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Sample records for blood cells bind

  1. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 µmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 µM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore...... A23187 mediates a rapid equilibration of Co(2+) across the cell membrane leading to a marked accumulation, reflecting effective cytoplasmic buffering. The fraction (a(Co)) of total cell cobalt being present as free, ionized Co(2+) is estimated at a(Co)=0.01 from the equilibrium distribution...... of cobalt, and also from the initial slope of the cobalt buffering curve. The cobalt accumulation is similar in fed and ATP-depleted cells. The buffering curve for [Co(T)](c) can be fitted by a Michaelis type function with B(max)=24 mmol (l cells)(-1) and half-saturation at 240 µM [Co(2+)](c). The tracer...

  2. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells

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    Shin-ichiro Suemori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS. However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO, which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95. Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  3. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Wada, Hideho; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Tsujioka, Takayuki; Sugihara, Takashi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS). However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF) cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95). Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  4. Nuclear thyroid hormone receptor binding in human mononuclear blood cells after goitre resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E; Blichert-Toft, M;

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear thyroxine and triiodothyronine receptor-binding in human mononuclear blood cells were examined in 14 euthyroid persons prior to and 1, 6, 24 and 53 weeks after goitre resection. One week after resection decreased serum T3 from 1.47 nmol/l to 1.14 nmol/l (P less than 0.05), FT4I from 103 a...... to preresectional values. We conclude that the expected alteration of the metabolic state caused by resection of the gland is opposed by increased nuclear binding of T4 and T3....

  5. Binding of toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

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    Poindexter, N.J.; Schlievert, P.M.

    1987-07-01

    Toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), produced by Staphylococcus aureus and associated with toxic shock syndrome, functions in vitro as both a lymphoproliferative and immunosuppressive protein for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMs). We analyzed TSST-1-target cell interactions by receptor-ligand binding analyses. In competitive binding experiments, 2 X 10(5) human PBMs or purified cell populations were incubated in the presence of small amounts of (5-50 ng) of /sup 125/I-labeled TSST-1 and increasing amounts of unlabeled TSST-1 (25-10,000 ng). Data were analyzed by the method of Scatchard. Toxin-specific receptors were shown to exist on T lymphocytes within the PBM population. T4+ cells had 27.5 X 10(6) receptors per cell, and T8+ cells had 9 X 10(6) receptors per cell. T4+ and T8+ receptors had dissociation constants of 2.58 X 10(-8) M and 1.8 X 10(-8) M, respectively. These studies confirm earlier work showing that TSST-1 causes the functional activation of a population of T lymphocytes involved in suppression of immunoglobulin responses.

  6. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to granulo......The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC...

  7. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  8. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-01-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,0...

  9. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-02-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. PMID:3871945

  10. Effects of competitive red blood cell binding and reduced hematocrit on the blood and plasma levels of (/sup 14/C)Indapamide in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettieri, J.T.; Portelli, S.T.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of chlorthalidone and acetazolamide on the red blood cell binding of indapamide were investigated. Both drugs caused a substantial decrease in the amount of indapamide bound to the erythrocytes in vitro. This effect was demonstrated by a change in the indapamide blood/plasma ratio from approximately 6 in control samples, to a value of 1 when either of the displacing agents was added. Coadministration of acetazolamide with /sup 14/C-labeled indapamide to rats, resulted in a 5-fold drop in the blood levels of total radioactivity, relative to rats dosed with (/sup 14/C)indapamide alone. Concomitantly, there was a 2-fold increase in the plasma levels of total radioactivity after acetazolamide coadministration. In rats whose hematocrits had been reduced by extensive bleeding, there were only minor alterations in the blood/plasma partitioning of (/sup 14/C)indapamide. Thus, chlorthalidone and acetazolamide were able to displace indapamide from erythrocytes in vitro and in vivo, possibly by competition at a carbonic anhydrase binding site. The pharmacokinetics of drugs which are extensively bound to erythrocytes may be significantly altered by the presence of other agents capable of competitive binding.

  11. Phenotype-associated lectin-binding profiles of normal and transformed blood cells: a comparative analysis of mannose- and galactose-binding lectins from plants and human serum/placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K K; André, S; Gabius, H J; Sharp, J G

    1994-10-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of normal and transformed blood cells are commonly characterized by plant lectins. To infer physiological significance of protein-carbohydrate interactions, mammalian lectins are obviously preferable as research tools. So far, human serum lectins have not been used to assess their binding to immunophenotyped human normal or transformed blood cells. Thus, our study combines two groups of lectins with different specificity from plant and human sources. Besides concanavalin A (ConA) we have isolated the mannose-binding protein and serum amyloid P component from human serum. Especially the mannose-binding protein is believed to play a role in host defence against bacteria and yeast cells with unknown impact on normal and tumor cells. These three lectins establish the first group. In addition to the immunomodulatory mistletoe lectin, whose binding can elicit enhanced cytokine secretion from mononuclear blood cells, we included the beta-galactoside-binding lectin (14 kDa) from human placenta in the second group. The initial series of measurements was undertaken using two-color flow cytometry to determine the phenotype-associated binding (based on cluster designation; CD) of the lectins to blood and bone marrow cells from normal donors and the cell line CEM (T-lymphoblastoid), KG1-A (primitive myeloid leukemia) and Croco II (B-lymphoblastoid). Heterogeneity was apparent for each lectin in the CD-defined cell populations. Significant differences in binding were noted between Viscum album agglutinin (VAA) and other lectins for CD4+ cells from blood and between mannose-binding protein (MBP) and VAA versus 14 kDa, ConA and serum amyloid P component (SAP) for CD19+ cells from bone marrow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    binding, the main contributors being B cells. E initially inhibited and then later enhanced the IC binding to lymphocytes, suggesting that E promote B cell uptake of C3d,g-covered IC via CR2. Our findings, that E can restrict the IC uptake by circulating leucocytes, and that an IC-induced degranulation...

  13. Increased nuclear tri-iodothyronine binding and thyroid hormone-stimulated glucose consumption in mononuclear blood cells from patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear tri-iodothyronine (T3) maximal binding capacity (MBC) and thyroxine- and T3-stimulated cellular oxygen consumption and glucose consumption were examined in mononuclear blood cells from six patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), in six patients with alcoholic hepatitis (AH), and in six healthy...

  14. The Lipid Moiety of Haemozoin (Malaria Pigment and P. falciparum Parasitised Red Blood Cells Bind Synthetic and Native Endothelin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Basilico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelin1 (ET-1 is a 21-amino acid peptide produced by the vascular endothelium under hypoxia, that acts locally as regulator of vascular tone and inflammation. The role of ET-1 in Plasmodium falciparum malaria is unknown, although tissue hypoxia is frequent as a result of the cytoadherence of parasitized red blood cell (pRBC to the microvasculature. Here, we show that both synthetic and endothelial-derived ET-1 are removed by parasitized RBC (D10 and W2 strains, chloroquine sensitive, and resistant, resp. and native haemozoin (HZ, malaria pigment, but not by normal RBC, delipidized HZ, or synthetic beta-haematin (BH. The effect is dose dependent, selective for ET-1, but not for its precursor, big ET-1, and not due to the proteolysis of ET-1. The results indicate that ET-1 binds to the lipids moiety of HZ and membranes of infected RBCs. These findings may help understanding the consequences of parasite sequestration in severe malaria.

  15. Malaria transmission-blocking antigen, Pfs230, mediates human red blood cell binding to exflagellating male parasites and oocyst production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eksi, S.; Czesny, B.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Eling, W.M.C.; Williamson, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria transmission requires that the parasites differentiate into gametocytes prior to ingestion by a mosquito during a blood meal. Once in the mosquito midgut the gametocytes emerge from red blood cells (RBCs), fertilize, develop into ookinetes and finally infectious sporozoites. Gamete surface a

  16. Demonstration of specific binding of heparin to Plasmodium falciparum-infected vs. non-infected red blood cells by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force ranging between 28 and 46 pN depending on the loading rate. No significant binding of heparin to non-infected RBCs has been observed in control experiments. This work represents the first approach to quantitatively evaluate GAG-pRBC molecular interactions at the individual molecule level.Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) in the microvascular endothelium of different tissues, as well as in the formation of small clusters (rosettes) between infected and non-infected red blood cells (RBCs). Both sequestration and rosetting have been recognized as characteristic events in severe malaria. Here we have used heparin and pRBCs infected by the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum as a model to study GAG-pRBC interactions. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting assays have shown that exogenously added heparin has binding specificity for pRBCs (preferentially for those infected with late forms of the parasite) vs. RBCs. Heparin-pRBC adhesion has been probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, obtaining an average binding force

  17. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Verma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pKa, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (Cmax observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine.

  18. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... where they are needed, and then kill and digest the harmful organism or substance (see White blood ... Patel Hello Everyone! Hello to all of you readers! I know you will be seeing my biography, ...

  19. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo, and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable use as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate. The binding of folate by cow mild preparations in particular was found to be very poor. (orig.)

  20. Differential lectin binding on walls of thoraco-cervical blood vessels and lymphatics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, H; Uryu, K; Okamoto, K; Sakai, H; Kaneda, T; Sakanaka, M

    1991-08-01

    Lectin binding in the walls of large to medium-sized blood vessels and lymphatics in the rat thoraco-cervical region was examined histochemically. The tunica intima of the aorta and superficial cervical artery showed positive reactions with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (ConA) but not with Dolichus biflorus agglutinin (DBA). The tunica media of the aorta exhibited intense WGA binding, especially on the smooth muscle cells, but the tunica media of the superficial cervical artery did not react with the lectin. Neither ConA nor DBA bound to the tunica media of the aorta and superficial cervical artery. The tunica adventitia of both arteries contained sites binding the three lectins, although DBA reactivity declined as the vascular diameter decreased. The tunica intima of the superior vena cava and azygos vein exhibited positive WGA and ConA binding, whereas DBA binding was noted on only part of the tunica intima of the superior vena cava and not on that of the azygos vein. The tunica media and tunica adventitia were reactive for all three lectins. The WGA and ConA binding sites in the tunica adventitia showed loose networks, suggesting lectin binding on connective tissue elements interlacing among smooth muscle bundles. Lectin binding sites in the walls of lymphatics exhibited an arrangement similar to those in the walls of the veins. Moreover valves protruding into the lumen showed intense WGA and ConA binding and scattered DBA binding. Three other lectins (Ulex europaeus agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, Maclura pomifera) were examined, but they showed no reactions with the vessels. Thus, the differential binding of lectins on the walls of blood vessels and lymphatics of various sizes suggests the functional complexity of monosaccharide residues in the vascular walls. PMID:1758681

  1. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Alterations of serum concentrations of thyroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin, nuclear binding of tri-iodothyronine and thyroid hormone-stimulated cellular uptake of oxygen and glucose in mononuclear blood cells from patients with non-thyroidal illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L

    1990-01-01

    with healthy control subjects (1.45 +/- 0.30 nmol/l). Neither serum TSH nor sex hormone-binding globulin differed from that of the control group. Nuclear T3 binding capacity was increased (P less than 0.05) in patients with NTI (10.1 +/- 3.0 fmol/100 micrograms DNA) compared with controls (2.5 +/- 0.9 fmol/100......Nuclear tri-iodothyronine (T3) binding and thyroid hormone-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake were examined in mononuclear blood cells from patients with non-thyroidal illness (NTI) in which serum T3 was significantly (P less than 0.05) depressed (0.62 +/- 0.12 (S.D.) nmol/l) compared.......05) compared with controls (0.24 +/- 0.10 mmol/l per mg DNA per h). In contrast, neither unstimulated nor thyroid hormone-stimulated oxygen consumption differed. We conclude that both increased nuclear T3 binding and increased thyroid hormone-induced glucose uptake may represent counter-regulatory mechanisms...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 352 352 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation ( ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  10. Radiolabeled blood cells: radiation dosimetry and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years blood cells labeled with In-111 have become increasingly useful in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. Indium-111 by the virtue of its physical characteristics and ability to bind to cell cytoplasmic components, provides an excellent cell tracer and thereby, allows investigators to monitor in vivo cell distribution by external imaging and help determine a course of regimen in treating life threatening diseases. Due to natural phenomena such as margination, blood pool, and reticuloendothelial cell activity, in the normal state, depending upon the cell type and the quality of cell preparations, 30%-50% of the administered radioactivity is immediately distributed in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Over a period of time the radioactivity in these organs slightly increases and decays with a physical half-life of In-111. The resulting radiation dose to these organs ranges between 1-25 rads/mCi In-111 administered. The authors have developed a new In-111 labeling technique which preserves platelet ultrastructure and shown that human lymphocytes labeled with In-111 in mixed leukocytes preparations a) are only 0.003% of the total -body lymphocytes population and b) are killed. The consequence if any may be considered insignificant, particularly because 5.6% metaphases from normal men and 6.5% metaphases from normal women in the US have at least one chromosome aberration. Calculations have shown that the risk of fatal hematological malignancy, over a 30 year period, in recipients of 100 million lymphocytes labeled with 100 μCi In-111 is 1/million patients studied. This risk is less than 0.025% of the 1981 spontaneous cancer patient rate in the country. 32 references, 10 tables

  11. Z-DNA binding protein from chicken blood nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, A. G.; Spitzner, J. R.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A protein (Z alpha) that appears to be highly specific for the left-handed Z-DNA conformer has been identified in chicken blood nuclear extracts. Z alpha activity is measured in a band-shift assay by using a radioactive probe consisting of a (dC-dG)35 oligomer that has 50% of the deoxycytosines replaced with 5-bromodeoxycytosine. In the presence of 10 mM Mg2+, the probe converts to the Z-DNA conformation and is bound by Z alpha. The binding of Z alpha to the radioactive probe is specifically blocked by competition with linear poly(dC-dG) stabilized in the Z-DNA form by chemical bromination but not by B-form poly(dC-dG) or boiled salmon-sperm DNA. In addition, the binding activity of Z alpha is competitively blocked by supercoiled plasmids containing a Z-DNA insert but not by either the linearized plasmid or by an equivalent amount of the parental supercoiled plasmid without the Z-DNA-forming insert. Z alpha can be crosslinked to the 32P-labeled brominated probe with UV light, allowing us to estimate that the minimal molecular mass of Z alpha is 39 kDa.

  12. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  13. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 27,845 views 49:19 Scott: Donating Blood ...

  15. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, C; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life saving in the case of wound healing but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  16. Ginkgo biloba extract alters the binding of the sodium [123I] iodide (Na123I) on blood constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the in vitro effect of an aqueous extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) on the distribution in blood cells (BC) and plasma (P) and on the binding of Na123I to the blood constituents using precipitation with trichloroacetic acid. The radioactivity percentages insoluble (SF) and insoluble fraction (IF) of blood constituents were determined. The EGb interfered (p123I in the P (from 69.64 to 86.13) and BC (from 30.36 to 13.87) and altered the fixation of the Na123I in IF-P and in IF-BC. - Highlights: ► Interaction between the Ginkgo biloba and blood constituents radiolabeled. ► Modification of the binding of sodium iodide (Na123I) to the blood constituents. ► This alteration should have influence in a diagnosis of nuclear medicine.

  17. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  18. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease For people who don’t suspect they ... Cells Bend Wise Choices Links Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  19. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) ... Medicine Clinics 225,676 views 6:18 Alicia's bone marrow donation - Duration: 8:33. ... Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,764 views ...

  2. Cadmium uptake by rat red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat red blood cells were employed to study the uptake of cadmium (109Cd). Suspensions of red blood cells were exposed to Cd concentrations (both bound and free) observed following in vivo Cd administration. Cd uptake was biphasic with an initial rapid phase (0C was one-fourth of that at 370C. The metabolic inhibitors: sodium fluoride (1mM), potassium cyanide (1mM) and carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (2μM) and the Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain (1mM) did not reduce Cd (50μM) uptake into red blood cells. This suggests that the uptake of Cd into red blood cells was not an active process. Incubation of Cd (10μM) with an equimolar concentration of Zn did not alter uptake of Cd into red blood cells, but at 5 and 10 times higher concentrations of Zn, Cd uptake was enhanced 5-fold. Mercury at one-tenth and equimolar concentrations of Cd increased Cd uptake by red blood cells 2-fold. N-Ethylmaleimide (0.5-5mM), which irreversibly inactivates membrane sulfhydryl groups, decreased Cd uptake. The data indicate that Cd uptake into rat red blood cells occurs by passive transport and that alterations of sulfhydryls of red blood cell membrane may modulate the process. (author)

  3. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  4. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated... automatically withdraw whole blood from a donor, separate the whole blood into blood components, collect one or more of the blood components, and return to the donor the remainder of the whole blood and...

  5. IBCIS:Intelligent blood cell identification system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adnan Khashman

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of blood cells in microscope images can provide useful information concerning the health of patients.There are three major blood cell types,namely,erythrocytes (red),leukocytes (white),and platelets.Manual classification is time consuming and susceptible to error due to the different morphological features of the cells.This paper presents an intelligent system that simulates a human visual inspection and classification of the three blood cell types.The proposed system comprises two phases:The image preprocessing phase where blood cell features are extracted via global pattern averaging,and the neural network arbitration phase where training is the first and then classification is carried out.Experimental results suggest that the proposed method performs well in identifying blood cell types regardless of their irregular shapes,sizes and orientation,thus providing a fast,simple and efficient rotational and scale invariant blood cell identification system which can be used in automating laboratory reporting.

  6. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  8. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  9. Elucidation of binding mechanism and identification of binding site for an anti HIV drug, stavudine on human blood proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Seetharamappa, J

    2013-05-01

    The binding of stavudine (STV) to two human blood proteins [human hemoglobin (HHb) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by spectroscopic methods viz., fluorescence, UV absorption, resonance light scattering, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence. The binding parameters of STV-blood protein were determined from fluorescence quenching studies. Stern-Volmer plots indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the interaction of STV with blood proteins. The values of n close to unity indicated that one molecule of STV bound to one molecule of blood protein. The binding process was found to be spontaneous. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters revealed the presence of hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces between protein and STV. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of STV to Sudlow's site I on HSA. Secondary structures of blood proteins have undergone changes upon interaction with STV as evident from the reduction of α-helices (from 46.11% in free HHb to 38.34% in STV-HHb, and from 66.44% in free HSA to 52.26% in STV-HSA). Further, the alterations in secondary structures of proteins in the presence of STV were confirmed by synchronous and 3D-fluorescence spectral data. The distance between the blood protein (donor) and acceptor (STV) was found to be 5.211 and 5.402 nm for STV-HHb and STV-HSA, respectively based on Föster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. Effect of some metal ions was also investigated. The fraction of STV bound to HSA was found to be 87.8%.

  10. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  11. Blood cell morphology : controversies and alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Wim van der

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we describe controversial morphologic features in both microscopic and automated differentiation of blood cells. In addition, we have investigated alternative methods to overcome these shortcomings. Furthermore we describe the variance of microscopic counting of band cells and variant

  12. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  13. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    analyzing the homology of these peptide sequences. The staining distribution of phage with the sequence of PNPNNST was similar to that of the blood vessel marker factor Ⅷ-related antigen staining. After sequencing, each phage with the selected peptide of PNPNNST with 1.0×1011 pfu/ml was injected intravenously into mice. The homing ability to tumor vessel of these 9 kinds of peptides in the xenograft was higher than control tissues (lung and spleen).Conclusion Nine peptides obtained from in vivo screening homed to the blood vessel of human esophageal cancer,and the two motifs of YSXNXW and PXNXXN are the possible biochemical recognition units binding to vascular endothelial cells of esophageal cancer.

  14. Automated red blood cell analysis compared with routine red blood cell morphology by smear review

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Poonam Radadiya; Dr.Nandita Mehta; Dr.Hansa Goswami; Dr.R.N.Gonsai

    2015-01-01

    The RBC histogram is an integral part of automated haematology analysis and is now routinely available on all automated cell counters. This histogram and other associated complete blood count (CBC) parameters have been found abnormal in various haematological conditions and may provide major clues in the diagnosis and management of significant red cell disorders. Performing manual blood smears is important to ensure the quality of blood count results an...

  15. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  16. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  17. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant Kd. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author)

  18. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant K{sub d}. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author).

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 23,393 ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new! Loading... Working... Sign ...

  20. Colour measurement and white blood cell recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gelsema, E S

    1972-01-01

    As a part of a collaboration with NEMCH aimed at the automation of the differential white blood cell count, studies have been made of the different possibilities for using colour to help in the recognition process. Results are presented comparing data obtained with a microspectrophotometer and with a simulated three-colour scanner.

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... Monks 3,700 views 4:41 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon ...

  2. Binding of the blood group-reactive lectins to human adult kidney specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L; Juusela, H; Virtanen, I

    1990-01-01

    The binding of a panel of blood group-reactive lectins to frozen sections of human kidney was studied with a special emphasis on reactivity with endothelia and basement membranes. The blood group A-reactive lectins, all specific for alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), Helix aspersa (HAA), Helix pomatia (HPA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GSA-I-A4) agglutinins bound to the endothelium in specimens with blood groups A and AB. In other samples, these lectins reacted predominantly with tubular basement membranes, as well as with certain tubules. Both Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinins (VVA), reported to react with blood group A1 substance, failed to reveal endothelia in most specimens, but bound differently to tubules in all blood groups. The blood group B-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-D-galactose (alpha-Gal) or GalNAc, respectively, GSA-I-B4 and Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), bound to the endothelia in specimens from blood group B or AB and in other specimens bound only to certain tubules. Among the blood group O-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-L-fucose (Fuc), Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA-I) conjugates, but not other lectins with a similar nominal specificity, bound strongly to endothelia in specimens with blood group O. The UEA-I conjugates bound distinctly more faintly to endothelia in specimens of other blood groups. The present results indicate that lectins, binding to defined blood group determinants, react with endothelia in specimens of the respective blood group status. Furthermore, they suggest that basement membranes and some tubules in the human kidney show a distinct heterogeneity in their expression of saccharide residues, related to their blood group status.

  3. The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein, a New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hui; KAWAGUCHI, RIKI

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adult organs. Its derivatives (retinoid) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence...

  4. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  5. Characterization of Plasminogen Binding to NB4 Promyelocytic Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies against Receptor-Induced Binding Sites in Cell-Bound Plasminogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Jardí

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The NB4 promyelocytic cell line exhibits many of the characteristics of acute promyelocytic leukemia blast cells, including the translocation (15 : 17 that fuses the PML gene on chromosome 15 to the RARα gene on chromosome 17. These cells have a very high fibrinolytic capacity. In addition to a high secretion of urokinase, NB4 cells exhibit a 10-fold higher plasminogen binding capacity compared with other leukemic cell lines. When tissue-type plasminogen activator was added to acid-treated cells, plasmin generation was 20–26-fold higher than that generated by U937 cells or peripheral blood neutrophils, respectively. We found that plasminogen bound to these cells can be detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using an antiplasminogen monoclonal antibody that specifically reacts with this antigen when it is bound to cell surfaces. All-trans retinoid acid treatment of NB4 cells markedly decreased the binding of this monoclonal antibody. This cell line constitutes a unique model to explore plasminogen binding and activation on cell surfaces that can be modulated by all-trans retinoid acid treatment.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  7. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  10. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  11. CYCLIC CHOLECYSTOKININ ANALOGUES EXHIBIT HIGH BLOOD STABILITY AND BINDING AFFINITY WITH CHOLECYSTOKININ RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Joh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, incidence of Cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is recognized as a factor that determines the aggressive phenotype of pancreatic cancer. In this study, a novel Cholecystokinin (CCK analogues; DOTA-Nle-cyclo (Glu-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-cCCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo (Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK were synthesized and radiolabeled and the targeting abilities on the CCK receptor were evaluated for new CCK receptor targeting agents searching. Peptides were prepared through a solid phase synthesis method and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 68Ga-labelling, which the peptides were radiolabeled with 68Ga by a high radiolabeling yield (>98%. Peptides were stable over 98% by incubation in mouse blood at 37°C for 2 h. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J human pancreatic carcinoma cells revealed that 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 were 12.31 nM of DOTA-cCCK and 1.69 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Stable in the blood of both DOTA-cCCK and DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, but the binding rate with the CCK receptor on AR42J cells, DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK confirmed better than DOTA-cCCK. Therefore, it is concluded that 68Ga-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK can be potential candidate as a targeting modality for the CCK receptor over-expressing tumors and further studies to evaluate their biological characteristics are needed.

  12. Automated microscopy system for peripheral blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boev, Sergei F.; Sazonov, Vladimir V.; Kozinets, Gennady I.; Pogorelov, Valery M.; Gusev, Alexander A.; Korobova, Farida V.; Vinogradov, Alexander G.; Verdenskaya, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Irina A.

    2000-11-01

    The report describes the instrument ASPBS (Automated Screening of Peripheral Blood Cells) designed for an automated analysis of dry blood smears. The instrument is based on computer microscopy and uses dry blood smears prepared according to the standard Romanovskii-Giemza procedure. In comparison with the well-known flow cytometry systems, our instrument provides more detailed information and offers an opporunity of visualizing final results. The basic performances of the instrument are given. Software of this instrument is based on digital image processing and image recognition procedures. It is pointed out that the instrument can be used as a fairly universal tool in scientific research, public demonstrations, in medical treatment, and in medical education. The principle used as the basis of the instrument appeared adequate for creating an instrument version serviceable even during space flights where standard manual procedures and flow cytometry systems fail. The benefit of the use of the instrument in clinical laboratories is described.

  13. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  14. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that factor XII (FXII) binds to cellular surfaces in the vascular system. One of the suggested receptors of this binding is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored urokinase-like plasminogen activator (u-PAR) harbored in caveolae/lipid rafts. However, binding of FXII...... lipid rafts. Accordingly, cholesterol-depleted cells were found to bind significantly reduced amounts of FXII. These observations, combined with the presence of a minority of u-PAR in caveolae concomitant with FXII binding, indicate that FXII binding to u-PAR may be secondary and depends upon...

  15. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  16. Structure and Ligand-Binding Mechanism of a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Binding Protein from a Blood-Feeding Disease Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4), D4 (LTD4), and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate, or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex, leaving free glutathione and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  17. Influence of Red Blood Cells on Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery in Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony; Liu, Yaling

    2011-12-22

    Multifunctional nanomedicine holds considerable promise as the next generation of medicine that allows for targeted therapy with minimal toxicity. Most current studies on Nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery consider a Newtonian fluid with suspending NPs. However, blood is a complex biological fluid composed of deformable cells, proteins, platelets, and plasma. For blood flow in capillaries, arterioles and venules, the particulate nature of the blood needs to be considered in the delivery process. The existence of the cell-free-layer and NP-cell interaction will largely influence both the dispersion and binding rates, thus impact targeted delivery efficacy. In this paper, a particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model NP transport, dispersion, and binding dynamics in blood suspension. The motion and deformation of red blood cells is captured through the Immersed Finite Element Method. The motion and adhesion of individual NPs are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics. A mapping algorithm and an interaction potential function are introduced to consider the cell-particle collision. NP dispersion and binding rates are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influence of red blood cells, vascular flow rate, and particle size on NP distribution and delivery efficacy is characterized. A non-uniform NP distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to over 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance NP dispersion, with dispersion rate increases as shear rate increases. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how the particulate nature of blood influences NP delivery, which will provide mechanistic insights on the nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications. PMID:22375153

  18. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Andrés Penuela; Fernando Palomino; Lina Andrea Gómez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods: Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one...

  19. Structural Constraints on Human Norovirus Binding to Histo-Blood Group Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bishal K; Leuthold, Mila M; Hansman, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Human norovirus interacts with the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), and this interaction is thought to be important for infection. The genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) noroviruses are the dominant cluster, evolve every other year, and are thought to modify their binding interactions with different HBGA types. Most human noroviruses bind HBGAs, while some strains were found to have minimal or no HBGA interactions. Here, we explain some possible structural constraints for several noroviruses that were found to bind poorly to HBGAs by using X-ray crystallography. We showed that one aspartic acid was flexible or positioned away from the fucose moiety of the HBGAs and this likely hindered binding, although other fucose-interacting residues were perfectly oriented. Interestingly, a neighboring loop also appeared to influence the loop hosting the aspartic acid. These new findings might explain why some human noroviruses bound HBGAs poorly, although further studies are required. PMID:27303720

  20. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  1. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  2. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl;

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-i...

  3. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    OpenAIRE

    Chechetkin, V.R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the semispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides...

  4. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  5. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  6. Automated red blood cell analysis compared with routine red blood cell morphology by smear review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Poonam Radadiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RBC histogram is an integral part of automated haematology analysis and is now routinely available on all automated cell counters. This histogram and other associated complete blood count (CBC parameters have been found abnormal in various haematological conditions and may provide major clues in the diagnosis and management of significant red cell disorders. Performing manual blood smears is important to ensure the quality of blood count results and to make presumptive diagnosis. In this article we have taken 100 samples for comparative study between RBC histograms obtained by automated haematology analyzer with peripheral blood smear. This article discusses some morphological features of dimorphism and the ensuing characteristic changes in their RBC histograms.

  7. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  8. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  9. The cell-binding domain of intimin from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli binds to beta1 integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, G; Lider, O; Hershkoviz, R; Mould, A P; Kachalsky, S G; Candy, D C; Cahalon, L; Humphries, M J; Dougan, G

    1996-08-23

    Bacteria interact with mammalian cells surface molecules, such as integrins, to colonize tissues and evade immunological detection. Herein, the ability of intimin, an outer membrane protein from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, to bind beta1 integrins was investigated. Solid-phase binding assays revealed binding of the carboxyl-terminal 280 amino acids of intimin (Int280) to alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. The binding required divalent ions (in particular, it was enhanced by Mn2+) and was inhibited by an RGD-containing peptide. Nonderivatized Int280, but not Int280CS (like Int280 but with Cys-937 replaced by Ser) blocked the binding of biotinylated Int280 to integrins. Int280 did not efficiently inhibit beta1 integrin binding of invasin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Both intimin and invasin, immobilized on plastic surfaces, mediated adherence of resting or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated human CD4(+) T cells, whereas fibronectin mediated the adherence of only activated T cells. T cell binding to intimin and invasin was integrin mediated because it was specifically blocked by an RGD-containing peptide and by antibodies directed against the integrin subunits beta1, alpha4, and alpha5. These results demonstrate a specific integrin binding activity for intimin that is related to, but distinct from, that of invasin. PMID:8702771

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Active Efflux Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Potschka, Heidrun

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by protecting the brain from potentially harmful endogenous and exogenous substances. BBB active drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are increasingly recognized as important determinants of drug distribution to, and elimination from, the CNS. The ABC efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been demonstrated as a key element of the BBB that can actively transport a huge variety of lip...

