized. During the 4-month intervention period, the aerobic exercise group (AE) (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (2 × 30 minutes/week), while the reference group (REF) (n = 59) attended lectures. Between-group differences in 4-month ABP changes were evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis using a repeated-measure 2 × 2 multiadjusted mixed-models design. Relative to REF, 24-hour ABP significantly increased in AE: systolic 3.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-5.7) and diastolic 2.3 mm Hg (95% CI 0.9-3.8). Cleaners with high aerobic workload exhibited particularly high 24-hour ABP increases: systolic 6.0 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4-9.6), and diastolic 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI 1.3-6.4). Aerobic exercise increased 24-hour ABP among cleaners. This adverse effect raises questions about the safety and intended benefits of aerobic exercise, especially among workers with high OPA and a demanding aerobic workload. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN86682076. Unique identifier ISRCTN86682076. Trial Number ISRCTN86682076. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

  7. Acute sodium bicarbonate loading has negligible effects on resting and exercise blood pressure but causes gastrointestinal distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Laura E; Kelly, Patrick V; Eliot, Kathrin A; Weiss, Edward P

    2013-06-01

    Oral ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (bicarbonate loading) has acute ergogenic effects on short-duration, high-intensity exercise. Because sodium bicarbonate is 27% sodium, ergogenic doses (ie, 300 mg∙kg⁻¹) result in sodium intakes well above the Dietary Reference Intakes upper limit of 2300 mg/day. Therefore, it is conceivable that bicarbonate loading could have hypertensive effects. Therefore, we performed a double-blind crossover trial to evaluate the hypothesis that bicarbonate loading increases resting and exercise blood pressure (BP). A secondary hypothesis was that bicarbonate loading causes gastrointestinal distress. Eleven endurance-trained men and women (exercise frequency, 4.6 ± 0.4 sessions/wk; duration, 65 ± 6 min/session) underwent testing on two occasions in random sequence: once after bicarbonate loading (300 mg∙kg⁻¹) and once after placebo ingestion. BP and heart rate were measured before bicarbonate or placebo consumption, 30 minutes after consumption, during 20 min of steady state submaximal cycling exercise, and during recovery. Bicarbonate loading did not affect systolic BP during rest, exercise, or recovery (P = .38 for main treatment effect). However, it resulted in modestly higher diastolic BP (main treatment effect, +3.3 ± 1.1 mmHg, P = .01) and higher heart rate (main treatment effect, +10.1 ± 2.4 beats per minute, P = .002). Global ratings of gastrointestinal distress severity (0-10 scale) were greater after bicarbonate ingestion (5.1 ± 0.5 vs 0.5 ± 0.2, P bicarbonate loading. In conclusion, although a single, ergogenic dose of sodium bicarbonate does not appear to have acute, clinically important effects on resting or exercise BP, it does cause substantial gastrointestinal distress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. COMPARISON OF PRE- AND POSTQUARANTINE BLOOD CHEMISTRY AND HEMATOLOGY VALUES FROM WILD-CAUGHT COWNOSE RAYS (RHINOPTERA BONASUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lara; Field, Cara L; Hoopes, Lisa; McDermott, Alexa; Clauss, Tonya

    2016-06-01

    Though one of the most widely kept elasmobranchs in human care, the cownose ray (CNR; Rhinoptera bonasus ), remains a species with minimal published information on hematologic reference intervals. As part of a larger study investigating the health and nutrition of the CNR, this study established a preliminary data set of plasma chemistry and hematology values specific to animals recently caught from the wild and compared this data set (intake sample) to values obtained following a period of quarantine (27-40 days) in an aquarium (exit sample). Blood samples were collected from 47 wild female (n = 46) and male (n = 1) CNR caught in pound nets off the coast of North Carolina and South Carolina. Differences between intake and exit values were analyzed. Due to the preponderance of female animals, data were not analyzed for sex differences. Plasma biochemical profiles were performed and analyzed. A select number of complete blood cell counts were performed (n = 24 from 12 animals). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) specific to time of sampling were determined for packed cell volume, total solids, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphorus, cholesterol, glucose, and aspartate aminotransferase. Values reported are a significant expansion on the existing limited data for CNRs and will serve as a reference for health assessment of individuals both in the wild and in exhibit populations.

  9. Effects of aerobic and resistance exercise intensities on 24-hours blood pressure in normotensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido Pimentel Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the effect of the intensity of aerobic and resistance exercise on the 24h BP response in normotensive women. Twenty-four women (aged 33 ± 9 years performed five experimental sessions in randomized order: CON - no exercise; AE50 - 50% of heart rate reserve (HRR; AE70 - 70% of HRR; RE40 - 40% of 1repetition maximum (RM and RE70 - 70% of 1RM. Systolic and diastolic BP and HR measurements were measured during 24h post-exercise at the participant's workplace. The AE50, AE70 and RE40 sessions led to the greatest and longest-lasting effects on the SBP, which persisted for up to 24h. For the DBP, the experimental sessions led to similar results; post exercise hypotension was observed until 7h post-exercise, with the exception of the AE70 session, which produced effects that persisted for 24h. Results shows that both aerobic and resistance exercise performed during the morning can decrease the mean BP above the baseline lasting 24 hours during a normal daily work. The aerobic exercise performed around 50% of HRR can better regulate both systolic and diastolic BP in this population.

  10. Arterial stiffness and blood flow adaptations following eight weeks of resistance exercise training in young and older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Lindy M; Fahs, Christopher A; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kim, Daeyeol; Mouser, James G; Shore, Erin A; Beck, Travis W; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2014-05-01

    Resistance training is recommended for all adults of both sexes. The arterial stiffness and limb blood flow responses to resistance training in young and older women have not been well-studied. The purpose of this study was to examine arterial stiffness and blood flow adaptations to high-intensity resistance exercise training in young and older women. Young (aged 18-25) and older (aged 50-64) women performed full-body high-intensity resistance exercise three times per week for eight weeks. The following measurements were performed twice prior to training and once following training: carotid to femoral and femoral to tibialis posterior pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, heart rate, resting forearm blood flow and forearm reactive hyperemia. Data was analyzed by ANOVAs with alpha set at 0.05. Correlations were also examined between changes in arterial stiffness and baseline arterial stiffness values. Older subjects had higher carotid-femoral PWV than younger subjects. No significant effects were found for femoral-tibialis posterior PWV or for resting forearm blood flow. Changes in carotid-femoral and femoral-tibialis posterior PWV correlated significantly with their respective baseline values. Older subjects increased peak forearm blood flow while young subjects showed no change. Total hyperemia increased significantly in both groups. In conclusion, in both young and older women, eight weeks of high-intensity resistance training appeared to improve microvascular forearm function while not changing carotid-femoral or femoral-tibialis posterior arterial stiffness. However, a large degree of individual variation was found and arterial stiffness adaptations appeared positively related to the initial stiffness values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of blood flow to the prefrontal cortex on high-intensity exercise combined with high-decibel music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyukki; Kim, Kyungae; Jung, Yu-Jin; Ahn, Na-Ri; So, Wi-Young; Kato, Morimasa

    2013-12-01

    We studied the effects of high-intensity exercise (70-75% of VO2 max) combined with high-decibel music (100 dB) on cognitive function (measured by the Stroop test) and related blood flow changes to the prefrontal cortex (measured by Oxy-hemoglobin (Hb), Deoxy-Hb, tissue oxygen index (TOI), and normalized tissue hemoglobin index (nTHI)). The subjects of the study were 28 healthy female university students in their early 20s. Subjects were categorized into control group (CG), music group (MG), exercise group (Ex), and music and exercise group (MnEx). A crossover design was implemented so that all subjects participated in all test groups. We found no significant difference in reaction time between CG and MG for the neutral and incongruent tasks of Stroop test. However, there were significant improvements in the neutral and incongruent tasks for both the Ex (p prefrontal cortex of the brain supported the Stroop test data. We found no difference between Ex and MnEx in the TOI; however, there was a significant decrease (p music could negatively affect prefrontal cortex activation of the brain during exercise.

  12. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C...... with control at the end of exercise (43 +/- 4 vs. 51 +/- 4 ml. 100 g(-1). min(-1); P metabolic rate was therefore higher at the end...... rate of oxygen may be ascribed to a Q(10) (temperature) effect and/or the level of cerebral neuronal activity associated with increased exertion....

  13. Blood chemistry and relative organ weights of rabbits fed neem leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) based diets on blood and relative organ weight characteristics of rabbits. In the first experiment, 36 rabbit bucks aged 7 to 8 months were distributed into four dietary groups, T1 , T2 T3 and T4 of 9 rabbits using completely randomized design.

  14. Impact of exercising muscles to exhaustion on blood markers in weight-training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Burini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic markers of physical exhaustion were evaluated in venous blood drawn from 8 men (20-30 years old with at least 3 years’ experience in weight-lifting training. They were submitted, in the morning, to an overload (exhaustion test starting at 80% of 1 RM (one repetition maximum on 8 muscle groups. Heart rate (HR was measured and samples of venous blood were collected before and immediately after the exhaustion test (ET and sent to a laboratory for blood gas analysis (pH, lactate, pO2, pCO2 and HCO-3 and measurement of electrolytes (Na+, Cl-, K+ and Ca++ and glycemia. The HR/kg ratios observed were in the following sequence of descending order: arm and hamstrings > shoulder and back > chest > quadriceps > calf. Results for NH4, pH, lactate and HCO-3 levels were changed in all 8 muscle groups, whereas Ca++, K+, Na+, Cl-, and uric acid did not change significantly after the ET. The muscle groups: back, biceps, triceps, chest, and hamstrings exhibited changes in seven to nine indicators while only 4 to 6 biochemical indicators changed in response to shoulder, calf, and quadriceps exercises. Thus, blood markers indicating acidosis, hemoconcentration and hyperglycemia were sensitive markers although with low specificity for the eight muscle groups. Calf and quadriceps had the highest tolerance for weight loading along with the smallest HR increase and lowest number of biochemical indicators changed. Therefore, it appears possible to reach muscle exhaustion with systemic responses in the blood by working out the arm muscles and hamstrings with lighter weights than for quadriceps and calf muscles.ResumoO impacto da exaustão (com pesos de grupos musculares, sobre indicadores sanguíneos de acidose e de hemoconcentração foi estudado em 8 jovens (20-30 anos treinados em musculação. Todos foram submetidos a sobrecarga inicial de 80% de 1RM, até a exaustão (TE, em 8 exercícios distintos, com coleta de sangue e registro da freqüência card

  15. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and α2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E. canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hemodynamic mechanisms of the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Neves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the hemodynamic mechanisms responsible for the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after exercise, 26 healthy sedentary individuals (age 29 ± 8 years underwent the Stroop color-word test before and 60 min after a bout of maximal dynamic exercise on a treadmill. A subgroup (N = 11 underwent a time-control experiment without exercise. Blood pressure was continuously and noninvasively recorded by infrared finger photoplethysmography. Stroke volume was derived from pressure signals, and cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance were calculated. Perceived mental stress scores were comparable between mental stress tests both in the exercise (P = 0.96 and control (P = 0.24 experiments. After exercise, the blood pressure response to mental stress was attenuated (pre: 10 ± 13 vs post: 6 ± 7 mmHg; P 0.05. In conclusion, a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise attenuates the blood pressure response to mental stress in healthy subjects, along with lower stroke volume and cardiac output, denoting an acute modulatory action of exercise on the central hemodynamic response to mental stress.

