WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood borne pathogens

  1. Blood-Borne Pathogens: Guidelines for Athletic Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Athletic Training, 1995

    1995-01-01

    These guidelines cover athletic trainers and blood-borne pathogens at athletic events, student athletic trainer education, universal precautions and Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, medical records and confidentiality, infected athletic trainers, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) testing, HBV…

  2. Occupational exposure to blood-borne or body fluid pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Healthcare workers are at risk of transmission of hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency viruses following accidental exposure to blood and body fluids. Interns are a vulnerable group of healthcare workers, cited as having the highest incidence of accidental needle-stick injuries and splashes with ...

  3. Standardization of NAT for Blood-Borne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Chudy, Michael; Nübling, C Micha

    2015-07-01

    Assays based on nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) are increasingly used for screening of blood and for diagnosis or monitoring of patients. Both regulatory requirements for blood screening and international recommendations for the treatment of patients are based on common reference materials available globally for the standardization of NAT assays. World Health Organization International Standards (WHO ISs) and International Reference Panels (WHO IRPs) are primary reference materials. The characterization and manufacture of WHO reference materials as well as their evaluation is performed on behalf of the WHO by collaborating centers; their establishment is decided upon by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS). The potency of the first WHO IS is defined by the 'international unit' (IU) which should be maintained upon replacement of the IS. The IU, unlike copy number or genome equivalent, is defined by the IS with a physical existence, is available worldwide, and allows traceability and comparability of results. The anticipated use of WHO ISs is the calibration of secondary standards or the validation of essential assay features, e.g. limit of detection.

  4. Tick-borne pathogens in the blood of wild and domestic ungulates in South Africa: interplay of game and livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggoetz, M; Schmid, M; Ston, D; Wyss, V; Chevillon, C; Pretorius, A-M; Gern, L

    2014-03-01

    We screened for tick-borne pathogens blood samples from 181 wild and domestic ungulates belonging to 18 host species in 4 South African Provinces. Polymerase chain reaction followed by reverse line blotting and sequencing allowed detecting 16 tick-borne pathogen species belonging to the genera Babesia, Theileria, Anaplasma, and Ehrlichia. Ten pathogen species were involved in 29 new host-pathogen combinations. Most infections (77.9%) involved more than one pathogen species. Principal component analysis (PCA) assigned the 163 infections, identified to species level, to 4 groups. Three groups were associated with sheep, cattle, and horse and their respective wild counterparts. Each group was characterised by high homogeneity in pathogen assemblage and host phylogenetic status. These groups characterised the most privileged transmission routes between and among wild and domestic ungulates. The 4th group showed high heterogeneity in pathogen assemblage and host phylogenetic status. This group seems to indicate frequent spill over events in impala of pathogens that usually circulate among cattle- or sheep-related species. Within 6 localities, we sampled an equal number of wild and domestic animals (n=128). On this dataset once having controlled for the significant variation among localities, the infection prevalence and intensity of infection did not differ significantly between wild and domestic hosts. This suggests that both animal types, domestic and wild hosts, could act as evenly efficient sources of infection for themselves and for each other. Overall, this study shed new light on the pathogen circulation naturally achieved at the interplay between wild and domestic ungulates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Fibrinolysis and proliferative endarteritis: two related processes in chronic infections? The model of the blood-borne pathogen Dirofilaria immitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier González-Miguel

    Full Text Available The interaction between blood-borne pathogens and fibrinolysis is one of the most important mechanisms that mediate invasion and the establishment of infectious agents in their hosts. However, overproduction of plasmin (final product of the route has been related in other contexts to proliferation and migration of the arterial wall cells and degradation of the extracellular matrix. We have recently identified fibrinolysis-activating antigens from Dirofilaria immitis, a blood-borne parasite whose key pathological event (proliferative endarteritis is produced by similar mechanisms to those indicated above. The objective of this work is to study how two of this antigens [actin (ACT and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBAL] highly conserved in pathogens, activate fibrinolysis and to establish a relationship between this activation and the development of proliferative endarteritis during cardiopulmonary dirofilariasis. We demonstrate that both proteins bind plasminogen, enhance plasmin generation, stimulate the expression of the fibrinolytic activators tPA and uPA in endothelial cell cultures and are located on the surface of the worm in contact with the host's blood. ELISA, western blot and immunofluorescence techniques were employed for this purpose. Additionally, the implication of lysine residues in this interaction was analyzed by bioinformatics. The involvement of plasmin generated by the ACT/FBAL and plasminogen binding in cell proliferation and migration, and degradation of the extracellular matrix were shown in an "in vitro" model of endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture. The obtained results indicate that ACT and FBAL from D. immitis activate fibrinolysis, which could be used by the parasite like a survival mechanism to avoid the clot formation. However, long-term overproduction of plasmin can trigger pathological events similar to those described in the emergence of proliferative endarteritis. Due to the high degree of

  6. Poor knowledge – predictor of nonadherence to universal precautions for blood borne pathogens at first level care facilities in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandir Subhash

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted an assessment of knowledge about blood borne pathogens (BBP and use of universal precautions at first level care facilities (FLCF in two districts of Pakistan. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey and selected three different types of FLCFs ; public, general practitioners and unqualified practitioners through stratified random sampling technique. At each facility, we interviewed a prescriber, a dispenser, and a housekeeper for knowledge of BBPs transmission and preventive practices, risk perception, and use of universal precautions. We performed multiple linear regression to assess the effect of knowledge score (11 items on the practice of universal precautions score (4 items- use of gloves, gown, needle recapping, and HBV vaccination. Results We interviewed 239 subjects. Most of the participants 128 (53% were recruited from general practitioners clinics and 166 (69.5% of them were dispensers. Mean (SD knowledge score was 3.8 (2.3 with median of 4. MBBS prescribers had the highest knowledge score while the housekeepers had the lowest. Mean universal precautions use score was 2.7 ± 2.1. Knowledge about mode of transmission and the work experience alone, significantly predicted universal precaution use in multiple linear regression model (adR2 = 0.093. Conclusion Knowledge about mode of transmission of blood borne pathogens is very low. Use of universal precautions can improve with increase in knowledge.

  7. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  8. Food-borne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemand, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Salmonella scare reinforced the importance of never taking chances when it comes to controlling pathogens. The issue has been resolved by radurisation. The article deals with the various pathogens that can effect food and argues the case for radurisation in dealing with them. It also looks at some of the other food products that can be treated using this process

  9. Molecular detection of vector-borne pathogens in blood and splenic samples from dogs with splenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movilla, Rebeca; Altet, Laura; Serrano, Lorena; Tabar, María-Dolores; Roura, Xavier

    2017-03-13

    The spleen is a highly perfused organ involved in the immunological control and elimination of vector-borne pathogens (VBP), which could have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. This study aimed to evaluate certain VBP in samples from dogs with splenic lesions. Seventy-seven EDTA-blood and 64 splenic tissue samples were collected from 78 dogs with splenic disease in a Mediterranean area. Babesia spp., Bartonella spp., Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp., Hepatozoon canis, Leishmania infantum, hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and Rickettsia spp. were targeted using PCR assays. Sixty EDTA-blood samples from dogs without evidence of splenic lesions were included as a control group. More than half (51.56%) of the biopsies (33/64) were consistent with benign lesions and 48.43% (31/64) with malignancy, mostly hemangiosarcoma (25/31). PCR yielded positive results in 13 dogs with spleen alterations (16.67%), for Babesia canis (n = 3), Babesia gibsoni (n = 2), hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. (n = 2), Rickettsia massiliae (n = 1) and "Babesia vulpes" (n = 1), in blood; and for B. canis, B. gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and L. infantum (n = 1 each), in spleen. Two control dogs (3.3%) were positive for B. gibsoni and H. canis (n = 1 each). Benign lesions were detected in the 61.54% of infected dogs (8/13); the remaining 38.46% were diagnosed with malignancies (5/13). Infection was significantly associated to the presence of splenic disease (P = 0.013). There was no difference in the prevalence of infection between dogs with benign and malignant splenic lesions (P = 0.69); however B. canis was more prevalent in dogs with hemangiosarcoma (P = 0.006). VBP infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. The immunological role of the spleen could predispose to alterations of this organ in infected dogs. Interestingly, all dogs with B. canis infection were diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma in the present survey. As previously

  10. A comparison of DNA extraction protocols from blood spotted on FTA cards for the detection of tick-borne pathogens by Reverse Line Blot hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Zerihun; Ahmed, Jabbar Sabir; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Nijhof, Ard Menzo

    2017-01-01

    An essential step in the molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) in blood is the extraction of DNA. When cooled storage of blood under field conditions prior to DNA extraction in a dedicated laboratory is not possible, the storage of blood on filter paper forms a promising alternative. We evaluated six DNA extraction methods from blood spotted on FTA Classic ® cards (FTA cards), to determine the optimal protocol for the subsequent molecular detection of TBPs by PCR and the Reverse Line Blot hybridization assay (RLB). Ten-fold serial dilutions of bovine blood infected with Babesia bovis, Theileria mutans, Anaplasma marginale or Ehrlichia ruminantium were made by dilution with uninfected blood and spotted on FTA cards. Subsequently, DNA was extracted from FTA cards using six different DNA extraction protocols. DNA was also isolated from whole blood dilutions using a commercial kit. PCR/RLB results showed that washing of 3mm discs punched from FTA cards with FTA purification reagent followed by DNA extraction using Chelex ® resin was the most sensitive procedure. The detection limit could be improved when more discs were used as starting material for the DNA extraction, whereby the use of sixteen 3mm discs proved to be most practical. The presented best practice method for the extraction of DNA from blood spotted on FTA cards will facilitate epidemiological studies on TBPs. It may be particularly useful for field studies where a cold chain is absent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of real-time PCR array for simultaneous detection of eight human blood-borne viral pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pripuzova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Real-time PCR array for rapid detection of multiple viral pathogens should be highly useful in cases where the sample volume and the time of testing are limited, i.e. in the eligibility testing of tissue and organ donors. FINDINGS: We developed a real-time PCR array capable of simultaneously detecting eight human viral pathogens: human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and -2, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human T-cell leukemia virus-1 and -2 (HTLV-1 and -2, vaccinia virus (VACV and West Nile virus (WNV. One hundred twenty (120 primers were designed using a combination of bioinformatics approaches, and, after experimental testing, 24 primer sets targeting eight viral pathogens were selected to set up the array with SYBR Green chemistry. The specificity and sensitivity of the virus-specific primer sets selected for the array were evaluated using analytical panels with known amounts of viruses spiked into human plasma. The array detected: 10 genome equivalents (geq/ml of HIV-2 and HCV, 50 geq of HIV-1 (subtype B, HBV (genotype A and WNV. It detected 100-1,000 geq/ml of plasma of HIV-1 subtypes (A - G, group N and CRF (AE and AG isolates. Further evaluation with a panel consisting of 28 HIV-1 and HIV-2 clinical isolates revealed no cross-reactivity of HIV-1 or HIV-2 specific primers with another type of HIV. All 28 viral isolates were identified with specific primer sets targeting the most conserved genome areas. The PCR array correctly identified viral infections in a panel of 17 previously quantified clinical plasma samples positive for HIV-1, HCV or HBV at as low as several geq per PCR reaction. CONCLUSIONS: The viral array described here demonstrated adequate performance in the testing of donors' clinical samples. Further improvement in its sensitivity for the broad spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes is under development.

  12. Suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil borne plant pathogens considerably reduce crop yields worldwide and are difficult to control due to their ”masked” occurrence  in the heterogeneous soil environment. This hampers the efficacy of chemical - and microbiological control agents.   Outbreaks of crop

  13. Prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in dogs from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Lindsay A; Newton, Kassie; Brunker, Jill; Crowdis, Kelly; Edourad, Emile Jean Pierre; Meneus, Pedro; Little, Susan E

    2016-07-15

    Canine vector-borne pathogens are common on some Caribbean islands, but survey data in Haiti are lacking. To determine the prevalence of selected vector-borne pathogens in dogs from Haiti, we tested blood samples collected from 210 owned dogs, 28 (13.3%) of which were infested with Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks at the time of blood collection. No other tick species were identified on these dogs. A commercially available ELISA identified antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in 69 (32.9%), antibodies to Anaplasma spp. in 37 (17.6%), and antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in 55 (26.2%); antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi were not detected in any sample. Molecular assays of whole blood from 207 of the dogs confirmed infection with Ehrlichia canis (15; 7.2%), Anaplasma platys (13; 6.3%), D. immitis (46; 22.2%), Wolbachia spp. (45; 21.7%), Babesia vogeli (16; 7.7%), and Hepatozoon canis (40; 19.3%), but Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia canis, Babesia rossi, Babesia gibsoni, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia ewingii, or Hepatozoon americanum were not detected. Co-infection with two or more vector-borne pathogens was detected by serology in 42 (20.0%) dogs and by molecular assays in 22 (10.6%) dogs; one dog was co-infected with B. vogeli and E. canis as detected by PCR with D. immitis detected by serology (antigen). Overall, evidence of past or current infection with at least one vector-borne pathogen was identified in 142/210 (67.6%) dogs in this study, underscoring the common nature of these pathogens, some of which are zoonotic, in Haiti. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Vector-Borne Pathogens in Stray Dogs in Northeastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Esin; Avcioglu, Hamza; Cengiz, Seyda; Hayirli, Armagan

    2017-08-01

    This experiment was carried out to attain prevalence and molecular characterization of pathogens causing canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) including babesiosis, hepatozoonosis, leishmaniasis, filariosis (Dirofilaria immitis, Dirofilaria repens, and Acanthocheilonema reconditum), ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis), and anaplasmosis (Anaplasma platys) in stray dogs. The study material consisted of 133 asymptomatic female (n = 96) and male (n = 37) stray dogs (≤1 year old, n = 16 and 1-6 years old, n = 117) housed in the Animal Care and Rehabilitation Center, Erzurum, Northeastern Turkey. Conventional and nested PCR were performed on blood samples to detect Babesia spp., Leishmania spp., Hepatozoon spp., D. immitis, D. repens, A. reconditum, E. canis, and A. platys. Sex and age association with the pathogen prevalence was determined using X 2 statistics. The positivity rate for at least one CVBD pathogen was 48.9% (65/133). DNA of B. canis, Hepatozoon spp., H. canis, D. immitis, and E. canis were detected in 5.3% (7/133), 27.1% (36/133), 5.3% (7/133), 1.5% (2/133), and 9.8% (13/133) of the dogs, respectively. Leishmania spp., D. repens, A. reconditum, and A. platys DNA were not detected. Mixed pathogens were determined in seven (10.8%) of the infected dogs, with predominant involvement of Hepatozoon spp. or H. canis. The pathogen prevalence did not vary by sex or age. Nucleotide blast analysis of Erzurum isolates showed 99.8-100% identities with the corresponding reference isolates. This study indicates presence of five CVB pathogens, including the first report of E. canis, in stray dogs in Erzurum, Turkey.

  15. Bacterial food-borne pathogens in Indian food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandekar, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Food technology and food processing techniques have made tremendous advances in preservation of food and ensuring safety of food by killing food-borne pathogens. In addition to old techniques such as pasteurization, canning, dehydration, fermentation and salting, a number of new techniques such as radiation processing, high pressure technology and pulsed electric field technology are being applied for preservation of food and to ensure food safety. Total Quality Management (TQM) concepts have been developed to take care of food safety from farm to table. Hazard Analysis at Critical Control Points (HACCP) is being applied for mass scale production of food to make food free from pathogens. Despite these advances, food-borne diseases have become one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. About two thirds of all the outbreaks are traced to microbial contaminated food. According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, food-borne and waterborne diarrhoeal diseases kill an estimated 2 million people annually, including many children. Food safety is a major concern not only for developing countries but also for the developed countries. A number of factors such as emergence of new food-borne pathogens, development of drug resistance in pathogens, changing life style, globalization of the food supply etc. are responsible for the continuous persistence of food-borne diseases. The food-borne disease outbreaks due to E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella and Campylobacter, are responsible for recall of many foods resulting in heavy losses to food industry. Due to consumer demand, a number of Ready-To-Eat (RTE) minimally processed foods are increasingly marketed; however, there is increased risk of foodborne diseases with these products. Food Technology Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, has been working on food-borne bacterial pathogens particularly Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio and Aeromonasf

  16. Microbial Flora and Food Borne Pathogens on Minced Meat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Food-borne pathogens are the leading cause of illness and death in developing countries. Changes in eating habits, mass catering, unsafe food storage conditions and poor hygiene practices are major contributing factors to food associated illnesses. In Ethiopia, the widespread habit of raw beef ...

  17. Ubiquity of the water-borne pathogens, Cryptosporidium and Giardia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of the diarrhoea disease caused by the water-borne pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia in KwaZulu-Natal, was determined from pathology laboratory data. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were found to be endemic in KwaZulu-Natal with laboratory-confirmed incidences ranging from 2.9 to 3.7% and 2.9 to ...

  18. No transmission of blood-borne viruses among hospital staff despite frequent blood exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskandarani, Hassan Ali; Kehrer, Michala; Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exposure to blood and body fluids (BBF) is a major concern for health-care workers (HCWs) and implies a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens. However, in Denmark, no exposure incidence studies among HCWs have been reported for the past ten years. The aims of this study were ...... of exposure, 35% had a three-month blood test and 17% had a six-month test. CONCLUSION: Despite a high rate of exposure to BBF among HCWs, the risk of infection was low. FUNDING: no external funding received. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  19. DNA microarray technique for detecting food-borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing GAO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the application of DNA microarray technique for screening and identifying multiple food-borne pathogens. Methods The oligonucleotide probes were designed by Clustal X and Oligo 6.0 at the conserved regions of specific genes of multiple food-borne pathogens, and then were validated by bioinformatic analyses. The 5' end of each probe was modified by amino-group and 10 Poly-T, and the optimized probes were synthesized and spotted on aldehyde-coated slides. The bacteria DNA template incubated with Klenow enzyme was amplified by arbitrarily primed PCR, and PCR products incorporated into Aminoallyl-dUTP were coupled with fluorescent dye. After hybridization of the purified PCR products with DNA microarray, the hybridization image and fluorescence intensity analysis was acquired by ScanArray and GenePix Pro 5.1 software. A series of detection conditions such as arbitrarily primed PCR and microarray hybridization were optimized. The specificity of this approach was evaluated by 16 different bacteria DNA, and the sensitivity and reproducibility were verified by 4 food-borne pathogens DNA. The samples of multiple bacteria DNA and simulated water samples of Shigella dysenteriae were detected. Results Nine different food-borne bacteria were successfully discriminated under the same condition. The sensitivity of genomic DNA was 102 -103pg/ μl, and the coefficient of variation (CV of the reproducibility of assay was less than 15%. The corresponding specific hybridization maps of the multiple bacteria DNA samples were obtained, and the detection limit of simulated water sample of Shigella dysenteriae was 3.54×105cfu/ml. Conclusions The DNA microarray detection system based on arbitrarily primed PCR can be employed for effective detection of multiple food-borne pathogens, and this assay may offer a new method for high-throughput platform for detecting bacteria.

  20. Nonthermal Plasma Inactivation of Food-Borne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, N.; Tiwari, B.; Rahavarao, K.; Cullen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is electrically energized matter, composed of highly reactive species including gas molecules, charged particles in the form of positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, electrons and quanta of electromagnetic radiation (photons) at near-room temperature. NTP is an emerging nonthermal technology with potential applications for decontamination in the food industries. An upsurge in the research activities for plasma based inactivation of food borne pathogens is evide...

  1. Antimicrobial Impacts of Essential Oils on Food Borne-Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozogul, Yesim; Kuley, Esmeray; Ucar, Yilmaz; Ozogul, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve essential oil (pine oil, eucalyptus, thyme, sage tea, lavender, orange, laurel, lemon, myrtle, lemon, rosemary and juniper) was tested by a disc diffusion method against food borne pathogens (Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi A, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas hydrophila, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus). The major components in essential oils were monoterpenes hydrocarbons, α-pinene, limonene; monoterpene phenol, carvacrol and oxygenated monoterpenes, camphor, 1,8-cineole, eucalyptol, linalool and linalyl acetate. Although the antimicrobial effect of essential oils varied depending on the chemical composition of the essential oils and specific microorganism tested, majority of the oils exhibited antibacterial activity against one or more strains. The essential oil with the lowest inhibition zones was juniper with the values varied from 1.5 to 6 mm. However, the components of essential oil of thyme and pine oil are highly active against food borne pathogen, generating the largest inhibition zones for both gram negative and positive bacteria (5.25-28.25 mm vs. 12.5-30 mm inhibition zones). These results indicate the possible use of the essential oils on food system as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogen. The article also offers some promising patents on applications of essential oils on food industry as antimicrobial agent.

  2. Reducing Blood-borne Exposure in Interventional Radiology: What the IR Should Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tso, David K. [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Athreya, Sriharsha, E-mail: sathreya@stjoes.ca [St. Joseph' s Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Canada)

    2013-08-01

    Interventional radiologists are at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens in their day-to-day practice. Percutaneous exposure from unsafe sharps handling, mucocutaneous exposure from body fluid splashes, and glove perforation from excessive wear can expose the radiologist to potentially infectious material. The increasing prevalence of blood-borne pathogens, including hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus, puts nurses, residents, fellows, and interventional radiologists at risk for occupational exposure. This review outlines suggestions to establish a culture of safety in the interventional suite.

  3. Blood Pressure in Young Adults Born at Very Low Birth Weight: Adults Born Preterm International Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovi, P.; Vohr, B.; Ment, L.R.; Doyle, L.W.; McGarvey, L.; Morrison, K.M.; Evensen, K.A.I.; Pal, S. van der; Grunau, R.E.; Brubakk, A.M.; Andersson, S.; Saigal, S.; Kajantie, E.

    2016-01-01

    Adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) have higher blood pressure than those born at term. It is not known whether all VLBW adults are at risk or whether higher blood pressure could be attributed to some of the specific conditions underlying or accompanying preterm birth. To

  4. Vector-borne pathogens in arctic foxes, Vulpes lagopus, from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarelli, Patricia E; Elmore, Stacey A; Jenkins, Emily J; Alisauskas, Ray T; Walsh, Mary; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Maggi, Ricardo G

    2015-04-01

    Because of the relatively low biodiversity within arctic ecosystems, arctic foxes, Vulpes lagopus, could serve as sentinels for the study of changes in the ecology of vector-borne zoonotic pathogens. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular prevalence of 5 different genera of vector borne pathogens (Anaplasma, Babesia, Bartonella, Ehrlichia, and Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp.) using blood collected from 28 live-trapped arctic foxes from the region of Karrak Lake, Nunavut, Canada. Bartonella henselae (n = 3), Mycoplasma haemocanis (n = 1), Ehrlichia canis (n = 1), and an Anaplasma sp. (n = 1) DNA were PCR amplified and subsequently identified by sequencing. This study provides preliminary evidence that vector borne pathogens, not typically associated with the arctic ecosystem, exist at low levels in this arctic fox population, and that vector exposure, pathogen transmission dynamics, and changes in the geographic distribution of pathogens over time should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Molecular detection and characterization of tick-borne pathogens in dogs and ticks from Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kamani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Only limited information is currently available on the prevalence of vector borne and zoonotic pathogens in dogs and ticks in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to use molecular techniques to detect and characterize vector borne pathogens in dogs and ticks from Nigeria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood samples and ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Rhipicephalus turanicus and Heamaphysalis leachi collected from 181 dogs from Nigeria were molecularly screened for human and animal vector-borne pathogens by PCR and sequencing. DNA of Hepatozoon canis (41.4%, Ehrlichia canis (12.7%, Rickettsia spp. (8.8%, Babesia rossi (6.6%, Anaplasma platys (6.6%, Babesia vogeli (0.6% and Theileria sp. (0.6% was detected in the blood samples. DNA of E. canis (23.7%, H. canis (21.1%, Rickettsia spp. (10.5%, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (5.3% and A. platys (1.9% was detected in 258 ticks collected from 42 of the 181 dogs. Co- infections with two pathogens were present in 37% of the dogs examined and one dog was co-infected with 3 pathogens. DNA of Rickettsia conorii israelensis was detected in one dog and Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick. DNA of another human pathogen, Candidatus N. mikurensis was detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Heamaphysalis leachi ticks, and is the first description of Candidatus N. mikurensis in Africa. The Theileria sp. DNA detected in a local dog in this study had 98% sequence identity to Theileria ovis from sheep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study indicate that human and animal pathogens are abundant in dogs and their ticks in Nigeria and portray the potential high risk of human exposure to infection with these agents.

  6. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänscheid, H; Fernández, M; Lassmann, M

    2015-01-01

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10 −11  Gy·s −1 ·Bq −1 ·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1–1.2·10 −11  Gy·s −1 ·Bq −1 ·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m. (paper)

  7. Molecular survey of arthropod-borne pathogens in sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus), Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Ivo; Betášová, Lenka; Bischof, Vlastimil; Venclíková, Kristýna; Blažejová, Hana; Mendel, Jan; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Kosoy, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In the study, we screened a total of 399 adult sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus) for the presence of RNA and DNA specific for arboviral, bacterial, and protozoan vector-borne pathogens. All investigated keds were negative for flaviviruses, phleboviruses, bunyaviruses, Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis," and Babesia spp. All ked pools were positive for Bartonella DNA. The sequencing of the amplified fragments of the gltA and 16S-23S rRNA demonstrated a 100 % homology with Bartonella melophagi previously isolated from a sheep ked and from human blood in the USA. The identification of B. melophagi in sheep keds in Central Europe highlights needs extending a list of hematophagous arthropods beyond ticks and mosquitoes for a search of emerging arthropod-borne pathogens.

  8. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli: An Emerging Enteric Food Borne Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC are quite heterogeneous category of an emerging enteric pathogen associated with cases of acute or persistent diarrhea worldwide in children and adults, and over the past decade has received increasing attention as a cause of watery diarrhea, which is often persistent. EAEC infection is an important cause of diarrhea in outbreak and non-outbreak settings in developing and developed countries. Recently, EAEC has been implicated in the development of irritable bowel syndrome, but this remains to be confirmed. EAEC is defined as a diarrheal pathogen based on its characteristic aggregative adherence (AA to HEp-2 cells in culture and its biofilm formation on the intestinal mucosa with a “stacked-brick” adherence phenotype, which is related to the presence of a 60 MDa plasmid (pAA. At the molecular level, strains demonstrating the aggregative phenotype are quite heterogeneous; several virulence factors are detected by polymerase chain reaction; however, none exhibited 100% specificity. Although several studies have identified specific virulence factor(s unique to EAEC, the mechanism by which EAEC exerts its pathogenesis is, thus, far unknown. The present review updates the current knowledge on the epidemiology, chronic complications, detection, virulence factors, and treatment of EAEC, an emerging enteric food borne pathogen.

  9. Molecular Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Humans with Tick Bites and Erythema Migrans, in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Jahfari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tick-borne diseases are the most prevalent vector-borne diseases in Europe. Knowledge on the incidence and clinical presentation of other tick-borne diseases than Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis is minimal, despite the high human exposure to these pathogens through tick bites. Using molecular detection techniques, the frequency of tick-borne infections after exposure through tick bites was estimated.Ticks, blood samples and questionnaires on health status were collected from patients that visited their general practitioner with a tick bite or erythema migrans in 2007 and 2008. The presence of several tick-borne pathogens in 314 ticks and 626 blood samples of this cohort were analyzed using PCR-based methods. Using multivariate logistic regression, associations were explored between pathogens detected in blood and self-reported symptoms at enrolment and during a three-month follow-up period.Half of the ticks removed from humans tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Rickettsia helvetica, Rickettsia monacensis, Borrelia miyamotoi and several Babesia species. Among 92 Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. positive ticks, 33% carried another pathogen from a different genus. In blood of sixteen out of 626 persons with tick bites or erythema migrans, DNA was detected from Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (n = 7, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (n = 5, Babesia divergens (n = 3, Borrelia miyamotoi (n = 1 and Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. (n = 1. None of these sixteen individuals reported any overt symptoms that would indicate a corresponding illness during the three-month follow-up period. No associations were found between the presence of pathogen DNA in blood and; self-reported symptoms, with pathogen DNA in the corresponding ticks (n = 8, reported tick attachment duration, tick engorgement, or antibiotic treatment at enrolment.Based on molecular detection techniques, the

  10. Molecular Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Humans with Tick Bites and Erythema Migrans, in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahfari, Setareh; Hofhuis, Agnetha; Fonville, Manoj; van der Giessen, Joke; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Sprong, Hein

    2016-10-01

    Tick-borne diseases are the most prevalent vector-borne diseases in Europe. Knowledge on the incidence and clinical presentation of other tick-borne diseases than Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis is minimal, despite the high human exposure to these pathogens through tick bites. Using molecular detection techniques, the frequency of tick-borne infections after exposure through tick bites was estimated. Ticks, blood samples and questionnaires on health status were collected from patients that visited their general practitioner with a tick bite or erythema migrans in 2007 and 2008. The presence of several tick-borne pathogens in 314 ticks and 626 blood samples of this cohort were analyzed using PCR-based methods. Using multivariate logistic regression, associations were explored between pathogens detected in blood and self-reported symptoms at enrolment and during a three-month follow-up period. Half of the ticks removed from humans tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Rickettsia helvetica, Rickettsia monacensis, Borrelia miyamotoi and several Babesia species. Among 92 Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. positive ticks, 33% carried another pathogen from a different genus. In blood of sixteen out of 626 persons with tick bites or erythema migrans, DNA was detected from Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (n = 7), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (n = 5), Babesia divergens (n = 3), Borrelia miyamotoi (n = 1) and Borrelia burgdorferi s. l. (n = 1). None of these sixteen individuals reported any overt symptoms that would indicate a corresponding illness during the three-month follow-up period. No associations were found between the presence of pathogen DNA in blood and; self-reported symptoms, with pathogen DNA in the corresponding ticks (n = 8), reported tick attachment duration, tick engorgement, or antibiotic treatment at enrolment. Based on molecular detection techniques, the probability of

  11. An analysis of multimodal occupational exposure leading to blood borne infections among health care workers

    OpenAIRE

    N Lakshmi Priya; K Usha Krishnan; G Jayalakshmi; S Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure poses a significant risk of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to healthcare workers (HCWs). Adherence to standard precautions, awareness about post exposure prophylaxis is poor in developing countries. This retrospective study analyzes the self-reported cases of occupational exposure in a tertiary care hospital. During the study period, 105 HCWs sustained occupational exposure to blood and body fluids. Majority of the victims 36 (34.2%) were interns and the clinical ...

  12. Seed-borne pathogens and electrical conductivity of soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Luiza Wain-Tassi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adequate procedures to evaluate seed vigor are important. Regarding the electrical conductivity test (EC, the interference in the test results caused by seed-borne pathogens has not been clarified. This research was carried out to study the influence of Phomopsis sojae (Leh. and Colletotrichum dematium (Pers. ex Fr. Grove var. truncata (Schw. Arx. fungi on EC results. Soybean seeds (Glycine max L. were inoculated with those fungi using potato, agar and dextrose (PDA medium with manitol (-1.0 MPa and incubated for 20 h at 25 °C. The colony diameter, index of mycelial growth, seed water content, occurrence of seed-borne pathogens, physiological potential of the seeds, measured by germination and vigor tests (seed germination index, cold test, accelerated aging and electrical conductivity, and seedling field emergence were determined. The contents of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the seed and in the soaking solution were also determined. A complete 2 × 4 factorial design with two seed sizes (5.5 and 6.5 mm and four treatments (control, seeds incubated without fungi, seeds incubated with Phomopsis and seeds incubated with Colletotrichum were used with eight (5.5 mm large seeds and six (6.5 mm large seeds replications. All seeds submitted to PDA medium had their germination reduced in comparison to the control seeds. This reduction was also observed when seed vigor and leached ions were considered. The presence of Phomopsis sojae fungus in soybean seed samples submitted to the EC test may be the cause of misleading results.

  13. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  14. A PCR survey of vector-borne pathogens in different dog populations from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huanping; Sevinc, Ferda; Ceylan, Onur; Sevinc, Mutlu; Ince, Ege; Gao, Yang; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Liu, Mingming; Efstratiou, Artemis; Wang, Guanbo; Cao, Shinuo; Zhou, Mo; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Ringo, Aaron Edmond; Zheng, Weiqing; Xuan, Xuenan

    2017-09-26

    In the present study, a total of 192 blood samples were collected from pet dogs, kennel dogs and shepherd dogs in Konya district, Turkey, and tested by specific PCR for the presence of vector-borne pathogens. Several pathogens were identified, most of which can cause substantial morbidity in dogs. PCR results revealed that 54 (28.1%) dogs were infected with one or more pathogens. Positive results were obtained for Babesia spp. in 4 dogs (2.1%), Hepatozoon spp. in 8 dogs (4.2%) and Mycoplasma spp. in 46 dogs (24%). Three dogs (1.6%) were infected with two or three pathogens. The sequence analysis of the positive DNA samples revealed the presence of Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Hepatozoon sp. MF, Mycoplasma haemocanis and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum. Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys were not detected. Regardless of ownership status, vector-borne diseases were common in these dog populations. There was significant difference of pathogen prevalence among the different dog populations. Mycoplasma spp. was more frequent in the kennel dogs (31.9%) than in the pet (21.4%) and shepherd dogs (13.8%). Additionally, the frequency of Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. was higher in the shepherd dogs which account for three quarters and half of the total number of Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp., respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mycoplasma infection in dogs in Turkey. The results of the present study provide a foundation for understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs), and for strategies to control these diseases in Turkey.