  11. Identification of transferrin as the principal neptunium-binding protein in the blood serum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, R.; Taylor, D.M.; Duffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 239Np(V) to blood serum components of rats was examined in vivo and in vitro. After gel filtration of the serum using a Sephacryl S-300 column, 98% of the applied activity appeared with protein fractions representing coeluted albumins and transferrin. A separation of the albumin- and transferrin-proteins by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-cellulose showed the 239Np being entirely bound to the iron-carrier protein transferrin. The high elution yields from the ion-exchange columns, greater than 90%, suggest that the binding may be quite strong. The binding capacity of transferrin for neptunium in vivo was found to decline when the iron level in blood serum was increased. Precipitation experiments showed that 84 +/- 2% of the 239Np was precipitated with 10% (w/v) trichloracetic acid, 77 +/- 3% with 90% ethanol but only 6 +/- 1% with saturated ammonium sulphate at pH 7.4. The available data indicate that as for plutonium, thorium, americium and curium, the iron transport protein, transferrin, may be the main carrier protein for neptunium in mammalian blood serum.

  12. Interleukin 3 activates human blood basophils via high-affinity binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure populations of human basophilic granulocytes were obtained from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blood by negative selection using a mixture of monoclonal antibodies and complement. 125I-radiolabeled recombinant human interleukin 3 (rhIL-3) bound to purified basophils in a specific manner. Quantitative binding studies and Scatchard plot analyses performed on samples from two donors revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity IL-3 binding sites. Purified CML basophils maintained in suspension in the presence of rhIL-3 incorporated up to 12 times more [3H]thymidine than basophils in control cultures. Furthermore, after preincubation in vitro with rhIL-3 for 30 min, normal blood basophils released 2- to 3-fold more histamine than basophils pretreated with control medium when exposed to various concentrations of an anti-IgE antibody. Together, these results show that rhIL-3 binds to a specific receptor on blood basophils and is a regulator of basophil function

  13. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  14. On-Orbit, Immuno-Based, Label-Free White Blood Cell Counting System with Microelectromechanical Sensor Technology (OILWBCS-MEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Aurora Flight Sciences, in partnership with Draper Laboratory, has developed a miniaturized system to count white blood cells in microgravity environments. The system uses MEMS technology to simultaneously count total white blood cells, the five white blood cell differential subgroups, and various lymphocyte subtypes. The OILWBCS-MEMS detection technology works by immobilizing an array of white blood cell-specific antibodies on small, gold-coated membranes. When blood flows across the membranes, specific cells' surface protein antigens bind to their corresponding antibodies. This binding can be measured and correlated to cell counts. In Phase I, the partners demonstrated surface chemistry sensitivity and specificity for total white blood cells and two lymphocyte subtypes. In Phase II, a functional prototype demonstrated end-to-end operation. This rugged, miniaturized device requires minimal blood sample preparation and will be useful for both space flight and terrestrial applications.

  15. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  16. Simultaneous high-resolution pH and spectrophotometric recordings of oxygen binding in blood microvolumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen equilibrium curves have been widely used to understand oxygen transport in numerous organisms. A major challenge has been to monitor oxygen binding characteristics and concomitant pH changes as they occur in vivo, in limited sample volumes. Here we report a technique allowing highly resolved and simultaneous monitoring of pH and blood pigment saturation in minute blood volumes. We equipped a gas diffusion chamber with a broad-range fibre-optic spectrophotometer and a micro-pH optode and recorded changes of pigment oxygenation along oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and pH gradients to test the setup. Oxygen binding parameters derived from measurements in only 15 μl of haemolymph from the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris showed low instrumental error (0.93%) and good agreement with published data. Broad-range spectra, each resolving 2048 data points, provided detailed insight into the complex absorbance characteristics of diverse blood types. After consideration of photobleaching and intrinsic fluorescence, pH optodes yielded accurate recordings and resolved a sigmoidal shift of 0.03 pH units in response to changing PO2 from 0 to 21 kPa. Highly resolved continuous recordings along pH gradients conformed to stepwise measurements at low rates of pH changes. In this study we showed that a diffusion chamber upgraded with a broad-range spectrophotometer and an optical pH sensor accurately characterizes oxygen binding with minimal sample consumption and manipulation. We conclude that the modified diffusion chamber is highly suitable for experimental biologists who demand high flexibility, detailed insight into oxygen binding as well as experimental and biological accuracy combined in a single setup. PMID:24436387

  17. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  18. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  19. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g....../dl and independent of shock day and bleeding. Patients with cardiovascular disease were transfused at higher haemoglobin levels. Transfused patients had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II (56 (45-69) vs. 48 (37-61), p = 0.0005), more bleeding episodes, lower haemoglobin levels days 1 to 5, higher...

  20. Hierarchy of ADAM12 binding to integrins in tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Fröhlich, Camilla; Nielsen, Christian Kamp;

    2005-01-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of cell surface proteins with protease and cell-binding activities. Using different forms and fragments of ADAM12 as substrates in cell adhesion and spreading assays, we demonstrated that alpha9beta1 integrin is the main receptor for ADAM......12. However, when alpha9beta1 integrin is not expressed--as in many carcinoma cells--other members of the beta1 integrin family can replace its ligand binding activity. In attachment assays, the recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM12 only supported alpha9 integrin-dependent tumor cell attachment......, whereas full-length ADAM12 supported attachment via alpha9 integrin and other integrin receptors. Cells that attached to full-length ADAM12 in an alpha9 integrin-dependent manner also attached to ADAM12 in which the putative alpha9beta1 integrin-binding motif in the disintegrin domain had been mutated...

  1. Red Blood Cells Estimation Using Hough Transform Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrul Humaimi Mahmood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of red blood cells contributes more to clinical diagnosis with respect to blood diseases. Theaim of this research is to produce a computer vision system that can detect and estimate the number of redblood cells in the blood sample image. Morphological is a very powerful tool in image processing, and it isbeen used to segment and extract the red blood cells from the background and other cells. The algorithmused features such as shape of red blood cells for counting process, and Hough transform is introduced inthis process. The result presented here is based on images with normal blood cells. The tested data consistsof 10 samples and produced the accurate estimation rate closest to 96% from manual counting.

  2. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. PMID:26590403

  3. Mechanical damage of red blood cells by rotary blood pumps: selective destruction of aged red blood cells and subhemolytic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Sobajima, Hideo; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Waguri, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) were measured to quantify RBC damage by rotary blood pumps. Six-hour hemolysis tests were conducted with a Bio-pump BPX-80, a Sarns 15200 roller pump, and a prototype mag-lev centrifugal pump (MedTech Heart) using fresh porcine blood circulated at 5 L/min against a 100 mm Hg head pressure. The temperature of the test and noncirculated control blood was maintained at 37 degrees C. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of each pump was determined by measuring the plasma-free hemoglobin level. The MCV was measured with a Coulter counter, and MCHC was derived from total hemoglobin and hematocrit. MCH was derived from MCV and MCHC. A multivariance statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences (n = 15, P < 0.05) in MCV, MCHC, and MCH between the blood sheared by the rotary blood pumps and the nonsheared control blood. Normalized to the control blood, the Bio-pump BPX-80 showed an MCV of 1.04 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.95 +/- 0.04, and an MCH of 0.98 +/- 0.02; the mag-lev MedTech Heart had an MCV of 1.02 +/- 0.02, an MCHC of 0.97 +/- 0.02, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01; and the roller pump exhibited an MCV of 1.03 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.96 +/- 0.03, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01. Per 0.01 increase in NIH, the BPX-80 showed a normalized MCV change of +10.1% and a normalized MCHC change of -14.0%; the MedTech Heart demonstrated a +6.9% MCV and -9.5% MCHC change; and the roller pump had a +0.5% MCV and -0.6% MCHC change. Due to shear in the pump circuits, the RBC increased while the MCHC decreased. The likely mechanism is that older RBCs with smaller size and higher hemoglobin concentration were destroyed fast by the shear, leaving younger RBCs with larger size and lower hemoglobin concentration. Subhemolytic trauma caused the intracellular hemoglobin to decrease due to gradual hemoglobin leakage through the micropores formed in the thinned

  4. The treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using umbilical cord blood and menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanberg, Paul R; Eve, David J; Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Tan, Jun; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Allickson, Julie G; Cruz, L Eduardo; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a potentially important means of treatment for a number of disorders. Two different stem cell populations of interest are mononuclear umbilical cord blood cells and menstrual blood-derived stem cells. These cells are relatively easy to obtain, appear to be pluripotent, and are immunologically immature. These cells, particularly umbilical cord blood cells, have been studied as either single or multiple injections in a number of animal models of neurodegenerative disorders with some degree of success, including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Sanfilippo syndrome type B. Evidence of anti-inflammatory effects and secretion of specific cytokines and growth factors that promote cell survival, rather than cell replacement, have been detected in both transplanted cells.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep......Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...... into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP...

  6. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  7. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris;

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...... proteome have been confirmed here. This comparison sheds light on several open issues in RBC biology and provides a departure point for more comprehensive understanding of RBC function....

  8. Colloidal Properties of Nanoerythrosomes Derived from Bovine Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Hoang, Dao; Bentley, William E; D'Souza, Warren D; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-12

    Liposomes are nanoscale containers that are typically synthesized from lipids using a high-shear process such as extrusion or sonication. While liposomes are extensively used in drug delivery, they do suffer from certain problems including limited colloidal stability and short circulation times in the body. As an alternative to liposomes, we explore a class of container structures derived from erythrocytes (red blood cells). The procedure involves emptying the inner contents of these cells (specifically hemoglobin) and resuspending the empty structures in buffer, followed by sonication. The resulting structures are termed nanoerythrosomes (NERs), i.e., they are membrane-covered nanoscale containers, much like liposomes. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are employed for the first time to study these NERs. The results reveal that the NERs are discrete spheres (∼110 nm diameter) with a unilamellar membrane of thickness ∼4.5 nm. Remarkably, the biconcave disc-like shape of erythrocytes is also exhibited by the NERs under hypertonic conditions. Moreover, unlike typical liposomes, NERs show excellent colloidal stability in both buffer as well as in serum at room temperature, and are also able to withstand freeze-thaw cycling. We have explored the potential for using NERs as colloidal vehicles for targeted delivery. Much like conventional liposomes, NER membranes can be decorated with fluorescent or other markers, solutes can be encapsulated in the cores of the NERs, and NERs can be targeted to specifically bind to mammalian cells. Our study shows that NERs are a promising and versatile class of nanostructures. NERs that are harvested from a patient's own blood and reconfigured for nanomedicine can potentially offer several benefits including biocompatibility, minimization of immune response, and extended circulation time in the body. PMID:26684218

  9. Investigation of two blood proteins binding to Cantharidin and Norcantharidin by multispectroscopic and chemometrics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rong; Cheng, Zhengjun, E-mail: ncczj1112@126.com; Li, Tian; Jiang, Xiaohui

    2015-01-15

    The interactions of Cantharidin/Norcantharidin (CTD/NCTD) with two blood proteins, i.e., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine hemoglobin (BHb), have been investigated by the fluorescence, UV–vis absorption, and FT-IR spectra under imitated physiological condition. The binding characteristics between CTD/NCTD and BSA/BHb were determined by fluorescence emission and resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra. The quenching mechanism of two blood proteins with CTD/NCTD is a static quenching. Moreover, the experimental data were further analyzed based on multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique to obtain the concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA/BHb, CTD/NCTD and CTD/NCTD–BSA/BHb complexes) which existed in the interaction procedure. The number of binding sites n and binding constants K{sub b} were calculated at various temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters (such as, ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) for BSA–CTD/NCTD and BHb–CTD/NCTD systems were calculated by the Van’t Hoff equation and also discussed. The distance r between CTD/NCTD and BSA/BHb were evaluated according to Förster no-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the conformations of BSA/BHb altered with the addition of CTD/NCTD. In addition, the effects of common ions on the binding constants of BSA–CTD/NCTD and BHb–CTD/NCTD systems were also discussed.

  10. Segmentation and Analysis of Cancer Cells in Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Nelikanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood cancer is an umbrella term for cancers that affect the blood, bone marrow and lymphatic system. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is one of the kinds of blood cancer which can be affected at any age in the humans. The analysis of peripheral blood samples is an important test in the procedures for the diagnosis of leukemia. In this paper the blood sample images are used and implementing a clustering algorithm for detection of the cancer cells. This paper also implements morphological operations and feature extraction techniques using MATLAB for the analysis of cancer cells in the images.

  11. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  12. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  13. Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood during cardiac surgery : effect on red blood cell function in concentrated blood compared with diluted blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Y. John; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Hagenaars, J. Ans M.; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood has been suggested to prevent patients from receiving activated leucocytes during autotransfusion in cardiac surgery. This study examines whether leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood affects the red blood cell (RBC) function and whether there is a

  14. Influence of Molecular Structure on O2-Binding Properties and Blood Circulation of Hemoglobin‒Albumin Clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Yamada

    Full Text Available A hemoglobin wrapped covalently by three human serum albumins, a Hb-HSA3 cluster, is an artificial O2-carrier with the potential to function as a red blood cell substitute. This paper describes the synthesis and O2-binding properties of new hemoglobin‒albumin clusters (i bearing four HSA units at the periphery (Hb-HSA4, large-size variant and (ii containing an intramolecularly crosslinked Hb in the center (XLHb-HSA3, high O2-affinity variant. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed that the Hb-HSA4 diameter is greater than that of either Hb-HSA3 or XLHb-HSA3. The XLHb-HSA3 showed moderately high O2-affinity compared to the others because of the chemical linkage between the Cys-93(β residues in Hb. Furthermore, the blood circulation behavior of 125I-labeled clusters was investigated by assay of blood retention and tissue distribution after intravenous administration into anesthetized rats. The XLHb-HSA3 was metabolized faster than Hb-HSA3 and Hb-HSA4. Results suggest that the molecular structure of the protein cluster is a factor that can influence in vivo circulation behavior.

  15. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  16. Binding and endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin by K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using isotopic labeling of human serum apotransferrin, the binding and the endocytosis of monoterbium transferrin (TbC-apotransferrin, TbC-apotransferrin- FeN) by K562 cells, a human leukemic cell line, have been investigated. There are about (8.58±2.41)×105 binding sites per cell surface at 0℃. The association constant for TbC-apo- transferrin binding is 4.1×107 mol-1@L, for TbC-apo- transferrin-FeN 2.7×107 mol-1@L at 0℃. At pH 7.4, upon warming cells to 37℃, endocytosis starts. The rate constants for the endocytosis are about 0.97 min-1 and 0.31 min-1 and the endocytosis ratio reaches 56% and 80% for TbC-apo- transferrin and TbC-apotransferrin-FeN, respectively.

  17. Stem Cell Transplant (Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Cord Blood Transplants)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are studied in cloning and other types of research. These stem cells are blood-forming stem cells. Stem cells mostly ... Preventing and managing GVHD are major priorities for research. Chronic ... 90 to 600 days after the stem cell transplant. A rash on the palms of the ...

  18. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  19. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh;

    2006-01-01

    expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...... transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of glucocorticoid and phorbol ester stimulation on monocyte and dendritic cell CD163 and CD91 expression was investigated in cell culture of mononuclear cells using multicolor flow cytometry. We identified two CD163+ subsets in human blood with dendritic cell...

  20. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  1. Effect of a commercial extract of Paullinia cupana (guarana) on the binding of 99mTc-DMSA on blood constituents: An in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, R.S. [Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87 Fundos, 4 Andar, Rio de Janeiro 20551-030 (Brazil); Moreno, S.R.F. [Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87 Fundos, 4 Andar, Rio de Janeiro 20551-030 (Brazil); Lima-Filho, G.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87 Fundos, 4 Andar, Rio de Janeiro 20551-030 (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S. [Departamento de Farmacologia e Psicobiologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87 Fundos, 5 Andar, Rio de Janeiro, 20551-030 (Brazil)]. E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Bernardo-Filho, M. [Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87 Fundos, 4 Andar, Rio de Janeiro 20551-030 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Coordenadoria de Pesquisa, Praca Cruz Vermelha 23, Rio de Janeiro, 20230-130 (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    We studied the influence of a commercial extract of Paullinia cupana (guarana) on the binding of technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid ({sup 99m}Tc-DMSA) on blood constituents. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) from Wistar rats (control and treated) were separated. P and BC were precipitated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) or ammonium sulphate (AS) and soluble (SF) and insoluble fractions (IF) isolated. The percentage of incorporated radioactivity (%ATI) in each fraction was determined. The treatment influenced the %ATI in IF-P and in IF-BC isolated by TCA precipitation.

  2. The PUF binding landscape in metazoan germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aman; Porter, Douglas F.; Kroll-Conner, Peggy L.; Mohanty, Ipsita; Ryan, Anne R.; Crittenden, Sarah L.; Wickens, Marvin; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    PUF (Pumilio/FBF) proteins are RNA-binding proteins and conserved stem cell regulators. The Caenorhabditis elegans PUF proteins FBF-1 and FBF-2 (collectively FBF) regulate mRNAs in germ cells. Without FBF, adult germlines lose all stem cells. A major gap in our understanding of PUF proteins, including FBF, is a global view of their binding sites in their native context (i.e., their “binding landscape”). To understand the interactions underlying FBF function, we used iCLIP (individual-nucleotide resolution UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation) to determine binding landscapes of C. elegans FBF-1 and FBF-2 in the germline tissue of intact animals. Multiple iCLIP peak-calling methods were compared to maximize identification of both established FBF binding sites and positive control target mRNAs in our iCLIP data. We discovered that FBF-1 and FBF-2 bind to RNAs through canonical as well as alternate motifs. We also analyzed crosslinking-induced mutations to map binding sites precisely and to identify key nucleotides that may be critical for FBF–RNA interactions. FBF-1 and FBF-2 can bind sites in the 5′UTR, coding region, or 3′UTR, but have a strong bias for the 3′ end of transcripts. FBF-1 and FBF-2 have strongly overlapping target profiles, including mRNAs and noncoding RNAs. From a statistically robust list of 1404 common FBF targets, 847 were previously unknown, 154 were related to cell cycle regulation, three were lincRNAs, and 335 were shared with the human PUF protein PUM2. PMID:27165521

  3. Hormones that Stimulate the Growth of Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golde, David W.; Gasson, Judith C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the nature and action of hematopoietic proteins which regulate the production of specific sets of blood cells. Discusses the production of these hematopoietins by recombinant-DNA methods in an effort to enable physicians to treat patients by eliciting production of specific types of blood cells. (CW)

  4. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  5. Lacking deoxygenation-linked interaction between cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and HbF from fetal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain of the...

  6. Adhesion of subsets of human blood mononuclear cells to porcine endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cellular immune response is a major barrier to xenotransplantation, and cell adhesion is the first step in intercellular recognition. Flow-cytometric adhesion assay has been used to investigate the differential adhesions of monocyte (Mo), natural killer cell (NK) and T lymphocyte (T) present within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), and to demonstrate the effect of human interferon-γ(hIFN-γ) or/and tumor necrosis factor-α (hTNF-α) pretreatment of PAEC on their adhesiveness for different PBMC subsets. The preferential sequence for PBMC subset binding to resting PAEC is Mo, NK and T cells, among which T cells show the slightest adherence; hTNF-α can act across the species, and augment Mo, NK and T cell adhesion ratios by 40%, 110% and 3 times, respectively. These results confirm at the cell level that host Mo and NK cells are major participants in the cellular xenograft rejection, thereby, providing a prerequisite for further studying the human Mo/NK-PAEC interactive mechanisms.

  7. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Preben D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low. The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5°C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO2. In 4 out of 7 samples colonies with MSC morphology were observed. Cellular morphology varied between monolayers of elongated spindle-shaped cells to layered cell clusters of cuboidal cells with shorter cytoplasmic extensions. Positive Alizarin Red and von Kossa staining as well as significant calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed osteogenesis. Histology and positive Safranin O staining of matrix glycosaminoglycans illustrated chondrogenesis. Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets confirmed adipogenesis. Conclusion We here report, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal model for proof-of-principle studies of cord blood derived MSCs.

  8. A Simulation of Blood Cells in Branching Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Isfahani, Amir H G; Freund, Jonathan B

    2008-01-01

    The multi-cellular hydrodynamic interactions play a critical role in the phenomenology of blood flow in the microcirculation. A fast algorithm has been developed to simulate large numbers of cells modeled as elastic thin membranes. For red blood cells, which are the dominant component in blood, the membrane has strong resistance to surface dilatation but is flexible in bending. Our numerical method solves the boundary integral equations built upon Green's functions for Stokes flow in periodic domains. This fluid dynamics video is an example of the capabilities of this model in handling complex geometries with a multitude of different cells. The capillary branch geometries have been modeled based upon observed capillary networks. The diameter of the branches varies between 10-20 mum. A constant mean pressure gradient drives the flow. For the purpose of this fluid dynamics video, the red blood cells are initiated as biconcave discs and white blood cells and platelets are initiated as spheres and ellipsoids resp...

  9. Establishment of outgrowth endothelial cells from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ramirez, Javier; Hofman, Menno; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hebbel, Robert P; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) are important tools when investigating diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for vascular disease. In this protocol, mononuclear cells are isolated from peripheral blood and plated on type I collagen at ∼135,000 cells per cm(2) in endothelial cell differentiation medium. On average, 0.34 colonies of endothelial cells per milliliter of blood can be obtained. Colonies of endothelial cells become visible after 14-28 d. Upon confluence, these rapidly expanding colonies can be passaged and have been shown to propagate up to 10(18)-fold. Isolated BOECs are phenotypically similar to vascular endothelial cells, as revealed by their cobblestone morphology, the presence of endothelial cell-specific Weibel-Palade bodies and the expression of endothelial cell markers such as VE-cadherin. The protocol presented here also provides a particularly useful tool for the ex vivo assessment of endothelial cell function from patients with different vascular abnormalities. PMID:22918388

  10. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chengqian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV. One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs. The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses.

  12. Interpretation of automated blood cell counts

    OpenAIRE

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Complete blood count (CBC) tests are rapid, inexpensiveand universally available, and often aid primary clinicianswith decision making about patients with severaldisorders. Thus the rapid availability of the results of CBCcould provide considerable advantage for both patientsand clinicians. Furthermore, physicians can also avoidunnecessary peripheral blood smear examination usingCBC parameters. Many hematology analyzers, which enabledus simultaneously, measure several different CBCparameters,...

  13. Red blood cells in sports: Effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heimo eMairbäurl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood’s buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called sports anemia. This is not anemia in a clinical sense because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume. The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g. in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise.

  14. SDS-binding assay based on tyrosine fluorescence as a tool to determine binding properties of human serum albumin in blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Nadezda; Shirshin, Evgeny; Fadeev, Victor; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Among all plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) is the most studied one as it is the main transport protein and can bind a wide variety of ligands especially fatty acids (FAs). The concentration of FAs bound to HSA in human blood plasma differs by three times under abnormal conditions (fasting, physical exercises or in case of social important diseases). In the present study a surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to simulate FAs binding to HSA. It was shown that the increase of Tyr fluorescence of human blood plasma due to SDS addition can be completely explained by HSA-SDS complex formation. Binding parameters of SDS-HSA complex (average number of sites and apparent constant of complex formation) were determined from titration curves based on tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence.

  15. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield. PMID:24611298

  16. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  17. Interpretation of automated blood cell counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete blood count (CBC tests are rapid, inexpensiveand universally available, and often aid primary clinicianswith decision making about patients with severaldisorders. Thus the rapid availability of the results of CBCcould provide considerable advantage for both patientsand clinicians. Furthermore, physicians can also avoidunnecessary peripheral blood smear examination usingCBC parameters. Many hematology analyzers, which enabledus simultaneously, measure several different CBCparameters, are available for early diagnosis. Herein theimpact of both pre and post analytic variations on the interpretationof the CBC results with case reports are reviewedin the light of the latest literature.Key words: Complete blood count, interpretation

  18. A model for red blood cells in simulations of large-scale blood flows

    CERN Document Server

    Melchionna, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are an essential component of blood. A method to include the particulate nature of blood is introduced here with the goal of studying circulation in large-scale realistic vessels. The method uses a combination of the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to account for the plasma motion, and a modified Molecular Dynamics scheme for the cellular motion. Numerical results illustrate the quality of the model in reproducing known rheological properties of blood as much as revealing the effect of RBC structuring on the wall shear stress, with consequences on the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Staphylococcal SSL5 Binding to Human Leukemia Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M. E. Walenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5 was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share many characteristics in migration and dissemination, we explored the potential of SSL5 as an antagonist of malignant cell behavior. Previously, it was demonstrated that rolling of human HL-60 leukemia cells on activated endothelial cells was mediated by P-selectin. In this study, we show that SSL5 targets HL-60 cells. Binding of SSL5 was rapid and without observed toxicity. Competition of SSL5 with the binding of three anti-PSGL-1 antibodies and P-selectin to HL-60 cells identified PSGL-1 as the ligand on HL-60 cells. Presence of sialyl Lewis x epitopes on PSGL-1 was crucial for its interaction with SSL5. Importantly, SSL5 not only inhibited the interaction of HL-60 cells with activated endothelial cells but also with platelets, which both play an important role in growth and metastasis of cancers. These data support the concept that SSL5 could be a lead in the search for novel strategies against hematological malignancies.

  20. White blood cells of peripheral blood with ConA-positive glycotopes in patients with chronic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Maslak

    2015-09-01

     Tumor growth progression of blood cells occurs due to changes in their genetic apparatus, which affects not only the cells morphological characteristics, but also their functional activity which to a greater extent depends on the membrane surface structures, a significant part of which is of glycoprotein nature. Complex type N-glycans are components of surface glycoproteins in the most of leukocytes. Thus, the study of changes in carbohydrate determinants of glycoproteins on the surface of leucocytes in tumorigenesis can help to reveal the mechanisms of this process. The aim of our study was to investigate the monocytes and granulocytes cytoplasmic membrane N-glycosylation in patients with chronic leukemia. The object of the study were blood cells of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 12 and polycythemia vera (n = 15 aged 58–66 years. Healthy hematologic volunteers (n = 15 aged 55 to 65 years were in the control group. N-glycan exposure on monocytes and granulocytes was investigated by flow cytometer Beckman Сoulter EPICS with Canavalia ensiformis lectin – Con A conjugated with fluorescent labels. The number of dead cells was monitored by means of binding them with propidium iodide. The result has been analyzed with FC Express. According to our data, levels of ConA-positive monocytes and granulocytes were 9,9 ± 1,0% and 32,7 ± 3,2%, respectively, in peripheral blood of healthy persons. The level of ConA-positive monocytes decreased to 31,0 ± 2,3% and the number of ConA-binding granulocytes increased to 66,7 ± 3,8% in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared with the norm. The number of ConA-positive monocytes decreased 3.3 times, and the level of granulocytes interacting with Canavalia ensiformis lectin slightly increased relative to control in polycythemia vera patients. There is significant increase in Con A-positive epitopes on granulocytes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and polycythemia vera compared with the

  1. Angiotensin II Inhibits Insulin Binding to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsulin-mediated glucose uptake in insulin target tissues is correlated with interstitial insulin concentration, rather than plasma insulin concentration. Therefore, insulin delivery to the interstitium of target tissues is very important, and the endothelium may also play an important role in the development of insulin resistance.MethodsAfter treating bovine aortic endothelial cells with angiotensin II (ATII, we observed the changes in insulin binding capacity and the amounts of insulin receptor (IR on the cell membranes and in the cytosol.ResultsAfter treatment of 10-7M ATII, insulin binding was decreased progressively, up to 60% at 60 minutes (P<0.05. ATII receptor blocker (eprosartan dose dependently improved the insulin binding capacity which was reduced by ATII (P<0.05. At 200 µM, eprosartan fully restored insulin binding capacity, althogh it resulted in only a 20% to 30% restoration at the therapeutic concentration. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR, but it did reduce the amount of IR on the plasma membrane and increased that in the cytosol.ConclusionATII decreased the insulin binding capacity of the tested cells. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR but did decrease the amount of IR on the plasma membrane. Our data indicate that ATII decreases insulin binding by translocating IR from the plasma membrane to the cytosol. The binding of insulin to IR is important for insulin-induced vasodilation and transendothelial insulin transport. Therefore, ATII may cause insulin resistance through this endothelium-based mechanism.

  2. White blood cell count - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hand. The puncture site is cleaned with antiseptic, and a tourniquet (an elastic band) or blood ... or young child: The area is cleansed with antiseptic and punctured with a sharp needle or a ...

  3. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  4. Blood group glycolipids as epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, B J; Douglas, L J

    1996-01-01

    The role of glycosphingolipids as possible epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans was examined by investigating the binding of biotinylated yeasts to lipids extracted from human buccal epithelial cells and separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Binding was visualized by the addition of 125I-streptavidin followed by autoradiography. Five C. albicans strains thought from earlier work to have a requirement for fucose-containing receptors all bound to the same three components in the lipi...

  5. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia;

    2011-01-01

    to determine the density and compressibility of individual cells enables the prediction and alteration of the separation outcome for a given cell mixture. We apply the method on white blood cells (WBCs) and DU145 prostate cancer cells (DUCs) aiming to improve isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood......, an emerging tool in the monitoring and characterizing of metastatic cancer....

  6. Net haemoglobin increase from reinfusion of refrigerated vs. frozen red blood cells after autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashenden, M; Mørkeberg, Jakob Sehested

    2011-01-01

    freezing. Nevertheless, frozen storage allowed haemoglobin to fully recover before reinfusion, while the haemoglobin was 10% lower in the refrigerated group compared with baseline. After reinfusion, the haemoglobin levels were 11·5% higher than the baseline values in the group reinfused with frozen blood......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES  Two main blood storage procedures can be used for storing red blood cells: refrigeration and freezing. Nevertheless, the efficiency of these procedures measured as the increase in haemoglobin after reinfusion compared with baseline has never been examined. The main...... objective was to examine which storage procedure yielded the largest increase in circulating haemoglobin after reinfusion compared to baseline. MATERIALS AND METHODS  Equal volumes of blood from 15 men were withdrawn and stored either frozen or refrigerated as packed red blood cells. Serial measures...

  7. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from...... the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...

  8. Ginkgo biloba extract alters the binding of the sodium [{sup 123}I] iodide (Na{sup 123}I) on blood constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleixo, Luiz Claudio Martins [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, 28 de Setembro, 87, 20551-030, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Via Cinco s/n, 21945-450 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moreno, Silvana Ramos Farias, E-mail: srfmoreno@hotmail.com [Departamento de Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24030-210, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24030-210, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Freitas, Rosimeire de Souza [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, 28 de Setembro, 87, 20551-030, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Thomaz, Helio [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Via Cinco s/n, 21945-450 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, 28 de Setembro, 87, 20551-030, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    We evaluated the in vitro effect of an aqueous extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) on the distribution in blood cells (BC) and plasma (P) and on the binding of Na{sup 123}I to the blood constituents using precipitation with trichloroacetic acid. The radioactivity percentages insoluble (SF) and insoluble fraction (IF) of blood constituents were determined. The EGb interfered (p<0.05) on the distribution of Na{sup 123}I in the P (from 69.64 to 86.13) and BC (from 30.36 to 13.87) and altered the fixation of the Na{sup 123}I in IF-P and in IF-BC. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between the Ginkgo biloba and blood constituents radiolabeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of the binding of sodium iodide (Na{sup 123}I) to the blood constituents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This alteration should have influence in a diagnosis of nuclear medicine.