  17. Effects of exercise with and without different degrees of blood flow restriction on torque and muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kim, Daeyeol; Fahs, Christopher A; Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi; Larson, Rebecca D; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    An unresolved question in resistance training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) is what percentage of estimated arterial occlusion pressure provides the most robust acute muscular response. Forty participants were assigned to Experiments 1, 2, or 3. Each experiment completed exercise protocols differing by pressure, exercise load, and/or volume. Torque was measured pre- and postexercise, and muscle activation was measured pre- and during each set. Pressure and load did not affect torque greatly. Muscle activation increased in all conditions (P muscle activation from 40% to 50% arterial occlusion [66% vs. 87% maximal voluntary contraction (30% 1RM)] but was not further increased with higher pressure. Different levels of BFR may alter the acute muscular response to a degree, although higher pressures do not appear to augment these changes. © 2014 The Authors. Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The effects of water-based exercise in combination with blood flow restriction on strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joamira P; Neto, Gabriel R; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Bemben, Michael G; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Batista, Gilmário; Silva, Júlio C G; Freitas, Eduardo D S; Sousa, Maria S C

    2015-12-01

    Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) are two methods that have independently been shown to improve muscle strength in those of advancing age. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of water-based exercise in combination with BFR on maximum dynamic strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women. Twenty-eight women underwent an 8-week water-based exercise program. The participants were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (a) water exercise only, (b) water exercise + BFR, or (c) a non-exercise control group. Functional capacity (chair stand test, timed up and go test, gait speed, and dynamic balance) and strength testing were tested before and after the 8-week aquatic exercise program. The main findings were as follows: (1) water-based exercise in combination with BFR significantly increased the lower limb maximum strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise, regardless of the application of BFR, increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test over a control group. Although we used a healthy population in the current study, these findings may have important implications for those who may be contraindicated to using traditional resistance exercise. Future research should explore this promising modality in these clinical populations.

  19. Pathogen exposure and blood chemistry in the Washington population of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. LeAnn; Schuler, Krysten L.; Thomas, Nancy J.; Webb, Julie L.; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Ip, Hon S.; Dubey, J.P.; Frame, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-01

    Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from Washington State, United States were evaluated in 2011 to determine health status and pathogen exposure. Antibodies to Brucella spp. (10%) and influenza A virus (23%) were detected for the first time in this population in 2011. Changes in clinical pathology values (serum chemistries), exposure to pathogens, and overall health of the population over the last decade were assessed by comparing 2011 data to the data collected on this population in 2001–2002. Several serum chemistry parameters were different between study years and sexes but were not clinically significant. The odds of canine distemper virus exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2001–2002 (80%) compared to 2011 (10%); likelihood of exposure significantly increased with age. Prevalence of exposure to Sarcocystis neurona was also higher in 2001–2002 (29%) than in 2011 (0%), but because testing methods varied between study years the results were not directly comparable. Exposure to Leptospira spp. was only observed in 2001–2002. Odds of Toxoplasma gondii exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2011 (97%) than otters in 2001–2002 (58%). Substantial levels of domoic acid (n = 2) and saxitoxin (n = 2) were found in urine or fecal samples from animals sampled in 2011. No evidence of calicivirus or Coxiella burnetii exposure in the Washington population of northern sea otters was found in either 2001–2002 or 2011. Changes in exposure status from 2001–2002 to 2011 suggest that the Washington sea otter population may be dealing with new disease threats (e.g., influenza) while also increasing their susceptibility to diseases that may be highly pathogenic in naïve individuals (e.g., canine distemper).

  20. The Effect of Four-Week Period of Aerobic Exercise with Cinnamon Consumption on Lipoprotein Indicates and Blood sugar in Diabetic Female Patients (Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dastani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cinnamon as an herbal medicine has the ability to reduce blood glucose and lipoproteins in diabetic patients. Based on the positive effects of exercise on diabetic patients, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Four weeks Period aerobic exercise alongside using cinnamon on lipoprotein parameters and blood glucose in women with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Thirty diabetic women were voluntarily selected and were randomly divided into three groups: 1 aerobic exercise group; 2 aerobic exercise alongside using cinnamon; and 3 control group. Aerobic exercise took four weeks with 60 percent of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of the study. Results: Blood glucose, the fat percentage and HDL, and the ratio of LDL to HDL in the first group significantly decreased and in the second group increased (P<0.05. Also the first group showed a significant reduction in triglyceride. The only significant change observed in the control group was a significant increase in the level of LDL. Comparing the first and second group, it was observed that in the second group the level of total cholesterol decreased and the ratio of LDL to HDL increased (P<0.05. Conclusion: Using cinnamon alongside aerobic exercise is likely to be beneficial in regulating the concentration of blood glucose and lipids in diabetic patients.

  1. Chronic effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on blood and enzyme chemistry of river otters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, L.K.; Bowyer, R.T.; Testa, J.W. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)); Faro, J.B. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Soldotna, AK (United States))

    1994-04-01

    River otters (Lutra canadensis) living in marine environments of Prince William Sound, Alaska, and exposed to crude oil from the Exxon Valdez spill in March 1989 showed elevated levels of blood haptoglobins, and interleukin-6 ir, as well as elevated activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and creatine kinase in summer 1991. Stepwise logistic regression, using a subset of these and other blood proteins and enzyme activities as potential independent variables, correctly classified 86.4% of 22 otters as inhabiting oiled or nonoiled areas. River otters abandoned latrine sites (an index to their abundance) over three times more often in oiled than in nonoiled areas, suggesting there may have been a delayed response in river otter populations to exposure to crude oil. This is the first clear model for the long-term effects of an oil spill on blood parameters of a free-ranging mammal using a nonlethal methodology. These effects occurred two years after the spill and following a major effort to clean oil from the shorelines of Prince William Sound.

  2. Exercise intensity and muscle hypertrophy in blood flow-restricted limbs and non-restricted muscles: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Thiebaud, Robert S; Bemben, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence for high-intensity resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy has accumulated over the last several decades, the basic concept of the training can be traced back to ancient Greece: Milo of Croton lifted a bull-calf daily until it was fully grown, which would be known today as progressive overload. Now, in the 21st century, different types of training are being tested and studied, such as low-intensity exercise combined with arterial as well as venous blood flow restriction (BFR) to/from the working muscles. Because BFR training requires the use of a cuff that is placed at the proximal ends of the arms and/or legs, the BFR is only applicable to limb muscles. Consequently, most previous BFR training studies have focused on the physiological adaptations of BFR limb muscles. Muscle adaptations in non-BFR muscles of the hip and trunk are lesser known. Recent studies that have reported both limb and trunk muscle adaptations following BFR exercise training suggest that low-intensity (20-30% of 1RM) resistance training combined with BFR elicits muscle hypertrophy in both BFR limb and non-BFR muscles. However, the combination of leg muscle BFR with walk training elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the BFR leg muscles. In contrast to resistance exercise with BFR, the exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to cause muscle hypertrophy in the non-BFR gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles. Other mechanisms including hypoxia, local and systemic growth factors and muscle cell swelling may also potentially affect the hypertrophic response of non-BFR muscles to BFR resistance exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  3. The interplay of exercise heart rate and blood pressure as a predictor of coronary artery disease and arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Andreas P; Liakos, Charalampos I; Vyssoulis, Gregory P; Chatzistamatiou, Evangelos I; Markou, Maria I; Tzamou, Vanessa; Stefanadis, Christodoulos I

    2013-03-01

    Delayed blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) decline at recovery post-exercise are independent predictors of incident coronary artery disease (CAD). Delayed BP recovery and exaggerated BP response to exercise are independent predictors of future arterial hypertension (AH). This study sought to examine whether the combination of two exercise parameters provides additional prognostic value than each variable alone. A total of 830 non-CAD patients (374 normotensive) were followed for new-onset CAD and/or AH for 5 years after diagnostic exercise testing (ET). At the end of follow-up, patients without overt CAD underwent a second ET. Stress imaging modalities and coronary angiography, where appropriate, ruled out CAD. New-onset CAD was detected in 110 participants (13.3%) whereas AH was detected in 41 former normotensives (11.0%). The adjusted (for confounders) relative risk (RR) of CAD in abnormal BP and HR recovery patients was 1.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-2.98; P=.011) compared with delayed BP and normal HR recovery patients and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.08-2.75; P=.014) compared with normal BP and delayed HR recovery patients. The adjusted RR of AH in normotensives with abnormal BP recovery and response was 2.18 (95% CI, 1.03-4.72; P=.047) compared with delayed BP recovery and normal BP response patients and 2.48 (95% CI, 1.14-4.97; P=.038) compared with normal BP recovery and exaggerated BP response individuals. In conclusion, the combination of two independent exercise predictors is an even stronger CAD/AH predictor than its components. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Blood-borne virus transmission in healthcare settings in Ireland: review of patient notification exercises 1997-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohue, S

    2012-01-21

    A review of patient notification exercises (PNEs) carried out in Ireland between 1997 and 2011 to investigate potential exposure to blood-borne viruses (BBVs) in healthcare settings was undertaken to inform future policy and practice. A questionnaire was sent to key informants in the health services to identify all relevant PNEs. Structured interviews were conducted with key investigators, and available documentation was examined. Ten BBV-related PNEs were identified. Despite testing over 2000 patients, only one case of transmission was found. However, in-depth local investigations before undertaking the PNEs identified six cases of healthcare-associated transmission.

  5. Digestibility, growth, blood chemistry, and enzyme activity of juvenile Oreochromis niloticus fed isocaloric diets containing animal and plant byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnolia Montoya-Mejía

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this work, we studied the digestibility, growth, blood chemistry, and enzyme activity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus juveniles (0.95±0.18 g using different animal (fish silage meal, whey meal, bovine blood meal, and red crab meal and plant (extruded bean, extruded chickpea meal, coconut paste, Jatropha curcas meal, and chickpea meal dietary byproducts. Nine isocaloric diets (321.92±9.10 kcal g−1 were evaluated for 60 days. The highest digestibility of crude protein values for animal and plant sources were obtained for the whey (93.6 and extruded bean meal (90.5 diets, respectively. The final body weight was higher for the red crab and extruded chickpea meal diets, meanwhile the fish silage and red crab byproducts obtained the highest protein efficiency ratio. Hematocrit was similar among the diets of each byproduct source and presented correlation with growth parameters. The highest glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride values were obtained for fish silage (138.0, 260.5, and 389.0 mg dL−1, respectively and whey meal (174.5, 242.3, and 284.0 mg dL−1, respectively groups. A positive correlation was found between the digestibility of crude protein of ingredients and chymotrypsin activity. Oreochromis niloticus is able to better utilize fish silage, whey, extruded bean, and extruded chickpea byproducts, adjusting its digestive physiology. Such ingredients can be used for formulating cheaper and efficient tilapia diets.