  15. Arthropod-borne pathogens of dogs and cats: From pathways and times of transmission to disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Domenico

    2018-02-15

    Vector-borne pathogens have developed a close relationship with blood feeding arthropod ectoparasites (e.g., mosquitoes, ticks, phlebotomine sand flies, black flies, fleas, kissing bugs, lice) and exploited a huge variety of vector transmission routes. Therefore, the life cycles of these pathogens result in a long evolved balance with the respective arthropod biology, ecology and blood feeding habits, instrumentally to the infection of several animal species, including humans. Amongst the many parasite transmission modes, such as ingestion of the arthropod, with its faeces or secretions, blood feeding represents the main focus for this article, as it is a central event to the life of almost all arthropod vectors. The time frame in which pathogens are transmitted to any animal host is governed by a large number of biological variables related to the vector, the pathogen, the host and environmental factors. Scientific data available on transmission times for each pathogen are discussed relative to their impact for the success of vector-borne disease control strategies. Blocking pathogen transmission, and thus preventing the infection of dogs and cats, may be achievable by the use of chemical compounds if they are characterised by a fast onset of killing activity or repellence against arthropods. The fast speed of kill exerted by systemic isoxazoline, as well as the repellent effect of pyrethroids have renewed the interest of the scientific community and pharmaceutical companies towards reducing the burden of vector-borne diseases under field conditions. However, endosymbionts and vaccines targeting arthropods or pathogen antigens should be further investigated as alternative strategies towards the goal of achieving an effective integrated control of vector-borne diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tick microbiome and pathogen acquisition altered by host blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swei, Andrea; Kwan, Jessica Y

    2017-03-01

    Lyme disease, a zoonotic disease, is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere. Diversity of the vector (tick) microbiome can impact pathogen transmission, yet the biotic and abiotic factors that drive microbiome diversity are largely unresolved, especially under natural, field conditions. We describe the microbiome of Ixodes pacificus ticks, the vector for Lyme disease in the western United States, and show a strong impact of host blood meal identity on tick microbiome species richness and composition. Western fence lizards, a host that is refractory to the Lyme disease pathogen, significantly reduces microbiome diversity in ticks relative to ticks that feed on a mammalian reservoir host. Host blood meal-driven reduction of tick microbiome diversity may have lifelong repercussions on I. pacificus vector competency and ultimately disease dynamics.

  17. Transport of Ixodid ticks and tick-borne pathogens by migratory birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eHasle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Birds, particularly passerines, can be parasitized by Ixodid ticks, which may be infected with tick-borne pathogens, like Borrelia spp., Babesia spp., Anaplasma, Rickettsia/Coxiella, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. The prevalence of ticks on birds varies over years, season, locality and different bird species. The prevalence of ticks on different species depends mainly on the degree of feeding on the ground. In Europe, the Turdus spp., especially the blackbird, Turdus merula, appears to be most important for harboring ticks. Birds can easily cross barriers, like fences, mountains, glaciers, desserts and oceans, which would stop mammals, and they can move much faster than the wingless hosts. Birds can potentially transport tick-borne pathogens by transporting infected ticks, by being infected with tick-borne pathogens and transmit the pathogens to the ticks, and possibly act as hosts for transfer of pathogens between ticks through co-feeding. Knowledge of the bird migration routes and of the spatial distribution of tick species and tick-borne pathogens is crucial for understanding the possible impact of birds as spreaders of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Successful colonization of new tick species or introduction of new tick-borne pathogens will depend on suitable climate, vegetation and hosts. Although it has never been demonstrated that a new tick species, or a new tick pathogen, actually has been established in a new locality after being seeded there by birds, evidence strongly suggests that this could occur.

  18. Effect of soil solarization on soil-borne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobh, Hana

    1995-01-01

    -knot indices nor yields were significantly different in both treatments. At present, fumigation with methyl bromide is the most common method adopted by Lebanese farmers to control soil-borne pathogens of high value crops in greenhouses. Since methyl bromide is extremely toxic and damage the ozone layer, and its use is banned in several countries and may be banned world wide in year 2001, these preliminary results prove that soil solarization may stand as a good alternative control measure

  19. An analysis of multimodal occupational exposure leading to blood borne infections among health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, N Lakshmi; Krishnan, K Usha; Jayalakshmi, G; Vasanthi, S

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure poses a significant risk of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to healthcare workers (HCWs). Adherence to standard precautions, awareness about post exposure prophylaxis is poor in developing countries. This retrospective study analyzes the self-reported cases of occupational exposure in a tertiary care hospital. During the study period, 105 HCWs sustained occupational exposure to blood and body fluids. Majority of the victims 36 (34.2%) were interns and the clinical practice that led to the occupational exposure was withdrawal of blood (45.7%). Good infection control practices and emphasis on appropriate disposal are needed to increase the occupational safety for HCWs.

  20. An analysis of multimodal occupational exposure leading to blood borne infections among health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Lakshmi Priya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure poses a significant risk of transmission of blood-borne pathogens to healthcare workers (HCWs. Adherence to standard precautions, awareness about post exposure prophylaxis is poor in developing countries. This retrospective study analyzes the self-reported cases of occupational exposure in a tertiary care hospital. During the study period, 105 HCWs sustained occupational exposure to blood and body fluids. Majority of the victims 36 (34.2% were interns and the clinical practice that led to the occupational exposure was withdrawal of blood (45.7%. Good infection control practices and emphasis on appropriate disposal are needed to increase the occupational safety for HCWs.

  1. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF GINGER OIL AGAINST FOOD BORN PATHOGENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAHA, S.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the antibacterial activity of ginger oil against Food Born pathogens and the effect of heating, microwave heating and gamma irradiation on microbiological quality and antibacterial activity of ginger oil. Growth and survival of A. hydrophila and L. monocytogenes in broth media and carrot juice with different concentrations of ginger oil was also studied. Gram-negative bacteria were more resistant than gram-positive bacteria. Heating at 80 0 C for 10 min did not change the antibacterial activity of ginger oil, whereas heating at 100 0 C for 5 min and autoclaving at 121 0 C for 15 min caused slight reduction in antibacterial activity in most microorganisms tested. Heating by microwave of ginger oil destroyed its antibacterial activity against B. cereus although it still works against other microorganisms tested. The dose 6 kGy caused slight reduction in antibacterial activity of ginger oil, whereas the dose 10 kGy caused markedly reduction in antibacterial activity of ginger oil against most microorganisms tested. Ginger oil was more effective on L. monocytogenes as compared with its effect on A. hydrophila in tryptone soya broth at 4 0 C or 25 0 C. Supplementation of ginger oil with carrot juice was more effective on A. hydrophila and L. monocytogenes than in tryptone soya broth and this effect was increased with increasing the time of incubation and the concentration of ginger oil. These results support the notion that plant essential oils may have an important role as pharmaceuticals and food preservatives

  2. Natural Mosquito-Pathogen Hybrid IgG4 Antibodies in Vector Borne Diseases: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlin L. Londono-Renteria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to antigens may favor the production of IgG4 antibodies over other antibody types. Recent studies have shown that up to a 30% of normal human IgG4 is bi-specific and is able to recognize two antigens of different nature. A requirement for this specificity is the presence of both eliciting antigens in the same time and at the same place where the immune response is induced. During transmission of most vector-borne diseases, the pathogen is delivered to the vertebrate host along with the arthropod saliva during blood feeding and previous studies have shown the existence of IgG4 antibodies against mosquito salivary allergens. However, there is very little ongoing research or information available regarding IgG4 bi-specificity with regards to infectious disease, particularly during immune responses to vector-borne diseases such as malaria, filariasis or dengue virus infection. Here, we provide background information and present our hypothesis that IgG4 may not only be a useful tool to measure exposure to infected mosquito bites, but that these bi-specific antibodies may also play an important role in modulation of the immune response against malaria and other vector-borne diseases in endemic settings.

  3. Risk of transmission of blood borne infections in climbing--consensus statement of UIAA Medcom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, V; Morrison, A; Küpper, T

    2011-03-01

    Blood borne infections such as hepatitis B, C (HBV, HBC) and human immunodeficiency disease (HIV) are major health problems globally. As the number of blood borne infections is postulated to increase among athletes, the question to the UIAA Medical Commission arises as to whether there is a risk of transmission in climbing. Using a nominal group consensus model approach a working group was formed during the UIAA Medical Commission's meeting in Adršpach-Zdoóov, in the Czech Republic, 2008. A working document was prepared and circulated via email. After several revisions the following final form was approved by written consent in lieu of a live meeting of the UIAA MedCom on 31st May, 2010: The main pathways of transmission of blood borne infections in athletes are similar to those experienced in the general population. The greatest risk to the athlete for contracting any blood borne pathogen infection is through sexual activity and parenteral drug use, and not in the sporting arena. The transmission risk in climbing is even smaller compared to contact sports. Mandatory HIV, HBV or HCV testing or widespread screening is not recommended, voluntary testing is recommended for all high risk athletes in the same way as for non-athletes. HIV and HBV positive climbers should not be banned from climbing or climbing competitions. The risk of transmission from infected athletes to other athletes is very low, the focus should be on preventive activities and education. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Isolation and characterization of seed-Borne pathogenic bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolated bacterial strains were identified based on colony morphology, biochemical, serological and pathogenicity tests. Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae, the causal agent of brown stripe was detected in 63% of the seed samples tested indicating that this pathogen is widely distributed in Tanzania. Other pathogens ...

  5. Identification of vector-borne pathogens in dogs and cats from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, J; Costa, M M; do Amaral, R B; de Sousa, K C M; André, M R; Machado, R Z; Vieira, M I B

    2016-07-01

    Dogs and cats are often infected with vector-borne pathogens and play a crucial role as reservoirs and hosts in their life cycles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of vector-borne pathogens among dogs and cats in the northwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) State, Brazil. One hundred and ten blood samples were collected from dogs (n=80) and cats (n=30). Laboratory analysis were carried out through stained blood smears, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Babesia vogeli and Ehrlichia canis (only for dogs) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) aiming the detection of pathogens. The following pathogens were screened by PCR among dogs and cats: Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. (18S rRNA gene), Anaplasma spp. (16S rRNA gene), and Ehrlichia spp. (dsb gene for dogs and 16S rRNA gene for cats) and Bartonella spp. (nuoG gene only for cats). Using blood smears structures morphologically compatible with piroplasms were found in 5.45% (6/110) of the samples. Anti-B. vogeli and anti-E. canis antibodies were detected in 91% (73/80) and 9% (7/80) of the dogs, respectively. All the seropositive dogs to E. canis were also to B. vogeli. Nineteen (17.3%) animals were positive to hemoparasites by PCR. After sequencing Rangelia vitalii 6/80 (7.5%), B. vogeli 3/80 (4%), Hepatozoon spp. 1/80 (1%), and Anaplasma spp. 1/80 (1%) were found in the dogs, and B. vogeli 2/30 (7%) and Bartonella spp. 6/30 (20%) were detected in the screened cats. No sample was positive for genes dsb and 16S rRNA of Ehrlichia spp. Only those animals which were positive for R. vitalii showed findings compatible with rangeliosis, such as anemia (100%), thrombocytopenia (67%), jaundice (50%), external bleeding (50%), and anorexia (50%). This is the first time that B. vogeli detected among cats in Southern Brazil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychosocial Factors at Work and Blood-Borne Exposure among Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to human blood and body fluids is a common risk for nurses. Many factors can affect the prevalence and incidence of this occupational hazard. Psychosocial factors at work may be a risk factor for the exposure. Objective: To assess needle stick, sharp injury and mucus exposure to blood-borne pathogens among nurses in Iran and to determine the association between these exposures and psychosocial factors at work. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on nurses in a public hospital, Tehran, Iran. 364 nurses received and 339 completed and returned a self-reported questionnaire containing demographic data, history of exposure to blood-borne pathogens at work during previous year and the General Nordic questionnaire for psychological and social factors at work (QPS Nordic 34+ Questionnaire. Results: Of 339 participants, 197 (58.1% reported needle-stick injury, 186 (54.6% reported another type of sharp injury, and 112 (33% reported a mucous membrane exposure during the previous year. More than half of the participants who had history of exposure, had not reported it. Those with middle or high level of stress had higher crude and adjusted odds than those with lower stress for all kinds of exposure. Adjusted odds ratios for high stress group (ranging from 2.8 to 4.4 were statistically different from 1. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of needle-stick and sharp injury and mucous membrane exposure to patients' blood or body fluids among studied nurses. There is a significant association between increasing psychosocial factors at work and exposure to blood-borne pathogens among this group of nurses.

  7. Survey on tick-borne pathogens in thoroughbred horses in the Hidaka district, Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybañez, Adrian Patalinghug; Sato, Fumio; Nambo, Yasuo; Fukui, Takashi; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Ohashi, Norio; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Kishimoto, Toshio; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2013-01-31

    A total of 87 Thoroughbred horses and 10 ixodid ticks from a ranch in Hidaka district, Hokkaido were tested for tick-borne diseases. Using the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) method, 3.4, 92.0 and 97.7% of the horses showed antibody titers of ≥ 80 against Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, and Borrelia garinii, respectively. This is the first report of infection with the 3 pathogens in horses in Japan. Using PCR, DNAs from the peripheral blood of all horses were found negative with any Anaplasma, Rickettsia and Borrelia spp., while those from Haemaphysalis megaspinosa ticks were found positive for Anaplasma sp. closely related to A. phagocytophilum in Japan, and A. bovis. B. japonica was also detected in an H. flava tick for the first time.

  8. High-throuhgput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelet, L.; Delannoy, S.; Devillers, E.; Umhang, G.; Aspan, A.; Juremalm, M.; Chirico, J.; Wal, van der F.J.; Sprong, H.; Boye Pihl, T.P.; Klitgaard, K.; Bodker, R.; Fach, P.; Moutailler, S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased travel, climatic, and environmental changes, the incidence of tick-borne disease in both humans and animals is increasing throughout Europe. Therefore, extended surveillance tools are desirable. To accurately screen tick-borne pathogens (TBPs), a large scale epidemiological study

  9. Imported and travelling dogs as carriers of canine vector-borne pathogens in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz Susanne

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the import of pets and pets taken abroad, arthropod-borne diseases have increased in frequency in German veterinary practices. This is reflected by 4,681 dogs that have been either travelled to or relocated from endemic areas to Germany. The case history of these dogs and the laboratory findings have been compared with samples collected from 331 dogs living in an endemic area in Portugal. The various pathogens and the seroprevalences were examined to determine the occurrence of, and thus infection risk, for vector-borne pathogens in popular travel destinations. Results 4,681 dogs were examined serological for Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis. Buffy coats were detected for Hepatozoon canis and blood samples were examined for microfilariae via the Knott's test. The samples were sent in from animal welfare organizations or private persons via veterinary clinics. Upon individual requests, dogs were additionally examined serological for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Rickettsia conorii. Overall B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen detected by antibody titers (23.4%, followed by L. infantum (12.2% and E. canis (10.1%. Microfilariae were detected in 7.7% and H. canis in 2.7% of the examined dogs. In 332/1862 dogs A. phagocytophilum, in 64/212 B. burgdorferi and in 20/58 R. conorii was detected. Of the 4,681 dogs, in total 4,226 were imported to Germany from endemic areas. Eighty seven dogs joined their owners for a vacation abroad. In comparison to the laboratory data from Germany, we examined 331 dogs from Portugal. The prevalence of antibodies/pathogens we detected was: 62.8% to R. conorii, 58% to B. canis, 30.5% to A. phagocytophilum, 24.8% to E. canis, 21.1% to H. canis (via PCR, 9.1% to L. infantum and 5.3% to microfilariae. Conclusions The examination of 4,681 dogs living in Germany showed pathogens like L. infantum that are non-endemic in Germany. Furthermore, the German

  10. Imported and travelling dogs as carriers of canine vector-borne pathogens in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menn, Brigitte; Lorentz, Susanne; Naucke, Torsten J

    2010-04-08

    With the import of pets and pets taken abroad, arthropod-borne diseases have increased in frequency in German veterinary practices. This is reflected by 4,681 dogs that have been either travelled to or relocated from endemic areas to Germany. The case history of these dogs and the laboratory findings have been compared with samples collected from 331 dogs living in an endemic area in Portugal. The various pathogens and the seroprevalences were examined to determine the occurrence of, and thus infection risk, for vector-borne pathogens in popular travel destinations. 4,681 dogs were examined serological for Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis. Buffy coats were detected for Hepatozoon canis and blood samples were examined for microfilariae via the Knott's test. The samples were sent in from animal welfare organizations or private persons via veterinary clinics. Upon individual requests, dogs were additionally examined serological for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Rickettsia conorii. Overall B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen detected by antibody titers (23.4%), followed by L. infantum (12.2%) and E. canis (10.1%). Microfilariae were detected in 7.7% and H. canis in 2.7% of the examined dogs. In 332/1862 dogs A. phagocytophilum, in 64/212 B. burgdorferi and in 20/58 R. conorii was detected. Of the 4,681 dogs, in total 4,226 were imported to Germany from endemic areas. Eighty seven dogs joined their owners for a vacation abroad. In comparison to the laboratory data from Germany, we examined 331 dogs from Portugal. The prevalence of antibodies/pathogens we detected was: 62.8% to R. conorii, 58% to B. canis, 30.5% to A. phagocytophilum, 24.8% to E. canis, 21.1% to H. canis (via PCR), 9.1% to L. infantum and 5.3% to microfilariae. The examination of 4,681 dogs living in Germany showed pathogens like L. infantum that are non-endemic in Germany. Furthermore, the German data are similar in terms of multiple pathogen infection to

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Seed-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae, the causal agent of brown stripe was detected in 63% of the seed samples tested indicat- ing that this pathogen is widely distributed in Tanzania. Other pathogens identified were Pantoea agglomerans causing palea brpwning, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causing bacterial blight and.

  12. Avian migrants facilitate invasions of neotropical ticks and tick-borne pathogens into the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily B; Auckland, Lisa D; Marra, Peter P; Hamer, Sarah A

    2015-12-01

    Migratory birds have the potential to transport exotic vectors and pathogens of human and animal health importance across vast distances. We systematically examined birds that recently migrated to the United States from the Neotropics for ticks. We screened both ticks and birds for tick-borne pathogens, including Rickettsia species and Borrelia burgdorferi. Over two spring seasons (2013 and 2014), 3.56% of birds (n = 3,844) representing 42.35% of the species examined (n = 85) were infested by ticks. Ground-foraging birds with reduced fuel stores were most commonly infested. Eight tick species were identified, including seven in the genus Amblyomma, of which only Amblyomma maculatum/Amblyomma triste is known to be established in the United States. Most ticks on birds (67%) were neotropical species with ranges in Central and South America. Additionally, a single Ixodes genus tick was detected. A total of 29% of the ticks (n = 137) and no avian blood samples (n = 100) were positive for infection with Rickettsia species, including Rickettsia parkeri, an emerging cause of spotted fever in humans in the southern United States, a species in the group of Rickettsia monacensis, and uncharacterized species and endosymbionts of unknown pathogenicity. No avian tick or blood samples tested positive for B. burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. An extrapolation of our findings suggests that anywhere from 4 to 39 million exotic neotropical ticks are transported to the United States annually on migratory songbirds, with uncertain consequences for human and animal health if the current barriers to their establishment and spread are overcome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Molecular and serological detection of tick-borne pathogens in donkeys (Equus asinus) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Morganti, Giulia; Ravagnan, Silvia; Laus, Fulvio; Spaterna, Andrea; Diaferia, Manuela; Moretti, Annabella; Fioretti, Daniela Piergili; Capelli, Gioia

    2014-10-10

    Donkeys, owing to the frequent outdoor activity, are exposed to a high risk of infection with tick-borne pathogens. This work aimed to detect exposure to Theileria equi, Babesia caballi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. of donkeys reared in Central Italy. For this purpose 122 adult donkeys were selected within 11 herds and submitted to blood collection. IgG antibodies to T. equi, B. caballi, A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. were detected by IFAT. Conventional PCRs targeting the genes MSP2 and the flagellin were used for the detection of A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. respectively and a Real Time PCR Sybr Green was used to detect Babesia/Theileria spp…. The species identity was determined by amplicons sequencing. Forty eight (39.3%) and 58 (47.5%) animals tested positive for T. equi and B. caballi antibodies, respectively; nine animals (7.4%) were found positive for antibodies against A. phagocytophilum whereas negative results were obtained for B. burgdorferi s.l. Twenty-six (21.3%) animals showed antibodies for both T. equi and B. caballi. Twenty-three (18.8%) donkeys were positive to Babesia/Theileria spp. PCR assay. Out of 21 sequenced amplicons, 20 were identified as T. equi, belonging to three main groups designated A, B and D and one as B. caballi group A. Neither A. phagocytophilum nor B. burgdorferi PCR results were positive. The study showed a high exposure of donkeys to tick-borne pathogens and provides information on the genetic identity of the T. equi strains circulating in Central Italy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. What is the risk for exposure to vector-borne pathogens in United States national parks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Lars; Wong, David; Shelus, Victoria; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2013-03-01

    United States national parks attract > 275 million visitors annually and collectively present risk of exposure for staff and visitors to a wide range of arthropod vector species (most notably fleas, mosquitoes, and ticks) and their associated bacterial, protozoan, or viral pathogens. We assessed the current state of knowledge for risk of exposure to vector-borne pathogens in national parks through a review of relevant literature, including internal National Park Service documents and organismal databases. We conclude that, because of lack of systematic surveillance for vector-borne pathogens in national parks, the risk of pathogen exposure for staff and visitors is unclear. Existing data for vectors within national parks were not based on systematic collections and rarely include evaluation for pathogen infection. Extrapolation of human-based surveillance data from neighboring communities likely provides inaccurate estimates for national parks because landscape differences impact transmission of vector-borne pathogens and human-vector contact rates likely differ inside versus outside the parks because of differences in activities or behaviors. Vector-based pathogen surveillance holds promise to define when and where within national parks the risk of exposure to infected vectors is elevated. A pilot effort, including 5-10 strategic national parks, would greatly improve our understanding of the scope and magnitude of vector-borne pathogen transmission in these high-use public settings. Such efforts also will support messaging to promote personal protection measures and inform park visitors and staff of their responsibility for personal protection, which the National Park Service preservation mission dictates as the core strategy to reduce exposure to vector-borne pathogens in national parks.

  15. Ticks and tick-borne pathogens at the cutaneous interface: host defenses, tick countermeasures, and a suitable environment for pathogen establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eWikel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are unique among hematophagous arthropods by continuous attachment to host skin and blood feeding for days; complexity and diversity of biologically active molecules differentially expressed in saliva of tick species; their ability to modulate the host defenses of pain and itch, hemostasis, inflammation, innate and adaptive immunity, and wound healing; and, the diverse array of infectious agents they transmit. All of these interactions occur at the cutaneous interface in a complex sequence of carefully choreographed host defense responses and tick countermeasures resulting in an environment that facilitates successful blood feeding and establishment of tick-borne infectious agents within the host. Here, we examine diverse patterns of tick attachment to host skin, blood feeding mechanisms, salivary gland transcriptomes, bioactive molecules in tick saliva, timing of pathogen transmission, and host responses to tick bite. Ticks engage and modulate cutaneous and systemic immune defenses involving keratinocytes, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, T cell subpopulations (Th1, Th2, Th17, Treg , B cells, neutrophils, mast cells, basophils, endothelial cells, cytokines, chemokines, complement, and extracellular matrix. A framework is proposed that integrates tick induced changes of skin immune effectors with their ability to respond to tick-borne pathogens. Implications of these changes are addressed. What are the consequences of tick modulation of host cutaneous defenses? Does diversity of salivary gland transcriptomes determine differential modulation of host inflammation and immune defenses and therefore, in part, the clades of pathogens effectively transmitted by different tick species? Do ticks create an immunologically modified cutaneous environment that enhances specific pathogen establishment? Can tick saliva molecules be used to develop vaccines that block pathogen transmission?

  16. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of Iranian surgeons about blood-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Mehrdad; Marashi, Seyed Ali; Kabir, Ali; Taghipour, Hamid Reza; Faghihi-Kashani, Amir Hossein; Ghoddoosi, Iraj; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other healthcare worker, it is the surgeons who are at an increased risk of exposure to hepatitis B (HB) virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgeons' concerns regarding risk awareness and behavioral methods of protection against blood-borne pathogen transmission during surgery. A 31-item questionnaire with a reliability coefficient of 0.73 was used. Of 575 surgeons invited to participate from three universities and one national annual surgical society between May and July 2007, 430 (75%) returned completed forms. Concern about being infected with blood-borne diseases was more than 70 (from a total score of 100). Only 12.9% of surgeons always used double gloves. Complete vaccination against HB was done in about 76% of surgeons and only 56.8% had checked their HB surface antibody (anti-HBs) level. Older surgeons never used double gloves (P = 0.001). Iranian surgeons are not aware of the correct percentage of infected patients with and seroconversion rate of blood-borne diseases, do not use double gloves adequately, do not report their needlestick injuries, vaccinate against HB, and check anti-HBs after vaccination. Educational meetings, pamphlets, and facilities must be provided to health care workers, informing them of hazards, prevention, and postexposure prophylaxis to needlestick injuries, vaccination efficacy, and wearing double gloves.

  17. Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens in cattle from Southwestern Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerihun Hailemariam

    Full Text Available Tick-borne diseases (TBDs cause significant losses among livestock and impact the livelihoods of resource-poor farming communities worldwide. In Ethiopia, detailed studies on the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens (TBPs in cattle using sensitive molecular detection methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of bovine TBPs of veterinary significance in local cattle populations. A comprehensive cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in cattle populations of Illubabor zone in Southwestern Ethiopia from June to August 2013. For this purpose, blood samples were collected from 392 cattle. A combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR and a Reverse Line Blot (RLB hybridization assay was employed for the detection of TBPs in these samples. The PCR/RLB results of the 392 blood samples indicated a high overall prevalence of 96.9% for TBPs, including Theileria mutans (66.1%, Theileria orientalis (51.8%, Anaplasma sp. Omatjenne (25.5%, Anaplasma marginale (14.5%, Babesia bigemina (14.0% and Theileria velifera (13.0% and minor occurrences of Ehrlichia ruminantium (0.5% and Ehrlichia minasensis (0.26%. Moreover, three novel Anaplasma genotypes were detected in bovine blood samples. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that they most likely represent three, but at least two, new species. The prevalence of the three novel Anaplasma species, preliminary designated as Anaplasma sp. Hadesa, Anaplasma sp. Saso and Anaplasma sp. Dedessa, was 12.5%, 14.3% and 5.6%, respectively. Overall, a total of 227 cattle (57.9% were found to be co-infected with two or more TBPs simultaneously and 86 different species combinations were observed. The findings show a very high burden of infection of cattle with TBPs in Ethiopia. The high frequency of co-infections suggests that clinical manifestations might be complex. Further research is required to determine the pathogenicity, host cell types and vector of

  18. Serine Protease Inhibitors in Ticks: An Overview of Their Role in Tick Biology and Tick-Borne Pathogen Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien A. Blisnick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New tick and tick-borne pathogen control approaches that are both environmentally sustainable and which provide broad protection are urgently needed. Their development, however, will rely on a greater understanding of tick biology, tick-pathogen, and tick-host interactions. The recent advances in new generation technologies to study genomes, transcriptomes, and proteomes has resulted in a plethora of tick biomacromolecular studies. Among these, many enzyme inhibitors have been described, notably serine protease inhibitors (SPIs, whose importance in various tick biological processes is only just beginning to be fully appreciated. Among the multiple active substances secreted during tick feeding, SPIs have been shown to be directly involved in regulation of inflammation, blood clotting, wound healing, vasoconstriction and the modulation of host defense mechanisms. In light of these activities, several SPIs were examined and were experimentally confirmed to facilitate tick pathogen transmission. In addition, to prevent coagulation of the ingested blood meal within the tick alimentary canal, SPIs are also involved in blood digestion and nutrient extraction from the meal. The presence of SPIs in tick hemocytes and their involvement in tick innate immune defenses have also been demonstrated, as well as their implication in hemolymph coagulation and egg development. Considering the involvement of SPIs in multiple crucial aspects of tick-host-pathogen interactions, as well as in various aspects of the tick parasitic lifestyle, these molecules represent highly suitable and attractive targets for the development of effective tick control strategies. Here we review the current knowledge regarding this class of inhibitors in tick biology and tick-borne pathogen transmission, and their potential as targets for future tick control trials.

  19. A study of ticks and tick-borne livestock pathogens in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budachetri, Khemraj; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Williams, Jaclyn; Kausar, Asma; Hassan, Muhammad Jawadul; Adamson, Steven; Dowd, Scot E.; Apanskevich, Dmitry; Arijo, Abdullah; Sindhu, Zia Uddin; Kakar, Muhammad Azam; Khan, Raja Muhammad Dilpazir; Ullah, Shafiq; Sajid, Muhammad Sohail; Ali, Abid; Iqbal, Zafar

    2017-01-01

    Background As obligate blood-feeding arthropods, ticks transmit pathogens to humans and domestic animals more often than other arthropod vectors. Livestock farming plays a vital role in the rural economy of Pakistan, and tick infestation causes serious problems with it. However, research on tick species diversity and tick-borne pathogens has rarely been conducted in Pakistan. In this study, a systematic investigation of the tick species infesting livestock in different ecological regions of Pakistan was conducted to determine the microbiome and pathobiome diversity in the indigenous ticks. Methodology/Principal findings A total of 3,866 tick specimens were morphologically identified as 19 different tick species representing three important hard ticks, Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis and Hyalomma, and two soft ticks, Ornithodorus and Argas. The bacterial diversity across these tick species was assessed by bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing using a 454-sequencing platform on 10 of the different tick species infesting livestock. The notable genera detected include Ralstonia, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Rickettsia, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Corynebacterium, Enterobacter, and Enterococcus. A survey of Spotted fever group rickettsia from 514 samples from the 13 different tick species generated rickettsial-specific amplicons in 10% (54) of total ticks tested. Only three tick species Rhipicephalus microplus, Hyalomma anatolicum, and H. dromedarii had evidence of infection with “Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii” a result further verified using a rompB gene-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. The Hyalomma ticks also tested positive for the piroplasm, Theileria annulata, using a qPCR assay. Conclusions/Significance This study provides information about tick diversity in Pakistan, and pathogenic bacteria in different tick species. Our results showed evidence for Candidatus R. amblyommii infection in Rhipicephalus microplus, H. anatolicum, and H. dromedarii ticks, which

  20. A study of ticks and tick-borne livestock pathogens in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Karim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As obligate blood-feeding arthropods, ticks transmit pathogens to humans and domestic animals more often than other arthropod vectors. Livestock farming plays a vital role in the rural economy of Pakistan, and tick infestation causes serious problems with it. However, research on tick species diversity and tick-borne pathogens has rarely been conducted in Pakistan. In this study, a systematic investigation of the tick species infesting livestock in different ecological regions of Pakistan was conducted to determine the microbiome and pathobiome diversity in the indigenous ticks.A total of 3,866 tick specimens were morphologically identified as 19 different tick species representing three important hard ticks, Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis and Hyalomma, and two soft ticks, Ornithodorus and Argas. The bacterial diversity across these tick species was assessed by bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing using a 454-sequencing platform on 10 of the different tick species infesting livestock. The notable genera detected include Ralstonia, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Rickettsia, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Corynebacterium, Enterobacter, and Enterococcus. A survey of Spotted fever group rickettsia from 514 samples from the 13 different tick species generated rickettsial-specific amplicons in 10% (54 of total ticks tested. Only three tick species Rhipicephalus microplus, Hyalomma anatolicum, and H. dromedarii had evidence of infection with "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" a result further verified using a rompB gene-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR assay. The Hyalomma ticks also tested positive for the piroplasm, Theileria annulata, using a qPCR assay.This study provides information about tick diversity in Pakistan, and pathogenic bacteria in different tick species. Our results showed evidence for Candidatus R. amblyommii infection in Rhipicephalus microplus, H. anatolicum, and H. dromedarii ticks, which also carried T. annulata.

  1. Canine vector-borne pathogens in semi-domesticated dogs residing in northern Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inpankaew, Tawin; Hii, Sze Fui; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Traub, Rebecca J

    2016-05-10

    In Southeast Asia, the canine vector-borne pathogens Babesia spp., Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Hepatozoon canis, haemotropic mycoplasmas and Dirofilaria immitis cause significant morbidity and mortality in dogs. Moreover, dogs have also been implicated as natural reservoirs for Rickettsia felis, the agent of flea-borne spotted fever, increasingly implicated as a cause of undifferentiated fever in humans in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and diversity of canine vector-borne pathogens in 101 semi-domesticated dogs from rural Cambodia using molecular diagnostic techniques. The most common canine vector-borne pathogens found infecting dogs in this study were Babesia vogeli (32.7 %) followed by Ehrlichia canis (21.8 %), Dirofilaria immitis (15.8 %), Hepatozoon canis (10.9 %), Mycoplasma haemocanis (9.9 %) and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" (2.9 %). A high level of co-infection with CVBD agents (23.8 %) was present, most commonly B. vogeli and E. canis. Naturally occurring R. felis infection was also detected in 10.9 % of dogs in support of their role as a natural mammalian reservoir for flea-borne spotted fever in humans. This study reports for the first time, the prevalence and diversity of CVBD pathogens in dogs in Cambodia. In total, five species of CVBD pathogens were found infecting semi-domesticated dogs and many were co-infected with two or more pathogens. This study supports the role of dogs as natural mammalian reservoirs for R. felis, the agent of flea-borne spotted fever in humans.

  2. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods. PMID:27092128

  3. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo eBai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods.