  9. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.; Grujić Jasmina N.; Krga-Milanović Mirjana M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test). It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red...

  10. Ceruloplasmin and other copper binding components of blood plasma and their functions: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C

    2016-09-01

    We know that blood plasma contains many proteins and also other components that bind copper. The largest contributor to copper in the plasma is ceruloplasmin, which accounts for 40-70 percent. Apart from ceruloplasmin and albumin, most of these components have not been studied extensively, and even for ceruloplasmin and albumin, much remains to be discovered. New components with new functions, and new functions of known components are emerging, some warranting reconsideration of earlier findings. The author's laboratory has been actively involved in research on this topic. This review summarizes and updates our knowledge of the nature and functions of ceruloplasmin and the other known and emerging copper-containing molecules (principally proteins) in this fluid, to better understand how they contribute to copper homeostasis and consider their potential significance to health and disease. PMID:27426697

  11. Electrical properties of the red blood cell membrane and immunohematological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloise Pöckel Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutination is widely used in transfusion medicine and depends on several factors including antigens, antibodies, electrical properties of red blood cells and the environment of the reaction. Intermolecular forces are involved in agglutination with cell clumping occurring when the aggregation force is greater than the force of repulsion. Repulsive force is generated by negative charges on the red blood cell surface that occur due to the presence of the carboxyl group of sialic acids in the cell membrane; these charges create a repulsive electric zeta potential between cells. In transfusion services, specific solutions are used to improve hemagglutination, including enzymes that reduce the negative charge of red blood cells, LISS which improves the binding of antibodies to antigens and macromolecules that decrease the distance between erythrocytes. The specificity and sensitivity of immunohematological reactions depend directly on the appropriate use of these solutions. Knowledge of the electrical properties of red blood cells and of the action of enhancement solutions can contribute to the immunohematology practice in transfusion services.

  12. Human umbilical cord blood cells and diabetes mellitus: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil; Kuppasani, Kishore; Ende, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for patients with diabetes is an area of great interest to both scientists and clinicians. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) are being increasingly used as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapy for diabetes because these cells can differentiate into pancreatic islet β-cells. Administration of HUCBCs has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. The use of autologous HUCBC transfusion in type 1 diabetic children has not shown any benefit. However, "Stem Cell Educator" therapy has shown promise in long term lowering of blood glucose levels in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent advances in HUCBC therapy in the treatment of diabetes and some of its complications.

  13. Amyloid β Levels in Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Satoh, Akira; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs) to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid) to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging), implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402 PMID:23166730

  14. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  15. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping;

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this techno...

  16. Characterization of the Duffy-Binding-Like Domain of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage Antigen 332

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Nilsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Pf332, a major Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage antigen, have largely been hampered by the cross-reactive nature of antibodies generated against the molecule due to its high content of repeats, which are present in other malaria antigens. We previously reported the identification of a conserved domain in Pf332 with a high degree of similarity to the Duffy-binding-like (DBL domains of the erythrocyte-binding-like (EBL family. We here describe that antibodies towards Pf332-DBL are induced after repeated exposure to P. falciparum and that they are acquired early in life in areas of intense malaria transmission. Furthermore, a homology model of Pf332-DBL was found to be similar to the structure of the EBL-DBLs. Despite their similarities, antibodies towards Pf332-DBL did not display any cross-reactivity with EBL-proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blotting, and peptide microarray. Thus the DBL domain is an attractive region to use in further studies on the giant Pf332 molecule.

  17. Rifins, rosetting, and red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Christian W; Hviid, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The binding of multiple uninfected erythrocytes to a central malaria parasite-infected erythrocyte (IE) is called rosetting. Rosetting has been associated with severe disease, but its functional significance,and the host receptors and parasite ligands involved are only partially known. A recent s...

  18. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  19. Deep diving in the blood stem cell-ome

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaitzidis, Demetrios; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the functional distinctions between cells comprising the bone marrow has yielded fundamental insights into lineage ordering and drivers of blood cell production. A novel, highly granular and multi-dimensional molecular characterization of functional subsets of hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells recently published in Cell Stem Cell (Cabezas-Wallscheid et al, 2014) will serve as a landmark and treasure trove for unanticipated insights into basic biology and the development of fut...

  20. Antibody binding to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis cell fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Katherine A.; Bowden, George H.; Richmond, Dorothy A.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Cole, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine which cell fraction(s) of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 serve as the best source of antigens recognized by salivary SIgA antibodies in infants. Design Whole cells of 38 reference and wild-type isolates of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis, S. gordonii, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and E. faecalis were fractionated into cell walls CW), protease-treated cell walls (PTCW), cell membranes (CM) and cell protein (CP). Whole cells and these fractions were tested for binding by rabbit anti-S. mitis SK145 and anti-S. oralis SK100 sera, and also by salivary SIgA antibodies from infants and adults. Results Anti-SK145 and anti-SK100 sera bound whole cells and fractions of all strains of S. mitis and S. oralis variably. Cluster analysis of antibody binding data placed the strains into S. mitis, S. oralis and ‘Non-S. mitis/non-S. oralis’ clusters. Antigens from CW and CM best discriminated S. mitis from S. oralis. CM bound the most infant salivary SIgA antibody and PTCW bound the least. In contrast, adult salivary SIgA antibody bound all of the cell fractions and at higher levels. Conclusions Presumably the relatively short period of immune stimulation and immunological immaturity in infants, in contrast to adults, result in low levels of salivary SIgA antibody that preferentially bind CM of S. mitis but not PTCW. By utilizing isolated cell walls and membranes as sources of antigens for proteomics it may be possible to identify antigens common to oral streptococci and dissect the fine specificity of salivary SIgA antibodies induced by oral colonization by S. mitis. PMID:17904095

  1. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  2. Safety and radiation risks in the labelling of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk in the management of radioactive material and biological exposition to infectious agents. Protocols and normative to observe GOOD RADIOPHARMACY Practices. Main infectious agents that may be transmitted during preparation of a blood cell radiopharmaceutical. Problems of contamination

  3. Staphylococcal SSL5 binding to human leukemia cells inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells and platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; Boer, Ingrid G. J.; Kruizinga, Roeline; Verheul, Henk M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; de Haas, Carla J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5) was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share m

  4. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  5. Is red blood cell rheology preserved during routine blood bank storage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J.; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Red blood cell (RBC) units stored for more than 2 weeks at 4 degrees C are currently considered of impaired quality. This opinion has primarily been based on altered RBC rheologic properties (i.e., enhanced aggregability, reduced deformability, and elevated endothelial cell interaction),

  6. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  7. New method to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into insulin producing cells: Human hematosphere culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Yang, Ji Min; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Jae Hee; Kim, Joonoh; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-02-24

    Strategy to differentiate stem cells into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in vitro has been a promising one to get cell source of β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. It has been suggested that islets and neurons share features and nestin-positive cells could differentiate into IPCs. We have recently developed a three-dimensional culture system using human peripheral blood cells named as blood-born hematosphere (BBHS). Here we showed that most of BBHS were composed of nestin-positive cells. Under the four-stage differentiation protocol for IPCs, we plated nestin-positive BBHS onto fibronectin-coated dish. These cells form islet-like clusters and most of them expressed insulin. Pancreatic specific genes were turned on, such as transcription factors (Pdx-1, Ngn3 and Nkx6.1), genes related to endocrine function (Glut-2 and PC2) or β cell function (Kir6.2, SUR1). Furthermore islet differentiation was confirmed by dithizone (DTZ) staining to detect zinc ion which binds insulin protein within the cells. Finally, IPCs derived from BBHS showed capability to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Taken together, our novel protocol successfully induced islet-like human insulin producing cells out of BBHS. This strategy of ex vivo expansion of IPCs using BBHS provides an autologous therapeutic cell source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22310720

  8. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-Hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmM...

  9. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Andrés Penuela

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods: Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin and control (isotonic buffer solution was added. The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value 6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 µmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 µmol/L; p-value = 0.009. The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05, while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05. Conclusions: Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis.

  10. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  11. A Framework for White Blood Cell Segmentation in Microscopic Blood Images Using Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Seman Zainina; Abdul Kahar Badrul; Sadeghian Farnoosh; Ramli Abdul; Saripan M-Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of blood smear is a commonly clinical test these days. Most of the time, the hematologists are interested on white blood cells (WBCs) only. Digital image processing techniques can help them in their analysis and diagnosis. For example, disease like acute leukemia is detected based on the amount and condition of the WBC. The main objective of this paper is to segment the WBC to its two dominant elements: nucleus and cytoplasm. The segmentation is conducted using a proposed ...

  12. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  13. Blood cell manufacture: current methods and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2009-07-01

    Blood transfusion depends on availability of donor material, and concerns over supply and safety have spurred development of methods to manufacture blood from stem cells. Current methods could theoretically yield therapeutic doses of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets. However, due to the very large number of cells required to have any impact on supply (currently 10(19) RBC/year in the US), realization of routine manufacture faces significant challenges. Current yields are orders of magnitude too low for production of meaningful quantities, and the physical scale of the problem is a challenge in itself. We discuss these challenges in relation to current methods and how it might be possible to realize limited 'blood pharming' of neutrophils in the near future. PMID:19500866

  14. Blood cell manufacture: current methods and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2009-07-01

    Blood transfusion depends on availability of donor material, and concerns over supply and safety have spurred development of methods to manufacture blood from stem cells. Current methods could theoretically yield therapeutic doses of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets. However, due to the very large number of cells required to have any impact on supply (currently 10(19) RBC/year in the US), realization of routine manufacture faces significant challenges. Current yields are orders of magnitude too low for production of meaningful quantities, and the physical scale of the problem is a challenge in itself. We discuss these challenges in relation to current methods and how it might be possible to realize limited 'blood pharming' of neutrophils in the near future.

  15. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  16. Computational modeling of red blood cells: A symplectic integration algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2010-03-01

    Red blood cells can undergo shape transformations that impact the rheological properties of blood. Computational models have to account for the deformability and red blood cells are often modeled as elastically deformable objects. We present a symplectic integration algorithm for deformable objects. The surface is represented by a set of marker points obtained by surface triangulation, along with a set of fiber vectors that describe the orientation of the material plane. The various elastic energies are formulated in terms of these variables and the equations of motion are obtained by exact differentiation of a discretized Hamiltonian. The integration algorithm preserves the Hamiltonian structure and leads to highly accurate energy conservation, hence he method is expected to be more stable than conventional finite element methods. We apply the algorithm to simulate the shape dynamics of red blood cells.

  17. Following red blood cells in a pulmonary capillary

    CERN Document Server

    Mauroy, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The red blood cells or erythrocytes are biconcave shaped cells and consist mostly in a membrane delimiting a cytosol with a high concentration in hemoglobin. This membrane is highly deformable and allows the cells to go through narrow passages like the capillaries which diameters can be much smaller than red blood cells one. They carry oxygen thanks to hemoglobin, a complex molecule that have very high affinity for oxygen. The capacity of erythrocytes to load and unload oxygen is thus a determinant factor in their efficacy. In this paper, we will focus on the pulmonary capillary where red blood cells capture oxygen. We propose a camera method in order to numerically study the behavior of the red blood cell along a whole capillary. Our goal is to understand how erythrocytes geometrical changes along the capillary can affect its capacity to capture oxygen. The first part of this document presents the model chosen for the red blood cells along with the numerical method used to determine and follow their shapes a...

  18. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  19. The A0 blood group genotype modifies the jejunal glycomic binding pattern profile of piglets early associated with a simple or complex microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priori, D; Colombo, M; Koopmans, S-J; Jansman, A J M; van der Meulen, J; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif is an important determinant of the bacterial-host interaction and may be affected in pigs by gut microbiota and by blood group genotype. The aim was to study the effect of intestinal association with different microbiota and A0 blood group genotypes on the expressed glycomic pattern in the small intestine. Twelve caesarean-derived pigs previously associated with a simple association (SA) or complex association (CA) microbiota were selected at 26 to 37 d of age. In each subject, different jejunal loops were perfused for 8 h with enterotoxigenic K88 (ETEC), ETEC fimbriae (F4), (LAM), or a saline control. The piglets were genotyped for A0 blood group and the glycomic profile was evaluated by microscopic screening of lectin binding: peanut agglutinin (PNA), which is galactose specific; agglutinin I (UEA), which is fucose specific; lectin II (MALii), which is sialic acid specific; concavalin A, which is mannose specific; soybean agglutinin (SBA), which is -acetyl-galactosamine specific; and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which is -acetyl-glucosamine specific. A0 pigs had fewer UEA-positive cells, MALii-positive cells ( < 0.001), and SBA-positive cells ( < 0.10) than 00 pigs. Simple association pigs had more SBA positive cells ( < 0.01) than CA pigs. Enterotoxigenic K88-perfused intestinal loops had fewer UEA-positive cells ( < 0.01) and WGA positive cells ( < 0.001) cells and more PNA positive cells (only in SA pigs, < 0.01). No effects of introduction of F4 and LAM in the intestinal lumen were observed. The porcine A0 blood group genotype and the luminal presence of ETEC strongly affected the jejunal mucosa glycomic pattern profile whereas an early oral simple or complex microbial association had limited effects. Pig genetic background has relevance on the cross talk between intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif and ETEC and, ultimately, on the gut microbial colonization in later life. PMID:27065129

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3:22. CTV News 322 views 3:22 Stem Cell Therapy Injections - Duration: 6:18. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics 254,233 views 6:18 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 7:24. tannermom80 106,911 views ...

  1. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  2. Reduced binding of human antibodies to cells from GGTA1/CMAH KO pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlak, C; Paris, L L; Lutz, A J; Sidner, R A; Estrada, J; Li, P; Tector, M; Tector, A J

    2014-08-01

    Xenotransplantation using genetically modified pig organs could solve the donor organ shortage problem. Two inactivated genes that make humans unique from pigs are GGTA1 and CMAH, the products of which produce the carbohydrate epitopes, aGal and Neu5Gc that attract preformed human antibody. When the GGTA1 and CMAH genes were deleted in pigs, human antibody binding was reduced in preliminary analysis. We analyzed the binding of human IgM and IgG from 121 healthy human serum samples for binding to GGTA1 KO and GGTA1/CMAH KO peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We analyzed a sub population for reactivity toward genetically modified pig PBMCs as compared to chimpanzee and human PBMCs. Deletion of the GGTA1 and CMAH genes in pigs improved the crossmatch results beyond those observed with chimpanzees. Sorting the 121 human samples tested against the GGTA1/CMAH KO pig PBMCs did not reveal a distinguishing feature such as blood group, age or gender. Modification of genes to make pig carbohydrates more similar to humans has improved the crossmatch with human serum significantly.

  3. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.; Slijper, M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. T

  4. Rapid white blood cell detection for peritonitis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Mei, Zhe; Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    A point-of-care and home-care lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system that integrates a microfluidic spiral device as a concentrator with an optical-coding device as a cell enumerator is demonstrated. The LoC system enumerates white blood cells from dialysis effluent of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. The preliminary results show that the white blood cell counts from our system agree well with the results from commercial flow cytometers. The LoC system can potentially bring significant benefits to end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients that are on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

  5. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises.

  6. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frei Eva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by...

  7. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by albumin.

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ... use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are interested in ...

  9. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4∶10(2∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  10. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test. It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red blood cell alloantibodies. Material and methods. We analyzed the records of crossmatch results and antibody screening performed at the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina during 2012. Results. Antibodies were found in 103 patients: A 63 patients with single antibodies: 1 16 with antibodies of unknown specificity (3 autoantibodies, 13 alloantibodies; 2 39 with clinically significant antibodies (23 from Rh system (2 anti-C, 2 anti-D, 12 anti-E, 7 anti-c, 4 anti-K, 3 anti-Fya, 7 anti-Jka, 2 anti-S; 3 8 with usually not significant antibodies (6 anti-M, 1 anti-A1, 1 anti- Cw; B 40 patients developed multiple antibodies: 1 all patients had at least one clinically significant antibody from various blood group system (44 Rh, 13 Kell, 7 Kidd, 7 MNSs (S, s; 2 3 patients had usually not significant antibodies (1 Lewis, 2 Lutheran; 3 3 patients occasionally had clinically significant antibody (3 anti- Yta; 4 3 patients had antibodies of unknown specificity (2 autoantibodies, 1alloantibody. Antibodies detected in the majority of patients (65-63.1% had a specificity of Rh and/or the Kell system. Conclusions. The main goal of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing is to detect clinically significant antibodies. The provision of antigen negative blood units for those patients is a special challenge for blood establishments. Database with a sufficient number of typed blood donors can help to resolve this problem.

  11. In-vitro red blood cell partitioning of doxycycline

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, P.V.; Badgujar, P.C.; Gatne, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In-vitro red blood cell (RBC) partitioning of doxycycline was studied to determine whether doxycycline penetrates RBC and its concentration was assayed keeping in view its high lipophilicity. Materials and Methods: Standardization of doxycycline was performed in whole blood and plasma of cattle by microbiological assay using Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 as indicator organizm. Actual concentration of the drug was obtained by comparing zone inhibition with standard graph and the exte...

  12. The number of fetal cells in maternal blood is associated to exercise and fetal gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlütter, Jacob Mørup; Kirkegaard, Ida; Christensen, Connie Britta;

    activity was obtained by a questionnaire and a structured interview. The number of fcmbs was assessed in 30 mL blood processed by a proprietary method developed in-house. Fetal cells in the blood, binding to fetal cell specific antibodies, were initially isolated by magnetic cell sorting. The fetal cells...... were then stained with a cocktail of fetal cell-specific antibodies, identified and counted. Results: Participants carrying male fetuses had higher median number of fcmbs per 30 mL blood than those carrying female fetuses (5 vs. 3, p=0.004). Exercise within 3 hours (1.5 vs. 4, p=0.02) and 24 hours (2...... vs. 4, p=0.06) decreased the number of fcmbs, whereas coitus the evening before increased the number (4 vs. 3, p=0.11). Conclusion: The number of fcmbs is affected by normal activities. This should be taken into account when planning collection of fetal cells in connection for prenatal diagnosis...

  13. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  14. Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood Smear Using Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count is a valuable metric for assisting with diagnosis or prognosis of various diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or infection. Counting WBCs can be done either manually or automatically. Automatic methods are capable of counting a large number of cells to give a statistically more accurate reading of the WBC count of a sample, but the specialized equipment tends to be expensive. Manual methods are inexpensive since they only involve a convention...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Patient-Centered Approach - Duration: 4:12. NCIcancertopics 3,087 views 4:12 The Truth About Cord ... 19 Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 1,127 views 3:35 Two ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... views 4:25 Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells - Duration: 14:59. TED 55, ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript 6,983 views ... Stem Cell Therapy Injections - Duration: 6:18. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics 234,106 views 6:18 ...

  18. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor); (LBNL)

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars;

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......, we show that a 5.0 kb CD44 mRNA contained multiple IMP-binding sites in its 3'UTR, and following IMP depletion this species became unstable. Direct knockdown of the CD44 transcript mimicked the effect of IMPs on invadopodia, and we infer that CD44 mRNA stabilization may be involved in IMP...

  20. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Stephen F.; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of solub...

  1. Whole blood-oxygen binding properties of four cold-temperate marine fishes: blood affinity is independent of pH-dependent binding, routine swimming performance, and environmental hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Neill A; Skov, Peter V; Wells, Rufus M G;

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between whole blood-oxygen affinity (P(50)) and pH-dependent binding (i.e., cooperativity and the Bohr [ Phi ] and Root effects) was examined statistically under standardized conditions (10.0 degrees Celsius) in four unrelated cold-temperate marine fishes that differ widely in...... swimming performance and the predicted low O(2) response of each species. The ecotype of the four marine species was also unrelated to pH-dependent binding because no difference in the Bohr effect was apparent ( Phi varied insignificantly from -0.90 to -1.06), and differences in the magnitude of the...... their swimming performance and their expected responses to hypoxia: cod (Gadus morhua), herring (Clupea harengus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus), and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). An unexpected difference in blood-oxygen affinity was found (herring>plaice>mackerel>cod), and this was independent of both...

  2. Detection of hepatitis B virus DNA in mononuclear blood cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Pontisso, P; Poon, M C; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C

    1984-01-01

    The Southern transfer hybridisation technique was used to test mononuclear blood cells for hepatitis B virus DNA. Viral DNA sequences were detected in mononuclear cells of 10 out of 16 patients with hepatitis B virus infection and in none of 21 normal controls. Blood contamination was excluded by the absence of hepatitis B virus DNA in the corresponding serum samples in all cases. Free monomeric hepatitis B virus DNA was found in three patients positive for hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg) and on...

  3. Histomorphometric study on blood cells in male adult ostrich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Tadjalli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform a histomorphometric study of blood cells in male adult ostrich, blood samples were obtained from jugular vein of 10 clinically healthy male adult ostriches (2 - 3 years old. The slides were stained with the Giemsa methods and the smears were evaluated for cellular morphology, with cellular size being determined by micrometry. The findings of this study revealed that the shape of the cell, cytoplasm and nucleus of erythrocytes in male adult ostriches were similar to those in other birds such as quails, chickens, Iranian green-head ducks.

  4. Binding and Clustering of Glycosaminoglycans: A Common Property of Mono- and Multivalent Cell-Penetrating Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations in cell culture provide evidence that negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at the surface of biological cells bind cationic cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) and cluster during CPC binding, thereby contributing to their endocytotic uptake. The GAG binding and clustering occur in the low-micromolar concentration range and suggest a tight interaction between GAGs and CPCs, although the relation between binding affinity and specificity of this interaction remains to b...

  5. Designer blood: creating hematopoietic lineages from embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Abby L.; Stachura, David L.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit the remarkable capacity to become virtually any differentiated tissue upon appropriate manipulation in culture, a property that has been beneficial for studies of hematopoiesis. Until recently, the majority of this work used murine ES cells for basic research to elucidate fundamental properties of blood-cell development and establish methods to derive specific mature lineages. Now, the advent of human ES cells sets the stage for more applied pursuits to generate transplantable cells for treating blood disorders. Current efforts are directed toward adapting in vitro hematopoietic differentiation methods developed for murine ES cells to human lines, identifying the key interspecies differences in biologic properties of ES cells, and generating ES cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to repopulate adult hosts. The ultimate medical goal is to create patient-specific and generic ES cell lines that can be expanded in vitro, genetically altered, and differentiated into cell types that can be used to treat hematopoietic diseases. PMID:16254136

  6. Analysis of zinc oxide nanoparticles binding proteins in rat blood and brain homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim KH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyu Hwan Shim,1 John Hulme,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Seong Soo A An1 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 2Department of Analysis, KTR, Kimpo, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and electronic products. Nevertheless, limited safety information is available for many NPs, especially in terms of their interactions with various binding proteins, leading to potential toxic effects. Zinc oxide (ZnO NPs are included in the formulation of new products, such as adhesives, batteries, ceramics, cosmetics, cement, glass, ointments, paints, pigments, and supplementary foods, resulting in increased human exposures to ZnO. Hence, we investigated the potential ZnO nanotoxic pathways by analyzing the adsorbed proteins, called protein corona, from blood and brain from four ZnO NPs, ZnOSM20(-, ZnOSM20(+, ZnOAE100(-, and ZnOAE100(+, in order to understand their potential mechanisms in vivo. Through this study, liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy technology was employed to identify all bound proteins. Totals of 52 and 58 plasma proteins were identified as being bound to ZnOSM20(- and ZnOSM20(+, respectively. For ZnOAE100(- and ZnOAE100(+, 58 and 44 proteins were bound, respectively. Similar numbers of proteins were adsorbed onto ZnO irrespective of size or surface charge of the nanoparticle. These proteins were further analyzed with ClueGO, a Cytoscape plugin, which provided gene ontology and the biological interaction processes of identified proteins. Interactions between diverse proteins and ZnO nanoparticles could result in an alteration of their functions, conformation, and clearance, eventually affecting many biological processes. Keywords: brain

  7. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  8. Separation of cancer cells from white blood cells by pinched flow fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant; Ashley, Neil; Koprowska, Kamila;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the microfluidic size-separation technique pinched flow fractionation (PFF) is used to separate cancer cells from white blood cells (WBCs). The cells are separated at efficiencies above 90% for both cell types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are found in the blood of cancer patients...... is challenged by the size overlap between cancer cells and the 106 times more abundant WBCs. The size overlap prevents high efficiency separation, however we demonstrate that cell deformability can be exploited in PFF devices to gain higher efficiencies than expected from the size distribution of the cells....

  9. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  10. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, D E; Nadejde, C; Curecheriu, L [' Al. I. Cuza' University, Faculty of Physics, 11A Blvd. Carol I, Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: dorinacreanga@yahoo.com; Culea, M [' Babes Bolyai' University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Oancea, S [University of Veterinary Medicine ' I. Ionescu de la Brad' , Iasi (Romania); Racuciu, M [' Lucian Blaga' University, Sibiu (Romania)

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm{sup -1} or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  11. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-digoxin binding by neural cells in the medulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traurig, H.H.; Bhagat, A.; Bass, N.H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to localize binding sites for the cardiac glycoside digoxin in the medulla of the rat in vivo. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected (IV) with /sup 3/H-digoxin and killed 30 minutes later. Autoradiographs of medullas showed evidence of /sup 3/H-digoxin binding to small- and medium-sized neural cells in the regions of the nucleus solitarius, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, area postrema, and in the zone between the area postrema and the underlying neuropil. However, the parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus were not labeled. The /sup 3/H-digoxin-labeled cells in the medulla were located mainly in the commissural and medial portions of nucleus solitarius at the level of the area postrema. Animals injected with unlabeled digoxin followed by /sup 3/H-digoxin showed reduced binding of radioactivity. The small- and medium-sized neurons of the caudal portions of the nucleus solitarius are internuncial in position with respect to cardiovascular afferents of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves and sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular efferent neurons of the medulla. The results of this study suggest that these /sup 3/H-digoxin-labeled cells, presumably neurons of nucleus solitarius, may possess high affinity binding sites for digoxin. Further, the area postrema, which lacks a blood-brain barrier, may provide a portal of entry for /sup 3/H-digoxin into regions of the medulla known to contain neurons that play a role in the regulation of cardiac rhythm.

  12. Antibody-Conjugated Paramagnetic Nanobeads: Kinetics of Bead-Cell Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Waseem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific labelling of target cell surfaces using antibody-conjugated paramagnetic nanobeads is essential for efficient magnetic cell separation. However, studies examining parameters determining the kinetics of bead-cell binding are scarce. The present study determines the binding rates for specific and unspecific binding of 150 nm paramagnetic nanobeads to highly purified target and non-target cells. Beads bound to cells were enumerated spectrophotometrically. Results show that the initial bead-cell binding rate and saturation levels depend on initial bead concentration and fit curves of the form A(1 − exp(−kt. Unspecific binding within conventional experimental time-spans (up to 60 min was not detectable photometrically. For CD3-positive cells, the probability of specific binding was found to be around 80 times larger than that of unspecific binding.

  13. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  14. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. PMID:26996518

  15. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future.

  16. A spectral and morphologic method for white blood cell classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Chang, Li; Zhou, Mei; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Guo, Fangmin

    2016-10-01

    The identification of white blood cells is important as it provides an assay for diagnosis of various diseases. To overcome the complexity and inaccuracy of traditional methods based on light microscopy, we proposed a spectral and morphologic method based on hyperspectral blood images. We applied mathematical morphology-based methods to extract spatial information and supervised method is employed for spectral analysis. Experimental results show that white blood cells could be segmented and classified into five types with an overall accuracy of more than 90%. Moreover, the experiments including spectral features reached higher accuracy than the spatial-only cases, with a maximum improvement of nearly 20%. By combing both spatial and spectral features, the proposed method provides higher classification accuracy than traditional methods.

  17. Mechanopathology of red blood cell diseases—Why mechanics matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    During the onset of a disease a cell may experience alterations in both the composition and organization of its cellular and molecular structures.These alterations may eventually lead to changes in its geometrical and mechanical properties such as cell size and shape,deformability and adhesion.As such,knowing how diseased cells respond to mechanical forces can reveal ways by which they differ from healthy ones.Here,we will present biomechanistic insights into red blood cell related diseases that manifest...

  18. RBCs and Parasites Segmentation from Thin Smear Blood Cell Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal V. Panchbhai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Manually examine the blood smear for the detection of malaria parasite consumes lot of time for trend pathologists. As the computational power increases, the role of automatic visual inspection becomes more important. An automated system is therefore needed to complete as much work as possible for the identification of malaria parasites. The given scheme based on used of RGB color space, G layer processing, and segmentation of Red Blood Cells (RBC as well as cell parasites by auto-thresholding with offset value and use of morphological processing. The work compare with the manual results obtained from the pathology lab, based on total RBC count and cells parasite count. The designed system successfully detects malaria parasites and RBC cells in thin smear image.

  19. Shear stress-induced improvement of red blood cell deformability

    OpenAIRE

    Meram, Ece; Yılmaz, Bahar D.; Bas, Ceren; Atac, Nazlı; Yalçın, Ö.; Başkurt, Oguz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, it is known that red blood cell (RBC) deformability is determined by the geometric and material properties of these cells. Experimental evidence accumulated during the last decade has introduced the concept of active regulation of RBC deformability. This regulation is mainly related to altered associations between membrane skeletal proteins and integral proteins, with the latter serving to anchor the skeleton to the lipid matrix. It has been hypothesized that shear stress induces...

  20. Hypoxia, hormones, and red blood cell function in chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stefanie; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2003-04-01

    The red blood cell function of avian embryos is regulated by cAMP. Adenosine A(2A) and beta-adrenergic receptor activation during hypoxic conditions cause changes in the hemoglobin oxygen affinity and CO(2) transport. Furthermore, experimental evidence suggests a general involvement of cAMP in terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts.

  1. Red Blood Cell Spectrin Skeleton in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Breton, Catherine; Abkarian, Manouk

    2016-02-01

    Das et al. recently reported a role for the major merozoite surface protein MSP1 in malarial parasite egress from the red blood cell (RBC). On the basis of these new data and physical considerations, we propose an updated model for the main steps of this essential process for parasite proliferation. PMID:26652974

  2. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  3. Automated counting of white blood cells in synovial fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jonge (Robert); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); M. Smit (Marij); M. de Frankrijker-Merkestijn; R.J. Dolhain; J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of automated leucocyte (white blood cell; WBC) counting by comparison with manual counting. METHODS: The number of WBC was determined in heparinized synovial fluid samples by the use of (i) a standard urine cytometer (Kova) and a

  4. The effects of cryopreservation on red blood cell rheologic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Lagerberg, Johan W. M.; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In transfusion medicine, frozen red blood cells (RBCs) are an alternative for liquid-stored RBCs. Little is known about the rheologic properties (i.e., aggregability and deformability) of thawed RBCs. In this study the rheologic properties of high-glycerol frozen RBCs and postthaw stored

  5. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S;

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  6. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-01

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  7. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  8. Natural Antioxidants Improve Red Blood Cell “Survival” in Non-Leukoreduced Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Kucherenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood collected in an anticoagulant can be kept refrigerated in an unmodified state within 5 - 6 weeks. Oxidative damage is considered to be a one of the major factors contributing to the development of storage lesions. Lipid and membrane proteins oxidation results in changes in cation gradients that affect the cell survival. Aim: In the present study we used the natural antioxidants and ion channels blockers (L-carnosine, spermine, phloretin and their mixtures to prolong “survival” of red blood cells (RBCs, measured as the lack of PS exposure and cell hemolysis, in the Alsever's preservative solution upon hypothermic storage. Results: We show that the mixture of carnosine (20 mM, spermine (20 µM and phloretin (100 µM effectively blunted phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Ca2+ accumulation and RBCs hemolysis in non-leukoreduced low (∼2% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage as well as after 1 day of post-storage incubation of the stored cells in physiological saline solution. In addition, a slight but significant decrease in PS exposure was observed in non-leukoreduced high (∼20% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage with the mixture of substances. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of the mixture of natural antioxidants (carnosine, spermine, and phloretin as an additive to blood preservative solution provides better RBCs storage and “survival”.