  6. Effect of Injection Minimal Dosages of Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA to Body Weight and Blood Chemistry Male Rat Strain Sprague-Dawley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nukman Moeloek

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Many family planning program focus more on men. Until now, vasectomy has been the commonly used method for male contraception. However, this method creates inconvenience such as irreversibility and psychological problems. One of the alternatives contraception is the combination of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA and androgen. The minimum dosage of DMPA could suppress testosterone level that leads to reduced spermatogenesis and sperm viability. Nevertheless, until now it is not known whether minimum dosages of DMPA have an effect to body weight and blood chemistry. Therefore, this research aimed at determinate the effect of minimal dosages of DMPA to body mass and blood chemistry using male rats (Rattus norvegicus L. strain Sprague-Dawley as model. This research using completely randomized design, unequal size sample, castration treatments and several doses DMPA (1.25, 0.625, and 0.313 milligram. Injecting of DMPA conducted intramuscularly on week 0 and week 12. Normality/homogeneity Data normality were analyzed before ANOVA test. Then, abnormal data were tested using Kruskal-Wallis test. The result shows that injection of DMPA in various doses do not have an effect on body weight and blood chemistry such as erytrocytes, haemoglobin, hematocrite, HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, SGOT, SGPT and triglyseride (p>0,05. Furthermore, it is concluded that that no effect of minimal dosages of DMPA to body mass and blood chemistry of rat.

  7. Ultralow Fouling and Functionalizable Surface Chemistry Based on a Zwitterionic Polymer Enabling Sensitive and Specific Protein Detection in Undiluted Blood Plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaisocherová, Hana; Piliarik, Marek; Homola, Jiří; Yang, W.; Zhang, Z.; Cao, Z.; Cheng, G.; Jiang, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 20 (2008), s. 7894-79001 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) * ultra low fouling * blood plasma Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  8. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    Changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (Vmean), measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, were used to determine whether increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or brain activation enhance cerebral perfusion during exercise. We also evaluated the role of "central command......, they support the hypothesis that cerebral perfusion during exercise reflects an increase in brain activation that is independent of MAP, central command, and muscle metaboreceptors but is likely to depend on influence of mechanoreceptors.......," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2...

  9. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...... perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P

  10. Continuous low- to moderate-intensity exercise training is as effective as moderate- to high-intensity exercise training at lowering blood HbA(1c) in obese type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D; Dendale, P; Jonkers, R A M; Beelen, M; Manders, R J F; Corluy, L; Mullens, A; Berger, J; Meeusen, R; van Loon, L J C

    2009-09-01

    Exercise represents an effective interventional strategy to improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. However, the impact of exercise intensity on the benefits of exercise training remains to be established. In the present study, we compared the clinical benefits of 6 months of continuous low- to moderate-intensity exercise training with those of continuous moderate- to high-intensity exercise training, matched for energy expenditure, in obese type 2 diabetes patients. Fifty male obese type 2 diabetes patients (age 59 +/- 8 years, BMI 32 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) participated in a 6 month continuous endurance-type exercise training programme. All participants performed three supervised exercise sessions per week, either 55 min at 50% of whole body peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)peak (low to moderate intensity) or 40 min at 75% of VO(2)peak (moderate to high intensity). Oral glucose tolerance, blood glycated haemoglobin, lipid profile, body composition, maximal workload capacity, whole body and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and skeletal muscle fibre type composition were assessed before and after 2 and 6 months of intervention. The entire 6 month intervention programme was completed by 37 participants. Continuous endurance-type exercise training reduced blood glycated haemoglobin levels, LDL-cholesterol concentrations, body weight and leg fat mass, and increased VO(2)peak, lean muscle mass and skeletal muscle cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase activity (p training at low to moderate or moderate to high intensity. When matched for energy cost, prolonged continuous low- to moderate-intensity endurance-type exercise training is equally effective as continuous moderate- to high-intensity training in lowering blood glycated haemoglobin and increasing whole body and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in obese type 2 diabetes patients. ISRCTN32206301 None.

  11. [Associations of the work duration, sleep duration and number of holidays with an exaggerated blood pressure response during an exercise stress test among workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Ohta, Masanori; Ikeda, Masaharu; Jiang, Ying; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that an exaggerated systolic blood pressure (ESBP) response during exercise, even if resting blood pressure is normal, is associated with an increased risk of future hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was designed to investigate the relationships of work duration, sleep duration and number of holidays with blood pressure response during an exercise stress test among normotensive workers. The subjects were 362 normotensive workers (79 males and 283 females; age, 49.1 years). A multi-stage graded submaximal exercise stress test was performed on each subject using an electric bicycle ergometer. The workload was increased every 3 minutes, and blood pressure was measured at rest and during the last 1 minute of each stage. In this study, an ESBP response during exercise was defined according to the criteria of the Framingham Study (peak systolic blood pressure ≥210 mmHg in males, or ≥190 mmHg in females). Working environments, work duration, sleep duration, number of holidays, and physical activity during commuting and work, and leisure time exercise duration were evaluated using a questionnaire. An ESBP response during exercise was observed in 94 (26.0%) workers. The adjusted odds ratio for the prevalence of an ESBP response during exercise was found to be significantly higher with an increase in work duration, decreases in sleep duration and number of holidays (psleep duration and number of holidays groups had significantly higher adjusted odds ratio for the prevalence of an ESBP response during exercise than the lowest work duration with highest sleep duration and number of holidays groups (pexercise and daily life are necessary to prevent the incidence of future hypertension, CVD and death due to overwork in workers with long-work duration, short sleep duration and small number of holidays.

  12. Effects of aerobic exercise and medical nutrition intervention on endothelial injury and placental blood perfusion in patients with preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Ju Zhang1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effects of aerobic exercise and medical nutrition intervention on endothelial injury and placental blood perfusion in patients with preeclampsia. Methods: 72 cases of patients diagnosed with preeclampsia in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Zigong Third People’s Hospital between January 2013 and August 2016 were selected randomly divided into two groups, the observation group received aerobic exercise, medical nutrition combined with routine intervention, and the control group received routine intervention. Before and after intervention, serum endothelial injury markers were detected. After delivery, the expression of apoptosis molecules and the contents of stress molecules caused by hypoxia in placenta were detected. Results: After intervention, serum AnnexinV, vWF, ET-1 and oxLDL contents of both groups were lower than those before intervention while NO, PLGF and ABCA1 contents were higher than those before intervention and serum AnnexinV, vWF, ET-1 and oxLDL contents of observation group were lower than those of control group while NO, PLGF and ABCA1 contents were higher than those of control group; after delivery, Bax, Fas, FasL and Caspase-3 mRNA expression as well as MDA, AOPP, CHOP and GRP78 protein contents in placenta of observation group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise and medical nutrition intervention can reduce the endothelial injury and improve the placental hypoxia of preeclampsia.

  13. Attenuation of morphine withdrawal signs, blood cortisol and glucose level with forced exercise in comparison with clonidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morphine withdrawal usually results in undesired outcomes , despite partial benefits of alternative medication such as methadone, because of the lack of mental sedation during the withdrawal period, may not lead to the desired result. In this study, forced exercise by treadmill is used to manage morphine dependence in animal model. Materials and Methods: Forty adult male mice were divided into 5 groups, from which 4 groups became dependent by increasing daily doses of morphine for 6 days (20-45 mg/kg, SC. Afterwards, the animals were treated for 21 days by either of the following protocol: Positive control (dependent received once daily 45 mg/kg of morphine sulfate (SC for 21 day, group under treatment by clonidine (0.4 mg/kg, SC for 21 day group under treatment by forced exercise by treadmill for 21 day, group under treatment by combination of clonidine (0.4 mg/kg, SC and forced exercise by treadmill for 21day and the negative control group(independent received saline injection like other groups. Each of this administration was injected at 8 AM. Finally, in the test day (day 28, all animals received a single dose of naloxone (3 mg/kg, SC at 8 AM and then were observed for withdrawal signs, and Total Withdrawal Score (TWS was determined as described previously. After withdrawal sign evaluation for evaluation of stress level of dependent mice, blood cortisol and glucose level were measured in non-fasting situations well. Results: This study showed that TWS significantly decreased in all treatment groups in comparison with positive control group (P < 0.001. Moreover, blood cortisol and glucose level significantly decreased in group under treatment by clonidine (0.4 mg/kg and group under treatment by combination of clonidine (0.4 mg/kg and forced exercise by treadmill groups in comparison with control positive (dependent (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggested that forced exercise can be useful as adjunct therapy in dependent people

  14. Effect of dietary lipid, carnitine and exercise on lipid profile in rat blood, liver and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Jyothsna; Jeevaratnam, K

    2009-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of physical exercise on effects of the daily intake of vegetarian diet of either vegetable hydrogenated fat (HF) or peanut oil (PO) with or without carnitine on the lipid profile. Eight groups of male Wistar rats were fed HF-diet (4 groups) or PO-diet (4 groups), with or without carnitine for 24 weeks. One group for each diet acted as sedentary control while the other groups were allowed swimming for 1 hr a day, 6 days/week, for 24 weeks. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFA), liver and thigh muscle glycogen, total fat (TF), TG, TC and FFA were analyzed. HF-fed rats showed significantly increased plasma TC, VLDL+LDL-cholesterol and TG compared to PO-fed rats, wherein a lowered plasma TC, TG levels in all the groups with significantly increased liver cholesterol and decreased muscle cholesterol was observed. Physical exercise of moderate intensity reduced plasma TC and TG accompanied by significantly reduced tissue TG and cholesterol while FFA and glycogen increased in all the groups. The influence of exercise was less pronounced in carnitine supplemented rats since carnitine could significantly reduce TG in plasma and tissues of sedentary rats. Results from the present study showed that the intake of HF diet significantly increased the plasma and tissue lipid profile and MUFA-rich diet or carnitine supplementation and/or exercise may ameliorate the deleterious effects of HF.

  15. Plateau in Muscle Blood Flow during Prolonged Exercise in Miniature Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-25

    J.R.S. and J. Ludbrook. Baroreflex participation in redistribu- tion of cardiac output at onset of exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 64:627-634, 1988. 17... marathon runners. In: Milvy, P. (ed.) The Marathon : Physiological, Medical, Epidemiological, and Psychological Studies. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 301:128

  16. Aerobic Exercise Responses and Blood Pressure Measurement of Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Ibadan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angba, Tessy Onogimesike

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of physical activities are universal for all, including those with intellectual disability. Individuals with intellectual disability are mostly neglected and hardly exercised. Hence, the opportunities for improved health and wellness are limited. Paucity of data that could guide ameliorative measures also presents another challenge.…

  17. effect of a low-intensity resistance exercise programme with blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Division of Sport Science, College of Science and Technology, Konkuk University,. Chungju-si, Republic of Korea ... individual basis is suggested. This can be accomplished by making the belt shorter than the ..... more effective than a 3% reduction of circumference for performance of individual BFR resistance exercises.

  18. Effects of rhythmic exercise performed to music on the rheological properties of blood in women over 60 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Anna; Filar-Mierzwa, Katarzyna; Dąbrowski, Zbigniew; Teległó, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of motor rehabilitation, in the form of rhythmic exercise to music, on the rheological characteristics of blood in older women. The study included 30 women (65-80 years of age), and the control group was comprised of 10 women of corresponding age. Women from the experimental group were subjected to a five-month rehabilitation program, in the form of rhythmic exercise performed to music (three 30-minute sessions per week); women from the control group were not involved in any regular physical activity. Blood samples from all the women were examined for hematological, rheological, and biochemical parameters prior to the study and five months thereafter. The rehabilitation program was reflected by a significant improvement of erythrocyte count and hematocrit. Furthermore, an improvement of erythrocyte deformability was observed by lower shear stress levels, while no significant changes were noted by the higher shear stress values. The rehabilitation resulted in a marked decrease of the aggregation amplitude while no significant changes were observed in aggregation index and total aggregation half-time. Additionally, the training regimen was reflected by a significant increase in the plasma viscosity, while no significant changes in fibrinogen levels were noted.