  4. Spiroplasma – an emerging arthropod-borne pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Cisak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiroplasma is a genus of wall-less, low-GC, small Gram-positive bacteria of the internal contractile cytoskeleton, with helical morphology and motility. The genus is classified within the class Mollicutes. Spiroplasma / host interactions can be classified as commensal, pathogenic or mutualist. The majority of spiroplasmas are found to be commensals of insects, arachnids, crustaceans or plants, whereas a small number of species are pathogens of plants, insects, and crustaceans. Insects are particularly rich sources of spiroplasmas. The bacteria are common in haematophagous arthropods: deerflies, horseflies, mosquitoes, and in ticks, where they may occur abundantly in salivary glands. The ability of spiroplasmas to propagate in rodents was experimentally proven, and Spiroplasma infections have been reported recently in humans. Some authors have purported an etiological role of Spiroplasma in causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, but convincing proof is lacking. The possibility for humans and other vertebrates to be infected with Spiroplasma spp. in natural conditions is largely unknown, as well as the possibility of the transmission of these bacteria by ticks and haematophagous insects. Nevertheless, in the light of new data, such possibilities cannot be excluded.

  5. Life History and Demographic Drivers of Reservoir Competence for Three Tick-Borne Zoonotic Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ostfeld, Richard S.; Levi, Taal; Jolles, Anna E.; Martin, Lynn B.; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Keesing, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Animal and plant species differ dramatically in their quality as hosts for multi-host pathogens, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. A group of small mammals, including small rodents and shrews, are among the most competent natural reservoirs for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi, Babesia microti, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, in eastern North America. For a group of nine commonly-infected mammals spanning >2 orders of magnitude in body mass, we as...

  6. Advanced molecular diagnostic techniques for detection of food-borne pathogens: Current applications and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesha, S; Manukumar, H M

    2018-01-02

    The elimination of disease-causing microbes from the food supply is a primary goal and this review deals with the overall techniques available for detection of food-borne pathogens. Now-a-days conventional methods are replaced by advanced methods like Biosensors, Nucleic Acid-based Tests (NAT), and different PCR-based techniques used in molecular biology to identify specific pathogens. Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., and pathogens are detected in contaminated food items that cause always diseases in human in any one or the other way. Identification of food-borne pathogens in a short period of time is still a challenge to the scientific field in general and food technology in particular. The low level of food contamination by major pathogens requires specific sensitive detection platforms and the present area of hot research looking forward to new nanomolecular techniques for nanomaterials, make them suitable for the development of assays with high sensitivity, response time, and portability. With the sound of these, we attempt to highlight a comprehensive overview about food-borne pathogen detection by rapid, sensitive, accurate, and cost affordable in situ analytical methods from conventional methods to recent molecular approaches for advanced food and microbiology research.

  7. A theoretical framework for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens: Identifying effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2011-06-07

    We develop and analyse a flexible compartmental model of the interaction between a plant host, a soil-borne pathogen and a microbial antagonist, for use in optimising biological control. By extracting invasion and persistence thresholds of host, pathogen and biological control agent, performing an equilibrium analysis, and numerical investigation of sensitivity to parameters and initial conditions, we determine criteria for successful biological control. We identify conditions for biological control (i) to prevent a pathogen entering a system, (ii) to eradicate a pathogen that is already present and, if that is not possible, (iii) to reduce the density of the pathogen. Control depends upon the epidemiology of the pathogen and how efficiently the antagonist can colonise particular habitats (i.e. healthy tissue, infected tissue and/or soil-borne inoculum). A sharp transition between totally effective control (i.e. eradication of the pathogen) and totally ineffective control can follow slight changes in biologically interpretable parameters or to the initial amounts of pathogen and biological control agent present. Effective biological control requires careful matching of antagonists to pathosystems. For preventative/eradicative control, antagonists must colonise susceptible hosts. However, for reduction in disease prevalence, the range of habitat is less important than the antagonist's bulking-up efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Occurrence of seed-borne fungal pathogens in rice seed from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of seed-borne fungal pathogens in rice seed from the southern highlands of Tanzania. L T H Nsemwa, H Wolffhechel. Abstract. (African Crop Science Journal: 1999 7(2): 217-222). AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  9. Fusarium diseases as the main soil borne fungal pathogen on plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most frequently soil-borne fungal pathogens on plants are Fusarium species that make high economical damages in various agricultural locations in Iran. Our studies show that Fusarium species cause significant yield losses in main crops especially potato, pea, bean, wheat, corn and rice in several parts of the country.

  10. (Cucumis melo L.) cultivars to soil-borne plant pathogenic fungi in Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl11

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... Melon is an important dessert fruit in the Sistan region of. Iran, but its cultivation is threatened by attacks of. Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi), Monosporascus cannonballus (Pollack and Uecker) and Rhizoctonia solani (Kuhn) (Safarnezhad, 2004). Melon death induced by these soil-borne plant pathogenic ...

  11. Non- chemical methods of seed treatment for control of seed- borne pathogens on vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amein, T.; Wright, S.A.I.; Wickstrom, M.; Schmitt, A.; Koch, E.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Jahn, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of EU-project "Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production" (STOVE) was to evaluate non-chemical methods for control of seed-borne pathogens in organic vegetable production. Physical (hot air, hot water and electron) and biologi-cal (microorganisms and different agents of natural

  12. Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Orkun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara.A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph and Ha. parva.This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey

  13. Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkun, Ömer; Karaer, Zafer; Çakmak, Ayşe; Nalbantoğlu, Serpil

    2014-08-01

    The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara. A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca) were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph) and Ha. parva). This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. More

  14. Molecular detection of vector-borne pathogens in dogs and cats from Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Lima, Clara; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Colella, Vito; Ravagnan, Silvia; Capelli, Gioia; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís; Cardoso, Luís; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-06-20

    Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) have been increasingly reported in dogs and cats worldwide. However, no data are currently available regarding canine and feline VBDs in Qatar and limited information is available from other Persian Gulf countries. Blood samples from 98 client-owned animals (i.e. 64 dogs and 34 cats) living in Doha (Qatar) were collected and the presence of genomic DNA of Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., Dirofilaria spp., Ehrlichia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Mycoplasma spp. and Rickettsia spp. was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real time-PCR (rt-PCR) and sequence analysis. Of the 64 dogs, 12 (18.8%) were infected with at least one pathogen (i.e. 7.8% with Mycoplasma spp., 4.7% with Babesia vogeli, 3.1% with Ehrlichia canis, and 1.6% with Anaplasma platys, Babesia gibsoni and Hepatozoon canis, each). One of the 12 dogs was co-infected with B. vogeli and E. canis. Of the 34 cats, seven (20.6%) animals were infected with at least one pathogen (i.e. 5.9% were positive for Mycoplasma spp., and 2.9% for Babesia felis, B. vogeli, E. canis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and Mycoplasma haemofelis, each). No dogs or cats were positive for Dirofilaria spp. or Rickettsia spp. Although the sample sizes of dogs and cats herein analysed was moderately small, data from this study report the occurrence of A. platys, B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, E. canis, H. canis and Mycoplasma spp. in domestic dogs and of B. felis, B. vogeli, "Candidatus M. haemominutum", E. canis and M. haemofelis in domestic cats from Qatar. Further investigations along with prophylactic measures are strongly recommended in order to reduce the risk of dogs and cats acquiring VBDs in Qatar.

  15. Human soil-borne pathogens and risks associated with land use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily

    2017-04-01

    Soil is a source of pathogenic, neutral and beneficial microorganisms. Natural events and anthropogenic activity can affect soil biodiversity and influence the balance and distribution of soil-borne human pathogens. Important bacterial and fungal pathogens, such as Bacillus anthracis, Coxiella bernetii, Clostridium tetani, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Sporothrix schenckii will be discussed. This presentation will concentrate on soil pathogenic microorganisms and the effects of land use change on their prevalence and distribution. In particular, the potential of agricultural soil cultivation to enhance pathogen transmission to human through the release of soil microbes into the air attached to dust particles, contamination of waterways and infection of food plants and animal. Emerging solutions, such as biocontrol and probiotics, will be discussed.

  16. Prevalence of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Hard Ticks That Attacked Human Hosts in Eastern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Khasnatinov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of tick-borne infections in humans. The prevalence of 4 tick-borne pathogens was studied in the population of Ixodid ticks attacking human hosts in Irkutsk city and neighbouring territories from 2007 to 2017. Methods and Results: In total, 46,357 tick specimens detached from bitten people were analyzed. The antigen of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV was detected in each tick individually by ELISA assay using a commercial kit for the envelope protein E of TBEV. Total RNA and DNA were extracted from ticks using a RiboPrep kit. Reverse transcription was performed using a Reverta-L kit and RNA\\DNA of TBEV; B. burgdorferi sensu lato, A. phagocytophylum and Ehrlichia muris\\E. chaffeensis were detected using a real-time multiplex PCR kit. In total, during 8 years of observations, I. persulcatus caused approximately 86% of bites, Dermacentor sp. 13.95 %, and H. concinna 0.05 %. The most prevalent tick-borne pathogen in I. persulcatus ticks was Lyme disease agent B. burgdorferi sensu lato, which was detected in 12±6.5% of specimens annually. A. phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia sp. were detected in 7.8±2.7% and 4.6±1.5% of specimens, respectively. TBEV was present in 1±0.7% of I. persulcatus. Conclusion: I. persulcatus remains the most important vector of tick-borne diseases to humans in Eastern Siberia. D. nuttalli and D. silvarum are much less aggressive to humans and are less infected with major tick-borne pathogens. H. concinna does not play any significant role as a disease vector. However, a rigorous analysis of TBEV spread in the Dermacentor sp. population is necessary.

  17. Pathogens in Maternal Blood and Fetal Cord Blood Using Q-Pcr Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Qiong Hou

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of pathogens in fetal cord blood. Screening for the above pathogens in donor cord blood in cord blood banks using Q-PCR is strongly urged to decrease morbidity and mortality rates in fetal cord blood stem cell transplant recipients.

  18. Association of ABO and Rh Blood Groups to Blood-Borne Infections among Blood Donors in Tehran-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadali, Fatemeh; Pourfathollah, Aliakbar

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and syphilis infections in blood donors referred to Tehran Blood Transfusion Center (TBTC), and determine any association between blood groups and blood- borne infections between the years of 2005 and 2011. This was a retrospective study conducted at TBTC. All of the donor serum samples were screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis by using third generation ELISA kits and RPR test. Initial reactive samples were tested in duplicate. Confirmatory tests were performed on all repeatedly reactive donations. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse blood grouping. The results were subjected to chi square analysis for determination of statistical difference between the values among different categories according to SPSS program. Overall, 2031451 donor serum samples were collected in 2005-2011. Totally, 10451 were positive test for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis. The overall seroprevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis was 0.39%, 0.11%, 0.005%, and 0.010%, respectively. Hepatitis B and HIV infections were significantly associated with blood group of donors (P blood group "A" and percentage of HBs Ag was lower in donors who had blood group O. There was no significant association between Hepatitis C and syphilis infections with ABO and Rh blood groups (P>0.05). Compared with neighboring countries and the international standards, prevalence of blood-borne infections is relatively low.

  19. Molecular investigation of tick-borne pathogens in dogs from Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Luís; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Granada, Sara; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Gilad, Matan; Lopes, Ana Patrícia; Sousa, Sérgio Ramalho; Vilhena, Hugo; Baneth, Gad

    2016-05-10

    No molecular data have been available on tick-borne pathogens that infect dogs from Angola. The occurrence of agents from the genera Anaplasma, Babesia, Ehrlichia and Hepatozoon was assessed in 103 domestic dogs from Luanda, by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis. Forty-six dogs (44.7 %) were positive for at least one pathogen. Twenty-one animals (20.4 %) were found infected with Anaplasma platys, 18 (17.5 %) with Hepatozoon canis, six (5.8 %) with Ehrlichia canis, six (5.8 %) with Babesia vogeli, one (1.0 %) with Babesia gibsoni and one (1.0 %) with an unnamed Babesia sp. The molecular frequency of single infections taken together was 37.9 % and that of co-infections with several combinations of two pathogens accounted for 6.8 % of the animals. This is the first report of A. platys, B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, E. canis and H. canis infections diagnosed by PCR in domestic dogs from Angola. The present study provides evidence that dogs in Luanda are widely exposed to, and at risk of becoming infected with, tick-borne pathogens. Further investigation is needed, including a larger number of animals, canine populations from other cities and provinces of the country, as well as potential vector ticks, aiming at better characterizing and controlling canine vector-borne diseases in Angola.

  20. Zoonotic intestinal parasites and vector-borne pathogens in Italian shelter and kennel dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversa, Donato; Di Cesare, Angela; Simonato, Giulia; Cassini, Rudi; Merola, Carmine; Diakou, Anastasia; Halos, Lénaïg; Beugnet, Frederic; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the presence of zoonotic parasites and vector-borne pathogens in dogs housed in kennels and shelters from four sites of Italy. A total of 150 adoptable dogs was examined with different microscopic, serological and molecular methods. Overall 129 dogs (86%) were positive for one or more parasites and/or pathogens transmitted by ectoparasites. Forty-eight (32%) were positive for one infection, while 81 (54%) for more than one pathogen. The most common zoonotic helminths recorded were hookworms, roundworms and Capillaria aerophila, followed by mosquito-borne Dirofilaria spp. and Dipylidium caninum. One hundred and thirteen (77.9%), 6 (4.1%) and 2 (1.4%) dogs were positive for Rickettsia spp., Leishmania infantum and Anaplasma spp., respectively. The results show that dogs living in rescue facilities from the studied areas may be infected by many zoonotic internal parasites and vector-borne pathogens, and that control measures should be implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing of Early Ripening Strawberry Cultivars Tolerant to Soil-Borne Pathogens as Alternative to 'Elsanta'

    OpenAIRE

    Spornberger, Andreas; Steffek, Robert; Altenburger, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Soil-borne pathogens, above all Verticillium sp., cause plant loss and yield decrease in many Austrian strawberry regions. As part of a research project 13 cultivars were planted in 2005 at 11 sites on nine farms in five different Austrian regions. The aim was to test early ripening Verticillium tolerant cultivars which are winter hardy, with high yield and good fruit characteristics as alternative to the highly susceptible cultivar ‘Elsanta’. Although in 2005 climatic conditions where not fa...

  2. Modelling soil borne fungal pathogens of arable crops under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manici, L M; Bregaglio, S; Fumagalli, D; Donatelli, M

    2014-12-01

    Soil-borne fungal plant pathogens, agents of crown and root rot, are seldom considered in studies on climate change and agriculture due both to the complexity of the soil system and to the incomplete knowledge of their response to environmental drivers. A controlled chamber set of experiments was carried out to quantify the response of six soil-borne fungi to temperature, and a species-generic model to simulate their response was developed. The model was linked to a soil temperature model inclusive of components able to simulate soil water content also as resulting from crop water uptake. Pathogen relative growth was simulated over Europe using the IPCC A1B emission scenario derived from the Hadley-CM3 global climate model. Climate scenarios of soil temperature in 2020 and 2030 were compared to the baseline centred in the year 2000. The general trend of the response of soil-borne pathogens shows increasing growth in the coldest areas of Europe; however, a larger rate of increase is shown from 2020 to 2030 compared to that of 2000 to 2020. Projections of pathogens of winter cereals indicate a marked increase of growth rate in the soils of northern European and Baltic states. Fungal pathogens of spring sowing crops show unchanged conditions for their growth in soils of the Mediterranean countries, whereas an increase of suitable conditions was estimated for the areals of central Europe which represent the coldest limit areas where the host crops are currently grown. Differences across fungal species are shown, indicating that crop-specific analyses should be ran.

  3. A survey of tick-borne pathogens in dogs and their ticks in the Pantanal biome, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A L T; Witter, R; Martins, T F; Pacheco, T A; Alves, A S; Chitarra, C S; Dutra, V; Nakazato, L; Pacheco, R C; Labruna, M B; Aguiar, D M

    2016-03-01

    Tick and blood samples collected from domestic dogs in the Brazilian Pantanal were tested by molecular methods for the presence of tick-borne protozoa and bacteria. Among 320 sampled dogs, 3.13% were infected by Babesia vogeli (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae), 8.75% by Hepatozoon canis (Eucoccidiorida: Hepatozoidae), 7.19% by Anaplasma platys (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), and 0.94% by an unclassified Anaplasma sp. In three tick species collected from dogs, the following tick-borne agents were detected: (a) B. vogeli, An. platys and Ehrlichia canis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), infecting Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks; (b) H. canis, an unclassified Anaplasma sp. and Rickettsia amblyommii (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae), infecting Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks, and (c) Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, an emerging human pathogen, infecting Amblyomma ovale ticks. Molecular analysis, based on a mitochondrial gene, revealed that the Am. cajennense s.l. ticks of the present study corresponded to Amblyomma sculptum, a member of the Am. cajennense species complex, and that Rh. sanguineus s.l. belonged to the tropical lineage. Whereas dogs are exposed to a number of tick-borne bacterial and protozoan agents in the Pantanal biome, humans are potentially exposed to infection by spotted fever group rickettsiae (e.g. R. amblyommii and Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest) because both Am. sculptum and Am. ovale are among the most important human-biting ticks in Brazil. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. Pathogens in Maternal Blood and Fetal Cord Blood Using Q-Pcr Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Guang Qiong Hou; Sidney S. Chen; Chan Ping Lee

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the rates of infection of asymptomatic fetuses and mothers through fetal cord blood and maternal blood examination results. Materials and Methods: Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) was used to detect pathogens in maternal peripheral blood and fetal cord blood after delivery of term pregnancy at Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Center, Hualien, between July 2002 and June 2003. Results: We used Q-PCR to detect pathogens in 29 samples of maternal blood. The maternal hepatitis B virus...

  5. Tick-borne pathogens in ticks collected from birds in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chien Kuo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of human diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors, including ticks, are emerging around the globe. Birds are known to be hosts of ticks and can disperse exotic ticks and tick-borne pathogens. In Taiwan, previous studies have focused predominantly on mammals, leaving the role of birds in the maintenance of ticks and dissemination of tick-borne pathogens undetermined. Methods Ticks were collected opportunistically when birds were studied from 1995 to 2013. Furthermore, to improve knowledge on the prevalence and mean load of tick infestation on birds in Taiwan, ticks were thoroughly searched for when birds were mist-netted at seven sites between September 2014 and April 2016 in eastern Taiwan. Ticks were identified based on both morphological and molecular information and were screened for potential tick-borne pathogens, including the genera Anaplasma, Babesia, Borrelia, Ehrlichia and Rickettsia. Finally, a list of hard tick species collected from birds in Taiwan was compiled based on past work and the current study. Results Nineteen ticks (all larvae were recovered from four of the 3096 unique mist-netted bird individuals, yielding a mean load of 0.006 ticks/individual and an overall prevalence of 0.13%. A total of 139 ticks from birds, comprising 48 larvae, 35 nymphs, 55 adults and one individual of unknown life stage, were collected from 1995 to 2016, and 11 species of four genera were identified, including three newly recorded species (Haemaphysalis wellingtoni, Ixodes columnae and Ixodes turdus. A total of eight tick-borne pathogens were detected, with five species (Borrelia turdi, Anaplasma sp. clone BJ01, Ehrlichia sp. BL157-9, Rickettsia helvetica and Rickettsia monacensis not previously isolated in Taiwan. Overall, 16 tick species of five genera have been recorded feeding on birds, including nine species first discovered in this study. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the paucity of information on ticks of

  6. Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in the Korean Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus) from Jeonbuk Province, Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Seong, Giyong; Han, Yu-Jung; Oh, Sung-Suck; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in the Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). Pathogens were identified using PCR which included Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Theileria. Rickettsia was not detected, whereas Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria infections were detected in 4, 2, and 8 animals, respectively. The most prevalent pathogen was Theileria. Of the 8 Theileria-positive animals, 2 were mixed-infected with 3 pathogens...

  7. Co-infection and genetic diversity of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Werszko, Joanna; Cydzik, Krystian; Bajer, Anna; Michalik, Jerzy; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2013-05-01

    Wild species are essential hosts for maintaining Ixodes ticks and the tick-borne diseases. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence, the rate of co-infection with Babesia, Bartonella, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and the molecular diversity of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer in Poland. Almost half of the tested samples provided evidence of infection with at least 1 species. A. phagocytophilum (37.3%) was the most common and Bartonella (13.4%) the rarest infection. A total of 18.3% of all positive samples from roe deer were infected with at least 2 pathogens, and one-third of those were co-infected with A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella, and Babesia species. On the basis of multilocus molecular studies we conclude that: (1) Two different genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum, zoonotic and nonzoonotic, are widely distributed in Polish roe deer population; (2) the roe deer is the host for zoonotic Babesia (Bab. venatorum, Bab. divergens), closely related or identical with strains/species found in humans; (3) our Bab. capreoli and Bab. divergens isolates differed from reported genotypes at 2 conserved base positions, i.e., positions 631 and 663; and (4) this is the first description of Bart. schoenbuchensis infections in roe deer in Poland. We present 1 of the first complex epidemiological studies on the prevalence of Babesia, Bartonella, and A. phagocytophilum in naturally infected populations of roe deer. These game animals clearly have an important role as reservoir hosts of tick-borne pathogens, but the pathogenicity and zoonotic potential of the parasite genotypes hosted by roe deer requires further detailed investigation.

  8. Smuggling across the border: how arthropod-borne pathogens evade and exploit the host defense system of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Quentin; Jaulhac, Benoit; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The skin is a critical barrier between hosts and pathogens in arthropod-borne diseases. It harbors many resident cells and specific immune cells to arrest or limit infections by secreting inflammatory molecules or by directly killing pathogens. However, some pathogens are able to use specific skin cells and arthropod saliva for their initial development, to hide from the host immune system, and to establish persistent infection in the vertebrate host. A better understanding of the initial mechanisms taking place in the skin should allow the development of new strategies to fight these vector-borne pathogens that are spread worldwide and are of major medical importance.

  9. Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens in Ixodes ricinus from Moldova collected in 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movila, Alexandru; Toderas, Ion; Uspenskaia, Inga; Conovalov, Jurii

    2013-06-01

    This study is the first report about the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens, as well as their (co-)infection rates, in the museum-archived I. ricinus female ticks collected in Moldova in 1960. A total of 16.7% (21/126) ticks was mono-infected. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto was revealed as the most abundant species (4.8%) followed by B. garinii (1.6%), B. afzelii (0.8%), B. valaisiana (0.8%), and B. lusitaniae (0.8%). DNA of Rickettsia helvetica (2.4%), R. monacensis (2.4%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (2.4%), 'Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis' (0.8%), and Babesia microti (0.8%) were also detected, indicating the occurrence of these emerging tick-borne microorganisms in Moldova since 1960 at least. In this study, we detected a co-infection (0.8%; 1/126 tested ticks) between B. microti and R. helvetica. Additional investigations are warranted to further characterize a historical snapshot of the distribution of tick-borne pathogens in Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between Food-borne Pathogens (Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes) and a Common Soil Flagellate (Cercomonas sp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Free-living protozoa may harbor, protect, and disperse bacteria, including those ingested and passed in viable form in feces. The flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil, but their role in the survival of food-borne pathogens associated with fruits and vegetables is not well....... The results of this study suggest that Cercomonas sp. and perhaps other soil flagellates may play a role for the survival of food-borne pathogens on plant surfaces and in soil....

  11. Tick-borne pathogen – Reversed and conventional discovery of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen eTijsse Klasen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular methods have increased the number of known microorganisms associated with ticks significantly. Some of these newly identified microorganisms are readily linked to human disease while others are yet unknown to cause human disease. The face of tick-borne disease discovery has changed with more diseases now being discovered in a ‘reversed way’, detecting disease cases only years after the tick-borne microorganism was first discovered. Compared to the conventional discovery of infectious diseases, this order of discoveries presents researchers with new challenges. Especially estimating public health risks of such agents is challenging, as case definitions and diagnostic procedures may initially be missing. We discuss the advantages and shortcomings of molecular methods, serology, epidemiological studies that might be used to study some fundamental questions regarding newly identified tick-borne diseases. With increased tick-exposure and improved detection methods, more tick-borne microorganisms will be added to the list of pathogens causing disease in humans in future.

  12. A molecular survey of vector-borne pathogens in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodžić, Adnan; Alić, Amer; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Harl, Josef; Wille-Piazzai, Walpurga; Duscher, Georg Gerhard

    2015-02-08

    Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have recently been recognized as potential reservoirs of several vector-borne pathogens and a source of infection for domestic dogs and humans, mostly due to their close vicinity to urban areas and frequent exposure to different arthropod vectors. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence and distribution of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon canis, Anaplasma spp., Bartonella spp., 'Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis', Ehrlichia canis, Rickettsia spp. and blood filaroid nematodes in free-ranging red foxes from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Spleen samples from a total of 119 red foxes, shot during the hunting season between October 2013 and April 2014 throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina, were examined for the presence of blood vector-borne pathogens by conventional PCRs and sequencing. In the present study, three species of apicomplexan parasites were molecularly identified in 73 red foxes from the entire sample area, with an overall prevalence of 60.8%. The DNA of B. canis, B. cf. microti and H. canis was found in 1 (0.8%), 38 (31.9%) and 46 (38.6%) spleen samples, respectively. In 11 samples (9.2%) co-infections with B. cf. microti and H. canis were detected and one fox harboured all three parasites (0.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between geographical region, sex or age of the host in the infection prevalence of B. cf. microti, although females (52.9%; 18/34) were significantly more infected with H. canis than males (32.9%; 28/85). The presence of vector-borne bacteria and filaroid nematodes was not detected in our study. This is the first report of B. canis, B. cf. microti and H. canis parasites in foxes from Bosnia and Herzegovina and the data presented here provide a first insight into the distribution of these pathogens among the red fox population. Moreover, the relatively high prevalence of B. cf. microti and H. canis reinforces the assumption that this wild canid species might be a possible reservoir and

  13. Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens in wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebani, Valentina Virginia; Rocchigiani, Guido; Nardoni, Simona; Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Vasta, Violetta; Papini, Roberto Amerigo; Verin, Ranieri; Poli, Alessandro; Mancianti, Francesca

    2017-08-01

    Spleen samples from 153 red foxes, shot during regular hunting season in the province of Pisa (Central Italy), were examined to detect DNA of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia sp./Theileria sp. DNA of vector-borne pathogens was detected in 120 (78.43%; 95% CI: 71.06-84.66%) foxes. Specifically, 75 (49%; 95% CI: 40.86-57.22%) animals scored PCR-positive per H. canis, 68 (44.44%; 95% CI: 36.42-52.69%) for E. canis, 35 (22.88%; 95% CI: 16.48-30.35%) for piroplasms (Theileria annae), 3 (1.96%; 95% CI: 0.41-5.62%) for C. burnetii and 1 (0.65%; 95% CI: 0.02-3.59%) for A. phagocytophilum. No positive reaction was observed for F. tularensis. Fifty-six animals (36.6%; 95% CI: 28.97-44.76%) were positive for two or three pathogens. Red foxes result to be involved in the cycle of vector-borne pathogens that are associated to disease in dogs and humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Vector-borne pathogens in dogs and red foxes from the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesner, Jana M; Krücken, Jürgen; Schaper, Roland; Pachnicke, Stefan; Kohn, Barbara; Müller, Elisabeth; Schulze, Christoph; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Dirofilaria repens is endemic in eastern and southern European regions but was recently found in Germany in dogs, mosquitoes and one human patient. Since some of the positive dog and mosquito samples were collected in Brandenburg, it was aimed to systematically assess the prevalence of D. repens and other canine vector-borne pathogens in Brandenburg. Dog owners also received a questionnaire and were asked to provide more information about the dogs including travel history. In total, 1023 dog blood samples as well as 195 fox spleen and 179 fox blood samples were collected. DNA was analysed by PCR for the presence of filariae, piroplasms, anaplasmataceae and Rickettsia spp. Filariae were detected in six dogs (0.6%), two were positive for DNA from D. repens, two from Dirofilaria immitis and two from Acanthocheilonema reconditum. One of the D. repens positive dogs originated from an animal shelter in Brandenburg, but the origin of the other one remained unknown. Interestingly, both D. repens ITS-1 sequences showed 100% identity to a D. repens sample obtained from a Japanese woman that travelled in Europe and were 97% identical to a newly proposed species Dirofilaria sp. 'hongkongensis' described from Hong Kong. However, identity to other D. repens sequences from Thailand was considerably lower (81%). Identity of 12S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase I to D. repens samples from southern Europe was 99%. Due to the low number of Dirofilaria spp. positive dogs and since the origin of these was unknown, endemic occurrence of Dirofilaria in Brandenburg could not be confirmed. Anaplasma phagocytophilum was found in 15 dogs (1.5%), Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in three dogs (0.3%) and E. canis in one dog (0.1%), which was co-infected with D. repens. Rickettsia spp. were detected in 8 dogs (0.8%), seven were Rickettsia raoultii and one was Rickettsia felis. To the author's knowledge, R. raoultii DNA was detected for the first time in dogs in Germany in this study and Candidatus

  15. Life history and demographic drivers of reservoir competence for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostfeld, Richard S; Levi, Taal; Jolles, Anna E; Martin, Lynn B; Hosseini, Parviez R; Keesing, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Animal and plant species differ dramatically in their quality as hosts for multi-host pathogens, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. A group of small mammals, including small rodents and shrews, are among the most competent natural reservoirs for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi, Babesia microti, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, in eastern North America. For a group of nine commonly-infected mammals spanning >2 orders of magnitude in body mass, we asked whether life history features or surrogates for (unknown) encounter rates with ticks, predicted reservoir competence for each pathogen. Life history features associated with a fast pace of life generally were positively correlated with reservoir competence. However, a model comparison approach revealed that host population density, as a proxy for encounter rates between hosts and pathogens, generally received more support than did life history features. The specific life history features and the importance of host population density differed somewhat between the different pathogens. We interpret these results as supporting two alternative but non-exclusive hypotheses for why ecologically widespread, synanthropic species are often the most competent reservoirs for multi-host pathogens. First, multi-host pathogens might adapt to those hosts they are most likely to experience, which are likely to be the most abundant and/or frequently bitten by tick vectors. Second, species with fast life histories might allocate less to certain immune defenses, which could increase their reservoir competence. Results suggest that of the host species that might potentially be exposed, those with comparatively high population densities, small bodies, and fast pace of life will often be keystone reservoirs that should be targeted for surveillance or management.

  16. Life history and demographic drivers of reservoir competence for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Ostfeld

    Full Text Available Animal and plant species differ dramatically in their quality as hosts for multi-host pathogens, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. A group of small mammals, including small rodents and shrews, are among the most competent natural reservoirs for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi, Babesia microti, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, in eastern North America. For a group of nine commonly-infected mammals spanning >2 orders of magnitude in body mass, we asked whether life history features or surrogates for (unknown encounter rates with ticks, predicted reservoir competence for each pathogen. Life history features associated with a fast pace of life generally were positively correlated with reservoir competence. However, a model comparison approach revealed that host population density, as a proxy for encounter rates between hosts and pathogens, generally received more support than did life history features. The specific life history features and the importance of host population density differed somewhat between the different pathogens. We interpret these results as supporting two alternative but non-exclusive hypotheses for why ecologically widespread, synanthropic species are often the most competent reservoirs for multi-host pathogens. First, multi-host pathogens might adapt to those hosts they are most likely to experience, which are likely to be the most abundant and/or frequently bitten by tick vectors. Second, species with fast life histories might allocate less to certain immune defenses, which could increase their reservoir competence. Results suggest that of the host species that might potentially be exposed, those with comparatively high population densities, small bodies, and fast pace of life will often be keystone reservoirs that should be targeted for surveillance or management.

  17. Search for tick-borne pathogens in the Svalbard archipelago and Jan Mayen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elsterová, Jana; Černý, Jiří; Müllerová, Jana; Šíma, Radek; Coulson, S.J.; Lorentzen, E.; Strøm, H.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, 20 October 2015 (2015), s. 27466 ISSN 0800-0395 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA ČR GAP302/12/2490; GA ČR GP13-12816P EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010009 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick * Ixodes uriae * tick-borne pathogens * arboviruses * Borrelia spirochetes * Babesia apicomplexans Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.728, year: 2015

  18. Quantifying dilution and amplification in a community of hosts for tick-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Taal; Keesing, Felicia; Holt, Robert D; Barfield, Michael; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2016-03-01

    Recent controversy over whether biodiversity reduces disease risk (dilution effect) has focused on the ecology of Lyme disease, a tick-borne zoonosis. A criticism of the dilution effect is that increasing host species richness might amplify disease risk, assuming that total host abundance, and therefore feeding opportunities for ticks, increase with species richness. In contrast, a dilution effect is expected when poor quality hosts for ticks and pathogens (dilution hosts) divert tick blood meals away from competent hosts. Even if host densities are additive, the relationship between host density and tick encounters can be nonlinear if the number of ticks that encounter a host is a saturating function of host density, which occurs if ticks aggregate on the remaining hosts rather than failing to find a host before death. Both dilution and amplification are theoretical possibilities, and assessing which is more prevalent required detailed analyses of empirical systems. We used field data to explore the degree of tick redistribution onto fewer individuals with variation in intraspecific host density and novel data-driven models for tick dynamics to determine how changes in vertebrate community composition influence the density of nymphs infected with the Lyme bacterium. To be conservative, we allowed total host density to increase additively with species richness. Our long-term field studies found that larval and nymphal ticks redistribute onto fewer individuals as host densities decline, that a large proportion of nymphs and adults find hosts, and that mice and chipmunks feed a large proportion of nymphs. White-footed mice, eastern chipmunks, short-tailed shrews, and masked shrews were important amplification hosts that greatly increased the density of infected nymphs. Gray squirrels and Virginia opossums were important dilution hosts. Removing these two species increased the maximum number of larvae attached to amplification hosts by 57%. Raccoons and birds were

  19. Safety of Blood and Plasma Derivatives: Pathogen Reducing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pourfathollah

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Human blood and blood products is the source of a wide range of medicinal products used for the treatment and prevention of a variety of injuries and disease. Despite stringent routine measures and filters employed, residual pathogen infectivity remains an important challenge in the field of blood transfusion. In this article various measures and technologies that can be applied in order to reduce the residual risk are reviewed.