  9. Multiscale modeling of red blood cell mechanics and blood flow in malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Fedosov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells (RBCs infected by a Plasmodium parasite in malaria may lose their membrane deformability with a relative membrane stiffening more than ten-fold in comparison with healthy RBCs leading to potential capillary occlusions. Moreover, infected RBCs are able to adhere to other healthy and parasitized cells and to the vascular endothelium resulting in a substantial disruption of normal blood circulation. In the present work, we simulate infected RBCs in malaria using a multiscale RBC model based on the dissipative particle dynamics method, coupling scales at the sub-cellular level with scales at the vessel size. Our objective is to conduct a full validation of the RBC model with a diverse set of experimental data, including temperature dependence, and to identify the limitations of this purely mechanistic model. The simulated elastic deformations of parasitized RBCs match those obtained in optical-tweezers experiments for different stages of intra-erythrocytic parasite development. The rheological properties of RBCs in malaria are compared with those obtained by optical magnetic twisting cytometry and by monitoring membrane fluctuations at room, physiological, and febrile temperatures. We also study the dynamics of infected RBCs in Poiseuille flow in comparison with healthy cells and present validated bulk viscosity predictions of malaria-infected blood for a wide range of parasitemia levels (percentage of infected RBCs with respect to the total number of cells in a unit volume.

  10. 78 FR 47714 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises... Advancing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies. The Council also will...

  11. 78 FR 23571 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the Secretary of the... Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies. The Council will also hear presentations...

  12. Ice-Binding Protein Derived from Glaciozyma Can Improve the Viability of Cryopreserved Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Jun; Shim, Hye Eun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kang, Yong-Cheol; Hur, Young Baek

    2015-12-28

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) can inhibit ice recrystallization (IR), a major cause of cell death during cryopreservation. IBPs are hypothesized to improve cell viability after cryopreservation by alleviating the cryoinjury caused by IR. In our previous studies, we showed that supplementation of the freezing medium with the recombinant IBP of the Arctic yeast Glaciozyma sp. (designated as LeIBP) could reduce post-thaw hemolysis of human red blood cells and increase the survival of cryopreserved diatoms. Here, we showed that LeIBP could improve the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells. Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), human preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. These mammalian cells were frozen in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/fetal bovine serum (FBS) solution with or without 0.1 mg/ml LeIBP at a cooling rate of -1°C/min in a -80°C freezer overnight. The minimum effective concentration (0.1 mg/ml) of LeIBP was determined, based on the viability of HeLa cells after treatment with LeIBP during cryopreservation and the IR inhibition assay results. The post-thaw viability of mammalian cells was examined. In all cases, cell viability was significantly enhanced by more than 10% by LeIBP supplementation in 5% DMSO/5% FBS: viability increased by 20% for HeLa cells, 28% for NIH/3T3 cells, 21% for MC3T3-E1, 10% for CHO-K1, and 20% for HaCaT. Furthermore, addition of LeIBP reduced the concentrations of toxic DMSO and FBS down to 5%. Therefore, we demonstrated that LeIBP can increase the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells by inhibiting IR.

  13. Proteolytically stabilizing fibronectin without compromising cell and gelatin binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy Wangechi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive proteolytic degradation of fibronectin (FN) has been implicated in impaired tissue repair in chronic wounds. We previously reported two strategies for stabilizing FN against proteolytic degradation; the first conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG) through cysteine residues and the second conjugated PEG chains of varying molecular weight on lysine residues. PEGylation of FN via lysine residues resulted in increased resistance to proteolysis with increasing PEG size, but an overall decrease in biological activity, as characterized by cell and gelatin binding. Our latest method to stabilize FN against proteolysis masks functional regions in the protein during lysine PEGylation. FN is PEGylated while it is bound to gelatin Sepharose beads with 2, 5, and 10 kDa PEG precursors. This results in partially PEGylated FN that is more stable than native FN and whose proteolytic stability increases with PEG molecular weight. Unlike completely PEGylated FN, partially PEGylated FN has cell adhesion, gelatin binding, and matrix assembly responses that are comparable to native FN. This is new evidence of how PEGylation variables can be used to stabilize FN while retaining its activity. The conjugates developed herein can be used to dissect molecular mechanisms mediated by FN stability and functionality, and address the problem of FN degradation in chronic wounds.

  14. Clustering of adhesion receptors following exposure of insect blood cells to foreign surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, James B; Zhuang, Shufei; Pilas, Barbara; Bee, Charles Mark; Kanost, Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses of insects involve interactions of two main classes of blood cells (hemocytes) known as granular cells and plasmatocytes. In response to a foreign surface, these hemocytes suddenly transform from circulating, non-adherent cells to cells that interact and adhere to each other and the foreign surface. This report presents evidence that during this adhesive transformation the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins lacunin and a ligand for peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin are released by granular cells and bind to surfaces of both granular cells and plasmatocytes. ECM protein co-localizes on cell surfaces with the adhesive receptors integrin and neuroglian, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ECM protein(s) secreted by granular cells are hypothesized to interact with adhesion receptors such as neuroglian and integrin by cross linking and clustering them on hemocyte surfaces. This clustering of receptors is known to enhance the adhesiveness (avidity) of interacting mammalian immune cells. The formation of ring-shaped clusters of these adhesion receptors on surfaces of insect immune cells represents an evolutionary antecedent of the mammalian immunological synapse. PMID:15894002

  15. The Laminin 511/521 Binding Site on the Lutheran Blood Group Glycoprotein is Located at theFlexible Junction of Ig Domains 2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankelow, Tosti J.; Burton, Nicholas; Stedansdottir, Fanney O.; Spring, Frances A.; Parsons, Stephen F.; Pesersen, Jan S.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Lammie, Donna; Wess, Timothy; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.; Brady, R. Leo; Anstee, David J.

    2007-07-01

    The Lutheran blood group glycoprotein, first discovered on erythrocytes, is widely expressed in human tissues. It is a ligand for the {alpha}5 subunit of Laminin 511/521, an extracellular matrix protein. This interaction may contribute to vasocclusive events that are an important cause of morbidity in sickle cell disease. Using X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering and site directed mutagenesis we show that the extracellular region of Lutheran forms an extended structure with a distinctive bend between the second and third immunoglobulin-like domains. The linker between domains 2 and 3 appears to be flexible and is a critical determinant in maintaining an overall conformation for Lutheran that is capable of binding to Laminin. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Asp312 of Lutheran and the surrounding cluster of negatively charged residues in this linker region form the Laminin binding site. Unusually, receptor binding is therefore not a function of the domains expected to be furthermost from the plasma membrane. These studies imply that structural flexibility of Lutheran may be essential for its interaction with Laminin and present a novel opportunity for the development of therapeutics for sickle cell disease.

  16. Angiostatin binds ATP synthase on the surface of human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Tammy L.; Stack, M. Sharon; Asplin, Iain; Enghild, Jan J; Højrup, Peter; Everitt, Lorraine; Hubchak, Susan; Schnaper, H. William; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent antagonist of angiogenesis and an inhibitor of endothelial cell migration and proliferation. To determine whether the mechanism by which angiostatin inhibits endothelial cell migration and/or proliferation involves binding to cell surface plasminogen receptors, we isolated the binding proteins for plasminogen and angiostatin from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Binding studies demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin...

  17. Differentiation of Human Cord Blood and Stromal Derived Stem Cells into Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Pamukçu Baran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The most basic properties of stem cells are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into multiple cell or tissue types. Umbilical cord blood has been utilized for human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an alternative source to bone marrow.The experiments show that Wharton’s jelly cells are easily attainable and can be expanded in vitro, maintained in culture, and induced to differentiate into neural cells. Almost recent studies it has been discovered that the cord blood-derived cells can differantiate not only to blood cells but also to various somatic cells like neuron or muscle cell with the signals taken from the envoirenment.Interestingly, neural cells obtained from umbilical cord blood show a relatively high spontaneous differentiation into oligodendrocytes, Embryonic stem cells proliferate indefinitely and can differentiate spontaneously into all tissue types.It has been shown that embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons and glia by treatment with retinoic acid or basic fibroblast growth factor. It has been studied that the diseases as Motor Neuron Disease, Parkinson, Alzheimer and degeneration of medulla spinalis and also paralysises could be treated with transplantation of cord blood-dericed stem cells.

  18. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  19. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  20. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  1. Generation of suppressive blood cells for control of allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Christian; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Jiga, Lucian; Dittmar, Laura; Mohr, Elisabeth; Greil, Johann; Mier, Walter; Becker, Luis E; Lang, Peter; Opelz, Gerhard; Terness, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies in rats showed that incubation of monocytic dendritic cells (DCs) with the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C (MMC) renders the cells immunosuppressive. Donor-derived MMC-DCs injected into the recipient prior to transplantation prolonged heart allograft survival. Although the generation of DCs is labour-intensive and time-consuming, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be easily harvested. In the present study, we analyse under which conditions DCs can be replaced by PBMCs and examine their mode of action. When injected into rats, MMC-incubated donor PBMCs (MICs) strongly prolonged heart allograft survival. Removal of monocytes from PBMCs completely abrogated their suppressive effect, indicating that monocytes are the active cell population. Suppression of rejection was donor-specific. The injected MICs migrated into peripheral lymphoid organs and led to an increased number of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) markers CD4 and CD25 and forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3). Tolerance could be transferred to syngeneic recipients with blood or spleen cells. Depletion of Tregs from tolerogenic cells abrogated their suppressive effect, arguing for mediation of immunosuppression by CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Tregs. Donor-derived MICs also prolonged kidney allograft survival in pigs. MICs generated from donor monocytes were applied for the first time in humans in a patient suffering from therapy-resistant rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant. We describe, in the present paper, a simple method for in vitro generation of suppressor blood cells for potential use in clinical organ transplantation. Although the case report does not allow us to draw any conclusion about their therapeutic effectiveness, it shows that MICs can be easily generated and applied in humans.

  2. A comparison of the rest complex binding patterns in embryonic stem cells and epiblast stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Seki

    Full Text Available We detected and characterized the binding sites of the representative Rest complex components Rest, Sin3A, and Lsd1. We compared their binding patterns in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells and epiblast stem (EpiS cells. We found few Rest sites unique to the EpiS cells. The ES-unique site features were distinct from those of the common sites, namely, the signal intensities were weaker, and the characteristic gene function categories differed. Our analyses showed that the Rest binding sites do not always overlap with the Sin3A and Lsd1 binding sites. The Sin3A binding pattern differed remarkably between the ES and EpiS cells and was accompanied by significant changes in acetylated-histone patterns in the surrounding regions. A series of transcriptome analyses in the same cell types unexpectedly showed that the putative target gene transcript levels were not dramatically different despite dynamic changes in the Rest complex binding patterns and chromatin statuses, which suggests that Rest is not the sole determinant of repression at its targets. Nevertheless, we identified putative Rest targets with explicitly enhanced transcription upon Rest knock-down in 143 and 60 common and ES-unique Rest target genes, respectively. Among such sites, several genes are involved in ES cell proliferation. In addition, we also found that long, intergenic non-coding RNAs were apparent Rest targets and shared similar features with the protein-coding target genes. Interestingly, such non-coding target genes showed less conservation through evolution than protein-coding targets. As a result of differences in the components and targets of the Rest complex, its functional roles may differ in ES and EpiS cells.

  3. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  4. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was perfo...

  5. A statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model for the survival time of red blood cells (RBCs) with a continuous distribution of cell lifespans is presented. The underlying distribution of RBC lifespans is derived from a probability density function with a bathtub-shaped hazard curve, and accounts for death of RBCs due to senescence (age-dependent increasing hazard rate) and random destruction (constant hazard), as well as for death due to initial or delayed failures and neocytolysis (equivalent to early red cell mortality). The model yields survival times similar to those of previously published studies of RBC survival and is easily amenable to inclusion of drug effects and haemolytic disorders. PMID:20950630

  6. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  7. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  8. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors. PMID:20101907

  9. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors.

  10. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool. PMID:21096766

  11. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex. PMID:11787717

  12. Pleomorphic Structures in Human Blood Are Red Blood Cell-Derived Microparticles, Not Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Adam J.; Gray, Warren D.; Schroeder, Max; Yi, Hong; Taylor, Jeannette V.; Dillard, Rebecca S.; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Stephens, David; Roback, John D.; Searles, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are a common, life-saving therapy for many patients, but they have also been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We identified unusual, pleomorphic structures in human RBC transfusion units by negative-stain electron microscopy that appeared identical to those previously reported to be bacteria in healthy human blood samples. The presence of viable, replicating bacteria in stored blood could explain poor outcomes in transfusion recipients and have major implications for transfusion medicine. Here, we investigated the possibility that these structures were bacteria. Results Flow cytometry, miRNA analysis, protein analysis, and additional electron microscopy studies strongly indicated that the pleomorphic structures in the supernatant of stored RBCs were RBC-derived microparticles (RMPs). Bacterial 16S rDNA PCR amplified from these samples were sequenced and was found to be highly similar to species that are known to commonly contaminate laboratory reagents. Conclusions These studies suggest that pleomorphic structures identified in human blood are RMPs and not bacteria, and they provide an example in which laboratory contaminants may can mislead investigators. PMID:27760197

  13. Pyruvate effects on red blood cells during in vitro cardiopulmonary bypass with dogs' blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, DaMing; Tan, HongJing; Cai, HuiJun; Zhou, FangQiang

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the effects of pyruvate (Pyr) on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) in red blood cells (RBCs) during the cardiopulmonary bypass procedure (CPB), blood, 500 mL, was collected from each of 10 healthy dogs (weight 12-18 kg). The blood was divided into two parts (250 mL each) and randomly assigned into the control group (Group C, n = 10) or the Pyr group (Group P, n = 10). The blood was commingled with an equal volume of 0.9% NaCl and pyruvated isotonic solution (Pyr 50 mM) in the extracorporeal circuit in the two groups, respectively. The CPB procedure was fixed at 120 min, and the transferring flow was 4 L/min. Contents of ATP in RBCs, eNOS activities, and NO productions in plasma were measured before CPB and during CPB at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min in both groups. The ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production were not different prior to CPB between the two groups. A decline of ATP levels was shown in both groups but remained significantly higher in Group P than in Group C at the same time points during in vitro CPB (P dogs' RBCs in the ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production, in vitro, but Pyr effectively protected RBCs in these functions during CPB. Pyr would be clinically protective for RBCs during CPB.

  14. Synthesis and characterisation of glucose-functional glycopolymers and gold nanoparticles: study of their potential interactions with ovine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Laura E; Phillips, Daniel J; Deller, Robert C; Davies, Gemma-Louise; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions can assist with the targeting of polymer- and nano-delivery systems. However, some potential protein targets are not specific to a single cell type, resulting in reductions in their efficacy due to undesirable non-specific cellular interactions. The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) is expressed to different extents on most cells in the vasculature, including human red blood cells and on cancerous tissue. Glycosylated nanomaterials bearing glucose (or related) carbohydrates, therefore, could potentially undergo unwanted interactions with these transporters, which may compromise the nanomaterial function or lead to cell agglutination, for example. Here, RAFT polymerisation is employed to obtain well-defined glucose-functional glycopolymers as well as glycosylated gold nanoparticles. Agglutination and binding assays did not reveal any significant binding to ovine red blood cells, nor any haemolysis. These data suggest that gluco-functional nanomaterials are compatible with blood, and their lack of undesirable interactions highlights their potential for delivery and imaging applications.

  15. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  16. Red cell properties after different modes of blood transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Makhro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extend has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 hours of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin and citrate-based CPDA for two temperatures (4oC and room temperature were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination, red blood cell (RBC volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations and formation of micro vesicles, Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameter may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature. Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+ handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4oC. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using optimized shipment protocol the majority of parameters were stable within 24 hours, the condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for the as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  17. Red blood cell phenotype matching for various ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjie, Karafa S W; Tauscher, Craig D; van Buskirk, Camille M; Wong, Clare; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smith, Carin Y; Stubbs, James R

    2011-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic transfusion support are at risk of alloimmunization after red blood cell (RBC) transfusion because of a disparity between donor and recipient antigen profiles. This research explored the probability of obtaining an exact extended phenotype match between blood donors randomly selected from our institution and patients randomly selected from particular ethnic groups. Blood samples from 1,000 blood donors tested by molecular method were evaluated for the predicted phenotype distribution of Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS. A random subsample of 800 donor phenotypes was then evaluated for the probability of obtaining an exact match with respect to phenotype with a randomly selected patient from a particular ethnic group. Overall, there was a greater than 80 percent probability of finding an exact donor-recipient match for the K/k alleles in the Kell system. The probability ranged from 3 percent to 38 percent, depending on the ethnicity and disparities in phenotypic profiles, for the Rh, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems. A significant donor-recipient phenotype mismatch ratio exists with certain blood group antigens such that, with current routine ABO and D matching practices, recipients of certain ethnic groups are predisposed to alloimmunization. PMID:22356481

  18. Blood cell telomere length is a dynamic feature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Svenson

    Full Text Available There is a considerable heterogeneity in blood cell telomere length (TL for individuals of similar age and recent studies have revealed that TL changes by time are dependent on TL at baseline. TL is partly inherited, but results from several studies indicate that e.g. life style and/or environmental factors can affect TL during life. Collectively, these studies imply that blood cell TL might fluctuate during a life time and that the actual TL at a defined time point is the result of potential regulatory mechanism(s and environmental factors. We analyzed relative TL (RTL in subsequent blood samples taken six months apart from 50 individuals and found significant associations between RTL changes and RTL at baseline. Individual RTL changes per month were more pronounced than the changes recorded in a previously studied population analyzed after 10 years' follow up. The data argues for an oscillating TL pattern which levels out at longer follow up times. In a separate group of five blood donors, a marked telomere loss was demonstrated within a six month period for one donor where after TL was stabilized. PCR determined RTL changes were verified by Southern blotting and STELA (single telomere elongation length analysis. The STELA demonstrated that for the donor with a marked telomere loss, the heterogeneity of the telomere distribution decreased considerably, with a noteworthy loss of the largest telomeres. In summary, the collected data support the concept that individual blood cell telomere length is a dynamic feature and this will be important to recognize in future studies of human telomere biology.

  19. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  20. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lozano-Ojalvo

    Full Text Available The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs. The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit.

  1. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions (≥3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  2. The effect of neurotoxin on rabies virus binding to mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, D J; Phillips, R M

    1991-08-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to alpha bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin known to inhibit rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor located at the neuromuscular junction in muscle tissue. The total amount of 3H-CVS virus that bound to neurotoxin treated cells was separated into specific and non-specific binding using a cold competition assay. Comparison of untreated and neurotoxin treated cells demonstrated that the majority of cell-associated virus in untreated cells was of a specific nature whereas the majority of the cell-associated virus in neurotoxin treated cells was due to non-specific binding.

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxin induced mitogenesis: toxin binding and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxser, E S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1983-07-01

    The binding characteristics of 125I-labelled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (125I-SEA), a T-cell mitogen, to murine lymphoid cell subpopulations were analyzed. Both T- and B-lymphocytes from murine spleens possess specific binding sites for SEA, as do T-lymphocytes from thymus. B-lymphocytes appear to have a greater capacity for binding of 125-SEA than do T-lymphocytes from either thymus or spleen. Enterotoxin did not specifically bind to thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate cells (PECs), used as a source of macrophages. Adherent PECs however, incorporated 125-ISEA by fluid phase endocytosis. When exposed to SEA and thoroughly washed, macrophages stimulate lymphocyte mitogenesis in spleen or thymus cell cultures not directly exposed to toxin. Maximum mitogenic stimulation took place only when both PECs and lymphocytes were exposed to SEA. The presence of splenic B-lymphocytes enhanced the mitogenic response of thymus derived T-cells to SEA. Thus, B-lymphocytes appear to contribute to SEA mitogenesis. These data suggest that mitogenic stimulation and possibly other immunological phenomena associated with SEA occur as a result of complex interactions between cellular components of the immune system. PMID:6605472

  4. LGALS3BP, lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein, induces vascular endothelial growth factor in human breast cancer cells and promotes angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Enza; Tinari, Nicola; Semeraro, Daniela; Traini, Sara; Fichera, Imma; Cumashi, Albana; La Sorda, Rossana; Spinella, Francesca; Bagnato, Anna; Lattanzio, Rossano; D'Egidio, Maurizia; Di Risio, Annalisa; Stampolidis, Pavlos; Piantelli, Mauro; Natoli, Clara; Ullrich, Axel; Iacobelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum or tissue levels of lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) have been associated with short survival and development of metastasis in a variety of human cancers. However, the role of LGALS3BP, particularly in the context of tumor-host relationships, is still missing. Here, we show that LGALS3BP knockdown in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells leads to a decreased adhesion to fibronectin, a reduced transendothelial migration and, more importantly, a reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Production of VEGF, that was restored by exposure of silenced cells to recombinant LGALS3BP, required an intact PI3k/Akt signaling. Furthermore, we show that LGALS3BP was able to directly stimulate HUVEC tubulogenesis in a VEGF-independent, galectin-3-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis of human breast cancer tissues revealed a correlation among LGALS3BP expression, VEGF expression, and blood vessel density. We propose that in addition to its prometastatic role, LGALS3BP secreted by breast cancer cells functions critically as a pro-angiogenic factor through a dual mechanism, i.e by induction of tumor VEGF and stimulation of endothelial cell tubulogenesis.

  5. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David;

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding....

  6. Glucocorticoid receptors on leukemic cells as evidenced by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and 3H-dexamethasone binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of glucocorticoid receptors on the leukemic cells of 33 patients affected with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) and 6 patients affected with acute myeloic leukemia (AML) was investigated by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and [3H]-dexamethasone binding. The tests undertaken proved that after 20 hours of incubation 9 of 26 non-T-non-B-ALL (c-ALL and unclassified ALL) and 2 of AML were lysed with dexamethasone; blood lymphocytes and bone marrow leukocytes of healthy donors, however, were not affected. Non-T-non-B-ALL and AML were able to bind essentially more [3H]-dexamethasone than T-ALL. There existed no correlation between dexamethasone binding and dexamethasone-induced cytolysis. (author)

  7. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: In vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, G.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frydman, J.N.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Rocha, V.C.; Pereira, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99 m({sup 99m}Tc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  8. Proteins involved in invasion of human red blood cells by malaria parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jaśkiewicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium species. It is responsible for around 1-2 million deaths annually, mainly children under the age of 5. It occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas.Malaria is caused by five Plasmodium species:[i] P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. knowlesi[/i] and [i]P. ovale[/i]. Mosquitoes spread the disease by biting humans. The malaria parasite has two stages of development: the human stage and the mosquito stage. The first stage occurs in the human body and is divided into two phases: the liver phase and the blood phase.The invasion of erythrocytes by [i]Plasmodium[/i] merozoites is a multistep process of specific protein interactions between the parasite and red blood cell. The first step is the reversible merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte followed by its apical reorientation, then formation of an irreversible “tight” junction and finally entry into the red cell in a parasitophorous vacuole.The blood phase is supported by a number of proteins produced by the parasite. The merozoite surface GPI-anchored proteins (MSP-1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10 assist in the process of recognition of susceptible erythrocytes, apical membrane antigen (AMA-1 may be directly responsible for apical reorientation of the merozoite and apical proteins which function in tight junction formation. These ligands are members of two families: Duffy binding-like (DBL and reticulocyte binding-like (RBL proteins. In [i]Plasmodium[/i] [i]falciparum[/i] the DBL family includes: EBA-175, EBA-140 (BAEBL, EBA-181 (JESEBL, EBA-165 (PEBL and EBL-1 ligands.To date, no effective antimalarial vaccine has been developed, but there are several studies for this purpose. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of host cells invasion by parasites. Major efforts are focused on developing a multiantigenic and multiepitope vaccine preventing all steps of [i]Plasmodium[/i] invasion.

  9. Harvesting, processing and inventory management of peripheral blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijovic Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2003, 97% autologous transplants and 65% of allogeneic transplants in Europe used mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC. Soon after their introduction in the early 1990′s, PBSC were associated with faster haemopoietic recovery, fewer transfusions and antibiotic usage, and a shorter hospital stay. Furthermore, ease and convenience of PBSC collection made them more appealing than BM harvests. Improved survival has hitherto been demonstrated in patients with high risk AML and CML. However, the advantages of PBSC come at a price of a higher incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. In order to be present in the blood, stem cells undergo the process of "mobilisation" from their bone marrow habitat. Mobilisation, and its reciprocal process - homing - are regulated by a complex network of molecules on the surface of stem cells and stromal cells, and enzymes and cytokines released from granulocytes and osteoclasts. Knowledge of these mechanisms is beginning to be exploited for clinical purposes. In current practice, stem cell are mobilised by use of chemotherapy in conjunction with haemopoietic growth factors (HGF, or with HGF alone. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor has emerged as the single most important mobilising agent, due to its efficacy and a relative paucity of serious side effects. Over a decade of use in healthy donors has resulted in vast experience of optimal dosing and administration, and safety matters. PBSC harvesting can be performed on a variety of cell separators. Apheresis procedures are nowadays routine, but it is important to be well versed in the possible complications in order to avoid harm to the patient or donor. To ensure efficient collection, harvesting must begin when sufficient stem cells have been mobilised. A rapid, reliable, standardized blood test is essential to decide when to begin harvesting; currently, blood CD34+ cell counting by flow cytometry fulfils these criteria. Blood CD34+ cell counts strongly

  10. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on ...

  11. Flow of red blood cells in capillary networks

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Ana; Teixeira, Lúcia; Leble, Vladimir; Lima, R.; Ribeiro, António E.; Dias, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the flow of red blood cells through a column packed with soda lime glass spheres with diameter of 337.5 micron (pore diameter 150 micron). The ratio between the average velocity of the RBCs and the average velocity of the carrying fluid (physiological saline) was close to 0.9. The RBCs migrated faster through the column than the carrying fluid mainly due to a hydrodynamic chromatographic effect.

  12. Effect of Irradiation on Microparticles in Red Blood Cell Concentrates

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Yun, Seung Gyu; Koh, Young Eun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-01-01

    Changes in microparticles (MP) from red blood cell (RBC) concentrates in the context of irradiation have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how irradiation affects the number of MPs within transfusion components. Twenty RBC concentrates, within 14 days after donation, were exposed to gamma rays (dose rate: 25 cGy) from a cesium-137 irradiator. Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of MPs derived from RBC concentrates before and 24 hr after irradiation. The...

  13. SNPs in microRNA binding sites in 3'-UTRs of RAAS genes influence arterial blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nossent, Anne Yaël; Hansen, Jakob Liebe; Doggen, Carine;

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction.......We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction....

  14. Mechanisms tagging senescent red blood cells for clearance in healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBogdanova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the analysis and evaluation of the diverse senescence markers suggested to prime red blood cells (RBC for clearance in humans. These tags develop in the course of biochemical and structural alterations accompanying RBC aging, as the decrease of activities of multiple enzymes, the gradual accumulation of oxidative damage, the loss of membrane in form of microvesicles, the redistribution of ions and alterations in cell volume, density and deformability. The actual tags represent the penultimate galactosyl residues, revealed by desialylation of glycophorins, or the aggregates of the anion exchanger (band 3 protein to which anti-galactose antibodies bind in the first and anti-band 3 naturally occurring antibodies (NAbs in the second case. While anti-band 3 NAbs bind to the carbohydrate-free portion of band 3 aggreates in healthy humans, induced anti-lactoferrin antibodies bind to the carbohydrate-containing portion of band 3 and along with anti-band 3 NAbs may accelerated clearance of senescent RBC in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Exoplasmically accessible phosphatidylserine and the alterations in the interplay between CD47 on RBC and its receptor on macrophages, signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha protein, were also reported to induce erythrocyte clearance. We discuss the relevance of each mechanism and analyze the strength of the data.

  15. Protoporphyrin IX-induced structural and functional changes in human red blood cells, haemoglobin and myoglobin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susmita Sil; Tania Bose; Dibyendu Roy; Abhay Sankar Chakraborti

    2004-09-01

    Protoporphyrin IX and its derivatives are used as photosensitizers in the photodynamic therapy of cancer. Protoporphyrin IX penetrates into human red blood cells and releases oxygen from them. This leads to a change in the morphology of the cells. Spectrophotometric studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX interacts with haemoglobin and myoglobin forming ground state complexes. For both proteins, the binding affinity constant decreases, while the possible number of binding sites increases, as the aggregation state of the porphyrin is increased. The interactions lead to conformational changes of both haemoglobin and myoglobin as observed in circular dichroism studies. Upon binding with the proteins, protoporphyrin IX releases the heme-bound oxygen from the oxyproteins, which is dependent on the stoichiometric ratios of the porphyrin: protein. The peroxidase activities of haemoglobin and myoglobin are potentiated by the protein-porphyrin complexation. Possible mechanisms underlying the relation between the porphyrin-induced structural modifications of the heme proteins and alterations in their functional properties have been discussed. The findings may have a role in establishing efficacy of therapeutic uses of porphyrins as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as therapeutic agents.