  19. Increases in arterial blood oxygen during exercise in the lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BUSHNELL, PG; LUTZ, PL; STEFFENSEN, JF

    1982-01-01

    Polyethylene cannulae were implanted in pre- and post-branchial blood vessels allowing nonstressful blood sampling over a variety of activity ranges in an active tropical elasmobranch, the lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris). TheP 50 was found to be 11.8 Torr at 24°C and pH of 7.7. A Bohr shift...

  20. Changes in interstitial K+ and pH during exercise: implications for blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    that blood flow is affected by changes in K+ as low as 0.1 mmol/L. The vasodilatory effect of K+ can be inhibited with simultaneous barium infusion, indicating that inward rectifier potassium (Kir)channels are involved. Acidosis has a direct effect on blood flow and an indirect effect, mediated by changes...

  1. Blood chemistry profile as indicator of nutritional status in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Helena; Santos, Sara; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2014-10-01

    This study was carried out to establish biochemical parameters with potential diagnostic value to assess the nutritional status of healthy seabass. For that purpose, triplicate groups of seabass juveniles were submitted to different feeding protocols: fed for 14 days; fed for 7 days followed by 7 days of fasting or fasted for 14 days. At the end of the trial, body, liver and viscera were randomly sampled for proximate composition analysis. Blood was also collected and the following plasma parameters were analyzed by standard clinical methods: glucose; cholesterol; triglycerides; protein; inorganic phosphorus; calcium; magnesium; alkaline phosphatase (ALP); aspartate aminotransferase; lactate dehydrogenase; creatine phosphokinase and lipase. No major effect of feed deprivation on body composition, visceral index, perivisceral and hepatic lipid content were observed, whereas hepatosomatic index and hepatic glycogen were reduced. Previous feeding conditions strongly influenced the plasma parameters in seabass. Comparatively to the fed group, plasma glucose, cholesterol and calcium levels were reduced after 2 weeks of fasting while plasma triglycerides, protein, inorganic phosphorus and ALP attained minimum levels after 1 week of fasting. Overall, enzymatic activity parameters showed higher variability than biochemistry parameters. In conclusion, during short-term starvation (nutritional status of seabass and may be useful to monitor feeding practices in aquaculture. Further studies are, however, required to extend results of this study to other fish size classes.

  2. Immediate effect of passive static stretching versus resistance exercises on postprandial blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudut, Peeyoosha; Rajan, Abey P

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly rising all over the globe at an alarming rate. In India, more than 61.3 million people have been presently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is possible to control the circulating blood glucose levels by reducing life style risk factors through physical activities comprising of muscle stretches, aerobic training, resistance exercises (REs), yoga, etc. The aim of this study is to identify and compare the immediate effect of passive static stretching (PSS) versus RE on blood glucose level in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study included 51 participants between the age of 40-65 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to study the immediate effect of 60-min PSS (n=25) and 60-min RE (n=26). The outcome measure was blood glucose level which was checked by glucometer (free-style neo). Blood sugar was assessed at 3 points of time that included fasting blood sugar level, 2 hr after the meal and immediately after the exercise regimen. Results of this study showed significant reduction in blood glucose level in subjects according to glucometer with PSS ( P =0.000) and RE ( P =0.00). However, both groups demonstrated equal effect in terms of lowering blood sugar level immediately after the exercise. The conclusion is both PSS and RE are effective in reducing postprandial blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mellitus and must be prescribed for the patients who demonstrate difficulty in controlling post prandial spike.

  3. Effects of supervised exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashino, Yasuaki; Jackson, Jeffrey L; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2012-12-01

    Our study's purpose was to perform a systematic review to assess the effect of supervised exercise interventions on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. We searched electronic databases and selected studies that evaluated the effect of supervised exercise intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in adult people with type 2 diabetes. We used random effect models to derive weighted mean differences of exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. Forty-two RCTs (2808 subjects) met inclusion criteria and are included in our meta-analysis. Structured exercise was associated with a change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of -2.42 mmHg (95% CI, -4.39 to -0.45 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of -2.23 mmHg (95% CI, -3.21 to -1.25 mmHg), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.02-0.07 mmol/L), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of -0.16 mmol/L (95% CI, -0.30 to -0.01 mmol/L). Heterogeneity was partially explained by age, dietary co-intervention and the duration and intensity of the exercise. Supervised exercise is effective in improving blood pressure control, lowering LDL-C, and elevating HDL-C levels in people with diabetes. Physicians should recommend exercise for their adult patients with diabetes who can safely do so. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  5. Haematology, Blood Chemistry and Carcass Characteristics of Growing Rabbits Fed Grasshopper Meal as a Substitute for Fish Meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Njidda* and C. E. Isidahomen1

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing fish meal with grasshopper meal on haematology, blood chemistry and carcass characteristics of growing rabbits. Forty rabbits of mixed breeds, aged 6-10 weeks, were randomly assigned to the dietary treatments in a complete randomized design with eight rabbits per treatment. The rabbits were fed with diets containing 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75 and 5% grasshopper meal in diets designated as T1 (control, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively. The experimental diets and clean drinking water were supplied ad libitum throughout the experimental period of nine weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, three rabbits per treatment were slaughtered for carcass evaluation, while blood samples were collected for analysis. The result of the experiment showed significant differences (P0.05 on haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC. The results also revealed significant differences (P0.05 on serum albumin and total protein. The results of carcass characteristics showed significant differences among treatments (P<0.05 for slaughter weight, carcass weight, dressing percentage, skin pelt, tail, feet and abdominal fat. The slaughter weight and carcass weight were better in groups receiving 2.5% grass hopper meal (50% fish meal replacement. From the results, it can be concluded that inclusion of 2.50% grasshopper meal as a replacement for fish meal (50% replacement has no adverse effects on the haematological parameters, serum biochemistry and carcass characteristics of rabbits.

  6. Regional blood flow during exercise in humans measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J

    2000-01-01

    Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the tracer indocyanine green (ICG), we quantified blood flow in calf muscle and around the Achilles tendon during plantar flexion (1-9 W). For comparison, blood flow in calf muscle was determined by dye dilution in combination with magnetic resonance...... imaging measures of muscle volume, and, for the peritendon region, blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. From rest to a peak load of 9 W, NIRS-ICG blood flow in calf muscle increased from 2.4+/-0.2 to 74+/-5 ml x 100 ml tissue(-1) x min(-1), similar to that measured by reverse dye (77+/-6 ml x 100...

  7. Beetroot-based gel supplementation improves handgrip strength, forearm muscle O2 saturation but not exercise tolerance and blood volume in jiu-jitsu athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Gustavo Vieira; Nascimento, Luiz; Volino-Souza, Mônica; Mesquita, Jacilene; Alvares, Thiago

    2018-03-22

    The ergogenic effect of beetroot on the exercise performance of trained cyclists, runners, kayakers, and swimmers has been demonstrated. However, whether or not beetroot supplementation presents a beneficial effect on the exercise performance of jiu-jitsu athletes (JJA) remains inconclusive. Therefore, present study assessed the effect of beetroot-based gel (BG) supplementation on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), exercise time until fatigue (ETF), muscle O2 saturation (SmO2), blood volume (tHb), and plasma nitrate and lactate in response to handgrip isotonic exercise (HIE) in JJA. In a randomized, crossover, double-blind design, 12 JJA performed three sets of HIE at 40% of the MVC until fatigue after 8 days (8th dose was offered 120 min previous exercise) of BG supplementation or a nitrate-depleted gel (PLA), and forearm SmO2 and tHb were continuously monitored by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Blood samples were taken before, immediately after exercise, and 20 min after exercise recovery in PLA and BG condition. MVC was evaluated at baseline and 20 min after HIE. There was a significant reduction in ∆MVC decline after HIE in BG condition. Forearm SmO2 during exercise recovery was significantly greater only after BG supplementation. No significant difference in ETF and tHb were observed between both BG and PLA in response to HIE. Plasma nitrate increased only after BG, whereas the exercise-induced increase in plasma lactate was significantly lower in BG when compared to PLA. In conclusion, BG supplementation may be a good nutritional strategy to improve forearm SmO2 and prevent force decline in response to exercise in JJA.

  8. The influence of 1800 MHz GSM-like signals on blood chemistry and oxidative stress in non-pregnant and pregnant rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kismali, Gorkem; Ozgur, Elcin; Guler, Goknur; Akcay, Aytac; Sel, Tevhide; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2012-05-01

    Environmental electromagnetic fields originate from man-made sources, such as mobile phones and base stations, and have led to increasing public concern about their possible adverse health effects. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) generated from these devices on oversensitive animals, such as pregnant rabbits. In the present study, the effects of whole body 1800 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)-like RFR exposure for 15 min/day for seven days on blood chemistry and lipid peroxidation levels in both non-pregnant and pregnant New Zealand White rabbits were investigated. Thirteen-month-old rabbits were studied in the following four groups: Non-pregnant control, non-pregnant RFR-exposed, pregnant control and pregnant RFR-exposed. Lipid peroxidation, namely malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, did not change after RFR exposure. However, blood chemistry parameters, such as cholesterol (CHO), total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), uric acid, creatinin and creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase-myocardial band isoenzyme (CK-MB) changed due to both pregnancy and RFR exposure. Our investigations have been shown that no indication for oxidative stress was detected in the blood of pregnant rabbits upon RF exposure at specific conditions employed in the present study. Minor changes in some blood chemistry parameters were detected but CK-MB and CK increases were found remarkable. Studies on RFR exposure during pregnancy will help establish international standards for the protection of pregnant women from environmental RFR.

  9. Association of blood pressure and heart rate response during exercise with cardiovascular events in the Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Mohammad R; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Sarna, Punit; Na, Beeya; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2010-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the association of blood pressure and heart rate response during exercise with myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure, stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) and death in ambulatory adults with coronary artery disease. A study population of 937 patients with stable coronary artery disease underwent treadmill exercise stress testing and was followed for 5 years. Participants were divided into quartiles based on peak SBP change, peak SBP and heart rate. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association of change in SBP and heart rate with subsequent cardiovascular events. The participants with SBP increases in the highest quartile had a decreased rate of hospitalization for heart failure [hazard ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21-0.7; P = 0.002], MI (hazard ratio 0.3, 95% CI 0.15-0.58; P = 0.0004), stroke or TIA (hazard ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.15-0.98; P = 0.04), and all cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5, 95% CI 0.33-0.76; P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, history of MI and HTN, use of β blockers, statins and calcium channel blockers, resting heart rate, and SBP, participants with SBP change in the highest quartile remained at lowest risk of MI (hazard ratio 0.31, 95% CI 0.15-0.66, P = 0.002), hospitalization for heart failure (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.22-0.97, P = 0.04) and death (hazard ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.32-0.86, P = 0.01). This association was largely explained by greater exercise capacity in those with the highest SBP change. Change in heart rate had a similar association with cardiovascular events. In ambulatory patients with coronary artery disease, the group with the greatest blood pressure and heart rate increase had the lowest risk of MI, heart failure, stroke or TIA and death. These findings support the notion that a robust blood pressure response predicts favorable outcomes.