  20. Research on the ecology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens - methodological principles and caveats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín eEstrada-Peña

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in tick-transmitted pathogens has experienced an upsurge in the past few decades. Routine application of tools for the detection of fragments of foreign DNA in ticks, together with a high degree of interest in the quantification of disease risk for humans, has led to a marked increase in the number of reports on the eco-epidemiology of tick-borne diseases. However, procedural errors continue to accumulate in the scientific literature, resulting in misleading information. For example, unreliable identification of ticks and pathogens, erroneous interpretations of short-term field studies, and the hasty acceptance of some tick species as vectors have led to ambiguities regarding the vector role of these arthropods. In this review, we focus on the ecological features driving the life cycle of ticks and the resulting effects on the eco-epidemiology of tick-transmitted pathogens. We review the factors affecting field collections of ticks, and we describe the biologically and ecologically appropriate procedures for describing tick host-seeking activity and its correlation with environmental traits. We detail the climatic variables that have biological importance on ticks and explain how they should be properly measured and analyzed. We also provide evidence to critically reject the use of some environmental traits that are being increasingly reported as the drivers of the behavior of ticks. With the aim of standardization, we propose unambiguous definitions of the status of hosts and ticks regarding their ability to maintain and spread a given pathogen. We also describe laboratory procedures and standards for evaluating the vectorial status of a tick or the reservoir role of a host. Such harmonization in protocols and terms should provide a coherent framework for the reporting of research findings concerning ticks and tick-borne diseases.

  1. Molecular survey on the occurrence of arthropod-borne pathogens in wild brown hares (Lepus europaeus) from Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchigiani, Guido; Ebani, Valentina Virginia; Nardoni, Simona; Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Bascherini, Alice; Leoni, Alessandro; Mancianti, Francesca; Poli, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    Data about the spreading of arthropod-borne pathogens among hare populations are very scant, so the aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate, through molecular analysis, the occurrence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Bartonella sp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Leishmania spp. and piroplasms DNA in blood of 51 wild hares (Lepus europaeus) living in protected areas in Tuscany. All hares resulted negative for A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella sp., B. burgdorferi s.l., C. burnetii and F. tularensis. Five animals (9.8%) were positive for Leishmania and one hare (1.9%) tested positive for piroplasms. Sequencing of this sample showed a piroplasm similar to one Babesia isolate from the same animal species in Turkey. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular report of piroplasms occurring in wild hares from Italy, and the second worldwide. The examined hares appeared to be in good health status, corroborating the hypothesis of a chronic carrier state of some vector borne agents for this animal species. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aerosolization as novel sanitizer delivery system to reduce food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S-W; Gray, P M; Dougherty, R H; Kang, D-H

    2005-01-01

    As a preliminary experiment on new sanitizer delivery tools, the efficacy of aerosolized sanitizer on food-borne pathogens was investigated in larger model chamber system. Peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide were aerosolized in a model system against artificially inoculated target micro-organisms on laboratory media. Cultures of four different food-borne pathogens were inoculated and affixed onto three different heights (bottom, wall and ceiling), and three different orientations (face-down, vertical and face-down) inside a commercial semi-trailer cabinet (14.6 x 2.6 x 2.8 m). Sanitizer was aerosolized into 2 microm droplet size fog and treated for 1 h at ambient temperature. Populations of Bacillus cereus, Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhimurium were reduced by an average of 3.09, 7.69, 6.93 and 8.18 log units per plate respectively. Interestingly, L. innocua, Staph. aureus, and Salm. typhimurium showed statistically not different (P >/= 0.05) reduction patterns relative to height and orientation that were never expected in a spraying system. Aerosolized sanitizers diffuse like gaseous sanitizers. Aerosolization has great potential for use in commercial applications.

  3. Ticks and tick-borne pathogens in wild birds in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakou, Anastasia; Norte, Ana Cláudia; Lopes de Carvalho, Isabel; Núncio, Sofia; Nováková, Markéta; Kautman, Matej; Alivizatos, Haralambos; Kazantzidis, Savas; Sychra, Oldřich; Literák, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Wild birds are common hosts of ticks and can transport them for long distances, contributing to the spreading of tick-borne pathogens. The information about ticks on birds and tick-borne pathogens in Greece is limited. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and species of ticks infesting wild resident birds (mostly small passerines) in Greece, and to assess Borrelia and Rickettsia infection in the collected ticks. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. was performed by nested PCR targeting the flaB gene. Rickettsia spp. were detected by PCR targeting the gltA and ompA genes. Seven (2 %) out of 403 birds examined in northern Greece in 2013 were infested with 15 ticks, identified as Ixodes frontalis, Ixodes acuminatus, Hyalomma marginatum, Hyalomma aegyptium and Hyalomma sp. All ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. while four of them were positive for rickettsiae (Rickettsia aeschlimannii in H. aegyptium and Rickettsia sp. in I. frontalis, H. aegyptium and H. marginatum). Ixodes acuminatus is reported for the first time in Greece and Sylvia borin is reported as a new host record for I. acuminatus.

  4. Tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on migratory passerines in Western part of Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Julia; Nazarova, Lidia; Katargina, Olga; Leivits, Agu; Järvekülg, Lilian; Golovljova, Irina

    2013-07-01

    During southward migration in the years 2006-2009, 178 migratory passerines of 24 bird species infested with ticks were captured at bird stations in Western Estonia. In total, 249 nymphal ticks were removed and analyzed individually for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The majority of ticks were collected from Acrocephalus (58%), Turdus (13%), Sylvia (8%), and Parus (6%) bird species. Tick-borne pathogens were detected in nymphs removed from Acrocephalus, Turdus, and Parus bird species. TBEV of the European subtype was detected in 1 I. ricinus nymph removed from A. palustris. B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA was found in 11 ticks (4.4%) collected from Turdus and Parus species. Bird-associated B. garinii and B. valaisiana were detected in I. ricinus nymphs removed from T. merula. Rodent-associated B. afzelii was detected in 3 I. ricinus nymphs from 2 P. major birds. One of the B. afzelii-positive nymphs was infected with a mix of 2 B. afzelii strains, whereas 1 of these strains was also detected in another nymph feeding on the same great tit. The sharing of the same B. afzelii strain by 2 nymphs indicates a possible transmission of B. afzelii by co-feeding on a bird. A. phagocytophilum DNA was detected in 1 I. ricinus nymph feeding on a T. iliacus. The results of the study confirm the possible role of migratory birds in the dispersal of ticks infected with tick-borne pathogens along the southward migration route via Estonia.

  5. Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in ticks collected from migratory birds in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capligina, Valentina; Salmane, Ineta; Keišs, Oskars; Vilks, Karlis; Japina, Kristine; Baumanis, Viesturs; Ranka, Renate

    2014-02-01

    Migratory birds act as hosts and long-distance vectors for several tick-borne infectious agents. Here, feeding Ixodes ticks were collected from migratory birds during the autumn migration period in Latvia and screened for the presence of epidemiologically important non-viral pathogens. A total of 93 DNA samples of ticks (37 larvae and 56 nymphs) removed from 41 birds (order Passeriformes, 9 species) was tested for Lyme borreliosis spirochaetes, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia spp., and Babesia spp. Borrelia burgdorferi DNA was detected in 18% of the tick samples, and a majority of infected ticks were from thrush (Turdus spp.) birds. Among the infected ticks, Borrelia valaisiana was detected in 41% of cases, Borrelia garinii in 35%, and mixed Bo. valaisiana and Bo. garinii infection in 24%. Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA was detected in 2% of ticks, R. helvetica in 12%, and Babesia spp. pathogens in 4% of ticks. Among these samples, 3 Babesia species were identified: Ba. divergens, Ba. microti, and Ba. venatorum. Coinfection with different pathogens that included mixed infections with different Borrelia genospecies was found in 20% of nymphal and 3% of larval Ixodes ticks. These results suggest that migratory birds may support the circulation and spread of medically significant zoonoses in Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, G Adam; Wilson, Raymond; Fernando, Anuruddika; Robinson, Ailie; MacGregor, Paula; Kennedy, David; Schaap, Dick; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Matthews, Keith R

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  7. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Adam Mott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  8. Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in the Korean Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus) from Jeonbuk Province, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Giyong; Han, Yu-Jung; Oh, Sung-Suck; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in the Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). Pathogens were identified using PCR which included Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Theileria. Rickettsia was not detected, whereas Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria infections were detected in 4, 2, and 8 animals, respectively. The most prevalent pathogen was Theileria. Of the 8 Theileria-positive animals, 2 were mixed-infected with 3 pathogens (Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria) and another 2 animals showed mixed-infection with 2 pathogens (Anaplasma and Theileria). Sequencing analysis was used to verify the PCR results. The pathogens found in this study were identified as Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Theileria sp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report identifying these 3 pathogens in the Korean water deer. Our results suggest that the Korean water deer may serve as a major reservoir for these tick-borne pathogens, leading to spread of tick-borne diseases to domestic animals, livestock, and humans. Further studies are needed to investigate their roles in this respect.

  9. Survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, haemotropic mycoplasmas and other arthropod-borne pathogens in cats from Albania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Albania is a country on the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Mediterranean climate is favourable for the stable development of many arthropod species, which are incriminated as vectors for various agents. Recently, several papers have reported on epidemiological aspects of parasitic diseases including vector-borne disease agents of dogs with zoonotic characteristics in Albania. However, data on the epidemiology of feline parasitic and bacterial agents in Albania is scarce. Methods Serum and EDTA-blood samples collected from 146 domestic cats from Tirana during 2008 through 2010 were examined for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania infantum, and Anaplasma spp. with IFAT, for infection with L. infantum, A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp. and haemotropic mycoplasmas with conventional PCR and real-time PCR and for Dirofilaria immitis with antigen ELISA. Additionally blood smear microscopy was carried out for detection of blood-borne pathogens. Results Antibodies to T. gondii (titre ≥1:100) were demonstrated in 91 cats (62.3%). Antibodies to N. caninum (titre ≥1:100), L. infantum (titre ≥1:64) and Anaplasma spp. (titre ≥1:100) were found in the serum of 15 (10.3%), 1 (0.7%) or 3 (2.1%) cats, respectively. DNA of haemotropic mycoplasmas was detected in the blood of 45 cats (30.8%), namely Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (21.9%), Mycoplasma haemofelis (10.3%), and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis (5.5%), with ten cats harbouring co-infections of two mycoplasmas each; blood from one cat was PCR positive for Bartonella henselae. No DNA of Leishmania spp. and A. phagocytophilum or circulating D. immitis antigen was detected in any cat sample. The overall prevalence of haemotropic mycoplasmas was significantly higher in male compared to female cats (40.6% vs. 24.1%, p = 0.0444); and age was associated positively with the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii (p = 0.0008) and the percentage of haemotropic

  10. Prevalence and Geographic Distribution of Vector-Borne Pathogens in Apparently Healthy Dogs in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrljak, Vladimir; Kuleš, Josipa; Mihaljević, Željko; Torti, Marin; Gotić, Jelena; Crnogaj, Martina; Živičnjak, Tatjana; Mayer, Iva; Šmit, Iva; Bhide, Mangesh; Barić Rafaj, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) are a group of globally extended and quickly spreading pathogens that are transmitted by various arthropod vectors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the seroprevalence against Babesia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Croatia. We investigated 435 randomly selected apparently healthy dogs in 13 different locations of Croatia for antibodies to B. canis by indirect immunofluorescence using a commercial IFA IgG Antibody Kit. All samples were also tested for qualitative detection of D. immitis antigen and for antibodies to A. phagocytophilum, B. burgdorferi sensu lato, L. infantum, and E. canis with two point-of-care assays. Overall, 112 dogs (25.74%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 21.70-30.12) were serologically positive for one or more of the pathogens. B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen (20.00%, 95% CI 16.34-24.07), followed by A. phagocytophilum (6.21%, 95% CI 4.12-8.90), L. infantum, (1.38%, 95% CI 0.51-2.97), and B. burgdorferi sensu lato (0.69%, 95% CI 0.01-2.00). The lowest seroprevalence was for D. immitis and E. canis (0.46%, 95% CI 0.01-1.65). Coinfection was determined in 12 dogs (2.76%, 95% CI 1.43-4.77), of which 10 were positive to two pathogens (7 with B. canis and A. phagocytophilum and 1 B. canis with B. burgdorferi sensu lato or L. infantum or E. canis). One dog was positive to three pathogens and another dog to four pathogens. Seroprevalence for babesia was age, breed, and lifestyle/use dependent. Purebred dogs had almost half the chance of developing disease than crossbred (OR = 0.58, p < 0.026, 95% CI 0.37-0.94). Seropositivity to B. canis was 3.41 times higher for dogs that lived outdoors/shelter (p < 0.006) or 4.57 times higher in mixed/hunting (p < 0.001) compared to indoor/companion dogs. This is the first comprehensive survey of VBP seropositivity conducted in Croatia. Some

  11. Extending the Bacillus cereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of different toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Auger, Sandrine [Genetique Microbienne; Galleron, Nathalie [Genetique Microbienne; Segurens, Beatrice [Center National Sequencage, F-91057 Evry, France; Simon, Jorg [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Dossat, Carole [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Broussolle, Veronique [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Brillard, Julien [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Guinebretiere, Marie-Helene [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Sanchis, Vincent [Genetique Microbienne; Nguen-the, Christophe [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Lereclus, Didier [Genetique Microbienne; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wincker, Patrick [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Weissenbach, Jean [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Ehrlich, Dusko [Genetique Microbienne; Sorokin, Alexei [Genetique Microbienne

    2008-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group represents sporulating soil bacteria containing pathogenic strains which may cause diarrheic or emetic food poisoning outbreaks. Multiple locus sequence typing revealed a presence in natural samples of these bacteria of about 30 clonal complexes. Application of genomic methods to this group was however biased due to the major interest for representatives closely related to Bacillus anthracis. Albeit the most important food-borne pathogens were not yet defined, existing data indicate that they are scattered all over the phylogenetic tree. The preliminary analysis of the sequences of three genomes discussed in this paper narrows down the gaps in our knowledge of the B. cereus group. The strain NVH391-98 is a rare but particularly severe food-borne pathogen. Sequencing revealed that the strain should be a representative of a novel bacterial species, for which the name Bacillus cytotoxis or Bacillus cytotoxicus is proposed. This strain has a reduced genome size compared to other B. cereus group strains. Genome analysis revealed absence of sigma B factor and the presence of genes encoding diarrheic Nhe toxin, not detected earlier. The strain B. cereus F837/76 represents a clonal complex close to that of B. anthracis. Including F837/76, three such B. cereus strains had been sequenced. Alignment of genomes suggests that B. anthracis is their common ancestor. Since such strains often emerge from clinical cases, they merit a special attention. The third strain, KBAB4, is a typical facultative psychrophile generally found in soil. Phylogenic studies show that in nature it is the most active group in terms of gene exchange. Genomic sequence revealed high presence of extra-chromosomal genetic material (about 530 kb) that may account for this phenomenon. Genes coding Nhe-like toxin were found on a big plasmid in this strain. This may indicate a potential mechanism of toxicity spread from the psychrophile strain community. The results of this genomic

  12. Comparison of Three Different DNA Extraction Methods for Linguatula serrata as a Food Born Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda ESLAMI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important items in molecular characterization of food-borne pathogens is high quality genomic DNA. In this study, we investigated three protocols and compared their simplicity, duration and costs for extracting genomic DNA from Linguatula serrata.Methods: The larvae were collected from the sheep’s visceral organs from the Yazd Slaughterhouse during May 2013. DNA extraction was done in three different methods, including commercial DNA extraction kit, Phenol Chloroform Isoamylalcohol (PCI, and salting out. Extracted DNA in each method was assessed for quantity and quality using spectrophotometery and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively.Results: The less duration was regarding to commercial DNA extraction kit and then salting out protocol. The cost benefit one was salting out and then PCI method. The best quantity was regarding to PCI with 72.20±29.20 ng/μl, and purity of OD260/OD280 in 1.76±0.947. Agarose gel electrophoresis for assessing the quality found all the same.Conclusion: Salting out is introduced as the best method for DNA extraction from L. seratta as a food-borne pathogen with the least costand appropriate purity. Although, the best purity was regarding to PCI but PCI is not safe as salting out. In addition, the duration of salting out was less than PCI. The least duration was seen in commercial DNA extraction kit, but it is expensive and therefore is not recommended for developing countries where consumption of offal is common.

  13. Acanthamoeba polyphaga, a potential environmental vector for the transmission of food-borne and opportunistic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacarso, Immacolata; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; Iseppi, Ramona; Sabia, Carla; Bondi, Moreno

    2012-06-01

    The endosymbiotic relationship could represent for many bacteria an important condition favouring their spread in the environment and in foods. For this purpose we studied the behaviour of some food-borne and opportunistic pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterocolitica) when internalized in Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Our results confirm the capability of the bacteria tested to grow within amoebal hosts. We can observe two types of interactions of the bacteria internalized in A. polyphaga. The first type, showed by Y. enterocolitica and A. hydrophila, was characterized by an early replication, probably followed by the killing and digestion of the bacteria. The second type, showed by E. faecalis and S. aureus was characterized by the persistence and grow inside the host without lysis. Lastly, when amoebae were co-cultured with L. monocytogenes and S. Enteritidis, an eclipse phase followed by an active intracellular growth was observed, suggesting a third type of predator-prey trend. The extracellular count in presence of A. polyphaga, as a result of an intracellular multiplication and subsequent release, was characterized by an increase of E. faecalis, S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and S. Enteritidis, and by a low or absent cell count for Y. enterocolitica and A. hydrophila. Our study suggests that the investigated food-borne and opportunistic pathogens are, in most cases, able to interact with A. polyphaga, to intracellularly replicate and, lastly, to be potentially spread in the environment, underlining the possible role of this protozoan in food contamination. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Wild Mushroom Show Potential Antimicrobial Activities against Food Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugal Kishore Mohanta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates an economical and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs using the wild mushroom Ganoderma sessiliforme. The synthesis of AgNPs was confirmed and the products characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR analysis was performed to identify the viable biomolecules involved in the capping and active stabilization of AgNPs. Moreover, the average sizes and morphologies of AgNPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. The potential impacts of AgNPs on food safety and control were evaluated by the antimicrobial activity of the synthesized AgNPs against common food-borne bacteria, namely, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus faecalis, Listeria innocua and Micrococcus luteus. The results of this study revealed that the synthesized AgNPs can be used to control the growth of food-borne pathogens and have potential application in the food packaging industry. Moreover, the AgNPs were evaluated for antioxidant activity (DPPH, for biocompatibility (L-929, normal fibroblast cells, and for cytotoxic effects on human breast adenosarcoma cells (MCF-7 & MDA-MB231 to highlight their potential for use in a variety of bio-applications.

  15. Ticks threatening lineage of Anatolian wild sheep (Ovis gmelinii anatolica) and determination of their tick-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkun, Ömer; Emir, Hasan; Karaer, Zafer

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to determine the ticks of the Anatolian wild sheep and to define their tick-borne pathogens while molecularly studying their relationships with those of the domestic sheep. Furthermore, another aim of this study is to investigate tick paralysis resulting in the death of the Anatolian wild sheep. Ticks and blood samples were collected from the wild sheep whilst tick samples were also collected from hares, guinea fowls, chickens, and a turkey living in the Anatolian wild sheep breeding area. While PCR amplification was carried out for the detection of Babesia spp., Theileria spp. and Anaplasma spp. in blood samples, CCHF virus was screened in the tick samples in addition to the above-mentioned pathogens. Theileria spp. was detected in blood samples of 45 wild sheep. A total of 3494 ticks were collected from 52 Anatolian wild sheep, 5 hares, 5 guinea fowls, 2 chickens, and 1 turkey whereas 98 ticks were collected from the ground. B. ovis and T. ovis were detected in tick pools (Rh. bursa and H. excavatum) that were collected from the wild sheep. The paralysis was diagnosed in both of the hind legs of the newborn lambs infested with a great number of ticks. We also report that the tick species (H. excavatum and Rh. bursa) are determined to cause tick paralysis and tick toxicosis, which are associated with mortality especially in lambs. T. ovis and B. ovis were detected and studied for the first time in Anatolian wild sheep and in their ticks. The results of phylogenetic analyses showed that T. ovis and B. ovis isolates are genetically very close to the isolates that were previously obtained from the domestic small ruminants. We show that the Anatolian wild sheep can play the role of a reservoir for T. ovis. The presence of the CCHF virus has also been clearly shown and it has been observed that this virus, which is very pathogenic for humans, is anywise circulating in the region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a controversial food-borne pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelidis, D; Angelidis, A S

    2017-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of severe healthcare-associated (HA) infections. Although during the last decade the incidence of HA invasive infections has dropped, the incidence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections has risen among the general population. Moreover, CA-MRSA, livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) and HA-MRSA (HA-MRSA) can be found in foods intended for human consumption. Several studies from different geographical areas have reported the presence of enterotoxin genes in several MRSA food isolates. Molecular typing studies have revealed genetic relatedness of these enterotoxigenic isolates with isolates incriminated in human infections. The contamination sources for foods, especially animal-origin foods, may be livestock as well as humans involved in animal husbandry and food-processing. Under favourable environmental conditions for growth and enterotoxin production, enterotoxigenic S. aureus isolates present in foods can cause staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP), irrespective of the contamination origin. Owing to the typically moderate clinical manifestations of SFP, the S. aureus strains responsible for SFP (cases or outbreaks) are frequently either not identified or not further characterized. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is rarely performed, because administration of antimicrobial therapy is not required in the vast majority of cases. Staphylococcal food poisoning is the result of consumption of foods with preformed enterotoxins. Hence, similar to methicillin-sensitive enterotoxigenic S. aureus, enterotoxigenic MRSA can also act as food-borne pathogens upon favourable conditions for growth and enterotoxin production. The severity of the intoxication is not related to the antimicrobial resistance profile of the causative S. aureus strain and therefore MRSA food-borne outbreaks are not expected to be more severe. This review evaluates the potential of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus

  17. Antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils and essences against five important food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Palmer, A; Stewart, J; Fyfe, L

    1998-02-01

    The antimicrobial properties of 21 plant essential oils and two essences were investigated against five important food-borne pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes. The oils of bay, cinnamon, clove and thyme were the most inhibitory, each having a bacteriostatic concentration of 0.075% or less against all five pathogens. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to inhibition by plant essential oils than the Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni was the most resistant of the bacteria investigated to plant essential oils, with only the oils of bay and thyme having a bacteriocidal concentration of less than 1%. At 35 degrees C, L. monocytogenes was extremely sensitive to the oil of nutmeg. A concentration of less than 0.01% was bacteriostatic and 0.05% was bacteriocidal, but when the temperature was reduced to 4 degrees, the bacteriostatic concentration was increased to 0.5% and the bacteriocidal concentration to greater than 1%.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum strains as a bio-control strategy against food-borne pathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Pia Arena

    2016-04-01

    their antimicrobial effect. This study emphasizes the tempting use of the tested L. plantarum strains and/or their CFS as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogens.

  19. Extreme Heat Resistance of Food Borne Pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium on Chicken Breast Fillet during Cooking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Aarieke E I; van Asselt, Esther D; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-01-01

    cooking enlarged the heat resistance of the food borne pathogens. Additionally, a high challenge temperature or fast heating rate contributed to the level of heat resistance. The data were used to assess the probability of illness (campylobacteriosis) due to consumption of chicken fillet as a function...

  20. Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens of the Caribbean: Current Understanding and Future Directions for More Comprehensive Surveillance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gondard, M.; Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Charles, R. A.; Vayssier-Taussat, M.; Albina, E.; Moutailler, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 29 (2017), č. článku 490. ISSN 2235-2988 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne pathogens * ticks * Caribbean * epidemiology * newhigh-throughput technologies * surveillance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  1. Multiple and Diverse vsp and vlp Sequences in Borrelia miyamotoi, a Hard Tick-Borne Zoonotic Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Alan G

    2016-01-01

    Based on chromosome sequences, the human pathogen Borrelia miyamotoi phylogenetically clusters with species that cause relapsing fever. But atypically for relapsing fever agents, B. miyamotoi is transmitted not by soft ticks but by hard ticks, which also are vectors of Lyme disease Borrelia species. To further assess the relationships of B. miyamotoi to species that cause relapsing fever, I investigated extrachromosomal sequences of a North American strain with specific attention on plasmid-borne vsp and vlp genes, which are the underpinnings of antigenic variation during relapsing fever. For a hybrid approach to achieve assemblies that spanned more than one of the paralogous vsp and vlp genes, a database of short-reads from next-generation sequencing was supplemented with long-reads obtained with real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules. This yielded three contigs of 31, 16, and 11 kb, which each contained multiple and diverse sequences that were homologous to vsp and vlp genes of the relapsing fever agent B. hermsii. Two plasmid fragments had coding sequences for plasmid partition proteins that differed from each other from paralogous proteins for the megaplasmid and a small plasmid of B. miyamotoi. One of 4 vsp genes, vsp1, was present at two loci, one of which was downstream of a candiate prokaryotic promoter. A limited RNA-seq analysis of a population growing in the blood of mice indicated that of the 4 different vsp genes vsp1 was the one that was expressed. The findings indicate that B. miyamotoi has at least four types of plasmids, two or more of which bear vsp and vlp gene sequences that are as numerous and diverse as those of relapsing fever Borrelia. The database and insights from these findings provide a foundation for further investigations of the immune responses to this pathogen and of the capability of B. miyamotoi for antigenic variation.

  2. Inhibition of in vitro growth of soil-borne pathogens by compost-inhabiting indigenous bacteria and fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, N.; Noreen, N.; Shahzad, S.

    2014-01-01

    During the present studies, compost-inhabiting microorganisms including 44 fungi and 15 bacteria isolated from different compost samples were evaluated for their in vitro efficacy against soil-borne pathogens viz., Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotium rolfsii. Compost inhabiting microbes like Trichoderma harzianum, T. virens, Bacillus cereus, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, Micrococcus varians and Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to inhibit all the test pathogens. Acrophialophora fusispora and Penicillium citrinum reduced the mycelial growth of all the test pathogens except Sclerotium rolfsii. Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus megaterium showed biocontrol activity against all the pathogens except Rhizoctonia solani. Trichoderma harzianum parasitized mycelia of all the tested pathogens and produced coiling around the mycelium. (author)

  3. Using Mindfulness to Develop Health Education Strategies for Blood Borne Virus Prevention in Injecting Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Carla; Laybutt, Becky; Carruthers, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Prevention education has had limited success in reducing transmission of blood borne virus among people who inject drugs. Innovative approaches to prevention education are required. Method: This study used video recordings of injecting episodes and interviews with participants reviewing their video recordings to explore the concept of…

  4. Genetic Diversity of Tick-Borne Rickettsial Pathogens; Insights Gained from Distant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Aguilar Pierlé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to capture genetic variation with unprecedented resolution improves our understanding of bacterial populations and their ability to cause disease. The goal of the pathogenomics era is to define genetic diversity that results in disease. Despite the economic losses caused by vector-borne bacteria in the Order Rickettsiales, little is known about the genetic variants responsible for observed phenotypes. The tick-transmitted rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma marginale infects cattle in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, including Australia. Genomic analysis of North American A. marginale strains reveals a closed core genome defined by high levels of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs. Here we report the first genome sequences and comparative analysis for Australian strains that differ in virulence and transmissibility. A list of genetic differences that segregate with phenotype was evaluated for the ability to distinguish the attenuated strain from virulent field strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the Australian strains revealed a marked evolutionary distance from all previously sequenced strains. SNP analysis showed a strikingly reduced genetic diversity between these strains, with the smallest number of SNPs detected between any two A. marginale strains. The low diversity between these phenotypically distinct bacteria presents a unique opportunity to identify the genetic determinants of virulence and transmission.

  5. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O’Toole, George A.; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001%(w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the Staphylococcus aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01%(w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1%(w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters. PMID:20089325

  6. Emergence and stability of high-pressure resistance in different food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlint, Dietrich; Rutten, Nele; Michiels, Chris W; Aertsen, Abram

    2012-05-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is becoming a valuable nonthermal food pasteurization technique, although there is reasonable concern that bacterial HHP resistance could compromise the safety and stability of HHP-processed foods. While the degree of natural HHP resistance has already been shown to vary greatly among and within bacterial species, a still unresolved question remains as to what extent different food-borne pathogens can actually develop HHP resistance. In this study, we therefore examined and compared the intrinsic potentials for HHP resistance development among strains of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Listeria innocua using a selective enrichment approach. Interestingly, of all strains examined, the acquisition of extreme HHP resistance could be detected in only some of the E. coli strains, indicating that a specific genetic predisposition might be required for resistance development. Furthermore, once acquired, HHP resistance proved to be a very stable trait that was maintained for >80 generations in the absence of HHP exposure. Finally, at the mechanistic level, HHP resistance was not necessarily linked to derepression of the heat shock genes and was not related to the phenomenon of persistence.

  7. Bovine anaplasmosis and tick-borne pathogens in cattle of the Galapagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, G V; Vinueza, R L; Marsot, M; Devillers, E; Cruz, M; Petit, E; Boulouis, H J; Moutailler, S; Monroy, F; Coello, M A; Gondard, M; Bournez, L; Haddad, N; Zanella, G

    2018-03-22

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the species of Anaplasma spp. and estimate its prevalence in cattle of the three main cattle-producing Galapagos Islands (Santa Cruz, San Cristóbal and Isabela) using indirect PCR assays, genetic sequencing and ELISA. Ticks were also collected from cattle and scanned for 47 tick-borne pathogens in a 48 × 48 real-time PCR chip. A mixed effects logistic regression was performed to identify potential risk factors explaining Anaplasma infection in cattle. A. phagocytophilum was not detected in any of the tested animals. Genetic sequencing allowed detection of A. platys-like strains in 11 (36.7%) of the 30 Anaplasma spp.-positive samples analysed. A. marginale was widespread in the three islands with a global between-herd prevalence of 100% [89; 100] 95% CI and a median within-herd prevalence of 93%. A significant association was found between A. marginale infection and age with higher odds of being positive for adults (OR = 3.3 [1.2; 9.9] 95% Bootstrap CI ). All collected ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus microplus. A. marginale, Babesia bigemina, Borrelia theileri and Francisella-like endosymbiont were detected in tick pools. These results show that the Galapagos Islands are endemic for A. marginale. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Zoonotic vector-borne bacterial pathogens in California mountain lions (Puma concolor), 1987-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Yvette A; Swift, Pamela; Chomel, Bruno B; Kasten, Rickie W; Fleer, Katryna; Foley, Janet E; Torres, Steven G; Johnson, Christine K

    2012-11-01

    Sera collected from 442 mountain lions in 48 California counties between the years of 1987 and 2010 were tested using immunofluorescence assays and agglutination tests for the presence of antibodies reactive to Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Bartonella henselae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum antigens. Data were analyzed for spatial and temporal trends in seropositivity. Seroprevalences for B. burgdorferi (19.9%) and B. henselae (37.1%) were relatively high, with the highest exposure in the Central Coast region for B. henselae. B. henselae DNA amplified in mountain lion samples was genetically similar to human-derived Houston-1 and domestic cat-derived U4 B. henselae strains at the gltA and ftsZ loci. The statewide seroprevalences of Y. pestis (1.4%), F. tularensis (1.4%), and A. phagocytophilum (5.9%), were comparatively low. Sera from Y. pestis- and F. tularensis-seropositive mountain lions were primarily collected in the Eastern and Western Sierra Nevada, and samples reactive to Y. pestis antigen were collected exclusively from adult females. Adult age (≥ 2 years) was a risk factor for B. burgdorferi exposure. Over 70% of tested animals were killed on depredation permits, and therefore were active near areas with livestock and human residential communities. Surveillance of mountain lions for these bacterial vector-borne and zoonotic agents may be informative to public health authorities, and the data are useful for detecting enzootic and peridomestic pathogen transmission patterns, particularly in combination with molecular characterization of the infecting organisms.

  9. Synergy among thymol, eugenol, berberine, cinnamaldehyde and streptomycin against planktonic and biofilm-associated food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Niu, H; Zhang, W; Mu, H; Sun, C; Duan, J

    2015-05-01

    Essential oils have been found to exert antibacterial, antifungal, spasmolytic, and antiplasmodial activity and therapeutic effect in cancer treatment. In this study, the antibacterial activities of four main essential oils' components (thymol (Thy), eugenol (Eug), berberine (Ber), and cinnamaldehyde (Cin)) were evaluated against two food-borne pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium, either alone or in combination with streptomycin. Checkerboard assay demonstrated that Thy and Cin elicited a synergistic effect with streptomycin against L. monocytogenes, while a synergy existed between Cin or Eug and streptomycin against Salm. Typhimurium. Further experiments showed that this synergy was sufficient to eradicate biofilms formed by these two bacteria. Thus, our data highlighted that the combinations of specific components from essential oils and streptomycin were useful for the treatment of food-borne pathogens, which might help prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance through improving antibiotic effectiveness. This study has shown the synergistic effect of four components of essential oil (thymol, eugenol, berberine and cinnamaldehyde) combined with streptomycin on planktonic and biofilm-associated food-borne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium. These findings indicate that combination of specific components of essential oils with streptomycin may provide alternative methods to overcome the problem of food-borne bacteria both in suspension and in biofilm. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Effect of small chain N acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals on biofilms of food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Jamuna Bai; V, Ravishankar Rai

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing or cell to cell communication which includes inter- and intra-cellular communication has been implicated in the production of virulence factor and formation of biofilm in food-borne pathogens. In the present study, the effect of quorum sensing signals on the biofilms of food-borne pathogens has been elucidated. N-butryl homoserine lactone and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone belonging to acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) family of signaling molecules were investigated for their effect on the biofilm formation (attachment and exopolymeric substance production) in the food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli , Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Vibrio parahemolyticus . The signaling molecules at a concentration of 1 µM were capable of increasing biofilm formation in all the tested pathogens. There was an increase in the attachment of the bacterial cells and biomass as observed by microtiter plate assay and exopolymeric substances production in the biofilms in presence of the AHLs. Further, it needs to be elucidated if the effect of AHLS on the biofilms of E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium is SdiA dependent.