  16. Protection of blood retinal barrier and systemic vasculature by insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagna P R Jarajapu

    Full Text Available Previously, we showed that insulin growth factor (IGF-1 binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, independent of IGF-1, reduces pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. The current study evaluates novel endothelium-dependent functions of IGFBP-3 including blood retinal barrier (BRB integrity and vasorelaxation. To evaluate vascular barrier function, either plasmid expressing IGFBP-3 under the regulation of an endothelial-specific promoter or a control plasmid was injected into the vitreous humor of mouse pups (P1 and compared to the non-injected eyes of the same pups undergoing standard OIR protocol. Prior to sacrifice, the mice were given an injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP. IGFBP-3 plasmid-injected eyes displayed near-normal vessel morphology and enhanced vascular barrier function. Further, in vitro IGFBP-3 protects retinal endothelial cells from VEGF-induced loss of junctional integrity by antagonizing the dissociation of the junctional complexes. To assess the vasodilatory effects of IGFBP-3, rat posterior cerebral arteries were examined in vitro. Intraluminal IGFBP-3 decreased both pressure- and serotonin-induced constrictions by stimulating nitric oxide (NO release that were blocked by L-NAME or scavenger receptor-B1 neutralizing antibody (SRB1-Ab. Both wild-type and IGF-1-nonbinding mutant IGFBP-3 (IGFBP-3NB stimulated eNOS activity/NO release to a similar extent in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. NO release was neither associated with an increase in intracellular calcium nor decreased by Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII blockade; however, dephosphorylation of eNOS-Thr(495 was observed. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activity and Akt-Ser(473 phosphorylation were both increased by IGFBP-3 and selectively blocked by the SRB1-Ab or PI3K blocker LY294002. In conclusion, IGFBP-3 mediates protective effects on BRB integrity and mediates robust NO release to stimulate

  17. Tissue engineering of blood vessels with endothelial cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN XU; MIN XIONG SHEN; DONG ZHU MA; LI YING WANG; XI LIANG ZHA

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells (TEC3 cells) derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were used as seed cells to construct blood vessels. Tissue engineered blood vessels were made by seeding 8 × l06 smooth muscle cells (SMCs) obtained from rabbit arteries onto a sheet of nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers, which was used as a biodegradable polymer scaffold. After being cultured in DMEM medium for 7 days in vitro, SMCs grew well on the PGA fibers, and the cell-PGA sheet was then wrapped around a silicon tube, and implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 6~8 weeks, the silicon tube was replaced with another silicon tube in smaller diameter, and then the TEC3 cells (endothelial cells differentiated from mouse ES cells) were injected inside the engineered vessel tube as the test group. In the control group only culture medium was injected. Five days later, the engineered vessels were harvested for gross observation, histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The preliminary results demonstrated that the SMC-PGA construct could form a tubular structure in 6~8 weeks and PGA fibers were completely degraded. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the newly formed tissue revealed a typical blood vessel structure, including a lining of endothelial cells (ECs) on the lumimal surface and the presence of SMC and collagen in the wall. No EC lining was found in the tubes of control group. Therefore, the ECs differentiated from mouse ES cells can serve as seed cells for endothelium lining in tissue engineered blood vessels.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. PMID:26149767

  19. 77 FR 22791 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises... Thawing and Washing, (4) Access to Transplantation, and (5) Advancing Hematopoietic Stem...

  20. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bonomi

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH, and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF and 42 poor responders (PR to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001 in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  1. Human growth hormone binding and stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in cloned rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 125I labelled human growth hormone to cloned insulin producing RIN-5AH cells is described. Binding was specific for somatotropic hormones since both human and rat growth hormone could compete for binding sites, whereas much higher concentrations of lactogenic hormones were needed to in...

  2. Biointerface: protein enhanced stem cells binding to implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, W; Kondyurin, A; Lee, Jae Ho; Lord, Megan S; Bilek, M M M; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-09-01

    The number of metallic implantable devices placed every year is estimated at 3.7 million. This number has been steadily increasing over last decades at a rate of around 8 %. In spite of the many successes of the devices the implantation of biomaterial into tissues almost universally leads to the development of an avascular sac, which consists of fibrous tissue around the device and walls off the implant from the body. This reaction can be detrimental to the function of implant, reduces its lifetime, and necessitates repeated surgery. Clearly, to reduce the number of revision surgeries and improve long-term implant function it is necessary to enhance device integration by modulating cell adhesion and function. In this paper we have demonstrated that it is possible to enhance stem cell attachment using engineered biointerfaces. To create this functional interface, samples were coated with polymer (as a precursor) and then ion implanted to create a reactive interface that aids the binding of biomolecules--fibronectin. Both AFM and XPS analyses confirmed the presence of protein layers on the samples. The amount of protein was significant greater for the ion implanted surfaces and was not disrupted upon washing with detergent, hence the formation of strong bonds with the interface was confirmed. While, for non ion implanted surfaces, a decrease of protein was observed after washing with detergent. Finally, the number of stem cells attached to the surface was enhanced for ion implanted surfaces. The studies presented confirm that the developed bionterface with immobilised fibronectin is an effective means to modulate stem cell attachment. PMID:22714559

  3. Development and application of resistive pulse spectroscopy: studies on the size, form and deformability of red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The following studies were conducted using the resistive pulse spectroscopy (RPS) technique: cumulative spectra and individual pulse forms for rigid latex polymer spheres; acquisition and analysis of RPS spectral data by means of special computer program; interaction of red blood cells with glutaraldehyde; membrane properties of erythrocytes undergoing abrupt osmotic hemolysis; reversible effects of the binding of chlorpromazine HCl at the red cell membrane surface; effects of high cholesterol diet on erythrocytes of guinea pigs; and multi-population analysis for a mixture of fetal and maternal red cells. (HLW)

  4. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  5. Cost-effective and Rapid Blood Analysis on a Cell-phone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongying; Sencan, Ikbal; Wong, Justin; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Tseng, Derek; Nagashima, Keita; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact and cost-effective imaging cytometry platform installed on a cell-phone for the measurement of the density of red and white blood cells as well as hemoglobin concentration in human blood samples. Fluorescent and bright-field images of blood samples are captured using separate optical attachments to the cell-phone and are rapidly processed through a custom-developed smart application running on the phone for counting of blood cells and determining hemoglobin density. W...

  6. The topology of plasminogen binding and activation on the surface of human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andronicos, N M; Ranson, M.

    2001-01-01

    The urokinase-dependent activation of plasminogen by breast cancer cells plays an important role in metastasis. We have previously shown that the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 over-expresses urokinase and binds and efficiently activates plasminogen at the cell surface compared to non-metastatic cells. The aim of this study was to further characterise plasminogen binding and determine the topology of cell surface-bound plasminogen in terms of its potential for activation. The l...

  7. Interleukin-15 Promotes the Commitment of Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells into NK Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建; 夏青; 孙汭; 田志刚

    2004-01-01

    To explore the effect of rhlL-15 on CB-CD34+ stem cells committing to NK cells, CD34+ stem cells were obtained from cord blood (CB) by magnetic-assisted cell sorting (MACS) method. CD3, CD16 and CD56 molecules expressed on cell surface were detected by flow cytometer. MTF method was used to test the cytotoxicity of NK cells. The results were that stem cell factor (SCF) alone has no effect on CD34+ stem cells. IL-15 stimulated CD34+ stem cells commit to NK cells, and SCF showed strong synergistic effect with IL-15. It was concluded that IL-15 and SCF played different roles during NK cell development, llr15 promoted CD34+ stem cells differentiate to NK cell precursor and SCF improved the effectsof IL-15 on NK cell differentiation.

  8. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  9. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, S.; Noorman, F.; Badloe, J. F.; Lagerberg, J. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular det

  10. Transplantation? Peripheral Stem Cell/Bone Marrow/Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Sirinoglu Demiriz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of peripheral stem cell (PSC and cord blood (CB as an alternative to bone marrow (BM recently has caused important changes on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT practice. According to the CIBMTR data, there has been a significant decrease in the use of bone marrow and increase in the use of PSC and CB as the stem cell source for HSCT performed during 1997–2006 period for patients under the age of 20. On the other hand, the stem cell source in 70% of the HSCT procedures performed for patients over the age of 20 was PSC and the second most preferred stem cell source was bone marrow. CB usage is very limited for the adult population. Primary disease, stage, age, time and urgency of transplantation, HLA match between the patient and the donor, stem cell quantity, and the experience of the transplantation center are some of the associated factors for the selection of the appropriate stem cell source. Unfortunately, there is no prospective randomized study aimed to facilitate the selection of the correct source between CB, PSC, and BM. In this paper, we would like to emphasize the data on stem cell selection in light of the current knowledge for patient populations according to their age and primary disease.

  11. Anti-angiogenic action of plasma hyaluronan binding protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Won; Song, Hyun Seok; Moon, Eun-Joung; Park, Shi-Young; Son, Myung Jin; Jung, Seung Youn; Kim, Ji Tae; Nam, Do-Hyun; Choi-Miura, Nam-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Yung-Jin

    2006-07-01

    The kringle domain is a triple loop structure present in angiostatin and endostatin. The disulfide bond-linked kringle architectures have been known to be essential for anti-angiogenic activity. Plasma hyaluronan binding protein (PHBP) is a novel serine protease which consists of three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains, a kringle domain, and a serine protease domain. PHBP can be cleaved autocatalytically to generate activity and is highly expressed in the human blood and liver. To determine the anti-angiogenic activities of PHBP, we purified recombinant mouse PHBP from stable cell line overexpressing PHBP and used protein in vivo and in vitro angiogenesis assays. We found that recombinant PHBP inhibits not only angiogenesis in vivo in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay but also the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependant manner. Moreover, we found that the kringle domain of PHBP was essential for the anti-angiogenic action of PHBP by the deletion mutants. These findings unravel a new function of PHBP as an inhibitor of the proangiogenic phenotype of vascular endothelial cells and demonstrate that the kringle domain of PHBP might be a potent novel inhibitor of activated endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16773202

  12. MEASUREMENT OF REGIONAL BONE BLOOD FLOW IN THE CANINE MANDIBULAR RAMUS USING RADIOLABELLED TOAD RED BLOOD CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛驰; 王翰章

    1994-01-01

    Toad red blood cells were used to measure regional bone blood flow in the canine mandibular ramus.The blood cells were labelled with sodium pertechnetate and fixed in 10% formalin;they were 22×15 μm in size and had a specific gravity close to that of dog red blood cells.These cells had no discernible effect on systemic hemody-namics after injection,did not agglutinate,were well mixed and evenly distributed throughout the body,and were completely extracted in one circulation through the mandible.The mandibular ramus was divided into six regions,and the blood flow rates in each were found to be similar to those reported in previous studies with radiolabelled carbonized,microspheres.Furthermore,the blood flow distribution pattern of the mandibular ramus determined in this study was identical to that of our previous study using the bone-seeking radionuclide method.We suggest that radiolabelled toad red blood cells are an ideal marker for measuring regional blood flow in the canine mandible.

  13. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes. PMID:26678758

  14. Isolation of rare tumor cells from blood cells with buoyant immuno-microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixin Shi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are exfoliated at various stages of cancer, and could provide invaluable information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. There is an urgent need for the development of cost-efficient and scalable technologies for rare CTC enrichment from blood. Here we report a novel method for isolation of rare tumor cells from excess of blood cells using gas-filled buoyant immuno-microbubbles (MBs. MBs were prepared by emulsification of perfluorocarbon gas in phospholipids and decorated with anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM antibody. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (85% and rapidly (within 15 minutes bound to various epithelial tumor cells suspended in cell medium. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (88% isolated frequent tumor cells that were spiked at 100,000 cells/ml into plasma-depleted blood. Anti-EpCAM MBs efficiently (>77% isolated rare mouse breast 4T1, human prostate PC-3 and pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells spiked into 1, 3 and 7 ml (respectively of plasma-depleted blood. Using EpCAM targeted MBs CTCs from metastatic cancer patients were isolated, suggesting that this technique could be developed into a valuable clinical tool for isolation, enumeration and analysis of rare cells.

  15. Comparison of chemical binding to recombinant fathead minnow and human estrogen receptors alpha in whole cell and cell-free binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Hartig, Phillip C; Cardon, Mary C; Wilson, Vickie S

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian receptors and assay systems are generally used for in vitro screening of endocrine-disrupting chemicals with the assumption that minor differences in amino acid sequences among species do not translate into significant differences in receptor function. Objectives of the present study were to evaluate the performance of two different in vitro assay systems (a whole cell and a cell-free competitive binding assay) in assessing whether binding of chemicals differs significantly between full-length recombinant estrogen receptors from fathead minnows (fhERalpha) and those from humans (hERalpha). It was confirmed that 17beta-estradiol displays a reduction in binding to fhERalpha at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C), as has been reported with other piscine estrogen receptors. Several of the chemicals (17beta-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, alpha-zearalanol, fulvestrant, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, and cadmium chloride) displayed higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the whole cell assay, while only dibutyl phthalate had a higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the cell-free assay. Both assays were effective in identifying strong binders, weak binders, and nonbinders to the two receptors. However, the cell-free assay provided a less complicated and more efficient binding platform and is, therefore, recommended over the whole cell binding assay. In conclusion, no strong evidence showed species-specific binding among the chemicals tested. PMID:19453209

  16. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4(+) T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M. J.; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Nielsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict...... synthesized and their binding affinities for the HLA-I supertypes were measured in a biochemical assay. Influenza-specific T cell responses towards the peptides were quantified using IFN gamma ELISPOT assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult healthy HLA-I typed donors as responder...... cells. Of the 131 peptides, 21 were found to induce T cell responses in 19 donors. In the ELISPOT assay, five peptides induced responses that could be totally blocked by the pan-specific anti-HLA-I antibody W6/32, whereas 15 peptides induced responses that could be completely blocked in the presence...

  17. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  18. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  19. Use of cryopreserved peripheral mononuclear blood cells in biomonitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Lotte; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of storing blood samples by freezing on selected biomarkers and possible implications for biomonitoring. Comparative measurements were performed in order to investigate the use of cryopreserved vs. freshly separated peripheral mononuclear blood c...... correlation of frequencies was seen when comparing fresh with cryopreserved samples. Furthermore we recommend fresh human plasma used in UDS incubation media........ We measured the DNA repair activity as dimethylsulfate induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in PMBC incubated with either autologous plasma or fetal bovine serum (FBS). Comparison of the hprt mutant frequency by the T cell cloning assay was made in parallel. Finally the content of B....../T-lymphocytes and monocytes was measured in phytohemaglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultures at different time intervals. The results showed a higher DNA repair activity in cryopreserved samples compared with fresh samples. We also found differences in mutant frequencies with higher values in fresh samples. A significant...

  20. Analysis of White Blood Cell Dynamics in Nailfold Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquard, Aurélien; Butterworth, Ian; Sánchez-Ferro, Alvaro; Giancardo, Luca; Soenksen, Luis; Cerrato, Carolina; Flores, Rafael; Castro-González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Based on video data acquired with low-cost, portable microscopy equipment, we introduce a semi-automatic method to count visual gaps in the blood flow as a proxy for white blood cells (WBC) passing through nailfold capillaries. Following minimal user interaction and a pre-processing stage, our method consists in the spatio-temporal segmentation and analysis of capillary profiles. Besides the mere count information, it also estimates the speed associated with every WBC event. The accuracy of our algorithm is validated through the analysis of two capillaries acquired from one healthy subject. Results are compared with manual counts from four human raters and confronted with related physiological data reported in literature. PMID:26738019

  1. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  2. Changes in binding of staphylococcal leukocidin to HL-60 cells during differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Morinaga, N; Nagamori, M; Kato, I.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of HL-60 cells to the cytotoxic activity of leukocidin increased depending on the degree of differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). To compare binding characteristics of two components (S and F) of leukocidin to HL-60 and DMSO-treated HL-60 cells, the S and F components were labeled with 125I. Scatchard analysis of the binding curve of the 125I-labeled S component to HL-60 cells showed two classes of binding sites. The binding sites with higher affinity had a ...

  3. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  4. Measurement of red blood cell mechanics during morphological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine; Dasari, Ramachandra; Feld, Michael; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark; Levine, Alex

    2010-03-01

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane, a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network, provides the principal control of the cell's morphology and mechanics. These properties, in turn, influence the ability of RBCs to transport oxygen in circulation. Current mechanical measurements of RBCs rely on external loads. Here we apply a Noncontact optical interferometric technique to quantify the thermal fluctuations of RBC membranes with 3 nm accuracy over a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Combining this technique with a new mathematical model describing RBC membrane undulations, we measure the mechanical changes of RBCs as they undergo a transition from the normal discoid shape to the abnormal echinocyte and spherical shapes. These measurements indicate that, coincident with this morphological transition, there is a significant increase in the membrane's shear and bending moduli. This mechanical transition can alter cell circulation and impede oxygen delivery.

  5. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum treatment on radiolabeling of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in vivo treatment with an aqueous cinnamon extract on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and on the morphology of red blood cells from Wistar rats. Animals were treated with cinnamon extract at different doses and for different periods of time. As controls, animals treated with 0.9% NaCl. Labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma, blood cells and insoluble fractions were isolated. Radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity (%ATI) was calculated. Also, blood smears were prepared to morphological analysis of red blood cells from. Data showed that in vivo cinnamon extract did not significantly (p>0.05) modify the %ATI of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells. The results suggest that in vivo aqueous cinnamon could not affect the membrane structures involved in transport of ions or the oxidation state of stannous and pertechnetate ions. (author)

  6. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I;

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB...

  7. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum treatment on radiolabeling of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, Monica Oliveira; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria]. E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, Gabrielle de Souza; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Geller, Mauro [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Biomedico. Dept. de Fisiologia Humana

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in vivo treatment with an aqueous cinnamon extract on the labeling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc and on the morphology of red blood cells from Wistar rats. Animals were treated with cinnamon extract at different doses and for different periods of time. As controls, animals treated with 0.9% NaCl. Labeling of blood constituents with {sup 99}mTc was performed. Plasma, blood cells and insoluble fractions were isolated. Radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity (%ATI) was calculated. Also, blood smears were prepared to morphological analysis of red blood cells from. Data showed that in vivo cinnamon extract did not significantly (p>0.05) modify the %ATI of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells. The results suggest that in vivo aqueous cinnamon could not affect the membrane structures involved in transport of ions or the oxidation state of stannous and pertechnetate ions. (author)

  8. NPM/ALK binds and phosphorylates the RNA/DNA-binding protein PSF in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galietta, Annamaria; Gunby, Rosalind H; Redaelli, Sara; Stano, Paola; Carniti, Cristiana; Bachi, Angela; Tucker, Philip W; Tartari, Carmen J; Huang, Ching-Jung; Colombo, Emanuela; Pulford, Karen; Puttini, Miriam; Piazza, Rocco G; Ruchatz, Holger; Villa, Antonello; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Marin, Oriano; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) induces cellular transformation in anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) carrying the t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. Protein-protein interactions involving NPM/ALK are important for the activation of downstream signaling pathways. This study was aimed at identifying novel NPM/ALK-binding proteins that might contribute to its oncogenic transformation. Using a proteomic approach, several RNA/DNA-binding proteins were found to coimmunoprecipitate with NPM/ALK, including the multifunctional polypyrimidine tract binding proteinassociated splicing factor (PSF). The interaction between NPM/ALK and PSF was dependent on an active ALK kinase domain and PSF was found to be tyrosine-phosphorylated in NPM/ALK-expressing cell lines and in primary ALK(+) ALCL samples. Furthermore, PSF was shown to be a direct substrate of purified ALK kinase domain in vitro, and PSF Tyr293 was identified as the site of phosphorylation. Y293F PSF was not phosphorylated by NPM/ALK and was not delocalized in NPM/ALK(+) cells. The expression of ALK fusion proteins induced delocalization of PSF from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and forced overexpression of PSF-inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in cells expressing NPM/ALK. PSF phosphorylation also increased its binding to RNA and decreased the PSF-mediated suppression of GAGE6 expression. These results identify PSF as a novel NPM/ALK-binding protein and substrate, and suggest that PSF function may be perturbed in NPM/ALK-transformed cells.

  9. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of Cardiac Catheterization Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheir Korraa1, Tawfik M.S.1, Mohamed Maher 2 and Amr Zaher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rejuvenation capacity among cardiac catheterization technicians occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Subjects and methods: The individual annual collective dose information was measured by thermoluminscent personal dosimeters (TLD for those technicians and found to be ranging between 2.16 and 8.44 mSv/y. Venous blood samples were obtained from 30 cardiac catheterization technicians exposed to X-ray during fluoroscopy procedures at the National Heart Institute in Embaba. The control group involved 25 persons not exposed to ionizing radiation and not working in hospitals in addition to 20 persons not exposed to ionizing radiation and working in hospitals. Blood samples were assayed for total and differential blood counts, micronucleus formation (FMN plasma stromal derived growth factor-1α (SDF-1 α and cell phenotype of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, whose surface markers were identified as the CD34, CD133 and kinase domain receptors (KDR. Results: SDF-1α (2650± 270 vs. 2170 ± 430 pg/ml and FMN (19.9 ± 5.5 vs. 2.8 ± 1.4/1000 cells were significantly higher among cardiac catheterization staff compared to those of the controls respectively. Similarly, EPCs: CD34 (53 ± 3.9 vs. 48 ± 8.5/105 mononuclear cells, CD133 (62.4 ± 4.8 vs. 54.2 ± 10.6 /105 mononuclear cells KDR (52.7 ± 10.6 vs.43.5± 8.2 /105 mononuclear cells were also significantly higher among cardiac catheterization staff compared to the values of controls respectively. Smoking seemed to have a positive effect on the FMN and SDF-1 but had a negative effect on EPCs. It was found that among cardiac catheterization staff, the numbers of circulating progenitor cells had increased and accordingly there was an increased capacity for tissue repair. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present work shows that occupational exposure to radiation, well within permissible levels, leaves a genetic mark on the

  10. Peripheral blood cell signatures of Plasmodium falciparum infection during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Ibitokou

    Full Text Available Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in placental intervillous spaces causes inflammation and pathology. Knowledge of the profiles of immune cells associated with the physiopathology of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM is scarce. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective study, both in Benin and Tanzania, including ∼1000 pregnant women in each site with systematic follow-up at scheduled antenatal visits until delivery. We used ex vivo flow cytometry to identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC profiles that are associated with PAM and anaemia, determining the phenotypic composition and activation status of PBMC in selected sub-groups with and without PAM both at inclusion and at delivery in a total of 302 women. Both at inclusion and at delivery PAM was associated with significantly increased frequencies both of B cells overall and of activated B cells. Infection-related profiles were otherwise quite distinct at the two different time-points. At inclusion, PAM was associated with anaemia, with an increased frequency of immature monocytes and with a decreased frequency of regulatory T cells (Treg. At delivery, infected women presented with significantly fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC, more myeloid DC expressing low levels of HLA-DR, and more effector T cells (Teff compared to uninfected women. Independent associations with an increased risk of anaemia were found for altered antigen-presenting cell frequencies at inclusion, but for an increased frequency of Teff at delivery. Our findings emphasize the prominent role played by B cells during PAM whenever it arises during pregnancy, whilst also revealing signature changes in other circulating cell types that, we conclude, primarily reflect the relative duration of the infections. Thus, the acute, recently-acquired infections present at delivery were marked by changes in DC and Teff frequencies, contrasting with infections at inclusion, considered chronic in

  11. Production of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Reprogramming of Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Zia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood cells are the simple, efficient and economical source for the production of induced pluripotent cells. The discovery of induced pluripotent cells was not novel; it was pedestal on the scientific principals and technologies which have been developed over last six decades. These are nuclear transfer and the cloning of Animals, Pluripotent cell lines and fusion hybrids and Transcription Factors and lineage switching. The use of human embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicines was a breakthrough but make use of these cells arise ethical issues as they are obtained from human embryos. An alternative advancement using induced pluripotent stem cells, which mimics the embryonic stem cells has the significant gain that they replaced the embryonic stem cells. The pluripotent cells can be induced from terminally differentiated somatic cells by the Induction of only four defined factors including c-Myc, klf4, Oct4 and Sox2 which are enough to alter the fate of cell.

  12. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  13. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V D [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  14. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  15. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of the Binding of GII.4 Norovirus Variants onto Human Blood Group Antigens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rougemont, A.; Ruvoen-Clouet, N.; Simon, B.; Estienney, M.; Elie-Caille, C.; Aho, S.; Pothier, P.; Le Pendu, J.; Boireau, W.; Belliot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are one of the leading causes of gastroenteritis in children and adults. For the last 2 decades, genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) NoVs have been circulating worldwide. GII.4 NoVs can be divided into variants, and since 2002 they have circulated in the population before being replaced every 2 or 3 years, which raises questions about the role of their histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) ligands in their evolution. To shed light on these questions, we performed an analysis of the interaction between representative GII.4 variants and HBGAs, and we determined the role of selected amino acids in the binding profiles. By mutagenesis, we showed that there was a strict structural requirement for the amino acids, directly implicated in interactions with HBGAs. However, the ablation of the threonine residue at position 395 (ΔT395), an epidemiological feature of the post-2002 variants, was not deleterious to the binding of the virus-like particle (VLP) to the H antigen, while binding to A and B antigens was severely hampered. Nevertheless, the ΔT395 VLPs gained the capacity to bind to the Lewis x and sialyl-Lewis x antigens in comparison with the wild-type VLP, demonstrating that amino acid residues outside the HBGA binding site can modify the binding properties of NoVs. We also analyzed the attachment of baculovirus-expressed VLPs from six variants (Bristol, US95/96, Hunter, Yerseke, Den Haag, and Osaka) that were isolated from 1987 to 2007 to phenotyped saliva samples and synthetic HBGAs. We showed that the six variants could all attach to saliva of secretors irrespective of the ABO phenotype and to oligosaccharides characteristic of the secretor phenotype. Interestingly, Den Haag and Osaka variants additionally bound to carbohydrates present in the saliva of Lewis-positive nonsecretors. The carbohydrate binding profile and the genetic and mutagenesis analysis suggested that GII.4 binding to Lewis x and sialyl-Lewis x antigens might be a by-product of the

  16. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using optoelectronic tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Verma; R Dasgupta; N Kumar; S Ahlawat; A Uppal; P K Gupta

    2014-02-01

    We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by lightinduced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles. We used thermal evaporation technique for coating the organic polymer, titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as a photoconductive layer on ITO-coated glass slide. Compare to the conventional optical tweezers, the technique requires optical power in W range and provides a manipulation area of a few mm2. The set-up was used to manipulate the polystyrene microspheres and red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs could be attracted or repelled by varying the frequency of the applied AC bias.

  17. THE PURE RED BLOOD CELL APLASIA IN RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzumabaeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pure red blood cell aplasia of renal transplant recipients caused by parvovirus B19 (PB19 is characterized by persistent anemia which resistant to erythropoietin therapy, lack of reticulocytes, bone marrow hypoplasia, and clinically accompanied by severe recurrent bacterial, fungal and viral infection. In case of reactivation PB19 it is necessarv, first of all, eliminate the causes activation of this virus and to cancel or reduce the dose of drugs which depressed the normal hematopoiesis germs, thus to reduce the pancytopenia associating complications in this population. 

  18. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016. PMID:25691005

  19. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  20. CD21(-/low) B cells in human blood are memory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorarinsdottir, K; Camponeschi, A; Cavallini, N; Grimsholm, O; Jacobsson, L; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2016-08-01

    The complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is part of a complex (CD21/CD19/CD81) acting as a co-receptor to the B cell receptor (BCR). Simultaneous triggering of the BCR and CD21 lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Although CD21 is important, B cells that express low amounts or lack surface CD21 (CD21(-/low) ) are increased in conditions with chronic inflammation, e.g. autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the CD21(-/low) B cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy donors. Here, we show that CD21(-/low) cells represent approximately 5% of B cells in peripheral blood from adults but are barely detectable in cord blood, after excluding transitional B cells. The CD21(-/low) subset can be divided into CD38(-) 24(+) and CD38(-) 24(low) cells, where most of the CD38(-) 24(+) are CD27(+) immunoglobulin (Ig)M(+) IgD(+) and the CD38(-) 24(low) are switched CD27(-) . Expression levels of additional markers, e.g. CD95 and CD62L, are similar to those on classical memory B cells. In contrast to naive cells, the majority of CD21(-/low) cells lack expression of the ABCB1 transporter. Stimulation with a combination of BCR, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7/8 and interleukin (IL)-2 induces proliferation and differentiation of the CD21(-/low) B cells comparable to CD21(+) CD27(+) memory B cells. The response excluding BCR agonist is not on par with that of classical memory B cells, although clearly above that of naive B cells. This is ascribed to a weaker response by the CD38(-) 24(low) subset, implying that some memory B cells require not only TLR but also BCR triggering. We conclude that the CD21(-/low) cells in healthy donors are memory B cells. PMID:27010233

  1. Stem and progenitor cells in biostructure of blood vessel walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Korta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of vascular and hematopoietic systems during organogenesis occurs at the same time. During vasculogenesis, a small part of cells does not undergo complete differentiation but stays on this level, “anchored” in tissue structures described as stem cell niches. The presence of blood vessels within tissue stem cell niches is typical and led to identification of niches and ensures that they are functioning. The three-layer biostructure of vessel walls for artery and vein, tunica: intima, media and adventitia, for a long time was defined as a mechanical barrier between vessel light and the local tissue environment. Recent findings from vascular biology studies indicate that vessel walls are dynamic biostructures, which are equipped with stem and progenitor cells, described as vascular wall-resident stem cells/progenitor cells (VW-SC/PC. Distinct zones for vessel wall harbor heterogeneous subpopulations of VW-SC/PC, which are described as “subendothelial or vasculogenic zones”. Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies show that prenatal activity of stem and progenitor cells is not only limited to organogenesis but also exists in postnatal life, where it is responsible for vessel wall homeostasis, remodeling and regeneration. It is believed that VW-SC/PC could be engaged in progression of vascular disorders and development of neointima. We would like to summarize current knowledge about mesenchymal and progenitor stem cell phenotype with special attention to distribution and biological properties of VW-SC/PC in biostructures of intima, media and adventitia niches. It is postulated that in the near future, niches for VW-SC/PC could be a good source of stem and progenitor cells, especially in the context of vessel tissue bioengineering as a new alternative to traditional revascularization therapies.

  2. Red blood cell pH, the Bohr effect, and other oxygenation-linked phenomena in blood O2 and CO2 transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, F B

    2004-11-01

    The discovery of the S-shaped O2 equilibrium curve and the Bohr effect in 1904 stimulated a fertile and continued research into respiratory functions of blood and allosteric mechanisms in haemoglobin (Hb). The Bohr effect (influence of pH/CO2 on Hb O2 affinity) and the reciprocal Haldane effect (influence of HbO2 saturation on H+/CO2 binding) originate in the Hb oxy-deoxy conformational change and allosteric interactions between O2 and H+/CO2 binding sites. In steady state, H+ is passively distributed across the vertebrate red blood cell (RBC) membrane, and intracellular pH (pHi) changes are related to changes in extracellular pH, Hb-O2 saturation and RBC organic phosphate content. As the Hb molecule shifts between the oxy and deoxy conformation in arterial-venous gas transport, it delivers O2 and takes up CO2 and H+ in tissue capillaries (elegantly aided by the Bohr effect). Concomitantly, the RBC may sense local O2 demand via the degree of Hb deoxygenation and release vasodilatory agents to match local blood flow with requirements. Three recent hypotheses suggest (1) release of NO from S-nitroso-Hb upon deoxygenation, (2) reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO by deoxy haems, and (3) release of ATP. Inside RBCs, carbonic anhydrase (CA) provides fast hydration of metabolic CO2 and ensures that the Bohr shift occurs during capillary transit. The formed H+ is bound to Hb (Haldane effect) while HCO3- is shifted to plasma via the anion exchanger (AE1). The magnitude of the oxylabile H+ binding shows characteristic differences among vertebrates. Alternative strategies for CO2 transport include direct HCO3- binding to deoxyHb in crocodilians, and high intracellular free [HCO3-] (due to high pHi) in lampreys. At the RBC membrane, CA, AE1 and other proteins may associate into what appears to be an integrated gas exchange metabolon. Oxygenation-linked binding of Hb to the membrane may regulate glycolysis in mammals and perhaps also oxygen-sensitive ion transport involved in

  3. Biological effects of the electrostatic field: red blood cell-related alterations of oxidative processes in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, Hayk A.; Sahakyan, Gohar V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activities of pro-/antioxidant enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and oxidative modification of proteins and lipids in red blood cells (RBCs) and blood plasma of rats exposed to electrostatic field (200 kV/m) during the short (1 h) and the long periods (6 day, 6 h daily). Short-term exposure was characterized by the increase of oxidatively damaged proteins in blood of rats. This was strongly expressed in RBC membranes. After long-term action, RBC content in peripheral blood was higher than in control ( P < 0.01) and the attenuation of prooxidant processes was shown.