  10. Evaluation of latent cardiac disease in diabetic patients with Tl-201 exercise myocardial scintigram and blood pool scintigram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Takeo; Kasai, Ryutaro; Ikebe, Nobuhiko; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Yamasawa, Ikuhiro; Ibukiyama, Chiharu; Notoya, Yoko

    1990-01-01

    To find latent heart disease in diabetic patients, 142 diabetic patients were divided into 4 groups: (1) no hypertension and normal ECG (DM group); (2) hypertension recognized clinically (HT group); (3) myocardial damage on ECG (MD group); (4) group associated with the previous 2 (HT+MD group). In all groups Tl-201 exercise myocardial scintigrams and blood pool scintigrams were taken for comparative analysis. Positive rates of SPECT were 27.7% (23/83) in the DM group, 30.0% (9/30) in the HT group, 50.0% (6/12) in the MD group, and 70.6% (12/17) in the HT+MD group. The rate in the HT+MD group was significantly higher than in that of the DM and HT groups (p<0.001, p<0.01). Blood pool scintigrams revealed that in the HT+MD group, as compared with the normal control group, both 1/3 FF and PFR were significantly depressed, in addition to significant TPF prolongation in the former (p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.05). These findings suggest that in diabetic patients hypertension and myocardial damage would lead to a high incidence of abnormality in SPECT and left ventricular rapid filling dysfunction. This indicate a high incidence of latent cardiac disease which can be recognized in diabetic patients by stress myocardial and blood pool scintigrams. (author)

  11. Submaximal Exercise Systolic Blood Pressure and Heart Rate at 20 Years of Follow-up: Correlates in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartano, Nicole L; Lyass, Asya; Larson, Martin G; Lewis, Gregory D; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2016-05-27

    Beyond their resting values, exercise responses in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) may add prognostic information for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In cross-sectional studies, exercise BP and HR responses correlate with CVD risk factors; however, it is unclear which factors influence longitudinal changes in exercise responses over time, which is important for our understanding of the development of CVD. We assessed BP and HR responses to low-level exercise tests (6-minute Bruce protocol) in 1231 Framingham Offspring participants (55% women) who underwent a routine treadmill test in 1979-1983 (baseline; mean age 39±8 years) that was repeated in 1998-2001 (follow-up; mean age 58±8 years). Adjusting for baseline exercise responses, we related the follow-up exercise responses to baseline CVD risk factors and to their changes between examinations. Compared with men, women had greater rise in exercise systolic (S)BP and HR at 20-year follow-up (both Pexercise SBP at follow-up (all Pexercise SBP and HR at follow-up (both Pexercise SBP (≥180 mm Hg) at follow-up (Pexercise in midlife. Maintaining or adopting a healthy risk factor profile may favorably impact the exercise responses over time. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Combined supplementation of carbohydrate, alanine, and proline is effective in maintaining blood glucose and increasing endurance performance during long-term exercise in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogusa, Yoshihito; Mizugaki, Ami; Hirabayashi-Osada, Yuri; Furuta, Chie; Ohyama, Kana; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate supplementation is extremely important during prolonged exercise because it maintains blood glucose levels during later stages of exercise. In this study, we examined whether maintaining blood glucose levels by carbohydrate supplementation could be enhanced during long-term exercise by combining this supplementation with alanine and proline, which are gluconeogenic amino acids, and whether such a combination would affect exercise endurance performance. Male C57BL/6J mice were orally administered either maltodextrin (1.25 g/kg) or maltodextrin (1.0 g/kg) with alanine (0.225 g/kg) and proline (0.025 g/kg) 15 min before running for 170 min. Combined supplementation of maltodextrin, alanine, and proline induced higher blood glucose levels than isocaloric maltodextrin alone during the late exercise phase (100-170 min). The hepatic glycogen content of mice administered maltodextrin, alanine, and proline was higher than that of mice ingesting maltodextrin alone 60 min after beginning exercise, but the glycogen content of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no difference. We conducted a treadmill running test to determine the effect of alanine and proline on endurance performance. The test showed that running time to exhaustion of mice that were supplemented with maltodextrin (2.0 g/kg) was longer than that of mice that were supplemented with water alone. Maltodextrin supplementation (1.0 g/kg) with alanine (0.9 g/kg) and proline (0.1 g/kg) further increased running time to exhaustion compared to maltodextrin alone (2.0 g/kg). These results indicate that combined supplementation of carbohydrate, alanine, and proline is effective for maintaining blood glucose and hepatic glycogen levels and increasing endurance performance during long-term exercise in mice.

  13. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  14. Efficacy of treadmill exercises on arterial blood oxygenation, oxygen consumption and walking distance in healthy elderly people: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichay, Ashraf Adel Fahmy; Ramírez, Juan M; Núñez, Víctor M; Lancho, Carolina; Poblador, María S; Lancho, José L

    2016-05-25

    Regular physical exercise and healthy lifestyle can improve aerobic power of the elderly, although lung capacity gradually deteriorates with age. The aims of the study are: a) to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a treadmill exercise program on arterial blood oxygenation (SaO2), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) and maximum walking distance (MWD) in healthy elderly people; b) to examine the outcome of the program at a supervised short-term and at an unsupervised long-term. A prospective, not-randomized controlled intervention trial (NRCT) was conducted. Eighty participants were allocated into two homogeneous groups (training group, TG, n = 40; control group, CG, n = 40). Each group consisted of 20 men and 20 women. Pre-intervention measures of SaO2, VO2max and MWD were taken of each participant 1-week before the training program to establish the baseline. Also, during the training program, the participants were followed up at the 12, 30 and 48th week. The exercise program consisted of walking on a treadmill with fixed 0 % grade of inclination 3 times weekly for 48 weeks; the first 12 weeks were supervised and the remaining 36 weeks of the program were unsupervised. Participants in the control group were encouraged to walk twice a week during 45 min, and received standard recommendations for proper health. Related to the baseline, the SaO2, VO2max, and MWD is greater in the intervention group at the 12(th) (p recommended for healthy older people, improving aerobic power. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN12621097 .

  15. Restricted Blood Flow Exercise in Sedentary, Overweight African-American Females May Increase Muscle Strength and Decrease Endothelial Function and Vascular Autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Bond

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Exercise with partially restricted blood flow is a low-load, low-intensity resistance training regimen which may have the potential to increase muscle strength in the obese, elderly and frail who are unable to do high-load training. Restricted blood flow exercise has also been shown to affect blood vessel function variably and can, therefore, contribute to blood vessel dysfunction. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that unilateral resistance training of the leg extensors with partially restricted blood flow increases muscle strength and decreases vascular autoregulation. Methods: The subjects were nine normotensive, overweight, young adult African-Americans with low cardiorespiratory fitness who underwent unilateral training of the quadriceps’ femoris muscles with partially restricted blood flow at 30% of the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM load for 3 weeks. The 1-RM load and post-occlusion blood flow to the lower leg (calf were measured during reactive hyperemia. Results: The 1-RM load increased in the trained legs from 77 ± 3 to 84 ± 4 kg (P 0.1. Post-occlusion blood flow decreased significantly in the trained legs from 19 ± 2 to 13 ± 2 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P < 0.05 and marginally in the contralateral untrained legs from 18 ± 2 to 16 ± 1 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P = 0.09. Changes in post-occlusion blood flow to the skin overlying the trained and the contralateral untrained muscles were not significant. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that restricted blood flow exercise, which results in significant gains in muscle strength, may produce decrements in endothelial dysfunction and vascular autoregulation. Future studies should determine whether pharmacopuncture plays a role in treatments for such blood vessel dysfunction.

  16. The number of fetal cells in maternal blood is associated to exercise and fetal gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Kirkegaard, Ida; Christensen, Connie Britta

    Introduction: We have established a robust method to specifically identify and isolate a placental fetal cell in maternal blood (fcmbs) at a gestational age of 12 weeks. The concentration of these cells, however, varies considerably among pregnant women (median 3 fcmbs/30 mL blood, range 0......-18), which is a challenge for the implementation of the method for prenatal diagnostic purposes. We conducted a study to identify factors influencing the number of fcmbs at a gestational age of 11-14 weeks. Methods: 59 pregnant women at weeks 11-14 were included, and information about lifestyle and daily...

  17. Aquatic exercise is as effective as dry land training to blood pressure reduction in postmenopausal hypertensive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Martinelli, Bruno; Martin, Luis Cuadrado; Waisberg, César Becalel; Franco, Roberto Jorge da Silva

    2014-06-01

    The evidence of the benefits from regular physical activity to hypertensives is based on dry land training studies. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the effect of aquatic exercise with dry land training on hypertensive women. This is a randomized controlled study with 52 post-menopausal hypertensive women. The patients were randomly allocated in three groups: water aerobic training group (n = 19), dry land aerobic training group (n = 19) and a non-intervention control group (n = 14). The training protocol was performed by 12 weeks. There were no differences among the three groups concerning basal blood pressure (BP) and biochemical variables. In water group, there was a statistically significant reduction of systolic BP from 136 ± 16 mm Hg at zero week to 124 ± 18 mm Hg at 11th week and 124 ± 15 mm Hg at 12th week. In dry land training group, there was a statistically significant reduction of systolic BP from 138 ± 15 mm Hg at zero week to 125 ± 10 mm Hg at 7th week, 127 ± 10 mm Hg at 10th week and 126 ± 9 mm Hg at 12th week. The control group presented no change in any of the assessed variables. No changes were carried out in any antihypertensive medications during study. This is a randomized controlled study that demonstrates the antihypertensive efficacy of aerobic aquatic exercise. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Decrease in Ionized and Total Magnesium Blood Concentrations in Endurance Athletes Following an Exercise Bout Restores within Hours-Potential Consequences for Monitoring and Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terink, Rieneke; Balvers, Michiel G J; Hopman, Maria T; Witkamp, Renger F; Mensink, Marco; Gunnewiek, Jacqueline M T Klein

    2017-06-01

    Magnesium is essential for optimal sport performance, generating an interest to monitor its status in athletes. However, before measuring magnesium status in blood could become routine, more insight into its diurnal fluctuations and effects of exercise itself is necessary. Therefore, we measured the effect of an acute bout of exercise on ionized (iMg) and total plasma magnesium (tMg) in blood obtained from 18 healthy well-trained endurance athletes (age, 31.1 ± 8.1 yr.; VO 2max , 50.9 ± 7.5 ml/kg/min) at multiple time points, and compared this with a resting situation. At both days, 7 blood samples were taken at set time points (8:30 fasted, 11:00, 12:30, 13:30, 15:00, 16:00, 18:30). The control day was included to correct for a putative diurnal fluctuation of magnesium. During the exercise day, athletes performed a 90 min bicycle ergometer test (70% VO 2max ) between 11:00 and 12:30. Whole blood samples were analyzed for iMg and plasma for tMg concentrations. Both concentrations decreased significantly after exercise (0.52 ± 0.04-0.45 ± 0.03 mmol/L and 0.81 ± 0.07-0.73 ± 0.06 mmol/L, respectively, p exercise. These findings suggest that timing of blood sampling to analyze Mg status is important. Additional research is needed to establish the recovery time after different types of exercise to come to a general advice regarding the timing of magnesium status assessment in practice.