  11. The location of splenic NKT cells favours their rapid activation by blood-borne antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Patricia; Sánchez-Niño, María Dolores; van Rooijen, Nico; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2012-05-16

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important role in mounting protective responses to blood-borne infections. However, though the spleen is the largest blood filter in the body, the distribution and dynamics of NKT cells within this organ are not well characterized. Here we show that the majority of NKT cells patrol around the marginal zone (MZ) and red pulp (RP) of the spleen. In response to lipid antigen, these NKT cells become arrested and rapidly produce cytokines, while the small proportion of NKT cells located in the white pulp (WP) exhibit limited activation. Importantly, disruption of the splenic MZ by chemical or genetic approaches results in a severe reduction in NKT cell activation indicating the need of cooperation between both MZ macrophages and dendritic cells for efficient NKT cell responses. Thus, the location of splenic NKT cells in the MZ and RP facilitates their access to blood-borne antigen and enables the rapid initiation of protective immune responses.

  12. Characterisation and antimicrobial resistance of sepsis pathogens in neonates born in tertiary care centres in Delhi, India: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal deaths globally. Most sepsis-related deaths occur in low-income and middle-income countries, where the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis remains poorly understood. Most of these countries lack proper surveillance networks, hampering accurate assessment of the burden of sepsis, implementation of preventive measures, and investment in research. We report results of neonates born in hospital from a multicentre collaboration on neonatal sepsis. In this cohort study, dedicated research teams prospectively followed up neonates born in one of three tertiary care centres in Delhi, India (Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College, Maulana Azad Medical College, and All India Institute of Medical Sciences [coordinating centre]) and subsequently admitted to the intensive care unit. Neonates were followed up daily until discharge or death. On clinical suspicion, neonates underwent sepsis work-up including blood cultures. The isolated organisms were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. We defined Gram-negative isolates resistant to any three of five antibiotic classes (extended-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and piperacillin-tazobactam) as multidrug resistant. 13 530 neonates of 88 636 livebirths were enrolled between July 18, 2011, and Feb 28, 2014. The incidence of total sepsis was 14·3% (95% CI 13·8-14·9) and of culture-positive sepsis was 6·2% (5·8-6·6). Nearly two-thirds of total episodes occurred at or before 72 h of life (defined as early onset; 1351 [83%] of 1980). Two-thirds (645 [64%]) of 1005 isolates were Gram-negative including, Acinetobacter spp (22%), Klebsiella spp (17%), and Escherichia coli (14%). The pathogen mix in early-onset sepsis did not differ from that of late-onset sepsis (ie, after 72 h). High rates of multidrug resistance were observed in Acinetobacter spp (181/222, 82%), Klebsiella spp (91/169, 54%), and Escherichia coli (52/137, 38

  13. Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens of the Caribbean: Current Understanding and Future Directions for More Comprehensive Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondard, Mathilde; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Charles, Roxanne A; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Albina, Emmanuel; Moutailler, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Ticks are obligate hematophagous arthropods of significant importance to human and veterinary medicine. They transmit a vast array of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and helminths. Most epidemiological data on ticks and tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) in the West Indies are limited to common livestock pathogens such as Ehrlichia ruminantium, Babesia spp. (i.e., B. bovis and B. bigemina ), and Anaplasma marginale , and less information is available on companion animal pathogens. Of note, human tick-borne diseases (TBDs) remain almost completely uncharacterized in the West Indies. Information on TBP presence in wildlife is also missing. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the ticks and TBPs affecting human and animal health in the Caribbean, and introduce the challenges associated with understanding TBD epidemiology and implementing successful TBD management in this region. In particular, we stress the need for innovative and versatile surveillance tools using high-throughput pathogen detection (e.g., high-throughput real-time microfluidic PCR). The use of such tools in large epidemiological surveys will likely improve TBD prevention and control programs in the Caribbean.

  14. Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens of the Caribbean: Current Understanding and Future Directions for More Comprehensive Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Gondard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are obligate hematophagous arthropods of significant importance to human and veterinary medicine. They transmit a vast array of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and helminths. Most epidemiological data on ticks and tick-borne pathogens (TBPs in the West Indies are limited to common livestock pathogens such as Ehrlichia ruminantium, Babesia spp. (i.e., B. bovis and B. bigemina, and Anaplasma marginale, and less information is available on companion animal pathogens. Of note, human tick-borne diseases (TBDs remain almost completely uncharacterized in the West Indies. Information on TBP presence in wildlife is also missing. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the ticks and TBPs affecting human and animal health in the Caribbean, and introduce the challenges associated with understanding TBD epidemiology and implementing successful TBD management in this region. In particular, we stress the need for innovative and versatile surveillance tools using high-throughput pathogen detection (e.g., high-throughput real-time microfluidic PCR. The use of such tools in large epidemiological surveys will likely improve TBD prevention and control programs in the Caribbean.

  15. Comparison of antibacterial effect of seven 1-monoglycerides on food-borne pathogens or spoilage bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Buňková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare under the same conditions in vitro the inhibitory effects of seven 1-monoglycerides (MAG containing fatty acids with a medium chain on ten strains of food-borne pathogens or spoilage gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and on their growth indicatos. The inhibitory effect of MAGs (monocaprylin, monocaprin, monolaurin, monomyristin, monopalmitin, MAG of undecanoic and 10-undecenoic acids at a concentration of 25 – 1500 mg·l-1 was observed. Growth of bacteria in the presence of MAG was studied by means of optical density of bacteria for 24 h. The data were modelled through a Gompertz equation and the lag-time, the maximum specific growth rate and the maximal value reached were calculated. MAGs inhibited mainly the growth of gram-positive bacteria, which was shown by the extended lag-time, decrease in specific growth rate and decrease in cell density. Inhibitory effects of tested MAGs could be ranked from point of view of the minimum inhibitory concentration: MAG-C12:0 > MAG-C11:0 > MAG-C10:0 > MAG-C14:0 > MAG-C11:1 > MAG-C8:0 > MAG-C16:0. In vitro, no significant inhibitory effects of 1-monoglycerides, with the exception of the highest concentrations applied, on the growth of gram-negative bacteria were detected. The main contribution of this study is to compare the effects of several MAG containing fatty acids with a medium chain under the same conditions on the growth indicators of bacteria.

  16. River Networks As Ecological Corridors for Species, Populations and Pathogens of Water-Borne Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, A.

    2014-12-01

    River basins are a natural laboratory for the study of the integration of hydrological, ecological and geomorphological processes. Moving from morphological and functional analyses of dendritic geometries observed in Nature over a wide range of scales, this Lecture addresses essential ecological processes that take place along dendritic structures, hydrology-driven and controlled, like e.g.: population migrations and human settlements, that historically proceeded along river networks to follow water supply routes; riparian ecosystems composition that owing to their positioning along streams play crucial roles in their watersheds and in the loss of biodiversity proceeding at unprecedented rates; waterborne disease spreading, like epidemic cholera that exhibits epidemic patterns that mirror those of watercourses and of human mobility and resurgences upon heavy rainfall. Moreover, the regional incidence of Schistosomiasis, a parasitic waterborne disease, and water resources developments prove tightly related, and proliferative kidney disease in fish thrives differently in pristine and engineered watercourses: can we establish quantitatively the critical linkages with hydrologic drivers and controls? How does connectivity within a river network affect community composition or the spreading mechanisms? Does the river basin act as a template for biodiversity or for species' persistence? Are there hydrologic controls on epidemics of water-borne disease? Here, I shall focus on the noteworthy scientific perspectives provided by spatially explicit eco-hydrological studies centered on river networks viewed as ecological corridors for species, populations and pathogens of waterborne disease. A notable methodological coherence is granted by the mathematical description of river networks as the support for reactive transport. The Lecture overviews a number of topics idiosyncratically related to my own research work but ideally aimed at a coherent body of materials and methods. A

  17. Antibacterial Potential of Jatropha curcas Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles against Food Borne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nitin; Tyagi, Amit K.; Kumar, Pushpendar; Malik, Anushree

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous leaf extract of Jatropha curcas was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Jc-AgNps) which were further evaluated for its antibacterial potential against food borne pathogens. J. curcas leaf extract could synthesize stable silver nanoparticles (Zeta potential: -23.4 mV) with absorption band at 430 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated various biological compounds responsible for capping and stabilizing Jc-AgNps in suspension, while the presence of silver was authenticated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray. Jc-AgNps were confirmed to be uniform in shape, size and behavior through dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. To investigate the antibacterial activity, disk diffusion and microplate dilution assays were performed and zone of inhibition (ZOI) as well as minimum inhibitory/bactericidal concentrations (MIC/MBCs) were evaluated against selected bacterial strains. Overall results showed that Escherichia coli (ZOI: 23 mm, MBC: 0.010 mg/ml) was the most sensitive organism, whereas Staphylococcus aureus (ZOI: 14.66 mm, MBC: 0.041 mg/ml) and Salmonella enterica (ZOI: 16.66 mm, MBC: 0.041 mg/ml) were the least sensitive against Jc-AgNps. The detailed microscopic investigations using SEM, TEM, and AFM were performed to understand the antibacterial impacts of Jc-AgNps against Listeria monocytogenes. SEM and TEM analysis showed the clear deformation and disintegration of treated L. monocytogenes cells, whereas AFM established a decrease in the height and cell surface roughness (root mean square value) in the treated L. monocytogenes. PMID:27877160

  18. Surveillance of vector-borne pathogens under imperfect detection: lessons from Chagas disease risk (mis)measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Nitz, Nadjar; Cuba, César Augusto Cuba; Hagström, Luciana; Hecht, Mariana Machado; Santana, Camila; Ribeiro, Marcelle; Vital, Tamires Emanuele; Santalucia, Marcelo; Knox, Monique; Obara, Marcos Takashi; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2018-01-09

    Vector-borne pathogens threaten human health worldwide. Despite their critical role in disease prevention, routine surveillance systems often rely on low-complexity pathogen detection tests of uncertain accuracy. In Chagas disease surveillance, optical microscopy (OM) is routinely used for detecting Trypanosoma cruzi in its vectors. Here, we use replicate T. cruzi detection data and hierarchical site-occupancy models to assess the reliability of OM-based T. cruzi surveillance while explicitly accounting for false-negative and false-positive results. We investigated 841 triatomines with OM slides (1194 fresh, 1192 Giemsa-stained) plus conventional (cPCR, 841 assays) and quantitative PCR (qPCR, 1682 assays). Detections were considered unambiguous only when parasitologists unmistakably identified T. cruzi in Giemsa-stained slides. qPCR was >99% sensitive and specific, whereas cPCR was ~100% specific but only ~55% sensitive. In routine surveillance, examination of a single OM slide per vector missed ~50-75% of infections and wrongly scored as infected ~7% of the bugs. qPCR-based and model-based infection frequency estimates were nearly three times higher, on average, than OM-based indices. We conclude that the risk of vector-borne Chagas disease may be substantially higher than routine surveillance data suggest. The hierarchical modelling approach we illustrate can help enhance vector-borne disease surveillance systems when pathogen detection is imperfect.

  19. Screening food-borne and zoonotic pathogens associated with livestock practices in the Sumapaz region, Cundinamarca, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Nelson E; Abril, Diego A; Valencia, Paola; Khandige, Surabhi; Soto, Carlos Yesid; Moreno-Melo, Vilma

    2017-04-01

    Hazardous practices regarding antibiotics misuse, unsanitary milking procedures, and the commercial sales of raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products are currently being practiced by livestock farmers in the Sumapaz region (Colombia). The purpose of this study was to screen for food-borne and zoonotic pathogens associated with local livestock practices. We evaluated 1098 cows from 46 livestock farms in the Sumapaz region that were selected by random. Of the total population of cattle, 962 animals (88%) were tested for bovine TB using a caudal-fold tuberculin test and 546 (50%) for brucellosis by a competitive ELISA. In the population tested, 23 cows were positive for Brucella sp. representing a 4.2% seroprevalence and no cases of bovine tuberculosis were found. In addition, food-borne contamination with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed together with antibiotic susceptibility for ten different antibiotics in milk samples from 16 livestock farms. We found that 12 of the farms (75%) were contaminated with these food-borne pathogens. Noteworthy, all of the isolated pathogenic strains were resistant to multiple antibiotics, primarily to oxytetracycline and erythromycin. Our findings suggest that livestock products could be a source of exposure to Brucella and multidrug-resistant E. coli and S. aureus strains as a result of unhygienic livestock practices in the Sumapaz region. Training in good farming practices is the key to improving safety in food production.

  20. Prevalensi Blood Borne Virus pada Pasien Hemodialisis Kronik di Instalasi Hemodialisis RSMH Palembang

    OpenAIRE

    Liana, Phey; Rahadiyanto, Kemas Ya’kub; Maulana, Dodi

    2015-01-01

    Pasien hemodialisis kronik lebih berisiko untuk mendapat infeksi Blood Borne Virus (BBV) seperti hepatitis B, hepatitis C, dan HIV karena penggunaan akses vaskular berulang. Pada pasien hemodialisis terdapat tiga faktor risiko utama mempengaruhi terjadinya penularan infeksi BBV yaitu, riwayat transfusi darah, riwayat transplantasi ginjal, dan durasi hemodialisis. Prevalensi BBV pada pasien hemodialisis berkisar 12-29%. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui prevalensi BBV di lingkungan hem...

  1. Impact of leucocyte depletion and prion reduction filters on TSE blood borne transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lacroux

    Full Text Available The identification in the UK of 4 v-CJD infected patients thought to be due to the use of transfused Red Blood Cell units prepared from blood of donors incubating v-CJD raised major concerns in transfusion medicine. The demonstration of leucocyte associated infectivity using various animal models of TSE infection led to the implementation of systematic leuco-depletion (LD of Red Blood cells concentrates (RBCs in a number of countries. In the same models, plasma also demonstrated a significant level of infectivity which raised questions on the impact of LD on the v-CJD transmission risk. The recent development of filters combining LD and the capture of non-leucocyte associated prion infectivity meant a comparison of the benefits of LD alone versus LD/prion-reduction filters (LD/PR on blood-borne TSE transmission could be made. Due to the similarity of blood/plasma volumes to human transfusion medicine an experimental TSE sheep model was used to characterize the abilities of whole blood, RBCs, plasma and buffy-coat to transmit the disease through the transfusion route. The impact of a standard RBCs LD filter and of two different RBCs LD/PR prototype filters on the disease transmission was then measured. Homologous recipients transfused with whole-blood, buffy-coat and RBCs developed the disease with 100% efficiency. Conversely, plasma, when intravenously administered resulted in an inconstant infection of the recipients and no disease transmission was observed in sheep that received cryo-precipitated fraction or supernatant obtained from infectious plasma. Despite their high efficacy, LD and LD/PR filtration of the Red Blood Cells concentrate did not provide absolute protection from infection. These results support the view that leuco-depletion strongly mitigates the v-CJD blood borne transmission risk and provide information about the relative benefits of prion reduction filters.

  2. Impact of leucocyte depletion and prion reduction filters on TSE blood borne transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroux, Caroline; Bougard, Daisy; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbiere, Fabien; Dernis, Dominique; Tardivel, René; Morel, Nathalie; Simon, Stephanie; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Weisbecker, Jean Louis; Schelcher, François; Grassi, Jacques; Coste, Joliette; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The identification in the UK of 4 v-CJD infected patients thought to be due to the use of transfused Red Blood Cell units prepared from blood of donors incubating v-CJD raised major concerns in transfusion medicine. The demonstration of leucocyte associated infectivity using various animal models of TSE infection led to the implementation of systematic leuco-depletion (LD) of Red Blood cells concentrates (RBCs) in a number of countries. In the same models, plasma also demonstrated a significant level of infectivity which raised questions on the impact of LD on the v-CJD transmission risk. The recent development of filters combining LD and the capture of non-leucocyte associated prion infectivity meant a comparison of the benefits of LD alone versus LD/prion-reduction filters (LD/PR) on blood-borne TSE transmission could be made. Due to the similarity of blood/plasma volumes to human transfusion medicine an experimental TSE sheep model was used to characterize the abilities of whole blood, RBCs, plasma and buffy-coat to transmit the disease through the transfusion route. The impact of a standard RBCs LD filter and of two different RBCs LD/PR prototype filters on the disease transmission was then measured. Homologous recipients transfused with whole-blood, buffy-coat and RBCs developed the disease with 100% efficiency. Conversely, plasma, when intravenously administered resulted in an inconstant infection of the recipients and no disease transmission was observed in sheep that received cryo-precipitated fraction or supernatant obtained from infectious plasma. Despite their high efficacy, LD and LD/PR filtration of the Red Blood Cells concentrate did not provide absolute protection from infection. These results support the view that leuco-depletion strongly mitigates the v-CJD blood borne transmission risk and provide information about the relative benefits of prion reduction filters.

  3. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes – Results from Simulated Training Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  4. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  5. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hecksteden

    Full Text Available Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1, after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8 and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11. Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery. With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l, urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl, free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml. For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling

  6. Prevalence and Diversity of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in Eastern National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tammi L; Graham, Christine B; Boegler, Karen A; Cherry, Cara C; Maes, Sarah E; Pilgard, Mark A; Hojgaard, Andrias; Buttke, Danielle E; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2017-05-01

    Tick-borne pathogens transmitted by Ixodes scapularis Say (Acari: Ixodidae), also known as the deer tick or blacklegged tick, are increasing in incidence and geographic distribution in the United States. We examined the risk of tick-borne disease exposure in 9 national parks across six Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States and the District of Columbia in 2014 and 2015. To assess the recreational risk to park visitors, we sampled for ticks along frequently used trails and calculated the density of I. scapularis nymphs (DON) and the density of infected nymphs (DIN). We determined the nymphal infection prevalence of I. scapularis with a suite of tick-borne pathogens including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia miyamotoi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti. Ixodes scapularis nymphs were found in all national park units; DON ranged from 0.40 to 13.73 nymphs per 100 m2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, was found at all sites where I. scapularis was documented; DIN with B. burgdorferi ranged from 0.06 to 5.71 nymphs per 100 m2. Borrelia miyamotoi and A. phagocytophilum were documented at 60% and 70% of the parks, respectively, while Ba. microti occurred at just 20% of the parks. Ixodes scapularis is well established across much of the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States, and our results are generally consistent with previous studies conducted near the areas we sampled. Newly established I. scapularis populations were documented in two locations: Washington, D.C. (Rock Creek Park) and Greene County, Virginia (Shenandoah National Park). This research demonstrates the potential risk of tick-borne pathogen exposure in national parks and can be used to educate park visitors about the importance of preventative actions to minimize tick exposure. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks in urban and suburban areas of Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne P. Oechslin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout Europe, Ixodes ricinus transmits numerous pathogens. Its widespread distribution is not limited to rural but also includes urbanized areas. To date, comprehensive data on pathogen carrier rates of I. ricinus ticks in urban areas of Switzerland is lacking. Results Ixodes ricinus ticks sampled at 18 (sub- urban collection sites throughout Switzerland showed carrier rates of 0% for tick-borne encephalitis virus, 18.0% for Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato, 2.5% for Borrelia miyamotoi, 13.5% for Rickettsia spp., 1.4% for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, 6.2% for "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis", and 0.8% for Babesia venatorum (Babesia sp., EU1. Site-specific prevalence at collection sites with n > 45 ticks (n = 9 significantly differed for B. burgdorferi (s.l., Rickettsia spp., and "Ca. N. mikurensis", but were not related to the habitat type. Three hundred fifty eight out of 1078 I. ricinus ticks (33.2% tested positive for at least one pathogen. Thereof, about 20% (71/358 were carrying two or three different potentially disease-causing agents. Using next generation sequencing, we could detect true pathogens, tick symbionts and organisms of environmental or human origin in ten selected samples. Conclusions Our data document the presence of pathogens in the (sub- urban I. ricinus tick population in Switzerland, with carrier rates as high as those in rural regions. Carriage of multiple pathogens was repeatedly observed, demonstrating the risk of acquiring multiple infections as a consequence of a tick bite.

  8. Tick-Borne Pathogens in Ticks Feeding on Migratory Passerines in Western Part of Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Geller, Julia; Nazarova, Lidia; Katargina, Olga; Leivits, Agu; Järvekülg, Lilian; Golovljova, Irina

    2013-01-01

    During southward migration in the years 2006–2009, 178 migratory passerines of 24 bird species infested with ticks were captured at bird stations in Western Estonia. In total, 249 nymphal ticks were removed and analyzed individually for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The majority of ticks were collected from Acrocephalus (58%), Turdus (13%), Sylvia (8%), and Parus (6%) bird species. Tick-borne pathog...

  9. Emerging horizons for tick-borne pathogens: from the "one pathogen-one disease" vision to the pathobiome paradigm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vayssier-Taussat, M.; Kazimírová, M.; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Hornok, S.; Farkas, R.; Cosson, J.-F.; Bonnet, S.; Vourch, G.; Gasqui, P.; Mihalca, A. D.; Plantard, O.; Silaghi, C.; Cutler, S.; Rizzoli, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 12 (2015), s. 2033-2043 ISSN 1746-0913 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : co-infections * emerging diseases * Ixodes ricinus * new paradigm * next-generation sequencing * pathobiome * unknown pathogens * vector competence * zoonoses Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2015

  10. An estimate of the cost of acute food and water borne health effects from marine pathogens and toxins in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, Erin P.; Kite-Powell, Hauke; Beet, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Large and growing segments of the U.S. population consume seafood or engage in marine recreation. These activities provide significant benefits but also bring risk of exposure to marine borne illness. To manage these risks, it is important to understand the incidence and cost of marine borne disease. We review the literature and surveillance/monitoring data to determine the annual incidence of disease and health consequences due to marine borne pathogens from seafood consumption and beach rec...

  11. Blood borne viral infections among Danish Health Care Workers - frequent blood exposure but low prevalence of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisker, Niels; Mygind, Lone H.; Krarup, Henrik B.; Licht, Dorthe; Georgsen, Jorgen; Christensen, Peer B.

    2004-01-01

    Denmark is a country with low prevalence and incidence of blood borne viral infections. Among health care workers (HCWs) vaccination for hepatitis B is only offered to high-risk groups. The aims of this cross sectional survey were to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B, -C, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among the staff at a Danish University hospital and to correlate this with risk factors for transmission. Additionally, we wanted to examine the current frequency of blood exposure, reporting habits and hepatitis B vaccination status in the staff. Of 1439 eligible hospital staffs included, 960 (67%) were HCWs. The overall human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-, hepatitis C Virus (HCV)- and hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-prevalence was 0% (0/1439), 0.14% (2/1439) and 1.6% (23/1439), respectively. Twenty-three percent of HCWs were vaccinated against HBV. Age, blood transfusion and stay in endemic areas were associated independently to HBV infection as opposed to job-category, duration of employment, HBV vaccination status and blood exposure. Based on a 4-week recall period, the incidence of percutaneous blood exposure was 1.5/person-year. In conclusion the HIV and hepatitis prevalence was low despite frequent blood exposure and the principal risk factors were unrelated to work. Danish HCWs do not seem to be at increased risk of hepatitis B even though universal HBV vaccination has not been implemented

  12. Antibacterial Effects of (Mentha X Piperita L. Hydroalcoholic Extract on the Six Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zandi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Iran is the richest country in terms of distribution of medicinal plants. The antimicrobial effect of plant extracts and essential oils is well known and they are used as a good substitute in food industry to control food-borne pathogens. Due to the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and their efficacy against microorganisms, the aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of peppermint extract in order to control pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Piperita L., which is one of the species of mint; was used in this invitro-experimental study. The extraction was performed by percolation method. Well - agar method was used for antibacterial effects of extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC were done for six standard bacteria using microdilution method. The test was performed 3 times for each bacterium. Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 16 and t-test. Results: The lowest MIC of peppermint extract on examined microorganisms were observed for Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis (3.25 mg/ ml. Also the maximum diameter of inhibition zone, was related to Staphylococcus aureus (32 mm. Conclusion: Results of this study indicated that peppermint extract has a favorable control effect on the growth of food borne pathogens, which can be used as a perfect preservative for keeping food.

  13. Blood-borne biomarkers of mortality risk: systematic review of cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Barron

    Full Text Available Lifespan and the proportion of older people in the population are increasing, with far reaching consequences for the social, political and economic landscape. Unless accompanied by an increase in health span, increases in age-related diseases will increase the burden on health care resources. Intervention studies to enhance healthy ageing need appropriate outcome measures, such as blood-borne biomarkers, which are easily obtainable, cost-effective, and widely accepted. To date there have been no systematic reviews of blood-borne biomarkers of mortality.To conduct a systematic review to identify available blood-borne biomarkers of mortality that can be used to predict healthy ageing post-retirement.Four databases (Medline, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science were searched. We included prospective cohort studies with a minimum of two years follow up and data available for participants with a mean age of 50 to 75 years at baseline.From a total of 11,555 studies identified in initial searches, 23 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Fifty-one blood borne biomarkers potentially predictive of mortality risk were identified. In total, 20 biomarkers were associated with mortality risk. Meta-analyses of mortality risk showed significant associations with C-reactive protein (Hazard ratios for all-cause mortality 1.42, p<0.001; Cancer-mortality 1.62, p<0.009; CVD-mortality 1.31, p = 0.033, N Terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide (Hazard ratios for all-cause mortality 1.43, p<0.001; CHD-mortality 1.58, p<0.001; CVD-mortality 1.67, p<0.001 and white blood cell count (Hazard ratios for all-cause mortality 1.36, p = 0.001. There was also evidence that brain natriuretic peptide, cholesterol fractions, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, fibrinogen, granulocytes, homocysteine, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, neutrophils, osteoprotegerin, procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide, serum uric acid, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, tissue inhibitor of

  14. Analysis of a food-borne fungal pathogen outbreak: virulence and genome of a Mucor circinelloides isolate from yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chan; Billmyre, R Blake; Li, Alicia; Carson, Sandra; Sykes, Sean M; Huh, Eun Young; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Ko, Dennis C; Cuomo, Christina A; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-07-08

    Food-borne pathogens are ongoing problems, and new pathogens are emerging. The impact of fungi, however, is largely underestimated. Recently, commercial yogurts contaminated with Mucor circinelloides were sold, and >200 consumers became ill with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Mucoralean fungi cause the fatal fungal infection mucormycosis, whose incidence has been continuously increasing. In this study, we isolated an M. circinelloides strain from a yogurt container, and multilocus sequence typing identified the strain as Mucor circinelloides f. circinelloides. M. circinelloides f. circinelloides is the most virulent M. circinelloides subspecies and is commonly associated with human infections, whereas M. circinelloides f. lusitanicus and M. circinelloides f. griseocyanus are less common causes of infection. Whole-genome analysis of the yogurt isolate confirmed it as being close to the M. circinelloides f. circinelloides subgroup, with a higher percentage of divergence with the M. circinelloides f. lusitanicus subgroup. In mating assays, the yogurt isolate formed sexual zygospores with the (-) M. circinelloides f. circinelloides tester strain, which is congruent with its sex locus encoding SexP, the (+) mating type sex determinant. The yogurt isolate was virulent in murine and wax moth larva host systems. In a murine gastromucormycosis model, Mucor was recovered from fecal samples of infected mice for up to 10 days, indicating that Mucor can survive transit through the GI tract. In interactions with human immune cells, M. circinelloides f. lusitanicus induced proinflammatory cytokines but M. circinelloides f. circinelloides did not, which may explain the different levels of virulence in mammalian hosts. This study demonstrates that M. circinelloides can spoil food products and cause gastrointestinal illness in consumers and may pose a particular risk to immunocompromised patients. Importance: The U.S. FDA reported that yogurt products were contaminated with M

  15. Pathogenicity of two seed-borne fungi commonly involved in maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of two mostly prevailing fungal species on maize (Zea maize L.) from different localities of Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Pakistan. Pathogenic fungi deteriorate food grains by producing mycotoxins and aflotoxins during storage consequently shedding menace on its ...

  16. Opportunities for optimization: fate of manure-borne pathogens during anaerobic digestion and solids separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion can inactivate zoonotic pathogens present in cattle manure, which reduces transmission of these pathogens from farms to humans through the environment. However, the variability in extent of inactivation across farms and over time is unknown because most studies have examined pat...

  17. The location of splenic NKT cells favours their rapid activation by blood-borne antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Patricia; Sánchez-Niño, María Dolores; van Rooijen, Nico; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important role in mounting protective responses to blood-borne infections. However, though the spleen is the largest blood filter in the body, the distribution and dynamics of NKT cells within this organ are not well characterized. Here we show that the majority of NKT cells patrol around the marginal zone (MZ) and red pulp (RP) of the spleen. In response to lipid antigen, these NKT cells become arrested and rapidly produce cytokines, while the small proportion of NKT cells located in the white pulp (WP) exhibit limited activation. Importantly, disruption of the splenic MZ by chemical or genetic approaches results in a severe reduction in NKT cell activation indicating the need of cooperation between both MZ macrophages and dendritic cells for efficient NKT cell responses. Thus, the location of splenic NKT cells in the MZ and RP facilitates their access to blood-borne antigen and enables the rapid initiation of protective immune responses. PMID:22505026

  18. Iatrogenic blood-borne viral infections in refugee children from war and transition zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Paul N

    2013-06-01

    Pediatric infectious disease clinicians in industrialized countries may encounter iatrogenically transmitted HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections in refugee children from Central Asia, Southeast Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. The consequences of political collapse and/or civil war-work migration, prostitution, intravenous drug use, defective public health resources, and poor access to good medical care-all contribute to the spread of blood-borne viruses. Inadequate infection control practices by medical establishments can lead to iatrogenic infection of children. Summaries of 4 cases in refugee children in Australia are a salient reminder of this problem.

  19. Coinfection by the tick-borne pathogens Babesia microti and Borrelia burgdorferi: ecological, epidemiological and clinical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Vannier, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ticks maintain a large and diverse array of human pathogens in the enzootic cycle, including Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti. Despite the poor ecological fitness of B. microti, babesiosis has recently emerged in areas endemic for Lyme disease. Studies in ticks, reservoir hosts and humans indicate that coinfection with B. burgdorferi and B. microti is common, promotes transmission and emergence of B. microti in the enzootic cycle, and causes greater disease severity and duration in humans. These integrative studies may serve as a paradigm for the study of other vector-borne coinfections. Identifying ecological drivers of pathogen emergence and host factors that fuel disease severity will help guide the design of effective curative and prevention strategies. PMID:26613664

  20. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Simon

    Full Text Available Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed.

  2. Emerging Pathogens and Vehicles of Food- and Water-borne Disease Outbreaks in Korea, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Shinje; Sohn, Il-Woong; Hong, Yeongseon; Lee, Hyungmin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Lee, Sangwon; Youn, Seung-Ki

    2014-02-01

    Food- and water-borne disease outbreaks (FBDOs) are an important public health problem worldwide. This study investigated the trends in FBDOs in Korea and established emerging causal pathogens and causal vehicles. We analyzed FBDOs in Korea by year, location, causal pathogens, and causal vehicles from 2007 to 2012. Information was collected from the FBDOs database in the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During 2007-2012, a total of 1794 FBDOs and 48,897 patients were reported. After 2007, FBDOs and patient numbers steadily decreased over the next 2 years and then plateaued until 2011. However, in 2012, FBDOs increased slightly accompanied by a large increase in the number of affected patients. Our results highlight the emergence of norovirus and pathogenic Escherichia coli other than enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) in schools in 2012. We found that pickled vegetables is an emerging causal vehicle responsible for this problem. On the basis of this study we recommend intensified inspections of pickled vegetable manufacturers and the strengthening of laboratory surveillance of relevant pathogens.