  4. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensionalmotions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial posit...

  5. X-box-binding protein 1-modified neural stem cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lihui; Xu, Tianmin; Wang, Fengzhang; Liu, Qun; Cui, Manhua

    2012-04-01

    X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells were transplanted into the right lateral ventricles of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease. The survival capacities and differentiation rates of cells expressing the dopaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase were higher in X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells compared to non-transfected cells. Moreover, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the substantia nigra were significantly increased, α-synuclein expression was decreased, and neurological behaviors were significantly ameliorated in rats following transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells. These results indicate that transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells can promote stem cell survival and differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, increase dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels, reduce α-synuclein aggregation in the substantia nigra, and improve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats.

  6. X-box-binding protein 1-modified neural stem cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihui Si; Tianmin Xu; Fengzhang Wang; Qun Liu; Manhua Cui

    2012-01-01

    X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells were transplanted into the right lateral ventricles of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease. The survival capacities and differentiation rates of cells expressing the dopaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase were higher in X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells compared to non-transfected cells. Moreover, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the substantia nigra were significantly increased, α-synuclein expression was decreased, and neurological behaviors were significantly ameliorated in rats following transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells. These results indicate that transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells can promote stem cell survival and differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, increase dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels, reduce α-synuclein aggregation in the substantia nigra, and improve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats.

  7. Pigment epithelium-derived factor binds to cell-surface F(1)-ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S P

    2010-05-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to an as yet unknown protein on the surfaces of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a approximately 60 kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina with Bos taurus F(1)-ATP synthase beta-subunit, and that F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F(1). Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F(1). Real-time binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F(1) interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F(1) and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF-binding and angiostatin-binding sites on F(1). Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of approximately 60 kDa. Antibodies to F(1)beta-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. The extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly reduced the amount of extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F(1), these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may form part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  8. Could cells from menstrual blood be a new source for cell-based therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man-Jing; Liu, Bin; Xia, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Kai-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Human endometrium is a highly regenerative tissue and contains a low number of cells which have high replicative ability and differentiation efficiency. This has been identified by many scientists. When the fresh growth of tissue and blood vessels is shed during each menstrual cycle, some cells with regenerative capabilities are present. Reports have also indicated that these cells possess the capacity to trans-differentiate into mesodermal, ectodermal and endodermal lineages by using standard commercially available culture reagents and methodologies. Given the ease of extraction and pluripotency of this cell population, we propose it as a novel alternative to current cells sources for cell-based therapies. PMID:19101090

  9. Blood analyte sensing using fluorescent dye-loaded red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Shao, Xiaole; Cooley, Nicholas; Milanick, Mark A.; Glass, Timothy E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of blood analytes provides crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Due to analyte transporters on red blood cell (RBC) membranes that equilibrate intracellular and extracellular analyte levels, RBCs serve as an attractive alternative for encapsulating analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, the functionalized RBCs may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed sensing system utilizes the ability of the RBCs to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before lysis, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. While at low temperature, analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution diffuse into the perforated RBCs and become entrapped upon restoration of temperature and osmolarity. Since the fluorescent signal from the entrapped dye reports on changes in the analyte level of the extracellular solution via the RBC transporters, interactions between the RBCs and the dye are critical to the efficacy of this technique. In this work, we study the use of a near infrared pH sensitive dye encapsulated within RBCs and assess the ability to measure dye fluorescence in vivo.

  10. Interleukin 1α and interleukin 1β bind to the same receptor on T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure, E. coli-derived recombinant murine interleukin 1α (IL 1α) was labeled with 125I and used for receptor binding studies. The 125I-IL 1 binds to murine EL-4 thymoma cells in a specific and saturable manner. Scatchard plot analysis for binding studies carried out at 40C reveals a single type of high affinity binding site with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 2.6 X 10-10 M and the presence of approximately 1200 binding sites per cell. Unlabeled recombinant murine IL 1 competes for 125I-IL 1 binding in a dose-dependent manner, whereas interferon-αA, interleukin 2 (IL 2), epidermal growth factor, and nerve growth factor have no effect. The 125I-IL 1 binding site is sensitive to trypsin, suggesting that it is localized on the cell surface. The authors have also examined the ability of purified recombinant human IL 1α and IL 1β to compete for binding of the radiolabeled murine IL 1 to its receptor and to stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells. They report here that both human IL 1 proteins are able to recognize the same binding site on mouse IL 1. In addition, murine as well as both human IL 1 proteins stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells

  11. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: In vitro assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99 m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of total proteins in blood plasma: a comparative study among dye-binding methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dimas Augusto Morozin Zaia; Fábio Rangel Marques; Cássia Thaïs Bussamra Vieira Zaia

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study between the biuret method (standard method for total proteins) and spectrophotometric methods using dyes (Bradford, 3',3",5',5"-tetrabromophenolphthalein ethyl ester-TBPEE, and erythrosin-B) was carried out for the determination of total proteins in blood plasma from rats. Bradford method showed the highest sensitivity for proteins and biuret method showed the lowest. For all the methods, the absorbance for different proteins (BSA, casein, and egg albumin) was measured and...

  13. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP

  14. Chronic morphine treatment up-regulates mu opioid receptor binding in cells lacking Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Onoprishvili, Irma; Simon, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of morphine and other agonists on the human mu opioid receptor (MOP) expressed in M2 melanoma cells, lacking the actin cytoskeleton protein filamin A and in A7, a sub clone of the M2 melanoma cells, stably transfected with filamin A cDNA. The results of binding experiments showed, that after chronic morphine treatment (24 hr) of A7 cells, MOP binding sites were down-regulated to 63% of control, whereas, unexpectedly, in M2 cells, MOP binding was up-regulated to 188...

  15. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments. PMID:27431921

  16. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  17. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  18. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  19. Measurement of the nonlinear elasticity of red blood cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Feld, Michael S.; Levine, Alex J.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The membranes of human red blood cells (RBCs) are a composite of a fluid lipid bilayer and a triangular network of semiflexible filaments (spectrin). We perform cellular microrheology using the dynamic membrane fluctuations of the RBCs to extract the elastic moduli of this composite membrane. By applying known osmotic stresses, we measure the changes in the elastic constants under imposed strain and thereby determine the nonlinear elastic properties of the membrane. We find that the elastic nonlinearities of the shear modulus in tensed RBC membranes can be well understood in terms of a simple wormlike chain model. Our results show that the elasticity of the spectrin network can mostly account for the area compression modulus at physiological osmolality, suggesting that the lipid bilayer has significant excess area. As the cell swells, the elastic contribution from the now tensed lipid membrane becomes dominant.

  20. Red blood cell cluster separation from digital images for use in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Guerrero-Peña, F A; Herold-García, S; Jaume-I-Capó, Antoni; Marrero-Fernández, P D

    2015-07-01

    The study of cell morphology is an important aspect of the diagnosis of some diseases, such as sickle cell disease, because red blood cell deformation is caused by these diseases. Due to the elongated shape of the erythrocyte, ellipse adjustment and concave point detection are applied widely to images of peripheral blood samples, including during the detection of cells that are partially occluded in the clusters generated by the sample preparation process. In the present study, we propose a method for the analysis of the shape of erythrocytes in peripheral blood smear samples of sickle cell disease, which uses ellipse adjustments and a new algorithm for detecting notable points. Furthermore, we apply a set of constraints that allow the elimination of significant image preprocessing steps proposed in previous studies. We used three types of images to validate our method: artificial images, which were automatically generated in a random manner using a computer code; real images from peripheral blood smear sample images that contained normal and elongated erythrocytes; and synthetic images generated from real isolated cells. Using the proposed method, the efficiency of detecting the two types of objects in the three image types exceeded 99.00%, 98.00%, and 99.35%, respectively. These efficiency levels were superior to the results obtained with previously proposed methods using the same database, which is available at http://erythrocytesidb.uib.es/. This method can be extended to clusters of several cells and it requires no user inputs. PMID:25216490

  1. 76 FR 19101 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Health Service Act, as amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises.... L. 92-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: ] Name: Advisory Council on Blood...

  2. 75 FR 62843 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Act, as amended) the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the.... L. 92-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Advisory Council on Blood...

  3. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrui Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per strand, we report a comprehensive (92.62% methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE. These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies.

  4. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  5. Binding of paraquat to cell walls of paraquat resistant and susceptible biotypes of Hordeum glaucum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, H.M.; Preston, C.; Powles, S.B. [University of Adeilaide, Glen Osmond, SA (Australia). CRC for Weed Management Systems and Department of Crop Protection

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Paraquat is a widely used, non-selective, light activated contact herbicide acting as a photosystem electron acceptor. Resistance to paraquat in weed species has occurred in Australia and world-wide following extensive use of this herbicide. The mechanism of resistance to paraquat in `Hordeum glaucum` is correlated with reduced herbicide translocation and may be due to sequestration of herbicide away from its site of action by either binding to cell walls or other means. We measured paraquat binding to a cell wall fraction in resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum to determine whether differences in binding of paraquat to cell walls could explain herbicide resistance. The cell wall fraction was isolated from leaves of resistant and susceptible biotypes and incubated with {sup 14}C-labelled paraquat. Of the total paraquat - absorbed by a cell wall preparation, about 80% remains strongly bind to the cell wall and doesn`t readily exchange with solution in the absence of divalent cations. Divalent cations (Ca{sup 2+},putrescine and paraquat) can competitively exchange for paraquat tightly bound to the cell wall. From kinetic experiments it seems that there are two types of binding sites in the cell wall with different affinities for paraquat. No significant differences between cell wall, characteristics of resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum have been found in any of our experiments. Therefore, increased binding of paraquat to the cell wall appears not to be a mechanism for exclusion of paraquat in resistant biotype

  6. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  7. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu, Jun-jun Xu, Zhi-hong Deng, Jie Feng, Yan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs. Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs. Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair.

  8. Studies on Morphology and Cytochemistry in Blood Cells of Ayu Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis

    OpenAIRE

    NAKADA, Kojin; FUJISAWA, Kuniyasu; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peripheral blood cells from ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis, were separated using a density gradient. Blood cells were then smeared using Shandon Cytospin and subjected to cytochemical staining. Blood cells were categorized based on morphological and cytochemical characteristics, and the density fractionation range and nucleus area/cell area ratio were observed. Lymphocytes are distinguished from neutrophils by their basophilic cytoplasm and Golgi-like field. The features of ch...

  9. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  10. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  11. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  12. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  13. Systems biology of stored blood cells: Can it help to extend the expiration date?

    OpenAIRE

    Paglia, Giuseppe; Bernhard Ø Palsson; Sigurjonsson, Olafur E.

    2012-01-01

    With increasingly stringent regulations regarding deferral and elimination of blood donors it will become increasingly important to extend the expiration date of blood components beyond the current allowed storage periods. One reason for the storage time limit for blood components is that platelets and red blood cells develop a condition called storage lesions during their storage in plastic blood containers. Systems biology provides comprehensive bio-chemical descriptions of organisms throug...

  14. The whole blood oxygen binding properties of a large but presumably sluggish polar elasmobranch, the Greenland shark Somniosus microcephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    Australian and New Zealand Society for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry. Auckland, N.Z., December 2012. Herbert, N.A.1, Skov, p.V.l, Tirsgaard, B.z and Steffensen, J.F. Z Only a few species of elasmobranch live in cold polar waters and the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is the m......Australian and New Zealand Society for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry. Auckland, N.Z., December 2012. Herbert, N.A.1, Skov, p.V.l, Tirsgaard, B.z and Steffensen, J.F. Z Only a few species of elasmobranch live in cold polar waters and the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus......) is the most notable example. These extremely large and long-lived sharks are thought to be sluggish but their active hunting lifestyle has recently been questioned by the finding of mobile prey species in their stomach (i.e. squid, fish and seal). The whole blood oxygen binding property of S. microcephalus...

  15. Transdifferentiation of Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Red Blood Cells by OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of red blood cells (RBCs, erythrocytes can have potentially life-threatening consequences for rare or unusual blood type patients with massive blood loss resulting from various conditions. Erythrocytes have been derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, but the risk of potential tumorigenicity cannot be ignored, and a majority of these cells produced from PSCs express embryonic ε- and fetal γ-globins with little or no adult β-globin and remain nucleated. Here we report a method to generate erythrocytes from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs by enforcing OCT4 gene expression and cytokine stimulation. Cells generated from hHFMSCs expressed mainly the adult β-globin chain with minimum level of the fetal γ-globin chain. Furthermore, these cells also underwent multiple maturation events and formed enucleated erythrocytes with a biconcave disc shape. Gene expression analyses showed that OCT4 regulated the expression of genes associated with both pluripotency and erythroid development during hHFMSC transdifferentiation toward erythroid cells. These findings show that mature erythrocytes can be generated from adult somatic cells, which may serve as an alternative source of RBCs for potential autologous transfusion.

  16. Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood Smear Using Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebum Chung

    Full Text Available White blood cell (WBC count is a valuable metric for assisting with diagnosis or prognosis of various diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or infection. Counting WBCs can be done either manually or automatically. Automatic methods are capable of counting a large number of cells to give a statistically more accurate reading of the WBC count of a sample, but the specialized equipment tends to be expensive. Manual methods are inexpensive since they only involve a conventional light microscope setup. However, it is more laborious and error-prone because the small field-of-view (FOV of the microscope necessitates mechanical scanning of a specimen for counting an adequate number of WBCs. Here, we investigate the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM to bypass these issues of the manual methods. With a 2x objective, FPM can provide a FOV of 120 mm2 with enhanced resolution comparable to that of a 20x objective, which is adequate for non-differentially counting WBCs in just one FOV. A specialist was able to count the WBCs in FPM images with 100% accuracy compared to the count as determined from conventional microscope images. An automatic counting algorithm was also developed to identify WBCs from FPM's captured images with 95% accuracy, paving the way for a cost-effective WBC counting setup with the advantages of both the automatic and manual counting methods.

  17. Modifying the red cell surface: towards an ABO-universal blood supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Martin L; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Eliminating the risk for ABO-incompatible transfusion errors and simplifying logistics by creating a universal blood inventory is a challenging idea. Goldstein and co-workers pioneered the field of enzymatic conversion of blood group A and B red blood cells (RBCs) to O (ECO). Using alpha-galactos......Eliminating the risk for ABO-incompatible transfusion errors and simplifying logistics by creating a universal blood inventory is a challenging idea. Goldstein and co-workers pioneered the field of enzymatic conversion of blood group A and B red blood cells (RBCs) to O (ECO). Using alpha...

  18. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  19. Multiple loci are associated with white blood cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Nalls

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available White blood cell (WBC count is a common clinical measure from complete blood count assays, and it varies widely among healthy individuals. Total WBC count and its constituent subtypes have been shown to be moderately heritable, with the heritability estimates varying across cell types. We studied 19,509 subjects from seven cohorts in a discovery analysis, and 11,823 subjects from ten cohorts for replication analyses, to determine genetic factors influencing variability within the normal hematological range for total WBC count and five WBC subtype measures. Cohort specific data was supplied by the CHARGE, HeamGen, and INGI consortia, as well as independent collaborative studies. We identified and replicated ten associations with total WBC count and five WBC subtypes at seven different genomic loci (total WBC count-6p21 in the HLA region, 17q21 near ORMDL3, and CSF3; neutrophil count-17q21; basophil count- 3p21 near RPN1 and C3orf27; lymphocyte count-6p21, 19p13 at EPS15L1; monocyte count-2q31 at ITGA4, 3q21, 8q24 an intergenic region, 9q31 near EDG2, including three previously reported associations and seven novel associations. To investigate functional relationships among variants contributing to variability in the six WBC traits, we utilized gene expression- and pathways-based analyses. We implemented gene-clustering algorithms to evaluate functional connectivity among implicated loci and showed functional relationships across cell types. Gene expression data from whole blood was utilized to show that significant biological consequences can be extracted from our genome-wide analyses, with effect estimates for significant loci from the meta-analyses being highly corellated with the proximal gene expression. In addition, collaborative efforts between the groups contributing to this study and related studies conducted by the COGENT and RIKEN groups allowed for the examination of effect homogeneity for genome-wide significant associations across

  20. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    NOTARI, LUIGI; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding ...

  1. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  2. [The dynamics of the rapid changes in the phospholipids of the whole blood and blood cells in patients with endometriosis interna].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakov, V I; Sliusar', N N; Bakuleva, L P; Damirov, M M; Kargapolov, A V

    1993-01-01

    Time course of rapid changes in blood phospholipids and blood cells was studied in 44 patients with endometriosis. Rapid reversible blood phospholipid changes were observed when these patients' red cells and lymphocytes were incubated with calcium chloride. Time course of rapid changes in phosphoinosites, sphyngomyelines, phosphatidylserines, phosphlatidylethanolamines of patients' red and white blood cells, whole blood, and myometrial tissue differed significantly from that in healthy women. The authors suppose that cellular proliferation processes in endometriosis are connected with phospholipid homeostasis disorders in blood cells and tissue. PMID:8250135

  3. Molecular matching of red blood cells is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Cobianchi da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of DNA methods to provide a means to precisely genotypically match donor blood units for the antigen-negative type of 35 sickle cell disease patients<. METHODS: Red blood cell units were investigated for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fyª, Fy b, Jkª, Jk b, S, s, Diª and RH variants by performing a molecular array (Human Erythrocyte Antigen BeadChipTM, BioArray Solutions, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of patient samples and donor units that had been serologically matched based on the ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and the presence of antibodies. RESULTS: Matches for 21 of 35 sickle cell disease patients presented discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between the genotype profile and the antigen profile of their serologically-matched blood units. The main discrepancies or mismatches occurred in the RH, FY, JK and MNS systems. Eight Rh alloimmunized patients presented RHD and RHCE variants that had not been serologically identified. According to these results better matches were found for the patients with genotyped units and the patients benefited as shown by better in vivo red blood cell survival. CONCLUSION: Molecular matching is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients, decreasing the risk of transfusion reactions, especially delayed transfusion reactions to existing alloantibodies and preventing alloimmunization.

  4. Effects of blood products on inflammatory response in endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Urner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transfusing blood products may induce inflammatory reactions within the vascular compartment potentially leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Experiments were designed to assess the inflammatory potential of different blood products in an endothelial cell-based in vitro model and to compare baseline levels of potentially activating substances in transfusion products. METHODS: The inflammatory response from pre-activated (endotoxin-stimulated and non-activated endothelial cells as well as neutrophil endothelial transmigration in response to packed red blood cells (PRBC, platelet concentrates (PC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP was determined. Baseline inflammatory mediator and lipid concentrations in blood products were evaluated. RESULTS: Following incubation with all blood products, an increased inflammatory mediator release from endothelial cells was observed. Platelet concentrates, and to a lesser extent also FFP, caused the most pronounced response, which was accentuated in already pre-stimulated endothelial cells. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells as well as blood product-induced migration of neutrophils through the endothelium was in good agreement with the lipid content of the according blood product. CONCLUSION: Within the group of different blood transfusion products both PC and FFP have a high inflammatory potential with regard to activation of endothelial cells. Inflammation upon blood product exposure is strongly accentuated when endothelial cells are pre-injured. High lipid contents in the respective blood products goes along with an accentuated inflammatory reaction from endothelial cells.

  5. Short and long-term conservation of blood and bone marrow cells for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of methods to conserve bone marrow, blood and blood components is necessary to ensure adequate supplies of these at times of radiation accidents or during radiation therapy with accompanying destruction of the haemopoietic tissues and essential blood elements. In addition, with adequate supplies of stored blood, treatment of astronauts affected by radiation, particularly when interplanetary flights become feasible, will be possible and therapy for patients with blood dyscrasias can be greatly expanded. The creation and expansion of blood banks for long-term storage of haemotherapeutic products is necessarily dependent on improved methods of conservation of blood and bone marrow cells

  6. RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huayu

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ. PMID:26839690

  7. RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huayu

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ.

  8. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  9. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  10. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Lei; Li-Ze Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury.The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods.Data Sources:The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015.Study Selection:Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic.Results:The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion.It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance.Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue.It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations,including trauma,critical care,pediatric,and cardiac surgery patients,which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms.It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity,decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability,and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process.Conclusion:It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects,and if so,which factors determine such clinical effects.However,considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance,potential preventive strategies should be considered,especially for the susceptible recipients.

  11. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m (99mTc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with 99mTc (99mTc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na99mTcO4 and 99mTc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs.

  12. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.S.; Pereira, M.O. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Benarroz, M.O.; Frydman, J.N.G.; Rocha, V.C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, M.J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Fisiologia, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto Biomedico, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas, Rua Frei Caneca, 94, Rio de Janeiro 20211040 (Brazil); Medeiros, A.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, M. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Coordenadoria de Pesquisa Basica, Praca Cruz Vermelha, 23, 20230130 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} and {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs.

  13. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON RED BLOOD CELL IMMUNE AND T-CELL SUBGROUP IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoWei; HuangYuxin; ChenHong; SunDayong; ZhangHongxin

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on immune system was observed in the rat by using micro- whole blood direct immunofluoreseence Staining assay to detect changes of the peripheral blood T lymphocyte subgroup and employing red blood cell (RBC) C3b receptor- yeast rosette test and red blood cell-IC rosette test to analyze erythroeytic immune function. Results showed that after EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36), CD4+, RBC-C3bRR and RBC-ICR in the peripheral blood of the normal rats increased significantly while CD8+ had no any considerable changes and a positive correlation between CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR was found. In immuoosuppression model rats, the values of CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR were obviously lower than those of the normal control group while CD8+ had no any striking changes; but after EA treatment, there were no evident differences between EA group and normal control group in the above-mentioned indexes. There were also no any significant differences between non-acupoint group and normal control group in those indexes. Results suggest that EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36) can raise T cell immune function and RBC adhesion function in both normal rats and immunosuppression model rats, both of which present a positive correlation.

  14. Diagnosis and epidemiology of red blood cell enzyme disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Van Wijk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The red blood cell possess an active metabolic machinery that provides the cell with energy to pump ions against electrochemical gradients, to maintain its shape, to keep hemoglobin iron in the reduced (ferrous form, and to maintain enzyme and hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups. The main source of metabolic energy comes from glucose. Glucose is metabolized through the glycolytic pathway and through the hexose monophosphate shunt. Glycolysis catabolizes glucose to pyruvate and lactate, which represent the end products of glucose metabolism in the erythrocyte. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is phosphorylated to adenosine triphosphate (ATP, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is reduced to NADH in glycolysis. 2,3- Bisphosphoglycerate, an important regulator of the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, is generated during glycolysis by the Rapoport-Luebering shunt. The hexose monophosphate shunt oxidizes glucose-6-phosphate, reducing NADP+ to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH. The red cell lacks the capacity for de novo purine synthesis but has a salvage pathway that permits synthesis of purine nucleotides from purine bases...

  15. Loss of deformability of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. Majid; Feng, James

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is largely due to stiffening of the infected red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary understanding ascribes the loss of RBC deformability to a 10-fold increase in membrane stiffness caused by extra cross-linking in the spectrin network. Local measurements by micropipette aspiration, however, have reported only an increase of 3-fold in the shear modulus. We believe the discrepancy stems from the rigid parasite particles inside infected cells, and have carried out numerical simulations to demonstrate this mechanism. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by linearly elastic springs. The cytosol is modeled as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The malaria parasite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. We simulate RBC stretching tests by optical tweezers in three dimensions. The results demonstrate that the presence of a sizeable parasite greatly reduces the ability of RBCs to deform under stretching. With the solid inclusion, the observed loss of deformability can be predicted quantitatively using the local membrane elasticity measured by micropipettes.

  16. Absence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells priming in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos B.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the proinflammatory environment occurring in dialytic patients, cytokine overproduction has been implicated in hemodialysis co-morbidity. However, there are discrepancies among the various studies that have analyzed TNF-alpha synthesis and the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC priming in this clinical setting. We measured bioactive cytokine by the L929 cell bioassay, and evaluated PBMC TNF-alpha production by 32 hemodialysis patients (HP and 51 controls. No difference in TNF-alpha secretion was observed between controls and HP (859 ± 141 vs 697 ± 130 U/10(6 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (5 µg/ml did not induce any further TNF-alpha release, showing no PBMC priming. Paraformaldehyde-fixed HP PBMC were not cytotoxic to L929 cells, suggesting the absence of membrane-anchored TNF-alpha. Cycloheximide inhibited PBMC cytotoxicity in HP and controls, indicating lack of a PBMC TNF-alpha pool, and dependence on de novo cytokine synthesis. Actinomycin D reduced TNF-alpha production in HP, but had no effect on controls. Therefore, our data imply that TNF-alpha production is an intrinsic activity of normal PBMC and is not altered in HP. Moreover, TNF-alpha is a product of de novo synthesis by PBMC and is not constitutively expressed on HP cell membranes. The effect of actinomycin D suggests a putative tighter control of TNF-alpha mRNA turnover in HP. This increased dependence on TNF-alpha RNA transcription in HP may reflect an adaptive response to hemodialysis stimuli.

  17. The role of the mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1 from Mycobacterium bovis BCG in host cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisch Ralph

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis differs from most pathogens in its ability to multiply inside monocytes and to persist during long periods of time within granuloma in a status of latency. A class of proteins called mycobacterial histone-like proteins has been associated with regulation of replication and latency, but their precise role in the infection process has yet to be uncovered. Our study aimed at defining the impact of the histone-like protein MDP1 from M. bovis BCG (mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1, corresponding to Rv2986c from M. tuberculosis on early steps of infection. Results Previously, a BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guérin strain had been generated by antisense-technique exhibiting reduced MDP1 expression. This strain was now used to analyse the impact of reduced amount of MDP1 on the interaction with human blood monocytes, macrophage lines and PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MDP1 was revealed to be required for growth at acidic pH and for intracellular replication in human blood monocytes. Down-regulation of MDP1 resulted in reduced secretion of the cytokine IL-1β by infected human PBMC. In addition, a reduction of MDP1 expression had a major impact on the formation of fused multi-nucleated macrophages. In monocyte preparations from human blood as well as in human and mouse macrophage cell lines, both the percentage of multi-nucleated cells and the number of nuclei per cell were much enhanced when the monocytes were infected with BCG expressing less MDP1. Conclusion MDP1 from M. bovis BCG affects the growth at acidic pH and the intracellular replication in human monocytes. It furthermore affects cytokine secretion by host cells, and the formation of fused multi-nucleated macrophages. Our results suggest an important role of MDP1 in persistent infection.

  18. Sequence-selective DNA binding with cell-permeable oligoguanidinium-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Jesús; Sánchez, Mateo I; Valero, Julián; de Mendoza, Javier; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-03-21

    Conjugation of a short peptide fragment from a bZIP protein to an oligoguanidinium tail results in a DNA-binding miniprotein that selectively interacts with composite sequences containing the peptide-binding site next to an A/T-rich tract. In addition to stabilizing the complex with the target DNA, the oligoguanidinium unit also endows the conjugate with cell internalization properties.

  19. Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2016-09-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , Ppump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis. PMID:26016736

  20. The Antioxidant Effect of Erythropoietin on Thalassemic Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Amer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of its stimulating effect on RBC production, erythropoietin (Epo is used to treat anemia, for example, in patients on dialysis or on chemotherapy. In β-thalassemia, where Epo levels are low relative to the degree of anemia, Epo treatment improves the anemia state. Since RBC and platelets of these patients are under oxidative stress, which may be involved in anemia and thromboembolic complications, we investigated Epo as an antioxidant. Using flow-cytometry technology, we found that in vitro treatment with Epo of blood cells from these patients increased their glutathione content and reduced their reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxides, and external phosphatidylserine. This resulted in reduced susceptibility of RBC to undergo hemolysis and phagocytosis. Injection of Epo into heterozygous (Hbbth3/+ β-thalassemic mice reduced the oxidative markers within 3 hours. Our results suggest that, in addition to stimulating RBC and fetal hemoglobin production, Epo might alleviate symptoms of hemolytic anemias as an antioxidant.

  1. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials....... TRIAL SELECTION: Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently screened...

  2. Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2016-01-01

    . Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide......Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according......·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium...

  3. Smoking and red blood cell phospholipid membrane fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murff, H J; Tindle, H A; Shrubsole, M J; Cai, Q; Smalley, W; Milne, G L; Swift, L L; Ness, R M; Zheng, W

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is associated with lower n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) concentrations; however, limited studies have accounted for dietary PUFA intake or whether tobacco dose or smoking duration influences this association. We measured red blood cell phospholipid (RBC) membrane concentrations of fatty acids in 126 current smokers, 311 former smokers, and 461 never smokers using gas liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Smokers had lower RBC membrane percentages of total n-3 LCPUFAs compared to former smokers or never smokers (median percent: 5.46, [interquartile range (IQR) 4.52, 6.28] versus 6.39; [IQR: 5.18, 7.85] versus 6.59; [IQR 5.34, 8.01]) (psmoking and cigarettes per day were not associated with RBC membrane n-3 LCPUFA differences. Smoking is associated with lower n-3 LCPUFA RBC membrane percentages and this association was not influenced by diet or smoking dose or duration. PMID:27637337

  4. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  5. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  6. Endothelial progenitor cell differentiation using cryopreserved, umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-ho JANG; Hugh C KIM; Sun-kyung KIM; Jeong-eun CHOI; Young-jin KIM; Hyun-woo LEE; Seok-yun KANG; Joon-seong PARK; Jin-hyuk CHOI; Ho-yeong LIM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the endothelial differentiation potentiality of umbilical cord blood (UCB), we induced the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC)from cryopreserved UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC). Methods: MNC from cryopreserved UCB and peripheral blood (PB) were cultured in M199 medium with endothelial cell growth supplements for 14 d. EPC were characterized by RT-PCR,flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry analysis. The proliferation of differen-tiated EPC was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTI') assay, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentra-tion was measured using an ELISA kit. Characteristics of UCB-derived EPC were compared with those of PB-derived EPC. Results: A number of round-shaped cells were loosely attached to the bottom after 24 h culture, and numerous spindle-shaped cells began to appear from the round-shaped ones on d 7. Those cells expressed endothelial markers such as, Fit-1/VEGFR-1, ecNOS, VE-cadherin, yon Willebrand factor, and secreted VEGF. The patterns of endothelial markers of EPC from PB and UCB did not show striking differences. The results of the prolifera-tion and secretion of VEGF were also similar. Conclusion: We successfully cul-tured UCB cells stored at -196 ℃ into cells with the quality of endothelial cells.Those EPC could be used for angiogenic therapeutics by activating adjacent endothelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis.