  19. Effects of a 12-week exercise training programme on aerobic fitness, body composition, blood lipids and C-reactive protein in adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patricia C H; Chia, Michael Y H; Tsou, Ian Y Y; Wansaicheong, Gervais K L; Tan, Benedict; Wang, John C K; Tan, John; Kim, Chung Gon; Boh, Gerald; Lim, Darren

    2008-04-01

    Developing effective exercise programmes for the paediatric population is a strategy for decreasing obesity and is expected to help in eventually limiting obesity-associated long-term health and societal impact. In this study, the effects of a 12-week twice weekly additional exercise training, which comprised a combination of circuit-based resistance training and aerobic exercises, in additional to typical physical education sessions, on aerobic fitness, body composition and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids were analysed in 13- to 14-year-old obese boys contrasted with a control group. Both the exercise group (EG, n = 12) and control group (CG, n = 12) participated in the typical 2 sessions of 40-minute physical education (PE) per week in schools, but only EG participated in additional 2 sessions per week of 45 to 60 minutes per session of exercise training, which comprised a combination of circuit-based resistance training and aerobic exercises maintained at 65% to 85% maximum heart rate (HRmax = 220 - age). Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Fasting serum CRP and blood lipids were analysed pre- and postexercise programme. Aerobic fitness was measured by an objective laboratory submaximal exercise test, PWC170 (Predicted Work Capacity at HR 170 bpm). Exercise training significantly improved lean muscle mass, body mass index, fitness, resting HR, systolic blood pressure and triglycerides in EG. Serum CRP concentrations were elevated at baseline in both groups, but training did not result in a change in CRP levels. In the CG, body weight increased significantly at the end of the 12-week period. This study supports the value of an additional exercise training programme, beyond the typical twice weekly physical education classes, to produce physiological benefits in the management of obesity in adolescents, including prevention of weight gain.

  20. Abnormal albuminuria and blood pressure rise in incipient diabetic nephropathy induced by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of light to moderate dynamic work (450 kpm/min followed by 600 kpm/min during 20 min each) on the blood pressure and renal protein handling in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (D3) (elevated baseline albumin excretio...

  1. Cytokine release and its modulation by dexamethasone in whole blood following exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, H. H.; Grünberg, K.; DeRijk, R. H.; Sterk, P. J.; Hiemstra, P. S.

    1998-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) play an important role in the treatment of inflammatory diseases like asthma. However, in selected patients a relative resistance to GC has been reported. Recently, it has been suggested that GC sensitivity of peripheral blood leucocytes may be regulated in a dynamic fashion

  2. Uranium chemistry in blood and aqueous media. Techniques of studies; Chimie de l`uranium en milieux aqueux et sanguin. Techniques d`etudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scapolan, St.

    1996-11-01

    The object of this report in a first step, is to understand the chemistry of uranium in aqueous phase by specifying the behavior of this element in function of several parameters such PH, concentration of present species, temperature, ionic force. In a second step, investigation techniques are reviewed: X rays diffraction, potentiometric titrations, polarography, spectrophotometry, NMR of {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 17}O, capillary electrophoresis, laser detection. The third part brings elements to understand the uranium complexation in blood medium.

  3. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in peripheral blood (PB as well as in bone marrow (BM. We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs, which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries.

  4. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Suszynska, Ewa; Malicka, Iwona; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in peripheral blood (PB) as well as in bone marrow (BM). We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries.

  5. Feeding of grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) with the contraceptive agent DiazaCon™: effect on cholesterol, hematology, and blood chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Christi A; Mayle, Brenda A; Furcolow, Carol A; Cowan, David P; Fagerstone, Kathleen A

    2011-12-01

    Grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) are an invasive species in Britain and Italy. They have replaced native red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) throughout most of Britain, and cause damage to trees. Currently, lethal control is used to manage grey squirrel populations in Britain, but nonlethal methods might be more acceptable to the public. One such method is contraception with 20,25-diazacholesterol dihydrochloride (DiazaCon™). DiazaCon™ inhibits the conversion of desmosterol to cholesterol, resulting in increasing desmosterol concentrations and decreasing cholesterol concentrations. Because cholesterol is needed for the synthesis of steroid reproductive hormones, such as progesterone and testosterone, inhibition of cholesterol synthesis indirectly inhibits reproduction. Desmosterol is used as a marker of efficacy in laboratory studies with species that do not reproduce readily in captivity. Grey squirrels were gavaged with a DiazaCon™ solution for 2 days, and then fed DiazaCon™-coated peanuts for an additional 8 days at target doses of 50 and 100 mg DiazaCon™ per kg body weight. There was a significant difference in cholesterol concentrations in the treatment groups compared to the control group. Cholesterol was reduced by ≥ 40% for 2 months in both treatment groups. There were no differences among groups with respect to blood chemistry and hematology parameters, and mean values are reported. The mean overall dose of DiazaCon™ received was 29.0 ± 1.6 and 55.3 ± 4.3 mg/kg in the low (50 mg/kg) and high dose (100 mg/kg) groups, respectively. DiazaCon™ might provide an effective, acceptable alternative to lethal control. © 2011 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  6. Self-Monitoring Using Continuous Glucose Monitors with Real-Time Feedback Improves Exercise Adherence in Individuals with Impaired Blood Glucose: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kaitlyn J; Little, Jonathan P; Jung, Mary E

    2016-03-01

    Exercise helps individuals with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes (T2D) manage their blood glucose (BG); however, exercise adherence in this population is dismal. In this pilot study we tested the efficacy of a self-monitoring group-based intervention using continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) at increasing exercise adherence in individuals with impaired BG. Thirteen participants with prediabetes or T2D were randomized to an 8-week standard care exercise program (CON condition) (n = 7) or self-monitoring exercise intervention (SM condition) (n = 6). Participants in the SM condition were taught how to self-monitor their exercise and BG, to goal set, and to use CGM to observe how exercise influences BG. We hypothesized that compared with the CON condition, using a real-time CGM would facilitate self-monitoring behavior, resulting in increased exercise adherence. Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed significant Condition × Time interactions for self-monitoring (P self-efficacy to self-monitor (P = 0.01), such that the SM condition showed greater increases in these outcomes immediately after the program and at the 1-month follow-up compared with the CON condition. The SM condition had higher program attendance rates (P = 0.03), and a greater proportion of participants reregistered for additional exercise programs (P = 0.048) compared with the CON condition. Participants in both conditions experienced improvements in health-related quality of life, waist circumference, and fitness (P values self-monitoring and exercise behavior in individuals living with prediabetes or T2D.

  7. An Outcome-Based Action Study on Changes in Fitness, Blood Lipids, and Exercise Adherence, Using the Disconnected Values (Intervention) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark H.; Kang, Minsoo

    2007-01-01

    The authors' purpose in this action study was to examine the effect of a 10-week intervention, using the Disconnected Values Model (DVM), on changes in selected measures of fitness, blood lipids, and exercise adherence among 51 university faculty (10 men and 41 women) from a school in the southeastern United States. The DVM is an intervention…

  8. Decrease in Ionized and Total Magnesium Blood Concentrations in Endurance Athletes Following an Exercise Bout Restores within Hours-Potential Consequences for Monitoring and Supplementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terink, R.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Witkamp, R.F.; Mensink, M.; Gunnewiek, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium is essential for optimal sport performance, generating an interest to monitor its status in athletes. However, before measuring magnesium status in blood could become routine, more insight into its diurnal fluctuations and effects of exercise itself is necessary. Therefore, we measured the

  9. Decrease in ionized and total magnesium blood concentrations in endurance athletes following an exercise bout restores within hours-potential consequences for monitoring and supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terink, Rieneke; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Hopman, Maria T.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Mensink, Marco; Klein Gunnewiek, J.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium is essential for optimal sport performance, generating an interest to monitor its status in athletes. However, before measuring magnesium status in blood could become routine, more insight into its diurnal fluctuations and effects of exercise itself is necessary. Therefore, we measured

  10. Central and peripheral blood flow during exercise with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device: constant versus increasing pump speed: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Jensen, Annette S; Nordsborg, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Background- End-stage heart failure is associated with impaired cardiac output (CO) and organ blood flow. We determined whether CO and peripheral perfusion are maintained during exercise in patients with an axial-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and whether an increase in LVAD pump speed...

  11. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training and Irbesartan on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Marquis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The present pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of an aerobic exercise training (AET program alone or combined with an antihypertensive agent (irbesartan to reduce blood pressure (BP and enhance heart rate variability (HRV in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  12. Does aerobic exercises induce mtDNA mutation in human blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of eight weeks aerobic training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in human blood leucocytes. Twenty untrained healthy students (training group: n =10, age = 20.7±1.5 yrs, weight = 67.7±10 kg, BF% = 17.5±7.35 & control group: n =10, age = 21±1.3 yrs, weight ...

  13. Chronic oral lactate supplementation does not affect lactate disappearance from blood after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouns, F; Fogelholm, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    1995-01-01

    values for placebo (PL) or lactate (L) treatment groups during different tests were as follows: Test 1 PL, 13.49 +/- 3.71; L, 13.70 +/- 1.90; Test 2 PL, 12.64 +/- 2.32; L, 12.00 +/- 2.23; Test 3 PL, 12.29 +/- 2.92; L, 11.35 +/- 1.38 and were reached 3 min postexercise. The decrease in blood lactate...

  14. Effect of Wheelchair Running on Recovery of Blood Lactate and Physical Performance after High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise – An Experimental Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive sprint sport players perform high intensity exercise only for a small percentage of a total game and such periods are often instrumental in determining the eventual outcome. Recovery is a key factor for performance, and constant lack of recovery or insufficient recovery turns into overtraining which is detrimental in achieving peak performance. The purpose was to find out the effect of wheelchair running on the physical performance recovery after high-intensity intermittent exercise. Method: Ten sportsmen having the age range from 20 to 29, VO2max Ranges from 60.51 to 64.29 were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. After filling pre-participation questionnaire and 30-min of supine rest, Blood lactate and the field tests for the measurement of static balance, power, speed and agility were applied. The subjects were made to run in the treadmill and to increase the intensity to reach the Target Heart Rate (THR. After 1-min the subjects were given rest for 15-s and after that they started exercise again and thus the subjects completed several bouts of such exercises until exhaustion followed by either Passive rest or wheelchair running for the duration of 10 minutes. Parameters were measures after completed the exercise bout and after the recovery. Results: After the recovery in experimental group significant improvement found only in blood lactate (p<0.01 and no significant changes found in other parameters while in control group no significant changes found in all parameters. There was no significant difference found in all the parameters including blood lactate between the groups. Conclusion: Both wheelchair running and passive recovery are same in the efficiency of blood lactate removal and restoration of physical performance following intense intermittent exercise.

  15. Transcriptome of the NTS in exercise-trained spontaneously hypertensive rats: implications for NTS function and plasticity in regulating blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Takagishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2013-01-07

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) controls the cardiovascular system during exercise, and alteration of its function may underlie exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. To understand the molecular basis of the NTS's plasticity in regulating blood pressure (BP) and its potential contribution to the antihypertensive effects, we characterized the gene expression profiles at the level of the NTS after long-term daily wheel running in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes in the NTS between exercise-trained (12 wk) and control SHRs. Pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that daily exercise altered the expression levels of NTS genes that are functionally associated with metabolic pathways (5 genes), neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions (4 genes), cell adhesion molecules (3 genes), and cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions (3 genes). One of the genes that belonged to the neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions category was histamine receptor H(1). Since we confirmed that the pressor response induced by activation of this receptor is increased after long-term daily exercise, it is suggested that functional plasticity in the histaminergic system may mediate the facilitation of blood pressure control in response to exercise but may not be involved in the lowered basal BP level found in exercise-trained SHRs. Since abnormal inflammatory states in the NTS are known to be prohypertensive in SHRs, altered gene expression of the inflammatory molecules identified in this study may be related to the antihypertensive effects in exercise-trained SHRs, although such speculation awaits functional validation.