  3. Bacterial and protozoal agents of canine vector-borne diseases in the blood of domestic and stray dogs from southern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Carla; Almeida, Bruno; Coimbra, Mónica; Fernandes, Maria Catarina; Cristóvão, José Manuel; Ramos, Cláudia; Martins, Ângela; Martinho, Filipe; Silva, Pedro; Neves, Nuno; Nunes, Mónica; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Cardoso, Luís; Campino, Lenea

    2015-03-23

    The so-called canine vector-borne diseases (CVBD) are caused by a wide range of pathogens transmitted by arthropods. In addition to their veterinary importance, many of these canine vector-borne pathogens can also affect the human population due to their zoonotic potential, a situation that requires a One Health approach. As the prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in cats from southern Portugal has been recently evaluated, the aim of the present study was to assess if the same agents were present in dogs living in the same area, and to assess positivity-associated risk factors. One thousand and ten dogs (521 domestic and 489 stray) from veterinary medical centres and animal shelters in southern Portugal were enrolled. Anaplasma spp./Ehrlichia spp., Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp. and Leishmania infantum infections were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in blood samples. Sixty-eight (6.7%) dogs were PCR-positive to at least one of the tested CVBD agent species, genera or complex, including one dog found positive to two different genera. Nineteen (1.9%) dogs were positive to Anaplasma spp./Ehrlichia spp., eight (0.8%) to B. burgdorferi s.l., 31 (3.1%) to Hepatozoon spp. and 11 (1.1%) to L. infantum. Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, B. burgdorferis.l. and Hepatozoon canis were identified by DNA sequencing, including one animal confirmed with both A. platys and H. canis. Furthermore, Wolbachia spp. was amplified in blood from four dogs. None of the tested dogs was positive by PCR for Bartonella spp. or Babesia spp. The molecular identification of CVBD agents in southern Portugal, some of them with zoonotic concern, reinforces the importance to alert the veterinary community, owners and public health authorities to prevent the risk of transmission of vector-borne pathogens among dogs and to other vertebrate hosts including humans. The prevalence of the selected pathogens was lower than that previously

  4. Molecular evidence of vector-borne pathogens in dogs and cats and their ectoparasites in Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessas, Amina; Leulmi, Hamza; Bitam, Idir; Zaidi, Sara; Ait-Oudhia, Khatima; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In Algeria, only limited information is currently available on the prevalence of emergent canine and feline vector-borne diseases. The aim of the present work was to detect by qPCR vector-associated bacteria in stray dogs and cats and their ectoparasites from Algiers. 18/117 (15.38%) dogs and 2/107 (1.87%) cats were positive for at least one vector-borne agent. Coxiella burnetii and Bartonella henselae were identified in 1/117 (0.85%) dog individually. Ehrlichia canis DNA was detected in 17/117 (14.52%) dogs. 1/107 (0.93%) cat was positive to C. burnetii and another 1/107 (0.93%) to B. henselae. DNA of Rickettsia massiliae, Rickettsia conorii and E. canis was detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Cat fleas were infected with Rickettsia felis, B. henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was identified in Xenopsylla cheopis collected from dogs. The findings of this study indicate that dogs and cats from Algeria are exposed to multiple tick and flea-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcome of Accidental Exposure Prone to Blood Borne Viral Infections in an Educational Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Sali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk for transmission of blood-borne viruses (BBVs such as Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV due to occupational exposure is a major concern in the health care setting.Materials and Methods: This study among 337 health care workers (HCWs accidentally exposed to BBVs was carried out from January 2009 to March 2015. The data were reviewed in labbafinejhad hospital, Tehran, Iran.Results: 4 HCWs had exposure to HBS Ag positive, which HBS antibody titer of them was higher than 10 mlu/ml, 6 HCWs were exposed to HCV seropositive patients underwent laboratory investigations for  HCV-antibody on 4,12, 24 weeks that results were negative. 3 cases had exposure to HIV seropositive patients which received standard antiretroviral post exposure prophylaxis.Conclusion: Timely performance for PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis reducing BBVs transmission among HCWs.prophylaxis. Conclusions: Timely performance for  PEP(Post Exposure Prophylaxis reducing BBVs transmission among HCWs.Key words: Outcome; Accidental Exposure; Blood Borne Viral Infections

  6. River networks as ecological corridors for species, populations and pathogens of water-borne disease (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, A.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Suweis, S.; Ceola, S.; Carrara, F.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2010-12-01

    Recent works at the interface of hydrology, geomorphology and ecology under an integrated framework of analysis will be reviewed with a view to a general theory for reactive transport on networks. A number of related topics will be reviewed, linked by the characters of stochastic transport, and the networked environmental matrix (including biodiversity of freshwater fish in river networks and vegetation along riparian systems, how river networks affected historic spreading of human populations, and how they influence the spreading of water-borne disease). The unique, coherent ecohydrological thread and similar mathematical methods will be exposed. Metacommunity and individual-based models will be described in the contexts of hydrochory, population and species migrations, and the spreading of infections of water-borne disease along the ecological corridors generated by the river basin. A general effect is shown to emerge on the effects of dendritic geometries on the ecological processes and dynamics operating on river basins. Insights provided by such a theory will lend themselves to issues of practical importance such as integration of riparian systems into large-scale resource management, spatial strategies to minimize loss of freshwater biodiversity, and effective prevention/vaccination campaigns against water-borne diseases.

  7. blood donors in Amhara and Tigray regional states

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood serves as a vehicle for transmission of blood-borne pathogens rincluding hepatitis viruses and Y hemoparasities. In northern parts of Ethiopia, screening of blood for blood-borne pathogens do not fulfill the standard protocols and screening 'for malaria parasites is not practiced. Determination of the ...

  8. Surveillance for Ixodes pacificus and the tick-borne pathogens Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi in birds from California's Inner Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, Regina J; Wright, Stan A; Donohue, Ann M; Macedo, Paula A; Foley, Janet E

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the involvement of birds in the ecology of the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus, and its associated zoonotic bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, at two interior coast-range study sites in northern California. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the agent of granulocytic anaplasmosis (GA), and B. burgdorferi s.s., the agent of Lyme disease (LD), are tick-borne pathogens that are well established in California. We screened blood and ticks from 349 individual birds in 48 species collected in 2011 and 2012 using pathogen-specific PCR. A total of 617 immature I. pacificus was collected with almost three times as many larvae than nymphs. There were 7.5 times more I. pacificus at the Napa County site compared to the Yolo County site. Two of 74 (3%) nymphal pools from an Oregon junco (Junco hyemalis) and a hermit thrush (Catharus guttatus) and 4 individual larvae (all from Oregon juncos) were PCR-positive for B. burgdorferi. Blood samples from a golden-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) and a European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) were positive for A. phagocytophilum DNA at very low levels. Birds that forage on ground or bark and nest on the ground, as well as some migratory species, are at an increased risk for acquiring I. pacificus. Our findings show that birds contribute to the ecologies of LD and GA in California by serving as a blood-meal source, feeding and transporting immature I. pacificus, and sometimes as a source of Borrelia infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  10. Vector-borne pathogens in dogs from Costa Rica: first molecular description of Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis infections with a high prevalence of monocytic ehrlichiosis and the manifestations of co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Alicia; Rojas, Diana; Montenegro, Víctor; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Yasur-Landau, Daniel; Baneth, Gad

    2014-01-31

    Infection with canine vector-borne pathogens was evaluated in dogs from four different regions of Costa Rica by PCR. Demographic data, clinical signs, packed cell volume values, and the presence of tick infestation were recorded for each dog. Forty seven percent (69/146) of the dogs were infected with at least one pathogen and 12% were co-infected with two pathogens. Ehrlichia canis was detected in 34%, Anaplasma platys in 10%, Babesia vogeli in 8%, and Hepatozoon canis in 7.5% of the blood samples. No infection was detected with Leishmania spp. in blood, skin scrapings or conjunctival swabs. Thirty percent of the dogs presented at least one clinical sign compatible with vector-borne disease, and of those, 66% were infected with a pathogen. Subclinical infections were determined in 58% of the infected dogs including 82% (9/11), 58% (29/50), 42% (5/12) and 36% (5/14) of the dogs with H. canis, E. canis, B. vogeli and A. platys infections, respectively. A distinct relationship was found between infection and anemia. The mean PCV values were 34.4% in dogs with no infection, 31.5% in those who had a single infection and 23% in those with co-infection. Co-infected dogs had significantly lower PCV values compared to non-infected and single-infected dogs (pCosta Rica as well as in Central America. The results of this study indicate that multiple vector-borne pathogens responsible for severe diseases infect dogs in Costa Rica and therefore, increased owner and veterinarian awareness are needed. Moreover, prevention of tick infestation is recommended to decrease the threat of these diseases to the canine population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. No transmission of blood-borne viruses among hospital staff despite frequent blood exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskandarani, Hassan Ali; Kehrer, Michala; Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2014-01-01

    to provide an updated evaluation of the annual frequency of registered exposures during the 2003-2012 period, the prevalence and incidence of transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV among HCWs, the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV among source patients, the follow-up by HBV vaccination and blood sampling in exposed...... HCWs and, finally, reporting habits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All registered first-time cases of BBF exposure at Odense University Hospital during the 2003-2012 period were included. The exposed HCW and source patient were linked to a laboratory database to obtain the test results for HIV, HBV, HCV...... and the anti-HBs level at baseline and after exposure. For 2012, a detailed analysis of BBF exposure was performed. RESULTS: A total of 2,274 first-time BBF exposures were analysed. We observed a 35% increase in the reported incidence of exposures in the period. The prevalence and incidence of HIV, HBV and HCV...

  12. An estimate of the cost of acute health effects from food- and water-borne marine pathogens and toxins in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Erin P; Kite-Powell, Hauke; Beet, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Large and growing segments of the United States population consume seafood or engage in marine recreation. These activities provide significant benefits but also bring risk of exposure to marine-borne illness. To manage these risks, it is important to understand the incidence and cost of marine-borne disease. We review the literature and surveillance/monitoring data to determine the annual incidence of disease and health consequences due to marine-borne pathogens from seafood consumption and beach recreation in the USA. Using this data, we employ a cost-of-illness model to estimate economic impacts. Our results suggest that health consequences due to marine-borne pathogens in the USA have annual costs on the order of US$900 million. This includes US$350 million due to pathogens and marine toxins specifically identified as causing food-borne disease, an estimated US$300 million due to seafood-borne disease with unknown etiology, US$30 million from direct exposure to the Vibrio species, and US$300 million due to gastrointestinal illness from beach recreation. Although there is considerable uncertainty about the degree of underreporting of certain pathogen-specific acute marine-related illnesses, the conservative assumptions we have used in constructing our estimate suggest that it should be considered a lower bound on true costs.

  13. Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from CD4+ T Cells Contributes to Control of a Blood-Borne Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Mary F; de Melo, Gabrielly L; Anidi, Chioma; Hamburger, Rebecca; Kim, Chris Y; Lee, So Youn; Pham, Jennifer; Kim, Charles C

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic regulation of leukocyte population size and activation state is crucial for an effective immune response. In malaria, Plasmodium parasites elicit robust host expansion of macrophages and monocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that myeloid expansion during P. chabaudi infection is dependent upon both CD4+ T cells and the cytokine Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (MCSF). Single-cell RNA-Seq analysis on antigen-experienced T cells revealed robust expression of Csf1, the gene encoding MCSF, in a sub-population of CD4+ T cells with distinct transcriptional and surface phenotypes. Selective deletion of Csf1 in CD4+ cells during P. chabaudi infection diminished proliferation and activation of certain myeloid subsets, most notably lymph node-resident CD169+ macrophages, and resulted in increased parasite burden and impaired recovery of infected mice. Depletion of CD169+ macrophages during infection also led to increased parasitemia and significant host mortality, confirming a previously unappreciated role for these cells in control of P. chabaudi. This work establishes the CD4+ T cell as a physiologically relevant source of MCSF in vivo; probes the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response during type 1 infection; and delineates a novel mechanism by which T helper cells regulate myeloid cells to limit growth of a blood-borne intracellular pathogen.

  14. MALDI-TOF MS identification and tracking of food spoilers and food-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koster, C.G.; Brul, S.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an established tool for identification of clinical relevant pathogens. MALDI-TOF MS is increasingly accepted as a molecular characterization tool and method for identification of genera, species and

  15. Prevalence of transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens among health-care workers and risk mitigation programme in a paediatric tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Nayyar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The health-care workers (HCWs are at an occupational risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, mainly, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus. HBV is currently the only blood-borne virus for which a vaccine is available. All health-care institutions must encourage the HCWs to undergo screening for blood-borne pathogens.

  16. Ticks and tick-borne pathogens and putative symbionts of black bears (Ursus americanus floridanus) from Georgia and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J; Nims, Todd N; Savage, Mason Y; Durden, Lance A

    2009-10-01

    Ticks were collected from 38 black bears (Ursus americanus floridanus) from northwestern Florida (n = 18) from 2003 to 2005 and southern Georgia (n = 20) in 2006. Five species (Amblyomma americanum, A. maculatum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis, and I. affinis) were collected from Florida bears, and 4 species (A. americanum, A. maculatum, D. variabilis, I. scapularis) were collected from bears in Georgia. Ixodes scapularis was the most frequently collected tick, followed by D. variabilis, A. americanum, A. maculatum, and I. affinis. The collection of I. affinis from a Florida bear represents a new host record. A subset of ticks was screened for pathogens and putative symbionts by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The zoonotic tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Rickettsia parkeri were detected in 1 of 23 (4.3%) A. americanum and 1 of 12 (8.3%) A. maculatum, respectively. The putative zoonotic pathogen "Rickettsia amblyommii" was detected in 4 (17.4%) A. americanum and 1 (8.3%) A. maculatum. Other putative symbiotic rickettsiae detected included R. bellii and R. montanensis in D. variabilis, a Rickettsia cooleyi-like sp. and Rickettsia sp. Is-1 in I. scapularis, and Rickettsia TR39-like sp. in I. scapularis and A. americanum. All ticks were PCR-negative for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Panola Mountain Ehrlichia sp., E. ewingii, Francisella tularensis, and Borrelia spp.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil from the Leaves and Seeds ofCoriandrum sativumtoward Food-borne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M; Karimi, F; Shariatifar, N; Mohammadpourfard, I; Shiri Malekabad, E

    2015-06-03

    The increasing incidence of drug-resistant pathogens and toxicity of existing antibacterial compounds has drawn attention toward the antimicrobial activity of natural products. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of the leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum . The five strains of bacteria comprising Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella enterica and Vibrio cholerae were used for the antibacterial tests. In this study, antimicrobial effects of the essential oil from the leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum are evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the inhibition zone and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The essential oil from Coriandrum sativum was extracted by steam distillation. The results indicate that the antimicrobial activities against the five pathogens were in the range of 2.5- 320 µg/mL. Increase in essential oil concentration caused significant increase in inhibitory feature. The essential oil of the leaves and seeds of Coriandrum sativum showed antimicrobial activity against the food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Thus, its oil can be used as an alternative to synthetic food preservative without toxic effects. Also, it can be used in biotechnological fields as ingredients in antibiotics and the pharmaceutical industry. These results suggest that the essential oil of C sativum leaves and seeds may have potential use in pharmaceutical and food industries for preservatives or antimicrobial agents.

  18. Molecular identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks collected from dogs and small ruminants from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaligiannis, Ιlias; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Papa, Anna; Sotiraki, Smaragda; de la Fuente, José

    2018-03-07

    Ticks are vectors for a variety of human and animal pathogens (bacteria, protozoa and viruses). In order to investigate the pathogens carried by ticks in Greece, a total of 179 adult ticks (114 female and 65 male) were collected from domestic animals (sheep, goats and dogs) from 14 prefectures of six regions of Greece. Among them, 40 were Dermacentor marginatus, 25 Haemaphysalis parva, 22 H. sulcata, one H. punctata, 13 Ixodes gibbosus, 77 Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. and one R. bursa. All ticks were tested for the presence of DNA of Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Rickettsia spp. and Theileria spp. The collected ticks were examined by PCR and reverse line blot (RLB) assay. A prevalence of 20.1% for Anaplasma spp., 15.6% for Babesia spp. (identifying B. bigemina, B. divergens, B. ovis and B. crassa), 17.9% for C. burnetii, 15.1% for Rickettsia spp., and 21.2% for Theileria spp. (identifying T. annulata, T. buffeli/orientalis, T. ovis and T. lestoquardi) was found. The results of this study demonstrate the variety of tick-borne pathogens of animal and human importance circulating in Greece, and that awareness is needed to minimize the risk of infection, especially among farmers and pet owners.

  19. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palus, Martin; Vancová, Marie; Širmarová, J.; Elsterová, Jana; Perner, Jan; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 507, JUL (2017), s. 110-122 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis * tick-borne encephalitis virus * blood-brain barrier * neuroinfection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Virology Impact factor: 3.353, year: 2016

  20. Campylobacter spp. as emerging food-borne pathogen - incidence, detection and resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Smole Možina

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter. coli are the leading cause of bacterial food-borne enteric infection with still increasing incidence in the most developed countries. Consuming and/or handling poultry meat is the most consistent risk factor, linked to the high prevalence of campylobacters in retail poultry meat. Recent data about the incidence of human campylobacteriosis and prevalence of C.jejuni and C. coli in poultry meat are presented. Important aspects of Campylobacter transmission along the food chain are discussed – physiological specificities possibly enabling adaptation and survival in the food production environment as well as the emerging resistance to antimicrobial agents used in veterinary and human medicine. Recent advances in detection and identification methods of Campylobacter spp. are mentioned as a basis for preventive strategies to bring these food-borne pat hogens under control. Recent risk assessments show that mitigation strategies could be applied at different points from food-animals production to the finalconsumptionoffoods.Educating the consumers is important,sincecritical control point remains the hygiene in the final food preparation.

  1. Prevalence of select vector-borne pathogens in stray and client-owned dogs from Algiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzag, Naouelle; Petit, Elisabeth; Gandoin, Christelle; Bouillin, Corinne; Ghalmi, Farida; Haddad, Nadia; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2015-02-01

    Data on the prevalence of vector-borne diseases agents infecting canines in Algeria is currently lacking. The purpose of this study is to assess by serological and molecular methods the prevalence of select arthropod borne-bacterial infections in client-owned and stray dogs. Antibodies to Anaplasma phagocytophilum were the most prevalent at 47.7%, followed by Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. at 37.6%, Ehrlichia canis at 30.0%, Bartonella henselae at 32.4% and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii at 27%. Seroprevalence was statistically significantly higher in stray dogs than those owned by clients. Seropositivity was not associated with health status, except for E. canis. Molecular evaluation indicates that 17.8% of the 213 analyzed dogs were positive for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma with a prevalence of 4.2% for E. canis, 14.1% for Anaplama platys and 0% for A. phagocytophilum. Seven (7.1%) of the tested dogs were positive for Bartonella spp. with two characterized as Bartonella rochalimae, four as B. henselae and one as B.v. subsp. berkhoffii. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbial Diagnostic Microarrays for the Detection and Typing of Food- and Water-Borne (Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kostić

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and sensitive pathogen detection in clinical and environmental (including food and water samples is of greatest importance for public health. Standard microbiological methods have several limitations and improved alternatives are needed. Most important requirements for reliable analysis include: (i specificity; (ii sensitivity; (iii multiplexing potential; (iv robustness; (v speed; (vi automation potential; and (vii low cost. Microarray technology can, through its very nature, fulfill many of these requirements directly and the remaining challenges have been tackled. In this review, we attempt to compare performance characteristics of the microbial diagnostic microarrays developed for the detection and typing of food and water pathogens, and discuss limitations, points still to be addressed and issues specific for the analysis of food, water and environmental samples.

  3. Next generation sequencing-based multigene panel for high throughput detection of food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Ossiprandi, Maria Cristina; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Mangifesta, Marta; Alessandri, Giulia; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Contamination of food by chemicals or pathogenic bacteria may cause particular illnesses that are linked to food consumption, commonly referred to as foodborne diseases. Bacteria are present in/on various foods products, such as fruits, vegetables and ready-to-eat products. Bacteria that cause foodborne diseases are known as foodborne pathogens (FBPs). Accurate detection methods that are able to reveal the presence of FBPs in food matrices are in constant demand, in order to ensure safe foods with a minimal risk of causing foodborne diseases. Here, a multiplex PCR-based Illumina sequencing method for FBP detection in food matrices was developed. Starting from 25 bacterial targets and 49 selected PCR primer pairs, a primer collection called foodborne pathogen - panel (FPP) consisting of 12 oligonucleotide pairs was developed. The FPP allows a more rapid and reliable identification of FBPs compared to classical cultivation methods. Furthermore, FPP permits sensitive and specific FBP detection in about two days from food sample acquisition to bioinformatics-based identification. The FPP is able to simultaneously identify eight different bacterial pathogens, i.e. Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus and Yersinia enterocolitica, in a given food matrix at a threshold contamination level of 10 1 cell/g. Moreover, this novel detection method may represent an alternative and/or a complementary approach to PCR-based techniques, which are routinely used for FBP detection, and could be implemented in (parts of) the food chain as a quality check. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic profiling of Cronobacter turicensis 3032, a food-borne opportunistic pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Paula; Hartmann, Isabel; Lehner, Angelika; Stephan, Roger; Gehrig, Peter; Grossmann, Jonas; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Roschitzki, Bernd; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin

    2009-07-01

    Members of the genus Cronobacter are opportunistic pathogens for neonates and are often associated with contaminated milk powder formulas. At present little is known about the virulence mechanisms or the natural reservoir of these organisms. The proteome of Cronobacter turicensis 3032, which has recently caused two deaths, was mapped aiming at a better understanding of physiology and putative pathogenic traits of this clinical isolate. Our analyses of extracellular, surface-associated and whole-cell proteins by two complementary proteomics approaches, 1D-SDS-PAGE combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS and 2D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, lead to the identification of 832 proteins corresponding to a remarkable 19% of the theoretically expressed protein complement of C. turicensis. The majority of the identified proteins are involved in central metabolic pathways, translation, protein folding and stability. Several putative virulence factors, whose expressions were confirmed by phenotypic assays, could be identified: a macrophage infectivity potentiator involved in C. turicensis persistence in host cells, a superoxide dismutase protecting the pathogen against reactive oxygen species and an enterobactin-receptor protein for the uptake of siderophore-bound iron. Most interestingly, a chitinase and a metalloprotease that might act against insects and fungi but no casein hydrolysing enzymes were found, suggesting that there is an environmental natural habitat of C. turicensis 3032.

  5. A multicentre molecular analysis of hepatitis B and blood-borne virus coinfections in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Linda; Carr, Michael J; Dean, Jonathan; Nguyen, Linh Thuy; Ta Thi, Thu Hong; Nguyen, Binh Thanh; Connell, Jeff; Coughlan, Suzie; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Hall, William W; Thi, Lan Anh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) infection is endemic in Viet Nam, with up to 8.4 million individuals estimated to be chronically infected. We describe results of a large, multicentre seroepidemiological and molecular study of the prevalence of HBV infection and blood-borne viral coinfections in Viet Nam. Individuals with varying risk factors for infection (n = 8654) were recruited from five centres; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. A mean prevalence rate of 10.7% was observed and levels of HBsAg were significantly higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (17.4%, n = 174/1000) and dialysis patients (14.3%, n = 82/575) than in lower-risk groups (9.4%; pa predominance of genotype B4 (82.6%); genotypes C1 (14.6%), B2 (2.7%) and C5 (0.5%) were also identified. The precore mutation G1896A was identified in 35% of all specimens, and was more frequently observed in genotype B (41%) than genotype C (3%; pa' region of the surface gene, point mutations were identified in 31% (n = 58/187) of sequences, and 2.2% (n = 4/187) and 5.3% (n = 10/187) specimens contained the major vaccine escape mutations G145A/R and P120L/Q/S/T, respectively. 368 HBsAg positive individuals were genotyped for the IL28B SNP rs12979860 and no significant association between the IL28B SNP and clearance of HBsAg, HBV viral load or HBeAg was observed. This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV infection in Viet Nam and also highlights the significant levels of blood-borne virus coinfections, which have important implications for hepatitis-related morbidity and development of effective management strategies.

  6. The antibiotic activity and mechanisms of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) bagasse extract against food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Zhengang; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-10-15

    Sugarcane bagasse contains natural compositions that can significantly inhibit food-borne pathogens growth. In the present study, the phenolic content in sugarcane bagasse was detected as higher than 4 mg/g dry bagasse, with 470 mg quercetin/g polyphenol. The sugarcane bagasse extract showed bacteriostatic activity against the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salomonella typhimurium. Additionally, the sugarcane bagasse extract can increase the electric conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions causing cellular leaking of electrolytes. Results of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested the antibacterial mechanism was probably due to the damaged cellular proteins by sugarcane bagasse extract. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the sugarcane bagasse extract might change cell morphology and internal structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening food-borne and zoonotic pathogens associated with livestock practices in the Sumapaz region, Cundinamarca, Colombia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenas, Nelson E.; Abril, Diego A.; Valencia, Paola

    2017-01-01

    -borne and zoonotic pathogens associated with local livestock practices. We evaluated 1098 cows from 46 livestock farms in the Sumapaz region that were selected by random. Of the total population of cattle, 962 animals (88%) were tested for bovine TB using a caudal-fold tuberculin test and 546 (50%) for brucellosis...... findings suggest that livestock products could be a source of exposure to Brucella and multidrug-resistant E. coli and S. aureus strains as a result of unhygienic livestock practices in the Sumapaz region. Training in good farming practices is the key to improving safety in food production.......Hazardous practices regarding antibiotics misuse, unsanitary milking procedures, and the commercial sales of raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products are currently being practiced by livestock farmers in the Sumapaz region (Colombia). The purpose of this study was to screen for food...

  8. Extreme Heat Resistance of Food Borne Pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium on Chicken Breast Fillet during Cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarieke E.I. de Jong

    2012-01-01

    The surface temperature reached 70∘C within 30 sec and 85∘C within one minute. Extremely high decimal reduction times of 1.90, 1.97, and 2.20 min were obtained for C. jejuni, E. coli, and S. typhimurium, respectively. Chicken meat and refrigerated storage before cooking enlarged the heat resistance of the food borne pathogens. Additionally, a high challenge temperature or fast heating rate contributed to the level of heat resistance. The data were used to assess the probability of illness (campylobacteriosis due to consumption of chicken fillet as a function of cooking time. The data revealed that cooking time may be far more critical than previously assumed.

  9. Thermographic visualization of leaf response in cucumber plants infected with the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Ling, Ning; Dong, Xian; Zhu, Yiyong; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2012-12-01

    Infection with the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC), which causes Fusarium wilt of cucumber plants, might result in changes in plant transpiration and water status within leaves. To monitor leaf response in cucumber infected with FOC, digital infrared thermography (DIT) was employed to detect changes in leaf temperature. During the early stages of FOC infection, stomata closure was induced by ABA in leaves, resulting in a decreased transpiration rate and increased leaf temperature. Subsequently, cell death occurred, accompanied by water loss, resulting in a little decrease in leaf temperature. A negative correlation between transpiration rate and leaf temperature was existed. But leaf temperature exhibited a special pattern with different disease severity on light-dark cycle. Lightly wilted leaves had a higher temperature in light and a lower temperature in dark than did in healthy leaves. We identified that the water loss from wilted leaves was regulated not by stomata but rather by cells damage caused by pathogen infection. Finally, water balance in infected plants became disordered and dead tissue was dehydrated, so leaf temperature increased again. These data suggest that membrane injury caused by FOC infection induces uncontrolled water loss from damaged cells and an imbalance in leaf water status, and ultimately accelerate plant wilting. Combining detection of the temperature response of leaves to light-dark conditions, DIT not only permits noninvasive detection and indirect visualization of the development of the soil-borne disease Fusarium wilt, but also demonstrates certain internal metabolic processes correlative with water status. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and tick-borne pathogens in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russart, Nathan M; Dougherty, Michael W; Vaughan, Jefferson A

    2014-09-01

    Ticks were sampled at nine locations throughout North Dakota during early summer of 2010, using flagging techniques and small mammals trapping. In total, 1,762 ticks were collected from eight of the nine locations. The dominant species were Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (82%), found throughout the state, and Ixodes scapularis Say (17%), found in northeastern counties. A few nymphal and adult I. scapularis tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi (3%) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (8%). This is the first report of I. scapularis and associated pathogens occurring in North Dakota and provides evidence for continued westward expansion of this important vector tick species in the United States.

  11. Environmental fate of manure-borne estrogens and pathogens applied to agricultural land

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Forslund, Anita; Bech, Tina Bundgaard

    technologies. This may remove both pathogens and estrogens from the slurry and enhance infiltration upon field application and hence the interaction between contaminants and the soil matrix. A sorption study investigated how 17β-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogen commonly found in pig manure, sorbs...... was investigated in a field study, where the spatial distribution of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium Bacteriophage 28B in and around the injection slit was measured on day 0, 1, 6, 18, and 46/49 in sandy clay loam and sandy loam soil. Transport of slurry components away from the slit varied...

  12. Discovering potential sources of emerging pathogens: South America is a reservoir of generalist avian blood parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Michaël A J; Pérez-Tris, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Generalist pathogens are capable of infecting a wide range of host species, and may pose serious disease emergence threats if accidentally moved outside their native areas. To date little effort has been devoted to identifying geographic areas that may act as reservoirs of generalist pathogens. According to current theory, where host diversity is high, parasite specialisation in one host species may be penalised by reduced host availability, while generalist parasites may benefit from the exploitation of various host species. Therefore natural selection could favor generalist parasites where host diversity is high. Here we explored if, in a highly diverse bird community in Ecuador, a generalist strategy is promoted among local Haemoproteus and Plasmodium blood-borne parasites compared with similar parasite communities throughout the world. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of every parasite lineage in order to understand the evolution of host specificity in this megadiverse area. We found high levels of host generalisation for both parasite genera, and the mean host range of the Haemoproteus community in Ecuador was significantly higher than other parasite communities in other areas outside the Neotropics. Generalist Haemoproteus parasites in this bird community had diverse phylogenetic ancestry, were closely related to specialist parasites and were apparently endemic to the Amazon, showing that different parasites have independently evolved into host generalists in this region. Finally we show that Haemoproteus communities in Ecuador and South America are more generalist than in temperate areas, making this continent a hotspot of generalist Haemoproteus parasites for wild birds. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Food Born Pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouha Kasra-Kermanshahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Disease caused by consuming microbial contaminated food has increased significantly in recent years due to changes in the livelihoods and eating habits of the human populations. Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are three of the most important foodborne bacterial pathogens and can lead to foodborne diseases. Increased use of antibiotics, has led to development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of new types of effective and nontoxic antimicrobial compounds. Nowadays, the most extensive research and commercial practices are based on probiotic bacteria. Probiotics, specifically lactic acid bacteria are widely used in the food industry for fermentation but have gained attention from health professionals because of their potential beneficial effects. Now probiotic therapy is thought to be an effective way to improve the gut health and an alternative to antibiotic treatments. They contribute to food safety by their ability to inhibit the growth of several other bacteria. LAB can be used as protective cultures to compete with potential pathogens and other undesired organisms, thereby increasing the safety of the food product.

  14. Monitoring of Soil-Borne Pathogens in the Agricultural Soils of the Pestrechinsky District (Tatarstan, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabarova, K. O.; Kuryntseva, P. A.; Galitskaya, P. Y.; Selivanovskaya, S. Y.

    2018-01-01

    A recent agricultural trend is aimed to develop organic farming technologies. Organic farming means no mineral fertilizers, pesticides, antibiotics and other chemical substances not characteristic of natural conditions should be used in farm production. When choosing the regions, where this technology can be successfully realized, it is important to evaluate not only the physical and chemical qualities of soils, but also the degree of their infestation with phytopathogens. The Pestrechinsky District of the Republic of Tatarstan, where transfer to organic farming is being planned, was chosen as such a region. Agricultural lands were marked at the map of the administrative region, 100 sampling site were generated using GIS Technologies. It was found out that soil microbial community was characterized by a typical ratio and count of yeast fungi (3.4·105 - 1.6·106 CFU•g-1), mold fungi (1.0·101 - 1.7·105 CFU·g-1) and bacteria (1.6·106 - 3.1·107 CFU·g-1). In all the selected soil samples plant pathogenic fungi of the Fusarium genus were found (26 to 250 CFU·g-1), and as for another genus of plant pathogenic fungi, Alternaria, their count was rather low (0 to 9 CFU·g-1, herewith in 46 samples out of 100 they were absent.

  15. Gut physiology mediates a trade-off between adaptation to malnutrition and susceptibility to food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Chakrabarti, Sveta; Babin, Aurelie; Kolly, Sylvain; Lemaitre, Bruno; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2015-10-01

    The animal gut plays a central role in tackling two common ecological challenges, nutrient shortage and food-borne parasites, the former by efficient digestion and nutrient absorption, the latter by acting as an immune organ and a barrier. It remains unknown whether these functions can be independently optimised by evolution, or whether they interfere with each other. We report that Drosophila melanogaster populations adapted during 160 generations of experimental evolution to chronic larval malnutrition became more susceptible to intestinal infection with the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila. However, they do not show suppressed immune response or higher bacterial loads. Rather, their increased susceptibility to P. entomophila is largely mediated by an elevated predisposition to loss of intestinal barrier integrity upon infection. These results may reflect a trade-off between the efficiency of nutrient extraction from poor food and the protective function of the gut, in particular its tolerance to pathogen-induced damage. © 2015 The Authors Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  16. Detection of food-borne pathogens by nanoparticle technology coupled to a low-cost cell reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiseux, Isabelle; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Gallant, Pascal; Bourqui, Pascal; Cao, Honghe; Vernon, Marci; Johnson, Roger; Chen, Shu; Mermut, Ozzy

    2010-02-01

    The detection, identification and quantification of pathogenic microorganisms at low cost are of great interest to the agro-food industry. We have developed a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific method for detection of food-borne pathogens based on use of nanoparticles alongside a low cost fluorescence cell reader for the bioassay. The nanoparticles are coupled with antibodies that allow specific recognition of the targeted Listeria in either a liquid or food matrix. The bioconjugated nanoparticles (FNP) contain thousands of dye molecules enabling significant amplification of the fluorescent signal emitted from each bacterium. The developed fluorescence Cell Reader is an LED-based reader coupled with suitable optics and a camera that acquires high resolution images. The dedicated algorithm allowed the counting of each individual nanoparticles-fluorescent bacterial cells thus enabling highly sensitive reading. The system allows, within 1 hour, the recovery and counting of 104 to 108 cfu/mL of Listeria in pure culture. However, neither the Cell Reader nor the algorithm can differentiate between the FNPs specifically-bound to the target and the residual unbound FNPs limiting sensitivity of the system. Since FNPs are too small to be washed in the bioassay, a dual tagging approach was implemented to allow online optical separation of the fluorescent background caused by free FNPs.

  17. Evaluation of methyl bromide alternatives efficacy against soil-borne pathogens, nematodes and soil microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Xie

    Full Text Available Methyl bromide (MB and other alternatives were evaluated for suppression of Fusarium spp., Phytophthora spp., and Meloidogyne spp. and their influence on soil microbial communities. Both Fusarium spp. and Phytophthora spp. were significantly reduced by the MB (30.74 mg kg-1, methyl iodide (MI: 45.58 mg kg-1, metham sodium (MS: 53.92 mg kg-1 treatments. MS exhibited comparable effectiveness to MB in controlling Meloidogyne spp. and total nematodes, followed by MI at the tested rate. By contrast, sulfuryl fluoride (SF: 33.04 mg kg-1 and chloroform (CF: 23.68 mg kg-1 showed low efficacy in controlling Fusarium spp., Phytophthora spp., and Meloidogyne spp. MB, MI and MS significantly lowered the abundance of different microbial populations and microbial biomass in soil, whereas SF and CF had limited influence on them compared with the control. Diversity indices in Biolog studies decreased in response to fumigation, but no significant difference was found among treatments in PLFA studies. Principal component and cluster analyses of Biolog and PLFA data sets revealed that MB and MI treatments greatly influenced the soil microbial community functional and structural diversity compared with SF treatment. These results suggest that fumigants with high effectiveness in suppressing soil-borne disease could significantly influence soil microbial community.