  7. From human monocytes to genome-wide binding sites--a protocol for small amounts of blood: monocyte isolation/ChIP-protocol/library amplification/genome wide computational data analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weiterer

    Full Text Available Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with a genome-wide analysis via high-throughput sequencing is the state of the art method to gain genome-wide representation of histone modification or transcription factor binding profiles. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in the context of human experimental samples is limited, especially in the case of blood cells. The typically extremely low yields of precipitated DNA are usually not compatible with library amplification for next generation sequencing. We developed a highly reproducible protocol to present a guideline from the first step of isolating monocytes from a blood sample to analyse the distribution of histone modifications in a genome-wide manner.The protocol describes the whole work flow from isolating monocytes from human blood samples followed by a high-sensitivity and small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with guidance for generating libraries compatible with next generation sequencing from small amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA.

  8. 75 FR 14175 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... sciences; basic scientists with expertise in the biology of adult stem cells; ethicists; hematology and transfusion medicine researchers with expertise in adult blood stem cells; persons with expertise in...

  9. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  10. Red blood cell transfusion in preterm neonates: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirico G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano ChiricoNeonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children Hospital, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Preterm neonates, especially very low birth weight infants, remain a category of patients with high transfusion needs; about 90% of those with <1,000 g birth weight may be transfused several times during their hospital stay. However, neonatal red blood cells (RBC transfusion is not without risks. In addition to well-known adverse events, several severe side effects have been observed unique to preterm infants, such as transfusion-related acute gut injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increased mortality risk. It is therefore important to reduce the frequency of RBC transfusion in critically ill neonates, by delayed clamping or milking the umbilical cord, using residual cord blood for initial laboratory investigations, reducing phlebotomy losses, determining transfusion guidelines, and ensuring the most appropriate nutrition, with the optimal supplementation of iron, folic acid, and vitamins. Ideally, RBC transfusion should be tailored to the individual requirements of the single infant. However, many controversies still remain, and the decision on whether to transfuse or not is often made on an empirical basis. Recently, a few clinical trials have been performed with the aim to compare the risk/benefit ratio of restrictive versus liberal transfusion criteria. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were observed, suggesting that the restrictive criteria may reduce the need for transfusion and the related side effects. Neurodevelopmental long-term outcome seemed more favorable in the liberal group at first evaluation, especially for boys, and significantly better in the restrictive group at a later clinical investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, performed at an average age of 12 years, showed that intracranial volume was substantially smaller in the liberal group compared with controls. When sex effects

  11. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  12. Human Blood-Vessel-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Wen Chen; Mirko Corselli; Bruno Péault; Johnny Huard

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem/progenitor cells with similar developmental potentials have been independently identified from diverse human tissue/organ cultures. The increasing recognition of the vascular/perivascular origin of mesenchymal precursors suggested blood vessels being a systemic source of adult stem/progenitor cells. Our group and other laboratories recently isolated multiple stem/progenitor cell subsets from blood vessels of adult human tissues. Each of the three structural layers of blood ve...

  13. Comparison of the Blood and Lymphatic Microvessel Density of Pleomorphic Adenoma and Basal Cell Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Andresa Borges Soares; Albina Altemani; Thais Ribeiro de Oliveira; Felipe de Oliveira Fonseca Rodrigues; Alfredo Ribeiro-Silva; Danilo Figueiredo Soave; Fabricio Passador-Santos; Suellen Trentin Brum; Marcelo Henrique Napimoga; Vera Cavalcanti de Araújo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common tumor of the salivary gland, while basal cell adenoma (BCA) is an uncommon neoplasm. Blood and lymphatic vessels are crucial for tumor metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the blood and lymphatic vascular density and vascular and endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in PA and BCA tumors. In addition, cell proliferation was evaluated in these tumors. METHODS Blood and lymphatic vessel content, VEGF expression, and cell p...

  14. Enrichment of prostate cancer cells from blood cells with a hybrid dielectrophoresis and immunocapture microfluidic system

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chao; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood is a technical challenge that is often addressed by microfluidic approaches. Two of the most prominent techniques for rare cancer cell separation, immunocapture and dielectrophoresis (DEP), are currently limited by a performance tradeoff between high efficiency and high purity. The development of a platform capable of these two performance criteria can potentially be facilitated by incorporating both DEP and immunocaptu...

  15. The where, when, how and why of hyaluronan binding by immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally S. M. Lee-Sayer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan is made and extruded from cells to form a pericellular or extracellular matrix (ECM and is present in virtually all tissues in the body. The size and form of hyaluronan present in tissues is indicative of a healthy or inflamed tissue, and the interactions of hyaluronan with immune cells can influence their response. Thus in order to understand how inflammation is regulated, it is necessary to understand these interactions and their consequences. Although there is a large turnover of hyaluronan in our bodies, the large molecular mass form of hyaluronan predominates in healthy tissues. Upon tissue damage and/or infection, the ECM and hyaluronan are broken down and an inflammatory response ensues. As inflammation is resolved, the ECM is restored and high molecular mass hyaluronan predominates again. Immune cells encounter hyaluronan in the tissues and lymphoid organs and respond differently to high and low molecular mass forms. Immune cells differ in their ability to bind hyaluronan and this can vary with the cell type and their activation state. For example, peritoneal macrophages do not bind soluble hyaluronan but can be induced to bind after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Likewise, naïve T cells, which typically express low levels of CD44, the hyaluronan receptor, do not bind hyaluronan until they undergo antigen-stimulated T cell proliferation and upregulate CD44. Despite substantial knowledge of where and when immune cells bind hyaluronan, why immune cells bind hyaluronan remains a major outstanding question. Here, we review what is currently known about the interactions of hyaluronan with immune cells in both healthy and inflamed tissues and discuss how hyaluronan binding by immune cells influences the inflammatory response.

  16. Model animal experiments on UV-c irradiation of blood and isolated cell populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular and molecular basis of the therapeutically used effect of reinjected ultraviolet (UVC) irradiated blood is unknown. First approaches to that problem were made in this study by aid of model experiments. Neither the spontaneous degranulation nor the antigen-induced histamine release from rat connective tissue mast cells (in vivo) was influenced by the injection (i.v.) of UV-irradiated blood or blood lymphocytes. By comparison of the effect of UV light on blood lymphocytes (number of dead cells, strength of chemoluminescence) after irradiation of the isolated cells and the unfractionated blood, respectively, it was shown that the strong light absorption within the blood sample prevents damage or functional alterations of the blood lymphocytes. The compound 48/80 - induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells can be completely inhibited by UV irradiation (0.6 mJ/cm2) without increasing the spontaneous histamine release. (author)

  17. Influenza a virus induces an immediate cytotoxic activity in all major subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Sturlan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A replication defective influenza A vaccine virus (delNS1 virus was developed. Its attenuation is due to potent stimulation of the innate immune system by the virus. Since the innate immune system can also target cancer cells, we reasoned that delNS1 virus induced immune-stimulation should also lead to the induction of innate cytotoxic effects towards cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, isolated CD56+, CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ subsets and different combinations of the above subsets were stimulated by delNS1, wild type (wt virus or heat inactivated virus and co-cultured with tumor cell lines in the presence or absence of antibodies against the interferon system. Stimulation of PBMCs by the delNS1 virus effectively induced cytotoxicity against different cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, virus induced cytotoxicity was exerted by all major subtypes of PBMCs including CD56+, CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ cells. Virus induced cytotoxicity in CD3+, CD14+ and CD19+ cells was dependent on virus replication, whereas virus induced cytotoxicity in CD56+ cells was only dependent on the binding of the virus. Virus induced cytotoxicity of isolated cell cultures of CD14+, CD19+ or CD56+ cells could be partially blocked by antibodies against type I and type II (IFN interferon. In contrast, virus induced cytotoxicity in the complete PBMC preparation could not be inhibited by blocking type I or type II IFN, indicating a redundant system of activation in whole blood. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that apart from their well known specialized functions all main subsets of peripheral blood cells also initially exert a cytotoxic effect upon virus stimulation. This closely links the innate immune system to the adaptive immune response and renders delNS1 virus a potential therapeutic tool for viro-immunotherapy of cancer.

  18. Binding of concanavalin A by the cell membrane of a unicellular organism, Paramecium aurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E

    1975-01-01

    As demonstrated by electron microscopy, Concanavalin A receptors exist on the cell membrane of Paramecium aurelia. The interpretation of the cytochemical detection of Con A binding is not very precise because of a slight, unspecific peroxidase adsorption.

  19. Novel decapeptides that bind avidly and deliver radioisotope to colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Abraham

    Full Text Available The rapidly growing field of targeted tumor therapy often utilizes an antibody, sometimes tagged with a tumor-ablating material such as radioisotope, directed against a specific molecule.This report describes the discovery of nine novel decapeptides which can be radioactively labeled, bind to, and deliver (32P to colon cancer cells. The decapeptides vary from one another by one to three amino acids and demonstrate vastly different binding abilities. The most avidly binding decapeptide can permanently deliver very high levels of radioisotope to the adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines at an efficiency 35 to 150 times greater than to a variety of other cell types, including cell lines derived from other types of cancer or from normal tissue.This experimental approach represents a new example of a strategy, termed peptide binding therapy, for the potential treatment of colorectal and other adenocarcinomas.

  20. STD NMR spectroscopy: a case study of fosfomycin binding interactions in living bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D.F.; Cabeca, Luis Fernando; Martins, Lucas G.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: anita@iq [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    A saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment was successfully employed to observe the binding interactions of fosfomycin resistant and non-resistant bacterial strains using living cell suspensions, without the need for isotopic labelling of the ligand or receptor. (author)

  1. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  2. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Bach Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Methods: Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Results: Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 m

  3. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting.

  4. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  5. Heterologously expressed Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding proteins are sufficient for invasion of host cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Francois, P; Que, Y A; Hussain, M; Heilmann, C; Moreillon, P; Lew, D; Krause, K H; Peters, G; Herrmann, M

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invasion of mammalian cells, including epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic cells, critically depends on fibronectin bridging between S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and the host fibronectin receptor integrin alpha(5)beta(1) (B. Sinha et al., Cell. Microbiol

  6. Complement and Antibody-mediated Enhancement of Red Blood Cell Invasion and Growth of Malaria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Sergei; Angov, Evelina; Landmesser, Mary E; Spring, Michele D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Stoute, José A

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a deadly pathogen. The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is a target for vaccine development. Although anti-merozoite antibodies can block invasion in vitro, there is no efficacy in vivo. To explain this discrepancy we hypothesized that complement activation could enhance RBC invasion by binding to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Here we show that a monoclonal antibody directed against the merozoite and human polyclonal IgG from merozoite vaccine recipients enhanced RBC invasion in a complement-dependent manner and that soluble CR1 inhibited this enhancement. Sialic acid-independent strains, that presumably are able to bind to CR1 via a native ligand, showed less complement-dependent enhancement of RBC invasion than sialic acid-dependent strains that do not utilize native CR1 ligands. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that complement-dependent invasion resulted in aggregation of CR1 at the RBC surface in contact with the merozoite. Finally, total anti-P. berghei IgG enhanced parasite growth and C3 deficiency decreased parasite growth in mice. These results demonstrate, contrary to current views, that complement activation in conjunction with antibodies can paradoxically aid parasites invade RBCs and should be considered in future design and testing of merozoite vaccines. PMID:27333049

  7. Peripheral blood cell variations in cirrhotic portal hypertension patients with hypersplenism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Fu Lu; Xin-Qiu Li; Xiao-Yu Han; Xiao-Guang Gong; Shun-Wu Chang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore peripheral blood cell variations in hepatic cirrhosis portal hypertension patients with hypersplenism. Methods: Clinical data of 322 hypersplenism patients with decreased peripheral blood cells, admitted with cirrhotic portal hypertension, was retrospectively studied over the last 17 years. Results:In 64% (206/322) of patients, more than 2 kinds of blood cell were decreased, including 89 cases of pancytopenia (43.2%), 52 cases of WBC+PLT decrease (25.2%), 29 cases of RBC + PLT decrease (14.1%), and 36 cases of WBC + RBC decrease (17.5%);in 36% (116/322) of patients, single type blood cell decrease occurred, including 31 cases of PLT decrease (26.7%), 29 cases of WBC decrease (25%) and 56 cases of RBC decrease (48.3%). Of 227 routine bone marrow examinations, bone marrow hyperplasia was observed in 118 cases (52.0%), the remainder showed no hyperplasia. For the distinct scope and extent of peripheralblood cell decreases, preoperative blood component transfusions were carried out, then treated by surgery, after whole group splenectomy, the peripheral blood cell count was significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusions: Of portal hypertensive patients with splenomegaly and hypersplenism, 64%have simultaneous decrease in various blood cells, 36%have decrease in single type blood cells, 52%of patients have bone marrow hyperplasia. A splenectomy can significantly increase the reduction of peripheral blood cells.

  8. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmeier, Gerd; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Pieroh, Philipp; Debebe, Tewodros; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  9. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  10. Mining a Yeast Library for Brain Endothelial Cell-Binding Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin Xiang; Cho, Yong Ku; Shusta, Eric V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of yeast surface display for the identification of antibodies that bind the plasma membranes of living cells. Yeast panning with a nonimmune human single-chain antibody library identified 34 unique lead antibodies that bind (Kd = 82 ± 15 nM) and in some cases internalize into rat brain endothelial cells. In addition, a novel yeast display immunoprecipitation procedure was employed for initial characterization of the cognate antigens.

  11. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  12. Modeling of band-3 protein diffusion in the normal and defective red blood cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Zhang, Yihao; Ha, Vi; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-04-13

    We employ a two-component red blood cell (RBC) membrane model to simulate lateral diffusion of band-3 proteins in the normal RBC and in the RBC with defective membrane proteins. The defects reduce the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton (vertical connectivity), or the connectivity of the membrane skeleton itself (horizontal connectivity), and are associated with the blood disorders of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) respectively. Initially, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton limits band-3 lateral mobility by measuring the band-3 macroscopic diffusion coefficients in the normal RBC membrane and in a lipid bilayer without the cytoskeleton. Then, we study band-3 diffusion in the defective RBC membrane and quantify the relation between band-3 diffusion coefficients and percentage of protein defects in HE RBCs. In addition, we illustrate that at low spectrin network connectivity (horizontal connectivity) band-3 subdiffusion can be approximated as anomalous diffusion, while at high horizontal connectivity band-3 diffusion is characterized as confined diffusion. Our simulations show that the band-3 anomalous diffusion exponent depends on the percentage of protein defects in the membrane cytoskeleton. We also confirm that the introduction of attraction between the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network reduces band-3 diffusion, but we show that this reduction is lower than predicted by the percolation theory. Furthermore, we predict that the attractive force between the spectrin filament and the lipid bilayer is at least 20 times smaller than the binding forces at band-3 and glycophorin C, the two major membrane binding sites. Finally, we explore diffusion of band-3 particles in the RBC membrane with defects related to vertical connectivity. We demonstrate that in this case band-3 diffusion can be approximated as confined diffusion for all attraction levels between the spectrin network and the lipid bilayer

  13. Removal of glycosaminoglycans from bovine granulosa cells contributes to increased binding of hydrogen-3 heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ax, R.L.; Stodd, C.M.; Boehm, S.K.; Bellin, M.E.

    1986-02-01

    Granulosa cells from small or large bovine follicles were pretreated with enzymes that hydrolyze various glycosaminoglycans, and binding of (/sup 3/H)-heparin to the granulosa was measured. Binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin increased significantly after enzymatic pretreatments with chondroitinase ABC and fungal hyaluronidase, and similar results were obtained with granulosa from small and large follicles. No changes in binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin were detected after hydrolyses with chondroitinase AC and heparinase in either follicle size. Heparitinase, which hydrolyzes heparan sulfate, led to a significant 50% increase in binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin to granulosa from large follicles but was without effect in small follicles. These results suggest that the lower binding of (/sup 3/H) heparin, which has been reported with follicular enlargement, may be due to heparan sulfate occupying or obstructing binding sites for heparin on granulosa from large follicles.

  14. STUDY OF CORD BLOOD NUCLEATED RED BLOOD CELLS/100 WBC COUNT AS A PREDICTOR OF PERINATAL ASPHYXIA AND ITS SEVERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutami Ratna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia is a major cause of neonatal mortality and chronic neurologic disability amongst survivors. There is no single parameter to define perinatal asphyxia. Recent studies have established a correlation between cord blood nucleated red blood cell count and severity of perinatal asphyxia. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate the utility of cord blood nucleated red blood cell/100 WBC count in early identification of perinatal asphyxia and in predicting its severity. MATERIALS AND METHOD This is a case-control study with a total number of 100 subjects, out of which 50 are asphyxiated/case group and the other 50 are non-asphyxiated/control group, which include neonates born in Gandhi Hospital in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Immediately after birth, umbilical cord blood is collected and a thin blood smear slide is prepared which is stained with Leishman stain for NRBC count. The NRBC count of the case group and the control group is compared. The results were analyzed statistically. RESULTS The mean NRBC count in case group was 38.3 and that in control group was 5.24 with significant rise in cord blood NRBC/100 WBC count in case group compared to controlled group with p value <0.001. Increase in NRBC/100 WBC count was also associated with increased severity of HIE in case group. CONCLUSION In conditions where blood gas analyzers are not easily available, cord blood NRBC count can be used as a cheaper and reliable alternative to predict perinatal asphyxia and to assess its severity.

  15. Intracellular trehalose improves the survival of human red blood cells by freeze-drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hui; LIU Baolin; HUA Zezhao; LI Chuan; WU Zhengzheng

    2007-01-01

    Freeze-drying of human red blood cells has a potential important application for blood transfusion.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects ofintracellular trehalose on the survival of red blood cells after freeze-drying and rehydration.Fresh red blood cells were incubated in trehalose solutions of various concentrations at 37℃ for 7 h following freeze-drying.Polyvinylpyrrolidone,Trehalose,sodium citrate,and human serum albumin were used as extracellular protective agents for the freeze-drying of red blood cells.The results indicated that the intracellular trehalose concentration was increased with increasing concentration of extracellular trehalose solution,and the maximum concen tration of intracellular trehalose reached 35 mmol/L.The viability of freeze-dried red blood cells increased with the increment of intracellular trehalose concentration.

  16. Lectin binding profiles of SSEA-4 enriched, pluripotent human embryonic stem cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Soojung

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have the potential to form every cell type in the body. These cells must be appropriately characterized prior to differentiation studies or when defining characteristics of the pluripotent state. Some developmentally regulated cell surface antigens identified by monoclonal antibodies in a variety of species and stem cell types have proven to be side chains of membrane glycolipids and glycoproteins. Therefore, to examine hESC surfaces for other potential pluripotent markers, we used a panel of 14 lectins, which were chosen based on their specificity for a variety of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages, along with stage specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4, to determine binding quantitation by flow cytometry and binding localization in adherent colonies by immunocytochemistry. Results Enriching cells for SSEA-4 expression increased the percentage of SSEA-4 positive cells to 98–99%. Using enriched high SSEA-4-expressing hESCs, we then analyzed the binding percentages of selected lectins and found a large variation in binding percentages ranging from 4% to 99% binding. Lycopersicon (tomatoesculetum lectin (TL, Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA, and Concanavalin A (Con A bound to SSEA-4 positive regions of hESCs and with similar binding percentages as SSEA-4. In contrast, we found Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA and Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL did not bind to hESCs while Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin (PHA-L, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA, Phaseolus vulgaris erythro-agglutinin (PHA-E, and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA bound partially to hESCs. These binding percentages correlated well with immunocytochemistry results. Conclusion Our results provide information about types of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages found on pluripotent hESC surfaces. We propose that TL, RCA and Con A may be used as markers that are associated with the

  17. Neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule interacts with neurons and astroglia via different binding mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (Ng-CAM) is present in the central nervous system on postmitotic neurons and in the periphery on neurons and Schwann cells. It has been implicated in binding between neurons and between neurons and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of Ng-CAM binding, we analyzed the aggregation of chick Ng- CAM either immobilized on 0.5-micron beads (Covaspheres) or reconstituted into liposomes. The results were correlated with the binding of these particles t...

  18. Postoperative infection and natural killer cell function following blood transfusion in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L S; Andersen, A J; Christiansen, P M;

    1992-01-01

    The frequency of infection in 197 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery and having either no blood transfusion, transfusion with whole blood, or filtered blood free from leucocytes and platelets was investigated in a prospective randomized trial. Natural killer cell function was measure...

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 13 on fetal cells obtained from maternal blood after minor enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Mesker, WE; Ouwerkerk-Van Velzen, MCM; Knepfle, CFHM; Wiesmeijer, KC; Beverstock, GC; Van Ommen, GJB; Tanke, HJ; Kanhai, HHH

    1998-01-01

    In a pilot study to establish fetal nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) detection in maternal blood, trisomy 13 was diagnosed by FISH analysis at 11 weeks' gestation. The NRBCs were detected after a single-step ficoll density gradient enrichment. In blood samples taken both before and after CVS, 52 and

  20. Survival of the fittest?--survival of stored red blood cells after transfusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Bost, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    During the last 90 years many developments have taken place in the world of blood transfusion. Several anticoagulants and storage solutions have been developed. Also the blood processing has undergone many changes. At the moment, in The Netherlands, red blood cell (RBC) concentrates (prepared from a

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of total proteins in blood plasma: a comparative study among dye-binding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Augusto Morozin Zaia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between the biuret method (standard method for total proteins and spectrophotometric methods using dyes (Bradford, 3',3",5',5"-tetrabromophenolphthalein ethyl ester-TBPEE, and erythrosin-B was carried out for the determination of total proteins in blood plasma from rats. Bradford method showed the highest sensitivity for proteins and biuret method showed the lowest. For all the methods, the absorbance for different proteins (BSA, casein, and egg albumin was measured and Bradford method showed the lowest variation of absorbance. The concentration of total protein obtained by using Bradford method was not statistically different (p>0.05 from concentration of total protein obtained by the biuret method. But in regard to erythrosin-B and TBPEE methods the concentrations of total protein were statistically different (pA determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo é importante em diversas áreas de pesquisa. Um estudo comparativo entre o método de biureto (método padrão para proteínas totais e diversos métodos que utilizam corantes (Bradford, tetrabromofenolftaleína etil éster-TBPEE, e eritrosina-B foi realizado para a determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo de ratos. O método de Bradford mostrou a maior sensibilidade para proteínas e o de biureto a menor. Para todos os métodos, as absorbâncias para diferentes proteínas (BSA, caseína, e ovoalbumina foram medidas e o método de Bradford mostrou a menor variação da absorbância. Utilizando o método de Bradford a concentração de proteínas totais obtida não foi estatisticamente diferente (p>0.05 daquela obtida pelo método do biureto. Porém, para os métodos da eritrosina-B e TBPEE as concentrações de proteínas totais foram estatisticamente diferentes (p<0.05 da obtida pelo método de biureto. Portanto o método de Bradford pode ser utilizado no lugar do método de biureto para a determinação de proteínas totais em plasma sangüíneo.

  2. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  3. Expression of Hyaluronan and the Hyaluronan-Binding Proteoglycans Neurocan, Aggrecan and Versican by Neural Stem Cells and Neural Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abaskharoun, Mary; Bellemare, Marie; Lau, Elizabeth; Margolis, Richard U

    2010-01-01

    We have examined the expression and localization patterns of hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in neural stem cells and differentiated neural cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Expression of proteoglycans and hyaluronan was weak in the SSEA1-positive embryonic stem cells but increased noticeably after retinoic acid induction to nestin-positive neural stem cells. After subsequent plating, the hyaluronan-binding chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans agg...

  4. Evaluation of an additive solution for preservation of canine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardrop, K J; Owen, T J; Meyers, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an additive preservative solution on canine red blood cell posttransfusion viability (PTV) and on selected canine red blood cell biochemical parameters was studied. One unit (450 mL) of blood was collected from 6 clinically normal dogs into the anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose, centrifuged, and the plasma removed. The red blood cells were then suspended in 100 mL of a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution and stored at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were removed for study at 1, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 44 days. The 24-hour PTV of autologous red blood cells was determined using a sodium chromate (51Cr) label. Red blood cell concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and pH were also determined. Canine red blood cell PTV, pH, ATP, and 2,3-DPG concentrations decreased during storage (P Food and Drug Administration (FDA) minimum standard for human red blood cells, the PTV was substandard in 75% of the day 44 units. The FDA standard was exceeded in 83% of the day 37 units. It was concluded that 37-day-old canine red blood cells preserved with a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution are of acceptable quality for transfusion.

  5. Red blood cell parameters in antenatal nonsickling hemoglobinopathy screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencaiova G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gabriela Bencaiova, Kristina Dapoto, Roland Zimmermann, Alexander Krafft Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Obstetric Research, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Objective: To find a hematological parameter and the cut-off level for identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Materials and methods: Venous blood samples of 849 women with singleton pregnancies were collected at the first visit. All women who met inclusion criteria were examined for nonsickling hemoglobinopathy. On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity of different cut-off levels for hematological parameters, we calculated the optimal clinically practicable parameter for screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Results: On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity, the best screening parameters for the identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies among nonanemic pregnant women are mean corpuscular volume (MCV with cut-off ≤80 fL (Youden’s index 91.2%, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH <27.5 pg (Youden’s index 90.7%, and microcytosis (MRC ≥3% (Youden’s index 90.2%. An analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves and the calculated Youden’s index showed that MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10% are the best red blood cell indices for the screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathy among anemic women with iron deficiency. Conclusion: Our results suggest targeted screening for nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in nonanemic pregnant women with MCV ≤80 fL, MCH ≤27.5 pg, or MRC ≥3% and in anemic women with MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10%. Keywords: anemia, antenatal, hemoglobinopathy, pregnancy, screening, hemoglobin, hematological parameters

  6. Vesiculation of healthy and defective red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2015-07-01

    Vesiculation of mature red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to removal of defective patches of the erythrocyte membrane. In blood disorders, which are related to defects in proteins of the RBC membrane, vesiculation of the plasma membrane is intensified. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain RBC vesiculation but the exact underlying mechanisms and what determines the sizes of the vesicles are still not completely understood. In this work, we apply a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics RBC membrane model to study how RBC vesiculation is controlled by the membrane spontaneous curvature and by lateral compression of the membrane. Our simulation results show that the formation of small homogeneous vesicles with a diameter less than 40 nm can be attributed to a large spontaneous curvature of membrane domains. On the other hand, compression on the membrane can cause the formation of vesicles with heterogeneous composition and with sizes comparable with the size of the cytoskeleton corral. When spontaneous curvature and lateral compression are simultaneously considered, the compression on the membrane tends to facilitate formation of vesicles originating from curved membrane domains. We also simulate vesiculation of RBCs with membrane defects connected to hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and to hereditary spherocytosis (HS). When the vertical connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is elevated, as in normal RBCs, multiple vesicles are shed from the compressed membrane with diameters similar to the cytoskeleton corral size. In HS RBCs, where the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is reduced, larger-size vesicles are released under the same compression ratio as in normal RBCs. Lastly, we find that vesicles released from HE RBCs can contain cytoskeletal filaments due to fragmentation of the membrane skeleton while vesicles released from the HS RBCs are depleted of cytoskeletal filaments.

  7. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  8. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances.

  9. SNPs in MicroRNA Binding Sites in 3′-UTRs of RAAS Genes Influence Arterial Blood Pressure and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nossent, A.Yael; Hansen, Jakob L.; Doggen, Carine; Quax, Paul H.A.; Sheikh, Soren P.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2011-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in microRNA (miR) binding sites in genes of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) can influence blood pressure and risk of myocardial infarction. Methods Using online databases dbSNP and TargetScan, we ident

  10. Binding of iodinated erythropoietin to rat bone marrow cells under normal and anemic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Tojo, A.; Fukamachi, H.; Kitamura, T.; Saito, T.; Urabe, A.; Takaku, F.