  16. Effect of resistance exercise under conditions of reduced blood insulin on AMPKα Ser485/491 inhibitory phosphorylation and AMPK pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kohei; Yokokawa, Takumi; Ato, Satoru; Sato, Koji; Fujita, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    Insulin stimulates skeletal muscle glucose uptake via activation of the protein kinase B/Akt (Akt) pathway. Recent studies suggest that insulin downregulates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity via Ser485/491 phosphorylation of the AMPK α-subunit. Thus lower blood insulin concentrations may induce AMPK signal activation. Acute exercise is one method to stimulate AMPK activation; however, no study has examined the relationship between blood insulin levels and acute resistance exercise-induced AMPK pathway activation. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the acute resistance exercise-induced AMPK pathway activation would be augmented by disruptions in insulin secretion through a decrease in AMPKα Ser485/491 inhibitory phosphorylation. To test the hypothesis, 10-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered the toxin streptozotocin (STZ; 55 mg/kg) to destroy the insulin secreting β-cells. Three days postinjection, the right gastrocnemius muscle from STZ and control rats was subjected to resistance exercise by percutaneous electrical stimulation. Animals were killed 0, 1, or 3 h later; activation of the Akt/AMPK and downstream pathways in the muscle tissue was analyzed by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Notably, STZ rats showed a significant decrease in basal Akt and AMPKα Ser485/491 phosphorylation, but substantial exercise-induced increases in both AMPKα Thr172 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) Ser79 phosphorylation were observed. Although no significant impact on resistance exercise-induced Akt pathway activation or glucose uptake was found, resistance exercise-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator-1 α (PGC-1α) gene expression was augmented by STZ treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that circulating insulin levels may regulate acute resistance exercise-induced AMPK pathway activation and AMPK-dependent gene expression relating to basal AMPKα Ser485/491 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017

  17. Blood glucose responses of type-2 diabetics during and after exercise performed at intensities above and below anaerobic threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ernesto Santos Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of analyzing the blood glucose responses during and after exercise performed at 90 and 110% of anaerobic threshold (AT, 10 type-2 diabetes patients (56.9±11.2years; 80.3±14.4kg performed an incremental test (IT on a cycle ergometer. After an initial IT to identify AT, the volunteers participated in three experimental sessions on three different days: 20 minutes’ of cycling at either 90 or 110% of AT, and a control session (CON. Blood glucose was measured at rest, and at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise or control condition, as well as every 15 minutes during a 2-hour postexercise recovery period (Rec. One-way ANOVA did not detect signifi cant differences in blood glucose levels between the sessions at 90 and 110% of AT. Compared to CON, a signifi cant decrease was observed at the 20th minute of exercise, and at the 15th and 60th minutes of Rec from the 90% AT session. Signifi cant reductions were also observed at the 10th and 20th minutes of exercise and at the 15th, 30th, 45th, 60th and 90th minutes of Rec from the session at 110% AT. Exercise performed at the higher intensity (110% AT resulted in a tendency of a more pronounced and prolonged hypoglycemic effect during and after exercise, and may be an alternative intensity for glycemic control in type 2 diabetics who do not have cardiovascular complications or other contraindications to exercising at intensities above the AT. Resumo Com o propósito de analisar a resposta da glicose sanguínea durante e após exercício a 90 e 110% do limiar anaeróbio (LA, 10 voluntários diabéticos tipo 2 (56,9 ± 11,2 anos; 80,3 ± 14,4 kg, realizaram um teste incremental (TI em cicloergômetro. Após a realização do TI para identifi cação do LA, os voluntários realizaram 3 sessões experimentais em dias distintos: 20 minutos em bicicleta ergométrica a 90 e 110% LA e uma sessão controle (CON. A glicemia foi mensurada no repouso, aos 10 e 20 min de exercício ou na situa

  18. Effect of extraluminal ATP application on vascular tone and blood flow in skeletal muscle: implications for exercise hyperemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khazraji, Baraa K.; Mortensen, Stefan P.; Jackson, Dwayne N.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Hellsten, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contractions, the concentration of ATP increases in muscle interstitial fluid as measured by microdialysis probes. This increase is associated with the magnitude of blood flow, suggesting that interstitial ATP may be important for contraction-induced vasodilation. However, interstitial ATP has solely been described to induce vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle. To examine whether interstitial ATP induces vasodilation in skeletal muscle and to what extent this vasoactive effect is mediated by formation of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, three different experimental models were studied. The rat gluteus maximus skeletal muscle model was used to study changes in local skeletal muscle hemodynamics. Superfused ATP at concentrations found during muscle contractions (1–10 μM) increased blood flow by up to 400%. In this model, the underlying mechanism was also examined by inhibition of NO and prostanoid formation. Inhibition of these systems abolished the vasodilator effect of ATP. Cell-culture experiments verified ATP-induced formation of NO and prostacyclin in rat skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells, and ATP-induced formation of NO in rat skeletal muscle cells. To confirm these findings in humans, ATP was infused into skeletal muscle interstitium of healthy subjects via microdialysis probes and found to increase muscle interstitial concentrations of NO and prostacyclin by ∼60% and ∼40%, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that a physiologically relevant elevation in interstitial ATP concentrations increases muscle blood flow, indicating that the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle interstitial [ATP] is important for exercise hyperemia. The vasodilator effect of ATP application is mediated by NO and prostanoid formation. PMID:23761642

  19. Effects of depletion sampling by standard three-pass pulsed DC electrofishing on blood chemistry parameters of fishes from Appalachian streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Christine L.; Panek, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse effects on fishes captured by electrofishing techniques have long been recognized, although the extent of associated physical injury and behavioral alterations are highly variable and dependent on a number of factors. We examined the effects of three-pass pulsed DC (PDC) electrofishing on two salmonid species (Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis) and five other genera (Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, Potomac Sculpin Cottus girardi, Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus) common to Appalachian streams. We examined the corresponding effects of PDC electroshock on the following physiological indicators of stress and trauma: blood glucose and serum lactate, as well as on other blood chemistry, namely, enzymes, electrolytes, minerals, and proteins. All species demonstrated physiological responses to PDC electroshock, indicated by the biochemical differences in blood parameters in unshocked and shocked groups of fish with or without gross evidence of hemorrhagic trauma. Serum lactate was the most consistent indicator of these effects. Significant differences in whole blood glucose levels were also noted in treatment groups in all species except Green Sunfish, although the patterns observed were not as consistent as for serum lactate. Elevations in the serum enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, in the electroshocked fish occurred only in the two salmonid species. In many instances, although blood parameters were elevated in electroshocked fish compared with the unshocked controls for a given species, there were no differences in those levels in electroshocked fish based on the presence of gross hemorrhagic trauma to axial musculature. While some of the blood parameters examined correlated with both the occurrence of electroshock and the resultant tissue injury, there was no apparent link between the altered blood chemistry and

  20. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, T P; Arango, J; Wolc, A; Brady, J V; Fulton, J E; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, I J; Persia, M E; O'Sullivan, N P

    2016-02-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  1. Evidence of major genes for exercise heart rate and blood pressure at baseline and in response to 20 weeks of endurance training: the HERITAGE family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, P; Borecki, I B; Rankinen, T; Pérusse, L; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Bouchard, C; Rao, D C

    2003-10-01

    Major gene effects on exercise heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) measured at 50 W and 80 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO (2)max) were assessed in 99 White families in the HERITAGE Family Study. Exercise HR and BP were measured both before and after 20 weeks of endurance training. The baseline phenotypes were adjusted for the effects of age and BMI, whereas the training responses (post-training minus baseline) were adjusted for the effects of age, BMI and the corresponding baseline values, within four sex-by-generation groups. Baseline exercise HR at 50 W was under the influence of a major recessive gene and a multifactorial component, which accounted for 30 % and 27 % of the variance, respectively. The training response was found to be under the influence of a major dominant gene, which accounted for 27 % of the variance. These significant major gene effects were independent of the effects of cigarette smoking, baseline VO (2)max, and the resting HR levels. No significant interactions were found between genotype and age, sex, or BMI. No major gene effect was found for exercise BP. Instead, we found the baseline exercise BP at 50 W and 80 % VO (2)max and the training response at 50 W were solely influenced by multifactorial effects, which accounted for about 50 %, 40 % and 20 % of the variance, respectively. No familial resemblance was found for training responses in exercise HR or BP at 80 % VO (2)max. Segregation analysis also was carried out for exercise HR in Whites pooled with a small sample of Blacks in HERITAGE. Similar major effects were found, but the transmission from parents to offspring did not follow Mendelian expectations, suggesting sample heterogeneity. In conclusion, submaximal exercise HR at baseline and in response to endurance training was influenced by putative major genes, with no evidence of interactions with sex, age or BMI, in contrast to a multifactorial etiology for exercise BP.

  2. The effect of consuming low- versus high-glycemic index meals after exercise on postprandial blood lipid response following a next-day high-fat meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, M; Chilibeck, P D; Yee, P; Zello, G A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Exercise performed shortly before (that is, within half a day of) a high-fat meal is beneficial for stimulating fat oxidation after the meal and reducing postprandial triglycerides (TG). This benefit of exercise is unfortunately negated if the after-exercise food choice to replace the calories expended during exercise is one containing high-glycemic index (HGI) carbohydrates. We determined the effect of consuming low-glycemic index (LGI) carbohydrates after an exercise session on fat oxidation and TG after a subsequent high-fat meal. Subjects/Methods: Using a randomized, counterbalanced crossover design, 23 overweight or obese individuals (body mass index ⩾25 kg m−2) performed: walking exercise (90 min) at 1800 h followed by no meal (EX); exercise followed by a meal with LGI carbohydrates (that is, lentils, EX-LGI); exercise followed by a meal with HGI carbohydrates (that is, instant potatoes, white bread, EX-HGI); and a control condition with no exercise or meal. After a 10-h overnight fast, participants were given a standardized high-fat meal. Fat oxidation was estimated before and for 6 h after this meal from respiratory gas measures and TG determined from blood samples. Results: Fat oxidation (mean±s.d.) was higher with EX (6.9±1.7 g h−1) than EX-HGI (6.3±1.6 g h−1; P=0.007) and Control (5.9±1.7 g h−1; P=0.00002), and EX-LGI (6.6±1.7 g h−1) was higher than Control (P=0.002). TG total area under the curve was 18–32% lower with EX and EX-LGI compared with control (P=0.0005 and P=0.0001, respectively) and EX-HGI (P=0.05 and P=0.021, respectively). Conclusions: A meal containing HGI carbohydrates consumed after an evening exercise session cancels the beneficial effect of exercise for stimulating fat oxidation and lowering TG after a subsequent high-fat meal, whereas consuming a post-exercise meal with LGI carbohydrates retains the positive effect of exercise. PMID:27376698

  3. The effect of consuming low- versus high-glycemic index meals after exercise on postprandial blood lipid response following a next-day high-fat meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, M; Chilibeck, P D; Yee, P; Zello, G A

    2016-07-04

    Exercise performed shortly before (that is, within half a day of) a high-fat meal is beneficial for stimulating fat oxidation after the meal and reducing postprandial triglycerides (TG). This benefit of exercise is unfortunately negated if the after-exercise food choice to replace the calories expended during exercise is one containing high-glycemic index (HGI) carbohydrates. We determined the effect of consuming low-glycemic index (LGI) carbohydrates after an exercise session on fat oxidation and TG after a subsequent high-fat meal. Using a randomized, counterbalanced crossover design, 23 overweight or obese individuals (body mass index ⩾25 kg m(-2)) performed: walking exercise (90 min) at 1800 h followed by no meal (EX); exercise followed by a meal with LGI carbohydrates (that is, lentils, EX-LGI); exercise followed by a meal with HGI carbohydrates (that is, instant potatoes, white bread, EX-HGI); and a control condition with no exercise or meal. After a 10-h overnight fast, participants were given a standardized high-fat meal. Fat oxidation was estimated before and for 6 h after this meal from respiratory gas measures and TG determined from blood samples. Fat oxidation (mean±s.d.) was higher with EX (6.9±1.7 g h(-1)) than EX-HGI (6.3±1.6 g h(-1); P=0.007) and Control (5.9±1.7 g h(-1); P=0.00002), and EX-LGI (6.6±1.7 g h(-1)) was higher than Control (P=0.002). TG total area under the curve was 18-32% lower with EX and EX-LGI compared with control (P=0.0005 and P=0.0001, respectively) and EX-HGI (P=0.05 and P=0.021, respectively). A meal containing HGI carbohydrates consumed after an evening exercise session cancels the beneficial effect of exercise for stimulating fat oxidation and lowering TG after a subsequent high-fat meal, whereas consuming a post-exercise meal with LGI carbohydrates retains the positive effect of exercise.