  18. Individual Patterns in Blood-Borne Indicators of Fatigue-Trait or Chance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Ross; Meyer, Tim; Fullagar, Hugh H K; Skorski, Sabrina; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Hecksteden, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Julian, R, Meyer, T, Fullagar, HHK, Skorski, S, Pfeiffer, M, Kellmann, M, Ferrauti, A, and Hecksteden, A. Individual patterns in blood-borne indicators of fatigue-trait or chance. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 608-619, 2017-Blood-borne markers of fatigue such as creatine kinase (CK) and urea (U) are widely used to fine-tune training recommendations. However, predictive accuracy is low. A possible explanation for this dissatisfactory characteristic is the propensity of athletes to react to different patterns of fatigue indicators (e.g., predominantly muscular [CK] or metabolic [U]). The aim of the present trial was to explore this hypothesis by using repetitive fatigue-recovery cycles. A total of 22 elite junior swimmers and triathletes (18 ± 3 years) were monitored for 9 weeks throughout 2 training phases (low-intensity, high-volume [LIHV] and high-intensity, low-volume [HILV] phases). Blood samples were collected each Monday (recovered) and Friday (fatigued) morning. From measured values of CK, U, free-testosterone (FT), and cortisol (C) as determined in the rested and fatigued state, respectively, Monday-Friday differences (Δ) were calculated and classified by magnitude before calculation of ratios (ΔCK/ΔU and ΔFT/ΔC). Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated as group-based estimates of reproducibility. Linear mixed modeling was used to differentiate inter- and intraindividual variability. Consistency of patterns was analyzed by comparing with threshold values (1.1 for all weeks). Reproducibility was very low for fatigue-induced changes (CV ≥ 100%) with interindividual variation accounting for 45-60% of overall variability. Case-wise analysis indicated consistent ΔCK/ΔU patterns for 7 individuals in LIHV and 7 in HILV; 5 responded consistently throughout. For ΔFT/ΔC the number of consistent patterns was 2 in LIHV and 3 in HILV. These findings highlight the potential value of an individualized and multivariate approach in the assessment of fatigue.

  19. Nanostructured Electrochemical Biosensors for Label-Free Detection of Water- and Food-Borne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reta, Nekane; Saint, Christopher P; Michelmore, Andrew; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2018-02-21

    The emergence of nanostructured materials has opened new horizons in the development of next generation biosensors. Being able to control the design of the electrode interface at the nanoscale combined with the intrinsic characteristics of the nanomaterials engenders novel biosensing platforms with improved capabilities. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive and critical overview of the latest trends in emerging nanostructured electrochemical biosensors. A detailed description and discussion of recent approaches to construct label-free electrochemical nanostructured electrodes is given with special focus on pathogen detection for environmental monitoring and food safety. This includes the use of nanoscale materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, nanoparticles, and nanosheets as well as porous nanostructured materials including nanoporous anodic alumina, mesoporous silica, porous silicon, and polystyrene nanochannels. These platforms may pave the way toward the development of point-of-care portable electronic devices for applications ranging from environmental analysis to biomedical diagnostics.

  20. Inactivation of food-borne pathogens by combined high hydrostatic pressure and irradiation- a model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamat, Anu; Thomas, Paul; Kesavan, P.C.; Fotedar, R.

    1997-01-01

    Application of radiation or high pressure as a food processing method is comparatively recent development in food industry. To investigate the response to hydrostatic pressure, cells of pathogens at logarithmic phase were exposed to 200 MPa for various time intervals in saline as model system. The cells of Salmonella were observed to be most sensitive whereas Listeria monocytogenes were most resistant as revealed by 7 and 2 log cycle inactivation respectively in 10 min. The cells of Bacillus cereus and Yersinia enterocolitica showed 3 long cycles reduction by the same treatment. Bacterial spores because of their resistant nature, are inactivated only at high radiation doses, which are technologically unfeasible. Studies carried out to examine the effectiveness of combination of pressure and radiation clearly suggested that combination treatment given in either sequence reduces the bacterial spore load more effectively than the individual treatment per se. (author)

  1. Emergence of a plasmid-borne multidrug resistance gene cfr(C) in foodborne pathogen Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yizhi; Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Wu, Zuowei; Liu, Mingyuan; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-06-01

    To identify and characterize a novel cfr variant that recently emerged and confers multidrug resistance in Campylobacter , a major foodborne pathogen. WGS was initially used to identify the cfr (C) gene in Campylobacter isolates and its function was further verified by cloning into an antibiotic-susceptible Campylobacter jejuni strain. Distribution of cfr (C) in various Campylobacter isolates was determined by PCR analysis. Genotyping of cfr (C)-positive strains was done by PFGE and MLST. The cfr (C) gene is predicted to encode a protein that shares 55.1% and 54.9% identity with Cfr and Cfr(B), respectively. cfr (C) was located on a conjugative plasmid of ∼48 kb. Cloning of cfr (C) into C. jejuni NCTC 11168 and conjugative transfer of the cfr (C)-containing plasmid confirmed its role in conferring resistance to phenicols, lincosamides, pleuromutilins and oxazolidinones, and resulted in an 8-256-fold increase in their MICs in both C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli . The cfr (C) gene was detected in multiple C. coli (34 of 344; 10%) isolates derived from different cattle farms in different states, and molecular typing of the cfr (C)-positive C. coli isolates revealed its spread mainly via clonal expansion. These results identify cfr (C) as a new multidrug resistance mechanism in Campylobacter and suggest the potential transmission of this mechanism via the foodborne route, warranting enhanced efforts to monitor its spread in Campylobacter and other foodborne pathogens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Whole blood pathogen reduction technology and blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review with regional discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Nkohkwo, Asa?ah; Agbor, Gabriel; Asongalem, Emmanuel; Tagny, Claude; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite vast improvements in transfusion services in sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade, there remain serious concerns on the safety and adequacy of the blood supply across the region. Objective: This review paper ascertains the role of pathogen reduction technology (PRT) in improving blood safety and supply adequacy in the region. Method: The state of blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa was reviewed. Meetings, seminars and correspondence were undertaken with key clinic...

  3. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses inhibit effective immune responses of human blood-derived macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Friesenhagen, Judith; Boergeling, Yvonne; Hrincius, Eike; Ludwig, Stephan; Roth, Johannes; Viemann, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Human blood-derived macrophages are non-permissive for influenza virus propagation, and fail to elicit inflammatory and antiviral responses upon infection with high pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  4. Early Determinants of Blood Pressure and Renal Function: Follow-up of very preterm born individuals until young adulcy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Keijzer-Veen (Mandy)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, the studies described in this thesis suggest that premature birth affects renal function and blood pressure at (young) adult age, and especially when born both SGA and premature. Minor differences are already detectable at young adult age. The biological mechanism is

  5. Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klamer, A; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, D M

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from...

  6. Anaerobic digestion in mesophilic and room temperature conditions: Digestion performance and soil-borne pathogen survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Le; Jian, Shanshan; Bi, Jinhua; Li, Yunlong; Chang, Zhizhou; He, Jian; Ye, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plant waste (TPW) was used as the feedstock of a batch anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion on Ralstonia solanacearum and Phytophthora capsici survival. Batch experiments were carried out for TS (total solid) concentrations of 2%, 4% and 6% respectively, at mesophilic (37±1°C) and room (20-25°C) temperatures. Results showed that higher digestion performance was achieved under mesophilic digestion temperature and lower TS concentration conditions. The biogas production ranged from 71 to 416L/kg VS (volatile solids). The inactivation of anaerobic digestion tended to increase as digestion performance improved. The maximum log copies reduction of R. solanacearum and P. capsici detected by quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) were 3.80 and 4.08 respectively in reactors with 4% TS concentration at mesophilic temperatures. However, both in mesophilic and room temperature conditions, the lowest reduction of R. solanacearum was found in the reactors with 6% TS concentration, which possessed the highest VFA (volatile fatty acid) concentration. These findings indicated that simple accumulation of VFAs failed to restrain R. solanacearum effectively, although the VFAs were considered poisonous. P. capsici was nearly completely dead under all conditions. Based on the digestion performance and the pathogen survival rate, a model was established to evaluate the digestate biosafety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Development of a novel approach for the production of dried genomic DNA for use as standards for qualitative PCR testing of food-borne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapmann, S.; Catalani, P.; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    , Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica were used to produce genomic DNA (gDNA). These preparations gave support to method development for qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection methods for food-borne pathogens. Purified gDNA was transformed into stable and dry gDNA by using...

  8. A multicentre molecular analysis of hepatitis B and blood-borne virus coinfections in Viet Nam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Dunford

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B (HBV infection is endemic in Viet Nam, with up to 8.4 million individuals estimated to be chronically infected. We describe results of a large, multicentre seroepidemiological and molecular study of the prevalence of HBV infection and blood-borne viral coinfections in Viet Nam. Individuals with varying risk factors for infection (n = 8654 were recruited from five centres; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. A mean prevalence rate of 10.7% was observed and levels of HBsAg were significantly higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (17.4%, n = 174/1000 and dialysis patients (14.3%, n = 82/575 than in lower-risk groups (9.4%; p<0.001. Coinfection with HIV was seen in 28% of HBV-infected IDUs (n = 49/174 and 15.2% of commercial sex workers (CSWs; n = 15/99. HCV infection was present in 89.8% of the HBV-HIV coinfected IDUs (n = 44/49 and 40% of HBV-HIV coinfected CSWs (n = 16/40. Anti-HDV was detected in 10.7% (n = 34/318 of HBsAg positive individuals. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV S gene (n = 187 showed a predominance of genotype B4 (82.6%; genotypes C1 (14.6%, B2 (2.7% and C5 (0.5% were also identified. The precore mutation G1896A was identified in 35% of all specimens, and was more frequently observed in genotype B (41% than genotype C (3%; p<0.0001. In the immunodominant 'a' region of the surface gene, point mutations were identified in 31% (n = 58/187 of sequences, and 2.2% (n = 4/187 and 5.3% (n = 10/187 specimens contained the major vaccine escape mutations G145A/R and P120L/Q/S/T, respectively. 368 HBsAg positive individuals were genotyped for the IL28B SNP rs12979860 and no significant association between the IL28B SNP and clearance of HBsAg, HBV viral load or HBeAg was observed. This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV infection in Viet Nam and also highlights the significant levels of blood-borne virus coinfections, which have important implications for hepatitis-related morbidity and development of effective

  9. [Clinical evaluation of the application of gene chip for identifying pathogens in blood cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-hai; Cheng, Ying; Chen, Li-dan; Huang, Xiao-yan; Shi, Yu-ling; He, Jie-jing; Wang, Lu-xia

    2009-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of using gene chip method to identify pathogens in blood cultures. Clinical blood samples were obtained and cultured using an automated blood culture system. A gene chip diagnostic kit was used to detect the pathogenic bacteria in these blood cultures following the procedures of target gene extraction and amplification, hybridization and result analysis. The conventional method was also used to isolate and identify the bacteria from the clinical blood cultures, and the results of the two methods were compared. In the 86 clinical blood samples, 74 were positive and 12 negative according to the conventional method, while 48 were positive and 38 negative as found by the gene chip method, showing significant differences in the results (Ppathogens in clinical blood cultures and awaits further improvement.

  10. Detection of Borrelia miyamotoi and other tick-borne pathogens in human clinical specimens and Ixodes scapularis ticks in New York State, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Danielle; Gebhardt, Linda; Prusinski, Melissa A; Meehan, Lisa J; Halse, Tanya A; Musser, Kimberlee A

    2017-03-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi (Bm) is a recently emerging bacterial agent transmitted by several species of ixodid ticks. Diagnosis of Bm infection can be challenging, as the organism is not easily cultivable. We have developed and validated a multiplex real-time PCR to simultaneously identify Bm infection and the agents causing human granulocytic anaplasmosis and human monocytic ehrlichiosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, respectively. The assay is 100% specific; highly sensitive, detecting 11 gene copies of Bm DNA in both whole blood and cerebral spinal fluid; and provides rapid results in less than two hours. A retrospective study of 796 clinical specimens collected between the years 2012 and 2014 and a prospective study of 366 clinical specimens were performed utilizing this novel assay to evaluate the frequency of Bm infection in New York State (NYS). Eight clinical specimens (1%) were found to be positive for Bm, 216 were positive for A. phagocytophilum, and 10 were positive for E. chaffeensis. Additionally, we tested 411 I. scapularis ticks collected in NYS during 2013 and 2014 in a separate multiplex real-time PCR to determine the prevalence of Bm, A. phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., and Borrelia species. Our results indicated rates of 1.5%, 27%, 19.7%, and 8.8% respectively. The ability to monitor both the frequency and geographic distribution of Bm cases and the prevalence and geographic distribution of Bm in ticks will help create a better understanding of this emerging tick-borne pathogen. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Urban Market Gardening and Rodent-Borne Pathogenic Leptospira in Arid Zones: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Garba, Madougou; Tatard, Caroline; Loiseau, Anne; Galan, Max; Kadaouré, Ibrahima; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Picardeau, Mathieu; Bertherat, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis essentially affects human following contact with rodent urine-contaminated water. As such, it was mainly found associated with rice culture, recreational activities and flooding. This is also the reason why it has mainly been investigated in temperate as well as warm and humid regions, while arid zones have been only very occasionally monitored for this disease. In particular, data for West African countries are extremely scarce. Here, we took advantage of an extensive survey of urban rodents in Niamey, Niger, in order to look for rodent-borne pathogenic Leptospira species presence and distribution across the city. To do so, we used high throughput bacterial 16S-based metabarcoding, lipL32 gene-targeting RT-PCR, rrs gene sequencing and VNTR typing as well as GIS-based multivariate spatial analysis. Our results show that leptospires seem absent from the core city where usual Leptospira reservoir rodent species (namely R. rattus and M. natalensis) are yet abundant. On the contrary, L. kirschneri was detected in Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus, two rodent species that are restricted to irrigated cultures within the city. Moreover, the VNTR profiles showed that rodent-borne leptospires in Niamey belong to previously undescribed serovars. Altogether, our study points towards the importance of market gardening in maintain and circulation of leptospirosis within Sahelian cities. In Africa, irrigated urban agriculture constitutes a pivotal source of food supply, especially in the context of the ongoing extensive urbanization of the continent. With this in mind, we speculate that leptospirosis may represent a zoonotic disease of concern also in arid regions that would deserve to be more rigorously surveyed, especially in urban agricultural settings.

  12. Urban Market Gardening and Rodent-Borne Pathogenic Leptospira in Arid Zones: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauthier Dobigny

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis essentially affects human following contact with rodent urine-contaminated water. As such, it was mainly found associated with rice culture, recreational activities and flooding. This is also the reason why it has mainly been investigated in temperate as well as warm and humid regions, while arid zones have been only very occasionally monitored for this disease. In particular, data for West African countries are extremely scarce. Here, we took advantage of an extensive survey of urban rodents in Niamey, Niger, in order to look for rodent-borne pathogenic Leptospira species presence and distribution across the city. To do so, we used high throughput bacterial 16S-based metabarcoding, lipL32 gene-targeting RT-PCR, rrs gene sequencing and VNTR typing as well as GIS-based multivariate spatial analysis. Our results show that leptospires seem absent from the core city where usual Leptospira reservoir rodent species (namely R. rattus and M. natalensis are yet abundant. On the contrary, L. kirschneri was detected in Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus, two rodent species that are restricted to irrigated cultures within the city. Moreover, the VNTR profiles showed that rodent-borne leptospires in Niamey belong to previously undescribed serovars. Altogether, our study points towards the importance of market gardening in maintain and circulation of leptospirosis within Sahelian cities. In Africa, irrigated urban agriculture constitutes a pivotal source of food supply, especially in the context of the ongoing extensive urbanization of the continent. With this in mind, we speculate that leptospirosis may represent a zoonotic disease of concern also in arid regions that would deserve to be more rigorously surveyed, especially in urban agricultural settings.

  13. Ecological factors characterizing the prevalence of bacterial tick-borne pathogens in Ixodes ricinus ticks in pastures and woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halos, Lénaïg; Bord, Séverine; Cotté, Violaine; Gasqui, Patrick; Abrial, David; Barnouin, Jacques; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2010-07-01

    Ecological changes are recognized as an important driver behind the emergence of infectious diseases. The prevalence of infection in ticks depends upon ecological factors that are rarely taken into account simultaneously. Our objective was to investigate the influences of forest fragmentation, vegetation, adult tick hosts, and habitat on the infection prevalence of three tick-borne bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Rickettsia sp. of the spotted fever group, in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks, taking into account tick characteristics. Samples of questing nymphs and adults were taken from 61 pastures and neighboring woodlands in central France. The ticks were tested by PCR of pools of nymphs and individual adults. The individual infection prevalence was modeled using multivariate regression. The highest infection prevalences were found in adult females collected in woodland sites for B. burgdorferi sensu lato and A. phagocytophilum (16.1% and 10.7%, respectively) and in pasture sites for Rickettsia sp. (8.7%). The infection prevalence in nymphs was lower than 6%. B. burgdorferi sensu lato was more prevalent in woodlands than in pastures. Forest fragmentation favored B. burgdorferi sensu lato and A. phagocytophilum prevalence in woodlands, and in pastures, the B. burgdorferi sensu lato prevalence was favored by shrubby vegetation. Both results are probably because large amounts of edges or shrubs increase the abundance of small vertebrates as reservoir hosts. The Rickettsia sp. prevalence was maximal on pasture with medium forest fragmentation. Female ticks were more infected by B. burgdorferi sensu lato than males and nymphs in woodland sites, which suggests an interaction between the ticks and the bacteria. This study confirms the complexity of the tick-borne pathogen ecology. The findings support the importance of small vertebrates as reservoir hosts and make a case for further studies in Europe on the link between the

  14. Piecewise linear approximations to model the dynamics of adaptation to osmotic stress by food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métris, Aline; George, Susie M; Ropers, Delphine

    2017-01-02

    Addition of salt to food is one of the most ancient and most common methods of food preservation. However, little is known of how bacterial cells adapt to such conditions. We propose to use piecewise linear approximations to model the regulatory adaptation of Escherichiacoli to osmotic stress. We apply the method to eight selected genes representing the functions known to be at play during osmotic adaptation. The network is centred on the general stress response factor, sigma S, and also includes a module representing the catabolic repressor CRP-cAMP. Glutamate, potassium and supercoiling are combined to represent the intracellular regulatory signal during osmotic stress induced by salt. The output is a module where growth is represented by the concentration of stable RNAs and the transcription of the osmotic gene osmY. The time course of gene expression of transport of osmoprotectant represented by the symporter proP and of the osmY is successfully reproduced by the network. The behaviour of the rpoS mutant predicted by the model is in agreement with experimental data. We discuss the application of the model to food-borne pathogens such as Salmonella; although the genes considered have orthologs, it seems that supercoiling is not regulated in the same way. The model is limited to a few selected genes, but the regulatory interactions are numerous and span different time scales. In addition, they seem to be condition specific: the links that are important during the transition from exponential to stationary phase are not all needed during osmotic stress. This model is one of the first steps towards modelling adaptation to stress in food safety and has scope to be extended to other genes and pathways, other stresses relevant to the food industry, and food-borne pathogens. The method offers a good compromise between systems of ordinary differential equations, which would be unmanageable because of the size of the system and for which insufficient data are available

  15. A nurse-led intervention improved blood-borne virus testing and vaccination in Victorian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Rebecca J; White, Bethany; Kinner, Stuart A; Stoové, Mark; Guy, Rebecca; Hellard, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    Testing is the first step in treatment and care for blood-borne viruses (BBVs) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). As new treatments for viral hepatitis emerge, it is important to document effective models for BBV/STI testing. A nurse-led intervention was implemented across three prisons in Victoria to improve BBV/STI testing. We evaluated the impact of the intervention on BBV/STI testing rates and hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination for reception prisoners. BBV/STI testing and HBV vaccination data were collected from the medical files of 100 consecutive reception prisoners at three prisons (n=300) prior to and after the intervention was implemented. BBV testing increased significantly from 21% of prisoners to 62% post-intervention. Testing for some STIs increased significantly, but remained low: 5% to 17% for chlamydia and 1% to 5% for gonorrhoea. HBV vaccination increased significantly from 2% to 19%. The nurse-led intervention resulted in substantially increased testing and vaccination, demonstrating the benefits of a concerted effort to improve BBV and STI management in correctional settings. The availability of new treatments for hepatitis C has precipitated expansion of treatment in prisons. Improving the testing rate of prisoners, the first step in the treatment cascade, will maximise the benefits. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  16. Availability of dental services for patients with blood-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellock, D J; Carlin, E M

    2002-08-01

    Dental practitioners were surveyed, using a self-completed postal questionnaire, to assess their attitudes to managing patients with blood-borne viruses (BBV) and to identify dental services available for such patients in North Nottinghamshire. Questionnaires were completed by 79 (65.3%) of the 121 practitioners from 43 (82.7%) of the 52 study practices. Previous BBV experience was reported by 44 (55.7%), 31 (39.2%), 20 (25.3%) respondents for hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), HIV, respectively. Over two-thirds would maintain existing patients with subsequently diagnosed BBV on their lists, approximately one-third would accept new BBV patients. Risk factors for BBV of homo/bisexuality and injecting drug use were not asked by 71 (89.9%) and 49 (62.0%) practitioners, respectively. Universal precautions were employed by 67 (84.8%) practitioners regardless of the patient's status and by seven practitioners for known BBV patients. The advice of the General Dental Council, British Dental Association, and the use of universal precautions are discussed.

  17. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach to investigate temperature adaptation of the food-borne pathogen Cronobacter turicensis 3032.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Paula; Grunau, Alexander; Schneider, Thomas; Hartmann, Isabel; Lehner, Angelika; Stephan, Roger; Gehrig, Peter; Grossmann, Jonas; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin

    2010-09-01

    The opportunistic food-borne pathogen Cronobacter sp. causes rare but significant illness in neonates and is capable to grow at a remarkably wide range of temperatures from 5.5 to 47 degrees C. A gel-free quantitative proteomics approach was employed to investigate the molecular basis of the Cronobacter sp. adaptation to heat and cold-stress. To this end the model strain Cronobacter turicensis 3032 was grown at 25, 37, 44, and 47 degrees C, and whole-cell and secreted proteins were iTRAQ-labelled and identified/quantified by 2-D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. While 44 degrees C caused only minor changes in C. turicensis growth rate and protein profile, 47 degrees C affected the expression of about 20% of all 891 identified proteins and resulted in a reduced growth rate and rendered the strain non-motile and filamentous. Among the heat-induced proteins were heat shock factors, transcriptional and translational proteins, whereas proteins affecting cellular morphology, proteins involved in motility, central metabolism and energy production were down-regulated. Notably, numerous potential virulence factors were found to be up-regulated at higher temperatures, suggesting an elevated pathogenic potential of Cronobacter sp. under these growth conditions. Significant alterations in the protein expression profile and growth rate of C. turicensis exposed to 25 degrees C indicate that at this temperature the organism is cold-stressed. Up-regulated gene products comprised cold-shock, DNA-binding and ribosomal proteins, factors that support protein folding and proteins opposing cold-induced decrease in membrane fluidity, whereas down-regulated proteins were mainly involved in central metabolism.

  18. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products. PMID:25473498

  19. Antimicrobial activities of commercial essential oils and their components against food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Duré, Rémi; Delcenserie, Véronique; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Clinquart, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of 15 commercial essential oils and their main components in order to pre-select candidates for potential application in highly perishable food preservation. The antibacterial effects against food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7) and food spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were tested using paper disk diffusion method, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations. Most of the tested essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria, except galangal oil. The essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, and thyme showed strong antimicrobial activities with MIC ≥ 0.125 μL/mL and MBC ≥ 0.25 μL/mL. Among tested bacteria, P. fluorescens was the most resistant to selected essential oils with MICs and MBCs of 1 μL/mL. The results suggest that the activity of the essential oils of cinnamon, oregano, thyme, and clove can be attributed to the existence mostly of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, which appear to possess similar activities against all the tested bacteria. These materials could be served as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food products.

  20. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%), limonene (11.50%), β-bourbonene (11.23%), cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%), trans-caryophyllene (1.04%), menthone (1.01%), menthol (1%), and terpinen-4-ol (0.99). The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL). Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  1. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Shahbazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS. The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%, limonene (11.50%, β-bourbonene (11.23%, cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%, trans-caryophyllene (1.04%, menthone (1.01%, menthol (1%, and terpinen-4-ol (0.99. The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL. Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  2. Evaluation of different extraction methods on antimicrobial potency of Adenium obesum stem against food borne pathogenic bacterial strains in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amzad Hossain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine and compare the effect on antimicrobial potency of crude stems extract of Adenium obesum (A. obesum by Soxhlet and maceration extraction methods. Methods: The crude extracts were prepared from the coarse samples of stems with methanol by using Soxhlet and maceration extraction methods. Both the crude extracts from two extraction methods were dissolved in water and successively extracted by different polarities solvents with increasing polarities. In vitro antimicrobial potency of different polarities crude extracts obtained from Soxhlet and maceration methods was determined by agar gel diffusion method against different food borne pathogenic bacterial strains. Results: The results for antimicrobial potency of different crude extracts were almost similar by Soxhlet and maceration and methods. The average range of inhibition potency of different polarities crude extracts was 0%-17% by Soxhlet method and inhibition potency 0%-24% by maceration method. Conclusions: These results obtained from in vitro approach give promising basic information about this plant as well as some potential crude extracts can be used for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Fructus forsythia Essential Oil and the Application of EO-Loaded Nanoparticles to Food-Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fructus forsythia essential oil (FEO with excellent antibacterial activity was rarely reported. The objective of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial activity and the antibacterial mechanism of FEO against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus in vitro. When treated FEO, the zones of inhibition (ZOI of E. coli (20.5 ± 0.25 mm and S. aureus (24.3 ± 0.21 mm were much larger than control (p < 0.05. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of FEO were 3.13 mg/mL and 1.56 mg/mL for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. The antibacterial mechanism of FEO against E. coil was due to the changes in permeability and integrity of cell membrane leading to the leakage of nucleic acids and proteins. With the superior antibacterial activity of FEO, the nano-encapsulation method has been applied in FEO. When compared to FEO and blank chitosan nanoparticles, FEO-loaded nanoparticles (chitosan to FEO of 1:1 can effectively inhibit the growth of E. coil above 90% at room temperature. It is necessary to consider that FEO and FEO-loaded nanoparticles will become promising antibacterial additives for food preservative, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications.

  4. A global assembly of adult female mosquito mark-release-recapture data to inform the control of mosquito-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, C.A.; Reiner Jr, R.C.; Perkins, T.A.; Lindsay, S.W.; Midega, J.T.; Brady, O.J.; Barker, C.M.; Reisen, W.K.; Harrington, L.C.; Takken, W.; Kitron, U.; Lloyd, A.L.; Hay, S.I.; Scott, T.W.; Smith, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogen transmission by mosquitos is known to be highly sensitive to mosquito bionomic parameters. Mosquito mark-release-recapture (MMRR) experiments are a standard method for estimating such parameters including dispersal, population size and density, survival, blood feeding frequency

  5. Exposure to vector-borne pathogens in privately owned dogs living in different socioeconomic settings in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Luciana Aguiar; Sales, Kamila Gaudêncio da Silva; Deuster, Katrin; Pollmeier, Matthias; Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2017-08-30

    This survey was conducted in four Brazilian cities, from three federative units (Pernambuco, Minas Gerais, and Federal District), representing different socioeconomic settings, to determine the presence of antibodies to or antigens and DNA of selected pathogens in privately owned dogs. From January to April 2015, blood and serum samples were collected and assayed using different tests. In particular, antibodies to Anaplasma spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and Ehrlichia spp., and antigens of Dirofilaria immitis were detected using a rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas antibodies to Babesia spp. were detected by an immunofluorescence antibody assay. Moreover, the presence of Leishmania DNA in blood samples was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, 208 (69.3%) out of 300 dogs were positive for at least one tested pathogen (intended here as antibodies, antigen or DNA, as abovementioned), with 139 (66.8%) of them being positive to two or more pathogens. No dog presented antibodies to B. burgdorferi s.l., and D. immitis antigens were detected exclusively in dogs from Pernambuco. Among positive dogs, the most common clinical signs were lymphadenomegaly (45.2%), onychogryphosis (41.3%), dermatitis (34.1%), pale mucous membranes (19.7%), weight loss (14.9%), fever (12.5%), alopecia (11.1%), and lethargy (4.8%). Tick and flea infestations were recorded in 41.7% and 29.3% of the dogs, respectively, with 49 (16.3%) dogs being co-infested by both ticks and fleas. Most of the tick- and flea-infested dogs presented high level of infestation (>10 ticks and >20 fleas). The level of tick infestation varied significantly among federative units, being highest in Minas Gerais (68.0%), followed by Pernambuco (36.0%) and Federal District (21.0%). On the other hand, the level of flea infestation was higher in Pernambuco (50.0%), followed by Minas Gerais (29.0%) and Federal District (9.0%). The number of dog owners reporting the use of

  6. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A probabilistic model in cross-sectional studies for identifying interactions between two persistent vector-borne pathogens in reservoir populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaumourin, Elise; Gasqui, Patrick; Buffet, Jean-Philippe; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoît; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations, individuals are infected more often by several pathogens than by just one. In such a context, pathogens can interact. This interaction could modify the probability of infection by subsequent pathogens. Identifying when pathogen associations correspond to biological interactions is a challenge in cross-sectional studies where the sequence of infection cannot be demonstrated. Here we modelled the probability of an individual being infected by one and then another pathogen, using a probabilistic model and maximum likelihood statistics. Our model was developed to apply to cross-sectional data, vector-borne and persistent pathogens, and to take into account confounding factors. Our modelling approach was more powerful than the commonly used Chi-square test of independence. Our model was applied to detect potential interaction between Borrelia afzelii and Bartonella spp. that infected a bank vole population at 11% and 57% respectively. No interaction was identified. The modelling approach we proposed is powerful and can identify the direction of potential interaction. Such an approach can be adapted to other types of pathogens, such as non-persistents. The model can be used to identify when co-occurrence patterns correspond to pathogen interactions, which will contribute to understanding how organism communities are assembled and structured. In the long term, the model's capacity to better identify pathogen interactions will improve understanding of infectious risk.

  8. A rapid, highly sensitive and culture-free detection of pathogens from blood by positive enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Sharma, Divya Khandige; Ragavendar, M S; Schmolke, Susanne; Huang, Yiwei; Gumbrecht, Walter; Mitra, Nivedita

    2016-12-01

    Molecular diagnostics is a promising alternative to culture based methods for the detection of bloodstream infections, notably due to its overall lower turnaround time when starting directly from patient samples. Whole blood is usually the starting diagnostic sample in suspected bloodstream infections. The detection of low concentrations of pathogens in blood using a molecular assay necessitates a fairly high starting volume of blood sample in the range of 5-10mL. This large volume of blood sample has a substantial accompanying human genomic content that interferes with pathogen detection. In this study, we have established a workflow using magnetic beads coated with Apolipoprotein H that makes it possible to concentrate pathogens from a 5.0mL whole blood sample, thereby enriching pathogens from whole blood background and also reducing the sample volume to ~200μL or less. We have also demonstrated that this method of enrichment allows detection of 1CFU/mL of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus gallinarum and Candida tropicalis from 5mL blood using quantitative PCR; a detection limit that is not possible in unenriched samples. The enrichment method demonstrated here took 30min to complete and can be easily integrated with various downstream molecular and microbiological techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of Blood Pathogens among Transfused Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the advent of 21st century technology that has resulted in the development of sophisticated equipments, blood supply is thought to be safer than ever. This study therefore, investigates the incidence and prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections in patients. The study was carried out on 55 hospitalized cohorts who ...

  10. Routine testing for blood-borne viruses in prisons: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Caroline; Pevalin, David J; O'Moore, Éamonn

    2015-12-01

    People in prison have a higher burden of blood-borne virus (BBV) infection than the general population, and prisons present an opportunity to test for BBVs in high-risk, underserved groups. Changes to the BBV testing policies in English prisons have recently been piloted. This review will enable existing evidence to inform policy revisions. We describe components of routine HIV, hepatitis B and C virus testing policies in prisons and quantify testing acceptance, coverage, result notification and diagnosis. We searched five databases for studies of both opt-in (testing offered to all and the individual chooses to have the test or not) and opt-out (the individual is informed the test will be performed unless they actively refuse) prison BBV testing policies. Forty-four studies published between 1989 and 2013 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 82% were conducted in the USA, 91% included HIV testing and most tested at the time of incarceration. HIV testing acceptance rates ranged from 22 to 98% and testing coverage from 3 to 90%. Mixed results were found for equity in uptake. Six studies reported reasons for declining a test including recent testing and fear. While the quality of evidence is mixed, this review suggests that reasonable rates of uptake can be achieved with opt-in and, even better, with opt-out HIV testing policies. Little evidence was found relating to hepatitis testing. Policies need to specify exclusion criteria and consider consent processes, type of test and timing of the testing offer to balance acceptability, competence and availability of individuals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  11. Relationship of blood and milk cell counts with mastitic pathogens in Murrah buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to see the effect of mastitic pathogens on the blood and milk counts of Murrah buffaloes. Milk and blood samples were collected from 9 mastitic Murrah buffaloes. The total leucocyte Counts (TLC and Differential leucocyte counts (DLC in blood were within normal range and there was a non-significant change in blood counts irrespective of different mastitic pathogens. Normal milk quarter samples had significantly (P<0.01 less Somatic cell counts (SCC. Lymphocytes were significantly higher in normal milk samples, whereas infected samples had a significant increase (P<0.01 in milk neutrophils. S. aureus infected buffaloes had maximum milk SCC, followed by E. coli and S. agalactiae. Influx of neutrophils in the buffalo mammary gland was maximum for S. agalactiae, followed by E.cli and S. aureus. The study indicated that level of mastitis had no affect on blood counts but it influenced the milk SCC of normal quarters.