    1989-02-01

    Specific binding sites for erythropoietin (Epo) were shown in normal and anemic rat bone marrow cells using (125I)labeled human recombinant Epo. When rats were treated once or several times with phenylhydrazine or malotilate, or by phlebotomy, the serum Epo level determined by RIA began to increase rapidly. Thereafter, both the number of erythroid colony-forming unit (CFU-E)-derived colonies and the Epo binding capacity of bone marrow cells increased almost simultaneously in response to induced anemic states, suggesting that the amount of Epo binding in bone marrow cells may reflect in vivo erythropoiesis. Scatchard analysis of the binding data from normal rats revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites (Kd = 0.18 +/- 0.04 nM, 38 +/- 5 sites/cell). In anemic states, the apparent average receptor number per cell increased (52-62 sites/cell) without changing in binding affinity toward Epo. Furthermore, (125I)Epo was cross-linked to the cell surface molecule of approximately 165 kd in nonreducing conditions and 75 kd in reducing conditions. Autoradiographic analysis indicated that Epo receptors were distributed on immature erythroid cells. Proerythroblasts were the most heavily labeled, whereas orthochromatic erythroblasts and cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages were not labeled. Calculations based on Scatchard and autoradiographic analysis showed that proerythroblasts have 390 receptor sites per cell, twice as many as basophilic or polychromatophilic erythroblasts have. These results are consistent with the stage-specific action of Epo in physiological differentiation of erythroid cells.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Peripheral_blood_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Peripheral_blood_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  19. Mechanism of Copper Uptake from Blood Plasma Ceruloplasmin by Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Ramos

    Full Text Available Ceruloplasmin, the main copper binding protein in blood plasma, has been of particular interest for its role in efflux of iron from cells, but has additional functions. Here we tested the hypothesis that it releases its copper for cell uptake by interacting with a cell surface reductase and transporters, producing apoceruloplasmin. Uptake and transepithelial transport of copper from ceruloplasmin was demonstrated with mammary epithelial cell monolayers (PMC42 with tight junctions grown in bicameral chambers, and purified human (64Cu-labeled ceruloplasmin secreted by HepG2 cells. Monolayers took up virtually all the (64Cu over 16h and secreted half into the apical (milk fluid. This was partly inhibited by Ag(I. The (64Cu in ceruloplasmin purified from plasma of (64Cu-injected mice accumulated linearly in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs over 3-6h. Rates were somewhat higher in Ctr1+/+ versus Ctr1-/- cells, and 3-fold lower at 2 °C. The ceruloplasmin-derived (64Cu could not be removed by extensive washing or trypsin treatment, and most was recovered in the cytosol. Actual cell copper (determined by furnace atomic absorption increased markedly upon 24h exposure to holoceruloplasmin. This was accompanied by a conversion of holo to apoceruloplasmin in the culture medium and did not occur during incubation in the absence of cells. Four different endocytosis inhibitors failed to prevent 64Cu uptake from ceruloplasmin. High concentrations of non-radioactive Cu(II- or Fe(III-NTA (substrates for cell surface reductases, or Cu(I-NTA (to compete for transporter uptake almost eliminated uptake of (64Cu from ceruloplasmin. MEFs had cell surface reductase activity and expressed Steap 2 (but not Steaps 3 and 4 or dCytB. However, six-day siRNA treatment was insufficient to reduce activity or uptake. We conclude that ceruloplasmin is a circulating copper transport protein that may interact with Steap2 on the cell surface, forming apoceruloplasmin, and Cu(I that

  20. Mechanism of Copper Uptake from Blood Plasma Ceruloplasmin by Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Danny; Mar, David; Ishida, Michael; Vargas, Rebecca; Gaite, Michaella; Montgomery, Aaron; Linder, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin, the main copper binding protein in blood plasma, has been of particular interest for its role in efflux of iron from cells, but has additional functions. Here we tested the hypothesis that it releases its copper for cell uptake by interacting with a cell surface reductase and transporters, producing apoceruloplasmin. Uptake and transepithelial transport of copper from ceruloplasmin was demonstrated with mammary epithelial cell monolayers (PMC42) with tight junctions grown in bicameral chambers, and purified human (64)Cu-labeled ceruloplasmin secreted by HepG2 cells. Monolayers took up virtually all the (64)Cu over 16h and secreted half into the apical (milk) fluid. This was partly inhibited by Ag(I). The (64)Cu in ceruloplasmin purified from plasma of (64)Cu-injected mice accumulated linearly in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) over 3-6h. Rates were somewhat higher in Ctr1+/+ versus Ctr1-/- cells, and 3-fold lower at 2 °C. The ceruloplasmin-derived (64)Cu could not be removed by extensive washing or trypsin treatment, and most was recovered in the cytosol. Actual cell copper (determined by furnace atomic absorption) increased markedly upon 24h exposure to holoceruloplasmin. This was accompanied by a conversion of holo to apoceruloplasmin in the culture medium and did not occur during incubation in the absence of cells. Four different endocytosis inhibitors failed to prevent 64Cu uptake from ceruloplasmin. High concentrations of non-radioactive Cu(II)- or Fe(III)-NTA (substrates for cell surface reductases), or Cu(I)-NTA (to compete for transporter uptake) almost eliminated uptake of (64)Cu from ceruloplasmin. MEFs had cell surface reductase activity and expressed Steap 2 (but not Steaps 3 and 4 or dCytB). However, six-day siRNA treatment was insufficient to reduce activity or uptake. We conclude that ceruloplasmin is a circulating copper transport protein that may interact with Steap2 on the cell surface, forming apoceruloplasmin, and Cu(I) that

  1. Differentiation of smooth muscle progenitor cells in peripheral blood and its application in tissue engineered blood vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang-zhe XIE; Ning-tao FANG; Shui LIU; Ping ZHOU; Yi ZHANG; Song-mei WANG; Hong-yang GAO; Luan-feng PAN

    2008-01-01

    Background: A major shortcoming in tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) is the lack of healthy and easily attainable smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs), especially from peripheral blood, may offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineering involving a less invasive harvesting technique. Methods: SPCs were isolated from 5-ml fresh rat peripheral blood by density-gradient centrifugation and cultured for 3 weeks in endothelial growth medium-2-MV (EGM-2-MV) medium containing platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF BB). Before seeded on the synthesized scaffold, SPC-derived smooth muscle outgrowth cell (SOC) phenotypes were assessed by immuno-fluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cells were seeded onto the silk fibroin-modified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (SF-PHBHHx) scaffolds by 6×104 cells/cm'2 and cultured under the static con-dition for 3 weeks. The growth and proliferation of the seeded cells on the scaffold were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Results: SOCs displayed specific "hill and valley" morphology, expressed the specific markers of the SMC lineage: protein, and extracellular matrix components elastin and matrix Gla protein (MGP), as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After seeded on the SF-PHBHHx scaffold, the cells showed excellent metabolic activity and proliferation. Conclusion: SPCs isolated from peripheral blood can be differentiated into the SMCs in vitro and have an impressive growth potential in the biodegradable synthesized scaffold. Thus, SPCs may be a promising cell source for constructing TEBVs.

  2. Binding of erythropoietin to CFU-E derived from fetal mouse liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukamachi, H.; Saito, T.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Takaku, F.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) to fetal mouse liver cells (FMLC) was investigated using a radioiodinated derivative which retained full biological activity. FMLC were fractionated using a preformed Percoll density gradient. Using the fractionated FMLC, the ability to form CFU-E colonies in a semisolid culture was examined, and the binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was measured. The highest specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was observed in a fraction with a density between 1.062 and 1.076 g/ml. The same fraction showed the highest ability to form CFU-E-derived colonies. After suspension culture of FMLC with EPO for 2 days, differentiated erythroid cells with higher density markedly increased. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO to these cells almost disappeared with differentiation. Scatchard analysis with cells of the CFU-E-enriched fraction showed a nonlinear curve, suggesting the existence of two classes of binding sites. One binding site was high-affinity (Kd1 = 0.41 nM), and the other low-affinity (Kd2 = 3.13 nM). These results suggest that the expression of EPO receptors on the erythroid cells is highest in CFU-E.

  3. Measurement of HCV-Specific CD8(+) Cytotoxic T-Cell Activities in the Peripheral Blood by Europium Release Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imawari, M

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) contain NK cells, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), helper T-cells, and B-cells that respond to viral infection and act to eliminate the virus from infected individuals. CTLs are not only thought to be a major host defense against viral infection, but are also implicated in the immunopathogenesis. Classical CTLs are CD8(+) and recognize endogenously synthesized and processed antigen in association with a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecule. The antigens are usually 8-10 amino acids long. HCV-specific CTLs have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of some of patients with HCV infection by stimulating PBMC with the HCV synthetic peptides (1). The peptides were synthesized as overlapping peptides to encompass a certain region of the HCV antigen (1), on the basis of antigenicity prediction from the amino acid composition of HCV (2), or on the basis of the HLA binding motifs in the HCV antigen (3). Several minimal and optimal epitopes in the HCV antigen and their HLA restriction of recognition by CTLs have been defined. Recently, it has been reported that HCV-specific CTLs may suppress the outgrowth of HCV (4). In this chapter, methods will be discussed that demonstrate HCV-specific CTLs in the peripheral blood of patients with HCV infection. We use nonradioisotope europium (Eu) for assay of CTL activities. PMID:21374383

  4. Binding of Excreted and/or Secreted Products of Adult Hookworms to Human NK Cells in Necator americanus-Infected Individuals from Brazil▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Olive, Denise; Damsker, Jesse M.; Loukas, Alex; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Constant, Stephanie L.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The impact of the interaction between excreted and/or secreted (ES) Necator americanus products and NK cells from Necator-infected individuals was analyzed. We investigated the binding of ES products to NK cells, the expression of NK cell receptors (CD56, CD159a/NKG2A, CD314/NKG2D, CD335/NKp46, and KLRF1/NKp80), the frequency of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing NK cells after whole-blood in vitro stimulation, and the capacity of N. americanus ES products to induce NK cell chemotaxis. In contrast to those from noninfected individuals, NK cells from Necator-infected individuals demonstrated no binding with N. americanus ES products. This phenomenon was not due to alterations in NK cell receptor expression in infected subjects and could not be reproduced with NK cells from uninfected individuals by incubation with immunoregulatory cytokines (interleukin-10/transforming growth factor β). Further, we found that a significantly greater percentage of NK cells from infected subjects than NK cells from uninfected individuals spontaneously produced IFN-γ upon ex vivo culture. Our findings support a model whereby NK cells from Necator-infected individuals may interact with ES products, making these cells refractory to binding with exogenous ES products. During N. americanus infection, human NK cells are attracted to the site of infection by chemotactic ES products produced by adult Necator worms in the gut mucosa. Binding of ES products causes the NK cells to become activated and secrete IFN-γ locally, thereby contributing to the adult hookworm's ability to evade host immune responses. PMID:18838519

  5. Single-cell evaluation of red blood cell bio-mechanical and nano-structural alterations upon chemically induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ameya; Chu, Trang T T; Dao, Ming; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Erythroid cells, specifically red blood cells (RBCs), are constantly exposed to highly reactive radicals during cellular gaseous exchange. Such exposure often exceeds the cells' innate anti-oxidant defense systems, leading to progressive damage and eventual senescence. One of the contributing factors to this process are alterations to hemoglobin conformation and globin binding to red cell cytoskeleton. However, in addition to the aforementioned changes, it is possible that oxidative damage induces critical changes to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton and corresponding bio-mechanical and nano-structural properties of the red cell membrane. To quantitatively characterize how oxidative damage accounts for such changes, we employed single-cell manipulation techniques such as micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on RBCs. These investigations demonstrated visible morphological changes upon chemically induced oxidative damage (using hydrogen peroxide, diamide, primaquine bisphosphate and cumene hydroperoxide). Our results provide previously unavailable observations on remarkable changes in red cell cytoskeletal architecture and membrane stiffness due to oxidative damage. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that a pathogen that infects human blood cells, Plasmodium falciparum was unable to penetrate through the oxidant-exposed RBCs that have damaged cytoskeleton and stiffer membranes. This indicates the importance of bio-physical factors pertinent to aged RBCs and it's relevance to malaria infectivity. PMID:25950144

  6. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  7. Characterization of Adherent Nonhematopoietic Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安小惠; 蔡国平

    2003-01-01

    To confirm and characterize the adherent fibroblast-like progenitors in human umbilical cord blood, we isolated mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Hypaque.Two main morphologically different kinds of cells were formed by culturing the cells in collagen-coated 24-well plastic dishes and flasks.One type was the adherent fibroblast-like cells, while the other was loosely adherent clonally expanded round cells.Our experiments demonstrate that the adherent fibroblast-like cells possess multilineage potential, including the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like cells and to express the mesenchymal cell marker.

  8. Blood cell gene expression profiling in subjects with aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars K; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sønder, Søren U;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microarray analysis of local and peripheral cells in subjects with immune-inflammatory diseases may identify candidate genes associated with these diseases. The present study identified differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from subjects with unt...

  9. 25 Years of Tension over Actin Binding to the Cadherin Cell Adhesion Complex: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a conceptual (re)evolution in understanding how the cadherin cell adhesion complex, which contains F-actin-binding proteins, binds to the actin cytoskeleton. There is now good synergy between structural, biochemical, and cell biological results that the cadherin-catenin complex binds to F-actin under force. PMID:27166091

  10. Sumatriptan increases the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals and healthy blood donors in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    2000-01-01

    HIV infection is characterized by the loss of CD4+ T cells as well as the loss of T-cell function, leading to severe immunodeficiency. The proliferative capacity of T cells measured in vitro as responses to antigens and mitogens is severely reduced during HIV infection. An increased level...... responsible for regulation of the intracellular levels of cAMP. In a preliminary study sumatriptan increased the proliferative responses of PBMC to a polyclonal activator in vitro in 9 of 10 HIV-seropositive individuals (p=0.007), and in 7 of 9 healthy blood donors (p=0.05). This was probably due...... of the intracellular second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to cause impaired proliferative capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-infected individuals in vitro. Sumatriptan, a 5HT1d receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes...

  11. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  12. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM [3H]naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-[3H]-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM [3H]-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1

  13. Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines bind to platelets. Incubation with platelets induces CD15 and P-selectin dependent adhesion of the cell lines to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, Ofra Malka; Ozer, Janet; Prinsloo, Isebrand; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is believed to spread in an orderly fashion within the lymphatic compartment. In a minority of cases, after reaching the spleen, the neoplasm disseminates, reminiscent of metastasis. In the spleen, the Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg tumor cells come across platelets in the blood vessels and mainly in the splenic red pulp. Based on this knowledge, we investigated the possibility of platelets inducing cell adhesion in Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. We showed that L428 and KMH-2 cells strongly adhere to thrombin-activated platelets. Cell adhesion to platelets is partially dependent on CD15 antigens (Lewis(X)), mainly sialyl-CD15, and P-selectin. KMH-2, as compared to L428 cells, showed increased binding due to its differential high expression of the sialyl-CD15. As a consequence of incubation with platelets, KMH-2 cells also produced increased amounts of tumor necrosis factors α (TNFα) followed by enhanced binding to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of both cell lines with activated platelets also induced activation of AP-1 transcription complex. Our findings are consistent with the concept that platelets play a critical role in the dissemination of HRS cells in HL, predominantly in the spleen, by increasing cell adhesion and thus promoting their proliferative and migratory properties beyond the lymphatic system.

  14. 3-D refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Songyi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Nab, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions for fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed of RBCs from cord blood of newborn infants, and of adult RBCs from mothers or non-pregnant women, employing optical holographic micro-tomography. Optical measurements of 3-D refractive index distributions, and of dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs, enabled retrieval of the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significant larger than those of RBCs from non-pregnant women, and cord RBCs have more flattened shapes than RBCs in adults. In addition, the Hb content in the cord RBCs of newborns was significantly greater. The Hb concentration in cord RBCs was higher than for non-pregnant women or maternal RBCs, but t...

  15. Relative deformability of red blood cells in sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia by trapping and dragging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Rance; Cooper, James; Welker, Gabriel; Aguilar, Elaura; Flanagan, Brooke; Pennycuff, Chelsey; Scott, David; Farone, Anthony; Farone, Mary; Erenso, Daniel; Mushi, Robert; del Pilar Aguinaga, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Genetic mutation of the β-globin gene or inheritance of this mutated gene changes the chemical composition of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule that could lead to either the heterozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell trait (SCT), or the homozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell anemia (SCA). These mutations could affect the reversible elastic deformations of the red blood cells (RBCs) which are vital for biological functions. We have investigated this effect by studying the differences in the deformability of RBCs from blood samples of an individual with SCT and an untreated patient with SCA along with hemoglobin quantitation of each blood sample. Infrared 1064 nm laser trap force along with drag shear force are used to induce deformation in the RBCs. Ultra2-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) is used for the hemoglobin quantitation.

  16. Osteopontin and the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4 compete for CD44 binding and have opposite effects on CD133+ cell colony formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobocan Monica C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C21, the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4, has growth promoting activity and was discovered as one of several erythropoietin-dependent endothelial proteins. C21 stimulates red cell formation in anemic mice and is a growth factor for CD34+ and CD36+ hematopoietic cells, skin fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. ROD1 has been identified as an intracellular mediator. Nothing is known about the existence of putative C21 receptors on plasma membranes of target cells. Findings We analyzed the nature of C21-binding proteins in cell lysates of skin fibroblasts using C21 affinity columns. The membrane receptor CD44 was identified as C21-binding protein by mass spectrometry. We were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD44 on cell growth or the effect of C21 on cell proliferation. A soluble form of CD44 was synthesized in insect cells and purified from culture supernatants with a combination of PVDF filtration in the presence of ammonium sulphate and HPLC. Both osteopontin and hyaluronic acid competitively displaced Biotin-C21 binding to CD44. In a colony-forming assay using primitive CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, osteopontin and C21 had opposite effects and C21 reduced the inhibitory action of osteopontin. Conclusion CD44 is a C21-binding membrane protein. We could not demonstrate an involvement of CD44 in the proliferative action of C21. Nevertheless, based on the antagonism of C21 and osteopontin in hematopoietic precursors, we speculate that C21 could indirectly have a major impact on hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, by hindering osteopontin membrane binding at the level of the bone marrow niche.

  17. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  18. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with α melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and 125I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither α melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an 125I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells

  19. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  20. Binding and uptake of diphtheria toxin by toxin-resistant Chinese hamster ovary and mouse cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Didsbury, J R; Moehring, J M; Moehring, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    We investigated two phenotypically distinct types of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants of Chinese hamster cells and compared their resistance with that of naturally resistant mouse cells. All are resistant due to a defect in the process of internalization and delivery of toxin to its target in the cytosol, elongation factor 2. By cell hybridization studies, analysis of cross-resistance, and determination of specific binding sites for 125I-labeled diphtheria toxin, we showed that these cell s...

  1. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  2. Cells capable of colony formation in the peripheral blood of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCredie, K B; Hersh, E M; Freireich, E J

    1971-01-22

    Colony-forming cells have been found in the peripheral blood of man and have been grown in vitro by use of a soft agar gel technique. It has been possible to collect these cells with a blood-cell separator in numbers similar to those found in the peripheral circulation. Repeat leukapheresis of the same donor does not reduce the number of circulating colony-forming cells. PMID:5538844

  3. Isolation and characterization of equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Armando de M. Carvalho; Ana Lucia M. Yamada; Juliana R.B. Martins; Leandro Maia; Marjorie de A Golim; Elenice Deffune; Carlos A. Hussni; Ana Liz G. Alves

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to isolate, cultivate and characterize equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (PbMSCs). Peripheral blood was collected, followed by the isolation of mononuclear cells using density gradient reagents, and the cultivation of adherent cells. Monoclonal mouse anti-horse CD13, mouse anti-horse CD44, and mouse anti-rat CD90 antibodies were used for the immunophenotypic characterization of the surface of the PbMSCs. These cells were also ...

  4. Time related variations in stem cell harvesting of umbilical cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Gianluigi Mazzoccoli; Giuseppe Miscio; Andrea Fontana; Massimiliano Copetti; Massimo Francavilla; Alberto Bosi; Federico Perfetto; Alice Valoriani; Angelo De Cata; Michele Santodirocco; Angela Totaro; Rosa Rubino; Lazzaro di Mauro; Roberto Tarquini

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent mesenchymal cells useful for treatment in malignant/nonmalignant hematologic-immunologic diseases and regenerative medicine. Transplantation outcome is correlated with cord blood volume (CBV), number of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ progenitor cells and colony forming units in UCB donations. Several studies have addressed the role of maternal/neonatal factors associated with the hematopoietic reconstruction pote...

  5. HIV-1 Infection of Placental Cord Blood Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    FOLCIK, RENEE M.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Li, Yuan; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Douglas, Steven D.; STARR, STUART E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), have been implicated as the initial targets of HIV infection in skin and mucosal surfaces. DC can be generated in vitro from blood-isolated CD14+ monocytes or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells in the presence of various cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether monocytes obtained from placental cord blood are capable of differentiation into dendritic cells when cultured with a combination of cytokines—granulocyte...

  6. Direct detection of red blood cell fragments: a new flow cytometric method to evaluate hemolysis in blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneweber, J; Chow, T W; Takano, T; Maeda, T; Nonaka, K; Schulte-Eistrup, S; Kawahito, S; Elert, O; Moake, J L; Nosé, Y

    2001-01-01

    Pump induced hemolysis is presently evaluated by measuring plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). However, this method has disadvantages because quantification of fHb depends on hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The aim of this work was to devise a hemoglobin independent method, capable of quantifying cell trauma directly by measuring the number of red blood cell (RBC) fragments. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify circulating RBC fragments derived from a roller pump (Sarns, Inc. Model 2 M 6,002) and a centrifugal pump (Gyro C1E3, Kyocera Corp.). The pumps were tested in a mock circuit for 2 hr (5 L/min flow against 100 mm Hg pressure head). Red blood cell fragments were quantified by a phycoerythrin (PE) labeled glycophorin A antibody specific for erythrocytes. Red blood cell fragments were smaller than the intact RBC population and overlapped in size with the platelet population (based on forward- and side-light scattering measurements). For the roller pump, the values for RBC fragments increased from 1,090 +/- 260/microl at 0 min to 14,880 +/- 5,900/microl after 120 min. In contrast, using the centrifugal pump, there was little increase in RBC fragments (from 730 +/- 270/microl at 0 min to 1,400 +/- 840/microl after 120 min). Flow cytometry can be used for the rapid, sensitive, hemoglobin independent evaluation of pump induced RBC trauma.

  7. Human cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells acquire functional cardiac properties through a cell fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Daniele; Crespi, Alessia; Brioschi, Chiara; Parente, Valeria; Toietta, Gabriele; Devanna, Paolo; Baruscotti, Mirko; Truffa, Silvia; Scavone, Angela; Rusconi, Francesca; Biondi, Andrea; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Vigna, Elisa; Difrancesco, Dario; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Barbuti, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy of cardiac repair by stem cell administration relies on a successful functional integration of injected cells into the host myocardium. Safety concerns have been raised about the possibility that stem cells may induce foci of arrhythmia in the ischemic myocardium. In a previous work (36), we showed that human cord blood CD34(+) cells, when cocultured on neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, exhibit excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes, even though no human genes were upregulated. The aims of the present work are to investigate whether human CD34(+) cells, isolated after 1 wk of coculture with neonatal ventricular myocytes, possess molecular and functional properties of cardiomyocytes and to discriminate, using a reporter gene system, whether cardiac differentiation derives from a (trans)differentiation or a cell fusion process. Umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were isolated by a magnetic cell sorting method, transduced with a lentiviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and seeded onto primary cultures of spontaneously beating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cocultured EGFP(+)/CD34(+)-derived cells were analyzed for their electrophysiological features at different time points. After 1 wk in coculture, EGFP(+) cells, in contact with cardiomyocytes, were spontaneously contracting and had a maximum diastolic potential (MDP) of -53.1 mV, while those that remained isolated from the surrounding myocytes did not contract and had a depolarized resting potential of -11.4 mV. Cells were then resuspended and cultured at low density to identify EGFP(+) progenitor cell derivatives. Under these conditions, we observed single EGFP(+) beating cells that had acquired an hyperpolarization-activated current typical of neonatal cardiomyocytes (EGFP(+) cells, -2.24 ± 0.89 pA/pF; myocytes, -1.99 ± 0.63 pA/pF, at -125 mV). To discriminate between cell autonomous differentiation and fusion, EGFP(+)/CD34

  8. Kinetics of CLL cells in tissues and blood during therapy with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib

    OpenAIRE

    Wodarz, Dominik; Garg, Naveen; Komarova, Natalia L.; Benjamini, Ohad; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.; Kantarjian, Hagop; James, Danelle; O’Brien, Susan; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    During ibrutinib therapy, 1.7% of blood and 2.7% of tissue CLL cells die per day which is 3 and 5 times higher than without treatment.The fraction of CLL cells that redistribute into the blood during ibrutinib treatment represents 23.3% ± 17% of the tissue disease burden.

  9. The effects of non-leukoreduced red blood cell transfusions on microcirculation in mixed surgical patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayhan, B.; Yuruk, K.; Koene, S.; Sahin, A.; Ince, C.; Aypar, U.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of the storage process on oxygen-carrying properties of red blood cells and the efficacy of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions concerning tissue oxygenation remain an issue of debate in transfusion medicine. Storage time and leukocyte content probably interact since longer stor

  10. Preoperative factors associated with red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Norgaard, Astrid;

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a frequently used treatment in patients admitted with a fractured hip, but the use remains an area of much debate. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative factors associated with the risk of receiving a red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture...

  11. CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INTERSTITIAL PNEUMONITIS FOLLOWING ALLOGENEIC PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-hua; HUANG Lian-sheng; ZHANG Xiao-hong; ZHU Kang-er; XU Yang; WU Dong; ZHAO Xiao-ying

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors and prophylaxis and treatment of cytomegalovirus interstitial pneumonitis(CMV-IP) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT). Methods: 43 patients who received allo-PBSCT were allocated to either a Gancyclovir(GCV)-prophylaxis group (n=19) or a non-GCV prophylaxis group (n=24).A comparison was made of the incidence of CMV-IP in patients given or not given prophylactic gancyclovir. Results: 9patients in non-GCV prophylaxis group developed late CMV-IP (P<0.05). Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) may be associated with a high risk of CMV-IP. 5 cases of CMV-IP were successfully treated with GCV, but 3 cases died of CMV-IP.The most common adverse event of GCV was neutropenia, but was reversible. Conclusion: CMV infection was a major cause of interstitial pneumonitis after allo-PBSCT, which correlated strongly with the severity of GVHD. Gancyclovir was shown to be effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of CMV-IP.

  12. Human red blood cells deformed under thermal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Ji-Jinn; Chan, Vincent; Feng, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2006-03-01

    The flow-induced mechanical deformation of a human red blood cell (RBC) during thermal transition between room temperature and 42.0 degrees C is interrogated by laser tweezer experiments. Based on the experimental geometry of the deformed RBC, the surface stresses are determined with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulation. It is found that the RBC is more deformable while heating through 37.0 degrees C to 42.0 degrees C, especially at a higher flow velocity due to a thermal-fluid effect. More importantly, the degree of RBC deformation is irreversible and becomes softer, and finally reaches a plateau (at a uniform flow velocity U > 60 microm s(-1)) after the heat treatment, which is similar to a strain-hardening dominated process. In addition, computational simulated stress is found to be dependent on the progression of thermotropic phase transition. Overall, the current study provides new insights into the highly coupled temperature and hydrodynamic effects on the biomechanical properties of human erythrocyte in a model hydrodynamic flow system.

  13. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus in volunteer blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P E; Stevens, C E; Pindyck, J; Schrode, J; Steaffens, J W; Lee, H

    1990-01-01

    Serum samples collected in 1985 and 1986 from 18,257 donors to the Greater New York Blood Program were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassay for antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus (anti-HTLV). Fifteen samples (0.08%) were confirmed positive: 7 by radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) alone, 6 by Western blot alone, and 2 by combined results from both tests. One donor, whose original test result was uninterpretable because multiple nonspecific bands were present on RIPA, clearly tested positive on subsequent specimens. Follow-up testing of individuals with this type of result may be needed to resolve their HTLV status. Anti-HTLV prevalence increased with age and was significantly more common in black or Hispanic donors and in those born in the Caribbean than in other donors. All anti-HTLV-positive donors were negative for antibody to HIV-1, and only one donor (7% of those positive) would have been excluded by any of the routine donor screening tests used at that time. PMID:2173176

  14. MicroRNA Expression in Alzheimer Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various coding genes representing multiple functional categories are downregulated in blood mononuclear cells (BMC of patients with sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD. Noncoding microRNAs (miRNA regulate gene expression by degrading messages or inhibiting translation. Using BMC as a paradigm for the study of systemic alterations in AD, we investigated whether peripheral miRNA expression is altered in this condition. MicroRNA levels were assessed using the microRNA microarray (MMChip containing 462 human miRNA, and the results validated by real time PCR. Sixteen AD patients and sixteen normal elderly controls (NEC were matched for ethnicity, age, gender and education. The expression of several BMC miRNAs was found to increase in AD relative to NEC levels, and may differ between AD subjects bearing one or two APOE4 alleles. As compared to NEC, miRNAs signifi cantly upregulated in AD subjects and confi rmed by qPCR were miR-34a and 181b. Predicted target genes downregulated in Alzheimer BMC that correlated with the upregulated miRNAs were largely represented in the functional categories of Transcription/Translation and Synaptic Activity. Several miRNAs targeting the same genes were within the functional category of Injury response/Redox homeostasis. Taken together, induction of microRNA expression in BMC may contribute to the aberrant systemic decline in mRNA levels in sporadic AD.

  15. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia M. Serebrennikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwavelength transmission (MWT spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs. The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2>0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites’ development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states.

  16. Non-immune binding of human IgG to M-related proteins confers resistance to phagocytosis of group A streptococci in blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry S Courtney

    Full Text Available The non-immune binding of immunoglobulins by bacteria is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of infections. M-related proteins (Mrp are group A streptococcal (GAS receptors for immunoglobulins, but it is not known if this binding has any impact on virulence. To further investigate the binding of immunoglobulins to Mrp, we engineered mutants of an M type 4 strain of GAS by inactivating the genes for mrp, emm, enn, sof, and sfbX and tested these mutants in IgG-binding assays. Inactivation of mrp dramatically decreased the binding of human IgG, whereas inactivation of emm, enn, sof, and sfbx had only minor effects, indicating that Mrp is a major IgG-binding protein. Binding of human immunoglobulins to a purified, recombinant form of Mrp indicated that it selectively binds to the Fc domain of human IgG, but not IgA or IgM and that it preferentially bound subclasses IgG₁>IgG₄>IgG₂>IgG₃. Recombinant proteins encompassing different regions of Mrp were engineered and used to map its IgG-binding domain to its A-repeat region and a recombinant protein with 3 A-repeats was a better inhibitor of IgG binding than one with a single A-repeat. A GAS mutant expressing Mrp with an in-frame deletion of DNA encoding the A-repeats had a dramatically reduced ability to bind human IgG and to grow in human blood. Mrp exhibited host specificity in binding IgG; human IgG was the best inhibitor of the binding of IgG followed by pig, horse, monkey, and rabbit IgG. IgG from goat, mouse, rat, cow, donkey, chicken, and guinea pig were poor inhibitors of binding. These findings indicate that Mrp preferentially binds human IgG and that this binding contributes to the ability of GAS to resist phagocytosis and may be a factor in the restriction of GAS infections to the human host.

  17. Biologically active monoiodinated alpha-MSH derivatives for receptor binding studies using human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different monoiodinated radioligands of alpha-MSH (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) were compared in a binding assay with human D10 melanoma cells: [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH, and [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH. They were prepared either by the classical chloramine T method or by the Enzymobead method. A simple and rapid purification scheme was developed consisting of a primary separation on reversed-phase C18 silica cartridges immediately after the iodination, followed by HPLC purification before each binding experiment. Biological testing of the three radioligands showed that they all retained high melanotropic activity in the B16 melanin assay and the Anolis melanophore assay. However, in human D10 melanoma cells, [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4]-alpha-MSH led to a high degree of non-specific binding to the cells which could not be displaced by excess alpha-MSH and only partially by [NIe4]-alpha-MSH. The [Tyr(125I)2,NIe4,D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH tracer gave similar results but with a much lower proportion of non-specific binding. On the other hand, [Tyr(125I)2]-alpha-MSH proved to be an excellent radioligand whose non-specific binding to the D10 cells was not higher than 20% of the total binding

  18. Analysis of the coagulation of human blood cells on diamond surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, V.; Fontana, M.; Guo, Zhao Jing; Ceragioli, H. J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and coagulation of human blood cells in contact with solid surfaces. Blood was extracted from the veins of healthy adult donors and the samples were used immediately after extraction, deposited either on borosilicate glass or diamond substrates. Some blood samples were anti-coagulated by adding heparin for single cell AFM imaging. No chemicals were used for attaching or immobilizing the cells. The diamond substrates were produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD diamond) using a hot-filament CVD system fed with ethanol highly diluted in hydrogen. AFM imaging of isolated cells (anti-coagulated by heparin) was only possible on the glass substrates due to the lack of adherence of the cells to the diamond surface. The coagulation results suggest that blood clotting on diamond produces a less rough surface than blood clotting on glass.

  19. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  20. Quantification of cell-free layer thickness and cell distribution of blood by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Janne; Bykov, Alexander; Fabritius, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    A high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 1-μm axial resolution was applied to assess the thickness of a cell-free layer (CFL) and a spatial distribution of red blood cells (RBC) next to the microchannel wall. The experiments were performed in vitro in a plain glass microchannel with a width of 2 mm and height of 0.2 mm. RBCs were suspended in phosphate buffered saline solution at the hematocrit level of 45%. Flow rates of 0.1 to 0.5 ml/h were used to compensate gravity induced CFL. The results indicate that OCT can be efficiently used for the quantification of CFL thickness and spatial distribution of RBCs in microcirculatory blood flow.