  4. Polymorphisms in ACE and ACTN3 Genes and Blood Pressure Response to Acute Exercise in Elite Male Athletes from Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmic, Tijana S; Zdravkovic, Marija D; Djelic, Marina N; Gavrilovic, Tamara D; Djordjevic Saranovic, Slavica A; Plavsic, Jadranka N; Mirkovic, Sanja V; Batinic, Djordje V; Antic, Milena N; Mihailovic, Zoran R; Atanasijevic, Nikola G; Mileusnic, Milan J; Stojkovic, Oliver V

    2017-12-01

    Physiological adaptations to various types of prolonged and intensive physical activity, as seen in elite athletes from different sports, include changes in blood pressure (BP) response to acute exercise. Also, functional polymorphisms of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) and alfa-actinin-3 (ACTN3) genes are shown to be associated with BP parameters changes, both in athletes and sedentary population. In this study, an Alu insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism in ACE gene, as well as nonsense mutation in the gene encoding ACTN3 have been scored in 107 elite Serbian athletes classified according to their sporting discipline to power/sprint (short distance runners/swimmers), endurance (rowers, footballers, middle-distance swimmers) or mixed sports (water polo, handball, volleyball players). Presence of nonfunctional allele in ACTN3 is associated with significantly increased maximal systolic BP (SBPmax, p = 0.04). Athletes with Alu insertion in ACE had significantly (p = 0.006) larger decline of systolic BP after 3 minutes of recovery (SBPR3), calculated as the percentage of maximal SBP response during exercise stress testing. Concomitant presence of non-functional variant in ACTN3 gene decreased this beneficiary effect of ACE mutation on SBPR3. Long term enrollment in power/sprint sports significantly increased resting diastolic BP (DBPrest: 74 mmHg) and SBPmax (197 mmHg) and improved SBPR3 (74.8%) compared to enrolment in endurance (72 mmHg; 178 mmHg; 81.1%) and mixed sports (69 mmHg; 185 mmHg; 80.0%). Lack of the effect of genotype by sport interaction on BP parameters suggests that the long-term effects of different disciplines on BP are not mediated by these two genes.

  5. THE PROLONGED INTAKE OF L-ARGININE-L-ASPARTATE REDUCES BLOOD LACTATE ACCUMULATION AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION DURING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Burtscher

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available L-arginine-L-aspartate is widely used by athletes for its potentially ergogenic properties. However, only little information on its real efficacy is available from controlled studies. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of prolonged supplementation with L-arginine-L-aspartate on metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses to submaximal exercise in healthy athletes by a double blind placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen healthy male volunteers (22 ± 3 years performed incremental cycle spiroergometry up to 150 watts before and after intake of L-arginine-L-aspartate (3 grams per day or placebo for a period of 3 weeks. After intake of L-arginine-L-aspartate, blood lactate at 150 watts dropped from 2.8 ± 0.8 to 2.0 ± 0.9 mmol·l-1 (p < 0.001 and total oxygen consumption during the 3-min period at 150 watts from 6.32 ± 0.51 to 5.95 ± 0.40 l (p = 0.04 compared to placebo (2.7 ± 1.1 to 2.7 ± 1.4 mmol·l-1; p = 0.9 and 6.07 ± 0.51 to 5.91 ± 0.50 l; p = 0.3. Additionally, L-arginine-L-aspartate supplementation effected an increased fat utilisation at 50 watts. L-arginine and L-aspartate seem to have induced synergistic metabolic effects. L-arginine might have reduced lactic acid production by the inhibition of glycolysis and L-aspartate may have favoured fatty acid oxidation. Besides, the results indicate improved work efficiency after L-arginine-L-aspartate intake. The resulting increases of submaximal work capacity and exercise tolerance may have important implications for athletes as well as patients

  6. Effects of 7 days of arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate supplementation on blood flow, plasma L-arginine, nitric oxide metabolites, and asymmetric dimethyl arginine after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Boucher, Tony; Reid, Jeremy; Skelton, Garson; Clark, Mandy

    2011-08-01

    Arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) supplements are alleged to increase nitric oxide production, thereby resulting in vasodilation during resistance exercise. This study sought to determine the effects of AAKG supplementation on hemodynamics and brachial-artery blood flow and the circulating levels of L-arginine, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx; nitrate/nitrite), asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), and L-arginine:ADMA ratio after resistance exercise. Twenty-four physically active men underwent 7 days of AAKG supplementation with 12 g/day of either NO(2) Platinum or placebo (PLC). Before and after supplementation, a resistance-exercise session involving the elbow flexors was performed involving 3 sets of 15 repetitions with 70-75% of 1-repetition maximum. Data were collected immediately before, immediately after (PST), and 30 min after (30PST) each exercise session. Data were analyzed with factorial ANOVA (p L-arginine was increased in the NO(2) group (p = .001). NOx was shown to increase in both groups at PST (p = .001) and at 30PST (p = .001) but was not different between groups. ADMA was not affected between tests (p = .26) or time points (p = .31); however, the L-arginine:ADMA ratio was increased in the NO(2) group (p = .03). NO(2) Platinum increased plasma L-arginine levels; however, the effects observed in hemodynamics, brachial-artery blood flow, and NOx can only be attributed to the resistance exercise.

  7. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Suszynska, Ewa; Malicka, Iwona; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in peripheral blood (PB) as well as in bone marrow (BM). We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers ...

  8. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...... muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake were measured at rest and during the exercise using PET with H(2)O(15) and (15)O(2) during: 1) control conditions; 2) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition by arterial infusion of L-NMMA and 3) combined NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by arterial infusion of L...

  9. Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high-intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalika Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50-60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.1±5.2 ml·kg(-1·min(-1; peak aerobic power 383±39 W and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.9±9.7 ml·kg(-1·min(-1; peak aerobic power 230±57 W were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression involving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load.

  10. Effect of immersion cryotherapy on blood lactate clearance after exercise DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n3p179

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Manfredini Baroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of immersion cryotherapy on blood lactate removal, an important physiological parameter related to muscle fatigue, after high-intensity exercise. Fifteen soccer athletes (15 to 17 years were randomized into an immer-sion group (IG, n=7 and a control group (CG, n=8. The athletes were subjected to a muscle fatigue inducer protocol (PIFM on a cycle ergometer. Next, GI athletes underwent immersion cryotherapy for 10 minutes, with the lower limbs being immersed at 5±1º C, whereas CG athletes rested for 10 minutes. Blood samples were collected for the determination of lactate concentration before the PIFM and 3, 15 and 25 minutes after the end of exercise (post-3, post-15 and post-25, respectively. The PIFM resulted in a significant increase of blood lactate concentration in the athletes, which was similar in two groups. During the recovery period, lactate concentration decreased by 13.6% at post-15 and by 15.3% at post-25 in IG, whereas GC presented a decrease of 14.6% and 28.5% decrease at post-15 and post-25, respectively. Passive recovery resulted in a significant decrease of lactate concentration, whereas the same was not observed for cryotherapy. These results suggest that, for the parameters used in this study, immersion cryotherapy was less effective than rest in the removal of blood lactate after high-intensity exercise.

  11. Physical exercise and glaucoma: a review on the roles of physical exercise on intraocular pressure control, ocular blood flow regulation, neuroprotection and glaucoma-related mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming Ming; Lai, Jimmy Shiu Ming; Choy, Bonnie Nga Kwan; Shum, Jennifer Wei Huen; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Ng, Alex Lap Ki; Chan, Jonathan Cheuk Hung; So, Kwok Fai

    2018-01-16

    The benefits of physical exercise on health and well-being have been studied in a wide range of systemic and ocular diseases, including glaucoma, a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by accelerated apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and insufficient ocular perfusion have been postulated to be the two main theories in glaucoma development and progression. The effects of exercise in these two aspects have been demonstrated by numerous researches. A review in 2009 focusing on these two theories concluded that exercise results in transient IOP reduction but an inconsistent elevation in ocular perfusion. However, the majority of the studies had been conducted in healthy subjects. Over the past decade, technological advancement has brought forth new and more detailed evidence regarding the effects of exercise. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of exercise by upregulation of neurotrophin and enhancement of mitochondrial function has been a focus of interest. Apart from visual impairment, the mental health issues in patients with glaucoma, which include anxiety and depression, should also be addressed. In this review, we mainly focus on publications from the recent years, so as to provide a comprehensive review on the impact of physical exercise on IOP, ocular perfusion, neuroprotection and mental health in patients with glaucoma. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Creatine supplementation: effects on blood creatine kinase activity responses to resistance exercise and creatine kinase activity measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation and exercise on the integrity of muscle fiber, as well as the effect of the supplementation on the creatine kinase (CK assay measurement. Forty-nine sedentary individuals participated in a double-blind study and were divided into two groups: C (n=26 received 4x5-day packages of 0.6 g.kg-1 of body weight contained 50% of creatine + 50% of dextrose, and P (n=23 received packages containing only dextrose. On the first day the groups performed a 1RM test for bench press, seated row, leg extension, leg curl and leg press. On D7 they received the supplements. On the fourteenth day, they performed a training session of five exercises, each in three sets of ten repetitions at 75% of 1RM. Blood was collected before (D14 and after the exercise session (D15. Differing levels of blood creatine were tested to determine the influence on the assay measurements of CK. ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests were used to compare groups and different times of study protocol (PO objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar o efeito da suplementação de creatina e do exercício na integridade das fibras musculares e, também, o efeito da suplementação na técnica de mensuração da atividade da creatina kinase (CK. Quarenta e nove sedentários participaram de um estudo duplo-cego e foram divididos em dois grupos: C (n=26 que receberam 4x5 dias embalagens com 0,6 g.kg-1 de massa corporal com 50% de creatina + 50% de dextrose, e P (n=23 que receberam embalagens contendo apenas dextrose. No primeiro dia, eles realizaram o teste de 1RM para os exercícios supino reto, remada sentada, cadeira extensora, mesa flexora, e leg press. No D7 receberam os suplementos. No décimo quarto dia eles realizaram uma sessão de treinos com os cinco exercícios, cada um com 3x10 repetições a 75% de 1RM. Sangue foi coletado antes (D14 e depois da sessão de exercícios (D15. Diferentes concentrações de

  13. Blood pressure and cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, during exercise and recovery time in the young overweight