  12. The use of nanoscale visible light-responsive photocatalyst TiO2-Pt for the elimination of soil-borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Exposure to the soil-borne pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia cenocepacia can lead to severe infections and even mortality. These pathogens exhibit a high resistance to antibiotic treatments. In addition, no licensed vaccine is currently available. A nanoscale platinum-containing titania photocatalyst (TiO(2-Pt has been shown to have a superior visible light-responsive photocatalytic ability to degrade chemical contaminants like nitrogen oxides. The antibacterial activity of the catalyst and its potential use in soil pathogen control were evaluated. Using the plating method, we found that TiO(2-Pt exerts superior antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli compared to other commercially available and laboratory prepared ultraviolet/visible light-responsive titania photocatalysts. TiO(2-Pt-mediated photocatalysis also affectively eliminates the soil-borne bacteria B. pseudomallei and B. cenocepacia. An air pouch infection mouse model further revealed that TiO(2-Pt-mediated photocatalysis could reduce the pathogenicity of both strains of bacteria. Unexpectedly, water containing up to 10% w/v dissolved soil particles did not reduce the antibacterial potency of TiO(2-Pt, suggesting that the TiO(2-Pt photocatalyst is suitable for use in soil-contaminated environments. The TiO(2-Pt photocatalyst exerted superior antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens, including B. pseudomallei and B. cenocepacia. Soil particles (<10% w/v did not significantly reduce the antibacterial activity of TiO(2-Pt in water. These findings suggest that the TiO(2-Pt photocatalyst may have potential applications in the development of bactericides for soil-borne pathogens.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Piper nigrum L. and Cassia didymobotyra L. leaf extract on selected food borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Sayeed Akthar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activity of leaf extract of Piper nigrum (P. nigrum and Cassia didymobotyra (C. didymobotyra (aqueous, methanol, ethanol and petroleum ether against the food borne pathogenic bacteria [Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa] and fungi [Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans (C. albicans] and also to investigate the presence of various phytochemicals in the leaf extracts of tested plants. Methods: The antimicrobial activity was determined by disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, minimum bactericidal and fungicidal concentration were determined by serial dilution method. Results: Methanol leaf extract of test plants exhibited greater antimicrobial activity against the selected bacterial and fungal strains. The MIC results showed that ethanol, methanol and petroleum ether leaf extract of P. nigrum inhibited the growth of S. aureus and E. coli at concentration of 12.5 mg/mL. While, ethanol and methanol leaf extracts of C. didymobotyra inhibited the growth of S. aureus at concentration of 6.25 mg/mL. The MIC values for ethanol, methanol and petroleum ether leaf extract of P. nigrum inhibited the growth of C. albicans at concentration of 25.0 mg/mL. While, it was reported that at concentration of 12.5 mg/mL methanol leaf extract of P. nigrum was against the Aspergillus spp. The MIC values of methanol leaf extract of C. didymobotyra inhibited the growth of C. albicans and Aspergillus spp. at concentration of 12.5 mg/mL and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration of ethanol, methanol leaf extract of P. nigrum for E. coli and ethanol, methanol leaf extract of C. didymobotyra for S. aureus was recorded at concentration 12.5 mg/mL. The minimum fungicidal concentration of ethanol and methanol leaf extract of P. nigrum and C. didymobotyra on C. albicans was recorded at concentration of 25.0 mg

  14. Prevalence of ticks and tick-borne pathogens: Babesia and Borrelia species in ticks infesting cats of Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Saran; Abdullah, Swaid; Helps, Chris; Tasker, Séverine; Newbury, Hannah; Wall, Richard

    2017-09-15

    In a study of tick and tick-borne pathogen prevalence, between May and October 2016, 278 veterinary practices in Great Britain examined 1855 cats. Six-hundred and one cats were found to have attached ticks. The most frequently recorded tick species was Ixodes ricinus (57.1%), followed by Ixodes hexagonus (41.4%) and Ixodes trianguliceps (1.5%). Male cats, 4-6 years of age living in rural areas were most likely to be carrying a tick; hair length and tick treatment history had no significant association with attachment. For cats that were parasitized by ticks in large urban areas, I. hexagonus was the most frequent species recorded. Molecular analysis was possible for 541 individual tick samples, others were too damaged for analysis; Babesia spp., and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato were identified in 1.1% (n=6) and 1.8% (n=10) of these, respectively. Babesia spp. included Babesia vulpes sp. nov./Babesia microti-like (n=4) in I. hexagonus and Babesia venatorum (n=2) in I. ricinus. Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. species included Borrelia garinii (n=6) and Borrelia afzelii (n=4). The majority of B. burgorferi s.l. cases were found in I. ricinus, with B. afzelii in one I. hexagonus nymph. No Borrelia or Babesia spp. were present in I. trianguliceps. To determine a true prevalence for ticks on cats, practices that only submitted questionnaires from cats with ticks and practices that submitted fewer than 5 returns per week were removed; amongst those considered to have adhered strictly to the collection protocol, feline tick prevalence amongst cats that had access to the outdoors was 6.6%. These results show that ticks can be found on cats throughout Great Britain, which harbour a range of species of Babesia and B. burgdorferi s.l. and that cats, particularly in green spaces within urban areas, may form an important host for I. hexagonus, a known vector of pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of aerobic and anaerobic vegetative growth of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus F4430/73 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Eric; Duport, Catherine; Zigha, Assia; Schmitt, Philippe

    2005-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that is still poorly characterized metabolically. In this study, the aerobic vegetative growth and anaerobic vegetative growth of the food-borne pathogen B. cereus F4430/73 strain were compared with those of the genome-sequenced ATCC14579 strain using glucose and glycerol as fermentative and nonfermentative carbon sources, respectively. Uncontrolled batch cultures on several defined media showed that B. cereus strains had high amino acid or pyruvate requirements for anaerobic fermentative growth. In addition, growth performance was considerably improved by maintaining the pH of the culture medium near neutrality. Spectra of fermentation by-products were typically (per mole of glucose) 0.2-0.4 acetate, 1.1-1.4 L-lactate, 0.3-0.4 formate, and 0.05-0.2 ethanol with only traces of succinate, pyruvate, and 2,3-butanediol. These spectra were drastically changed in the presence of 20 mmol nitrate x L(-1), which stimulated anaerobic growth. During anaerobic and aerobic respiration, the persistent production of acetate and other by-products indicated overflow metabolisms. This was especially true in glucose-grown cells for which respiratory complex III made only a minor contribution to growth. Surprisingly, oxygen uptake rates linked to the cytochrome c and quinol branches of the respiratory chain were maintained at high levels in anaerobic, respiring, or fermenting cells. Growth and metabolic features of B. cereus F4430/73 are discussed using biochemical and genomic data.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of the Antibiogramic Activities of the Seeds of Myristica fragrans on Food Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emefo, O. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Foodborne diseases have been shown to have direct impact on the health and welfare of a large number of the world population. The in vitro antibiogramic properties of natural spices (Myristica fragrans on common food borne pathogen became necessary both in improving food safety and development of new drugs. Methodology and Results: Test isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected from the culture collection unit of the department of Microbiology, Benson Idahosa University, Nigeria. Seeds of M. fragrans were extracted by soxhlet extractor using ethanol and water, while the oil was obtained by steam distillation. The extracts and oil were tested against the bacterial isolates using agar well diffusion method at varying concentration (12.5, 25, 50 and 100 mg/mL. The oil of M. fragrans was found to have the highest antibiogramic activity on the selected isolates, followed by its ethanolic extract with zones of inhibition ranging from 0-24 mm and 0-16 mm respectively. The aqueous extract of M. fragrans was found to be effective against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis only at 100 mg/mL. The MIC was also higher in oil extract of M. fragrans compared to its ethanolic and aqueous extracts. Conclusion, Significance and Impact of study: The oil and aqueous extract of M. fragrans showed antibiogramic properties against the bacterial isolates used at different concentrations. Thus, its oil can be used as an alternative to synthetic food preservative found to harbor toxic effects and could also serve as sources for development of new antibiotics.

  17. Novel Drug Targets for Food-Borne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni: An Integrated Subtractive Genomics and Comparative Metabolic Pathway Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2015-07-01

    Campylobacters are a major global health burden and a cause of food-borne diarrheal illness and economic loss worldwide. In developing countries, Campylobacter infections are frequent in children under age two and may be associated with mortality. In developed countries, they are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea in early adulthood. In the United States, antibiotic resistance against Campylobacter is notably increased from 13% in 1997 to nearly 25% in 2011. Novel drug targets are urgently needed but remain a daunting task to accomplish. We suggest that omics-guided drug discovery is timely and worth considering in this context. The present study employed an integrated subtractive genomics and comparative metabolic pathway analysis approach. We identified 16 unique pathways from Campylobacter when compared against H. sapiens with 326 non-redundant proteins; 115 of these were found to be essential in the Database of Essential Genes. Sixty-six proteins among these were non-homologous to the human proteome. Six membrane proteins, of which four are transporters, have been proposed as potential vaccine candidates. Screening of 66 essential non-homologous proteins against DrugBank resulted in identification of 34 proteins with drug-ability potential, many of which play critical roles in bacterial growth and survival. Out of these, eight proteins had approved drug targets available in DrugBank, the majority serving crucial roles in cell wall synthesis and energy metabolism and therefore having the potential to be utilized as drug targets. We conclude by underscoring that screening against these proteins with inhibitors may aid in future discovery of novel therapeutics against campylobacteriosis in ways that will be pathogen specific, and thus have minimal toxic effect on host. Omics-guided drug discovery and bioinformatics analyses offer the broad potential for veritable advances in global health relevant novel therapeutics.

  18. Seasonal distribution of air-borne pathogenic and free-living amoebae in Mexico City and its suburbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, F.; Bonilla, P.; Ramirez, E.; Calderon, A.; Gallegos, E.; Rodriguez, S.; Ortiz, R.; Hernandez, D.; Rivera, V. (ENEP-Iztacala, Tlalnepantla (Mexico). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology)

    1994-03-01

    A survey was carried out over a one-year period to isolate amoebae suspended in the air of Mexico City and its suburbs. Sampling stations were placed at the four cardinal points of the metropolitan area. Selective media were used to culture the amoebae isolated. Specialized taxonomic keys and physical and physiological tests were used for identification, and a statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between physico-chemical and biological parameters. 108 strains were isolated, of which 19 were pathogenic via intracerebral inoculation and 9 via intranasal inoculation. Species of the genera Acanthamoeba, Vahlkampfia and Hartmannella were most abundant. Acanthamoeba polyphaga showed the highest abundance. Several times during the period of the study SO[sub 2], O[sub 3], CO NO and NO[sub 2] exceeded the permissible levels established by the Mexican government. The ability of amoebae to form cysts and cyst size were important factors for their presence, survival, abundance and diversity in the atmosphere. The main source of air-borne amoebae was the soil. Factors that favored the incidence and diversity of the isolates were wind speed and direction, low relative humidity, generation of frequent dust-storms, resuspension of amoebae by vehicular traffic, proximity to garbage dumps and large extensions of bare soil. Soil cover was a factor associated with a reduction in the incidence and diversity of the aerial amoebae. This study demonstrates that there are viable cysts of amoebae in the atmosphere of Mexico City, that may have potential importance in the case of certain kinds of human allergies and diseases. Further research is needed to find out the aerial presence of viable cysts of obligatory, amphizoic or opportunistic amoebic parasites, and to clarify the qualitative and quantitative effects of the local meteorological and physico-chemical environment on the free-living amoebae present in the atmosphere. 48 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Molecular and serological detection of tick-borne pathogens in dogs from an area endemic for Leishmania infantumin Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyla Carstens Marques de Sousa

    Full Text Available Tick-borne pathogens affect a wide range of vertebrate hosts. To identify tick-borne pathogens among dogs from Campo Grande, MS, Brazil testing seropositive for Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi, a serological and molecular study was conducted to detectEhrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia vogeli in 60 serum and spleen samples. A confirmatory diagnosis ofL. infantum based on serological and molecular assays was also performed, as was sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis to assess the identity of the parasite species infecting these animals. IgG antibodies toEhrlichia spp., B. vogeli and L. infantum were found, respectively, in 39 (65%, 49 (81.6% and 60 (100% of the sampled dogs. Twenty-seven (45%, fifty-four (90%, fifty-three (88.3%, two (3.3% and one (1.6% dog were positive, respectively, forE. canis, Leishmania spp., Leishmania donovani complex, Babesia sp. and Anaplasma sp. in PCR assays. After sequencing, the amplicons showed 99% of identity with E. canis, B. vogeli, A. platys andLeishmania chagasi isolates. The findings of this study indicate that L. infantum-seropositive dogs from Campo Grande are exposed to multiple tick-borne pathogens, which should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of dogs with clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis.

  20. A simple method for normalization of DNA extraction to improve the quantitative detection of soil-borne plant pathogenic oomycetes by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Ishiguro, Y; Kageyama, K; Zhu, Z

    2015-08-01

    Most of the current research into the quantification of soil-borne pathogenic oomycetes lacks determination of DNA extraction efficiency, probably leading to an incorrect estimation of DNA quantity. In this study, we developed a convenient method by using a 100 bp artificially synthesized DNA sequence derived from the mitochondrion NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene of Thunnus thynnus as a control to determine the DNA extraction efficiency. The control DNA was added to soils and then co-extracted along with soil genomic DNA. DNA extraction efficiency was determined by the control DNA. Two different DNA extraction methods were compared and evaluated using different types of soils, and the commercial kit was proved to give more consistent results. We used the control DNA combined with real-time PCR to quantify the oomycete DNAs from 12 naturally infested soils. Detectable target DNA concentrations were three to five times higher after normalization. Our tests also showed that the extraction efficiencies varied on a sample-to-sample basis and were simple and useful for the accurate quantification of soil-borne pathogenic oomycetes. Oomycetes include many important plant pathogens. Accurate quantification of these pathogens is essential in the management of diseases. This study reports an easy method utilizing an external DNA control for the normalization of DNA extraction by real-time PCR. By combining two different efficient soil DNA extraction methods, the developed quantification method dramatically improved the results. This study also proves that the developed normalization method is necessary and useful for the accurate quantification of soil-borne plant pathogenic oomycetes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Seroprevalence of vector-borne pathogens and molecular detection of Borrelia afzelii in military dogs from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Pita, Joana; Amaro, Ana; Amaro, Fátima; Schnyder, Manuela; Grimm, Felix; Custódio, Ana Cristina; Cardoso, Luís; Deplazes, Peter; de Carvalho, Luís Madeira

    2016-05-10

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) are increasingly being reported worldwide and represent a serious threat to both animal and public health. Military dogs may constitute a risk group for the agents causing these diseases, as they frequently work outdoors in different areas and are thus exposed to vector arthropods. In order to assess the risk of exposure of this type of dogs, a serological and molecular survey was conducted in military working dogs in Portugal. One hundred apparently healthy dogs were surveyed. Serum samples were tested for antigens of Angiostrongylus vasorum and Dirofilaria immitis; and for antibodies to A. vasorum, Anaplasma spp., Babesia spp., Ehrlichia canis, Leishmania infantum, Rickettsia spp. and Toscana virus. Serum was tested by polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato), with sequencing of the DNA products. Forty-nine per cent of the dogs were seropositive for antibodies against Rickettsia spp., 16 % for Anaplasma spp., 13 % for L. infantum, 7 % for E. canis, 5 % for A. vasorum (including 1 % positive for both antibodies and circulating antigens), 3 % for Babesia spp. and 1 % positive for Toscana virus. B. burgdorferi (s.l.) was detected in eight out of 94 dogs tested (8.5 %) and in three cases (3.2 %) nucleotide sequence analysis showed identity with the genospecies Borrelia afzelii. No positive cases were recorded for D. immitis. Overall, 66 % of the dogs were positive for at least one out of the eight tested CVBD agents, six of which are zoonotic (i.e. Anaplasma spp., Borrelia spp., E. canis, L. infantum, Rickettsia spp. and Toscana virus). Serological specific antibody detection against more than one CVBD agent (including molecular detection of Borrelia spp.) was recorded in 25 % of the dogs, comprising 19 % with positive reaction to two agents, 5 % to three agents and 1 % to four agents. These results reveal a high occurrence of CVBD agents in military working dogs in Portugal and highlight the

  2. Applying the theory of island biogeography to emerging pathogens: toward predicting the sources of future emerging zoonotic and vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reperant, Leslie A

    2010-03-01

    Abstract Emerging infectious diseases are recognized as increasing threats to public and animal health, global economy, and social and political stability. Climate change, environmental changes, changes in human demographics and behaviors, and the rise of global trade and travel are most-often-cited drivers for the emergence of infectious diseases in human and animal populations (Schrag and Wiener 1995 , Daszak et al. 2001 , Dobson and Foufopoulos 2001 , May et al. 2001 , Taylor et al. 2001 , Antia et al. 2003 , IOM 2003 , Kuiken et al. 2003 , Weiss and McMichael 2004 , Wolfe et al. 2005 , Woolhouse and Gowtage-Sequeria 2005 , Chomel et al. 2007 , Woolhouse and Gaunt 2007 , Jones et al. 2008 ). Emerging pathogens are more likely to be zoonotic or vector-borne with a broad host range (Daszak et al. 2000 , Taylor et al. 2001 , Woolhouse and Gowtage-Sequeria 2005 , Jones et al. 2008 ). Emerging pathogens are also more frequently RNA viruses (Woolhouse and Gowtage-Sequeria 2005 ), which may better adapt to and establish in novel host species (Antia et al. 2003 , Andre and Day 2005 , Woolhouse et al. 2005 ). Determining the factors driving disease emergence eventually aims at assisting the prediction of the future emergence of infectious diseases. However, because of the multifactorial nature of the drivers involved (IOM 2003 ), our ability to predict which pathogens may arise in human or animal populations in the future remains limited (WHO/FAO/OIE 2004 ). In particular, the ability to identify the animal reservoirs where the greatest risks to human health will originate was deemed improbable (WHO/FAO/OIE 2004 ). Applying the theory of island biogeography (MacArthur and Wilson 1967 ) to emerging pathogens identifies (i) interactions between recipient host species and species sources of pathogens (including vector species), (ii) interactions within species sources of pathogens, and (iii) interactions within recipient host species, as mechanisms directly driving disease

  3. Ticks and tick-borne pathogens in South Bohemia (Czech Republic) – Spatial variability in Ixodes ricinus abundance, Borrelia burgdorferi and tick-borne encephalitis virus prevalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hönig, Václav; Švec, P.; Halas, Petr; Vavrušková, Zuzana; Tykalová, Hana; Kilian, Patrik; Vetišková, Vendula; Dorňáková, Veronika; Štěrbová, Jarmila; Šimonová, Zuzana; Erhart, Jan; Štěrba, Ján; Golovchenko, Maryna; Rudenko, Natalia; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2015), s. 559-567 ISSN 1877-959X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/09/H026; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick * tick-borne encephalitis * ixodes ricinus * environmental factors * lyme borreliosis Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (BC-A) Impact factor: 2.690, year: 2015 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1877959X15000783/1-s2.0-S1877959X15000783-main.pdf?_tid=8785a702-8de3-11e5-bd28-00000aacb35f&acdnat=1447844587_a91b4e4d404a70fda98b06e4950edb11

  4. Blood borne infections in sport: risks of transmission, methods of prevention, and recommendations for hepatitis B vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, R; Wallace, W A

    2004-12-01

    Athletes are at risk of blood borne infections through bleeding injuries or injection of drugs with contaminated syringes. Prevention should focus on reducing non-sport associated risky behaviour, as well as dealing appropriately with bleeding injuries. The risk of transmission of hepatitis B virus is particularly high in athletes in contact and collision sports, those who live in or travel to endemic regions, injecting drug abusers, and those who practice first aid when there is no healthcare practitioner available. It is recommended that such athletes, and also adolescent athletes, should be vaccinated against the virus as a routine.

  5. Blood-borne virus transmission in healthcare settings in Ireland: review of patient notification exercises 1997-2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohue, S

    2012-01-21

    A review of patient notification exercises (PNEs) carried out in Ireland between 1997 and 2011 to investigate potential exposure to blood-borne viruses (BBVs) in healthcare settings was undertaken to inform future policy and practice. A questionnaire was sent to key informants in the health services to identify all relevant PNEs. Structured interviews were conducted with key investigators, and available documentation was examined. Ten BBV-related PNEs were identified. Despite testing over 2000 patients, only one case of transmission was found. However, in-depth local investigations before undertaking the PNEs identified six cases of healthcare-associated transmission.

  6. Design and Elementary Evaluation of a Highly-Automated Fluorescence-Based Instrument System for On-Site Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, highly-automated instrument system used for on-site detection of foodborne pathogens based on fluorescence was designed, fabricated, and preliminarily tested in this paper. A corresponding method has been proved effective in our previous studies. This system utilizes a light-emitting diode (LED to excite fluorescent labels and a spectrometer to record the fluorescence signal from samples. A rotation stage for positioning and switching samples was innovatively designed for high-throughput detection, ten at most in one single run. We also developed software based on LabVIEW for data receiving, processing, and the control of the whole system. In the test of using a pure quantum dot (QD solution as a standard sample, detection results from this home-made system were highly-relevant with that from a well-commercialized product and even slightly better reproducibility was found. And in the test of three typical kinds of food-borne pathogens, fluorescence signals recorded by this system are highly proportional to the variation of the sample concentration, with a satisfied limit of detection (LOD (nearly 102–103 CFU·mL−1 in food samples. Additionally, this instrument system is low-cost and easy-to-use, showing a promising potential for on-site rapid detection of food-borne pathogens.

  7. Whole blood pathogen reduction technology and blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review with regional discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkohkwo, Asa'ah; Agbor, Gabriel; Asongalem, Emmanuel; Tagny, Claude; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2016-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in transfusion services in sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade, there remain serious concerns on the safety and adequacy of the blood supply across the region. This review paper ascertains the role of pathogen reduction technology (PRT) in improving blood safety and supply adequacy in the region. The state of blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa was reviewed. Meetings, seminars and correspondence were undertaken with key clinicians, scientists and professional bodies in the region, including the World Health Organization's Regional Office for Africa, to examine the suitability of PRT for improving the safety of whole blood transfusion, a prevalent transfusion format in the region. Existing literature suggests that combining PRT with current blood safety measures (such as serology) would improve the safety and adequacy of the blood supply for transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa. This was echoed by the findings of the stakeholder meetings. Following a detailed appraisal of two leading PRT systems, the Mirasol ® PRT System and the Cerus S-303 System, we suggest that companies conduct comprehensive toxicological evaluation of the agents used for PRT and publish this in the scientific literature. We also recommend that the safety and efficacy of these technologies should be established in a randomised clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. The occurrence of Ixodes ricinus ticks and important tick-borne pathogens in areas with high tick-borne encephalitis prevalence in different altitudinal levels of the Czech Republic. Part I. Ixodes ricinus ticks and tick-borne encephalitis virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, M.; Danielová, V.; Kříž, B.; Růžek, Daniel; Fialová, A.; Malý, M.; Materna, J.; Pejčoch, M.; Erhart, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2016), s. 118-128 ISSN 1210-7913 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * tick-borne encephalitis virus * occurence * altitude * region * season Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  9. Blood-borne parasites in the Black Vulture Coragyps atratus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood parasites of 17 Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) were surveyed. The birds were captured from two sites- a garbage dump in Miramar, Puntarenas and a beach in Cuajiniquil, Guanacaste, of Costa Rica. Two blood smears were made per bird, stained, and examined for Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Trypanosoma, ...

  10. Absorption of milk-borne insulin-like growth factor-I into portal blood of suckling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, A F; Dvorák, B; Kling, P J; Grille, J G; Koldovský, O

    2000-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are potent mitogens that have been implicated in control of growth and development during the perinatal period. These hormones are also present in biologically significant quantities in mammalian milks. Although one site of action of these IGFs may be at the intestinal level, current information about whether they pass intact into the circulation is conflicting. To test the hypothesis that milk-borne IGFs are absorbed into blood in receptor-active form, suckling rats were given either recombinant human (rh)125I-IGF-I or -II (4 x 10(6) counts per minute [cpm]), and the activity present in portal and cardiac blood was examined at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after ingestion for presence of appropriate molecular weight peptides in these samples. In selected samples, purified radioactive samples were tested for their ability to bind competitively to crude membranes bearing IGF receptors. The results of these studies indicate that rh125I-IGF-I is absorbed in receptor-active form into the portal circulation and that maximal amounts are present 20 to 30 minutes after ingestion. Estimation of the presence of intact hormone was made on the basis of the elution profile of samples when run on gel chromatography as well as reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Isolated samples from portal blood also bound competitively to placental membranes bearing IGF receptors. In contrast, rh125I-IGF-II could not be demonstrated in receptor-active form in portal blood. Chromatography showed appropriate sized peaks with greater activity in portal than cardiac samples, but competitive binding was not appreciated. It is likely that at least milk-borne IGF-I is absorbed intact and may exert effects on liver and other peripheral tissues. In addition, this study lends further credence to the possibility of an enterohepatic circulation for IGF-I.

  11. A multiplex PCR/LDR assay for simultaneous detection and identification of the NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Mark S; Pingle, Maneesh; Das, Sanchita; Hussain, Aashiq; Ocheretina, Oksana; Charles, Macarthur; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Golightly, Linnie; Barany, Francis

    2014-06-01

    Enteric pathogens that cause gastroenteritis remain a major global health concern. The goal of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR/ligation detection reaction (LDR) assay for the detection of all NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens directly from stool specimens. To validate the PCR/LDR assay, clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp., Vibrio spp., Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were tested. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were assessed using a large number of seeded culture-negative stool specimens and a smaller set of clinical specimens from Haiti. The overall sensitivity ranged from 91% to 100% (median 100%) depending on the species. For the majority of organisms, the sensitivity was 100%. The overall specificity based on initial testing ranged from 98% to 100% depending on the species. After additional testing of discordant samples, the lowest specificity was 99.4%. PCR/LDR detected additional category B agents (particularly diarrheagenic E. coli) in 11/40 specimens from Haiti that were culture-positive for V. cholerae and in approximately 1% of routine culture-negative stool specimens from a hospital in New York. This study demonstrated the ability of the PCR/LDR assay to detect a large comprehensive panel of category B enteric bacterial pathogens as well as mixed infections. This type of assay has the potential to provide earlier warnings of possible public health threats and more accurate surveillance of food and water-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Variability of Effective Micro-organisms (EM) in bokashi and soil and effects on soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Keumchul; Diepen, van G.; Blok, W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2017-01-01

    The microbial inoculant ‘Effective Microorganisms’ (EM) has been used to promote soil fertility and plant growth in agriculture. We tested effects of commercial EM products on suppression of soil-borne diseases, microbial activity and bacterial composition in organically managed sandy soils. EM was

  13. Blood-Borne Candidatus Borrelia algerica in a Patient with Prolonged Fever in Oran, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Mouffok, Nadjet; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    To improve the knowledge base of Borrelia in north Africa, we tested 257 blood samples collected from febrile patients in Oran, Algeria, between January and December 2012 for Borrelia species using flagellin gene polymerase chain reaction sequencing. A sequence indicative of a new Borrelia sp. named Candidatus Borrelia algerica was detected in one blood sample. Further multispacer sequence typing indicated this Borrelia sp. had 97% similarity with Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and B...

  14. Prospective comparison of a PCR assay and a microbiological culture technique for identification of pathogens from blood and non-blood samples in septic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plettig, Runa; Nowak, Andreas; Balau, Veronika; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Usichenko, Taras

    2015-01-01

    Molecular amplification techniques are suggested to be a useful adjunct in early detection of pathogens in septic patients. The aim was to study the feasibility of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay compared to the standard microbiological culture (MC) technique in identification of pathogenic microorganisms from blood and non-blood samples in septic patients. Samples for pathogen identification were taken during febrile septic episodes (SE) in 54 patients with sepsis and analyzed using both MC and PCR. Semi-automated multiplex PCR, provided by Philips Medical Systems, was able to detect nine different pathogens. The accuracy of pathogen identification using PCR vs. MC as well as the time-saving effect of PCR on the potential decision-making process for antimicrobial therapy was evaluated. In a total of 258 samples taken during 87 SE, both methods yielded more pathogens from the non-blood than blood samples (87 % vs. 45 %; p = 0.002). PCR identified more pathogens than MC in the blood samples (98 vs. 21; p technique. In the non-blood samples, PCR was comparable to that of MC.

  15. Blood-borne biomarkers and bioindicators for linking exposure to health effects in environmental health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M Ariel Geer; Kormos, Tzipporah M; Pleil, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Environmental health science aims to link environmental pollution sources to adverse health outcomes to develop effective exposure intervention strategies that reduce long-term disease risks. Over the past few decades, the public health community recognized that health risk is driven by interaction between the human genome and external environment. Now that the human genetic code has been sequenced, establishing this "G × E" (gene-environment) interaction requires a similar effort to decode the human exposome, which is the accumulation of an individual's environmental exposures and metabolic responses throughout the person's lifetime. The exposome is composed of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, many of which are measurable as biomarkers in blood, breath, and urine. Exposure to pollutants is assessed by analyzing biofluids for the pollutant itself or its metabolic products. New methods are being developed to use a subset of biomarkers, termed bioindicators, to demonstrate biological changes indicative of future adverse health effects. Typically, environmental biomarkers are assessed using noninvasive (excreted) media, such as breath and urine. Blood is often avoided for biomonitoring due to practical reasons such as medical personnel, infectious waste, or clinical setting, despite the fact that blood represents the central compartment that interacts with every living cell and is the most relevant biofluid for certain applications and analyses. The aims of this study were to (1) review the current use of blood samples in environmental health research, (2) briefly contrast blood with other biological media, and (3) propose additional applications for blood analysis in human exposure research.

  16. Identification of human pathogens isolated from blood using microarray hybridisation and signal pattern recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presterl Elisabeth

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogen identification in clinical routine is based on the cultivation of microbes with subsequent morphological and physiological characterisation lasting at least 24 hours. However, early and accurate identification is a crucial requisite for fast and optimally targeted antimicrobial treatment. Molecular biology based techniques allow fast identification, however discrimination of very closely related species remains still difficult. Results A molecular approach is presented for the rapid identification of pathogens combining PCR amplification with microarray detection. The DNA chip comprises oligonucleotide capture probes for 25 different pathogens including Gram positive cocci, the most frequently encountered genera of Enterobacteriaceae, non-fermenter and clinical relevant Candida species. The observed detection limits varied from 10 cells (e.g. E. coli to 105 cells (S. aureus per mL artificially spiked blood. Thus the current low sensitivity for some species still represents a barrier for clinical application. Successful discrimination of closely related species was achieved by a signal pattern recognition approach based on the k-nearest-neighbour method. A prototype software providing this statistical evaluation was developed, allowing correct identification in 100 % of the cases at the genus and in 96.7 % at the species level (n = 241. Conclusion The newly developed molecular assay can be carried out within 6 hours in a research laboratory from pathogen isolation to species identification. From our results we conclude that DNA microarrays can be a useful tool for rapid identification of closely related pathogens particularly when the protocols are adapted to the special clinical scenarios.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Blood Disease Bacterium A2 HR-MARDI, a Pathogen Causing Banana Bacterial Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrun, Rafidah; Abu Bakar, Norliza; Laboh, Rozeita; Redzuan, Rohaiza; Bala Jaganath, Indu

    2017-06-01

    Blood disease bacterium A2 HR-MARDI was isolated from banana plants infected with banana blood disease and which were planted in Kuala Kangsar, Malaysia. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of blood disease bacterium A2 HR-MARDI, which could provide important information on the virulence mechanism of this pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Badrun et al.

  18. Pathogen inactivation of Dengue virus in red blood cells using amustaline and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Maite; Laughhunn, Andrew; Santa Maria, Felicia; Lanteri, Marion C; Stassinopoulos, Adonis; Musso, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arbovirus primarily transmitted through mosquito bite; however, DENV transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) have been reported and asymptomatic DENV RNA-positive blood donors have been identified in endemic countries. DENV is considered a high-risk pathogen for blood safety. One of the mitigation strategies to prevent arbovirus TTIs is pathogen inactivation. In this study we demonstrate that the amustaline and glutathione (S-303/GSH) treatment previously found effective against Zika virus in red blood cells (RBCs) is also effective in inactivating DENV. Red blood cells were spiked with high levels of DENV. Viral RNA loads and infectious titers were measured in the untreated control and before and after pathogen inactivation treatment of RBC samples. DENV infectivity was also assessed over five successive cell culture passages to detect any potential residual replicative virus. The mean ± SD DENV titer in RBCs before inactivation was 6.61 ± 0.19 log 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 )/mL and the mean viral RNA load was 8.42 log genome equivalents/mL. No replicative DENV was detected either immediately after completion of treatment using S-303/GSH or after cell culture passages. Treatment using S-303/GSH inactivated high levels of DENV in RBCs to the limit of detection. In combination with previous studies showing the effective inactivation of DENV in plasma and platelets using the licensed amotosalen/UVA system, this study demonstrates that high levels of DENV can be inactivated in all blood components. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  19. Arcobacter: an emerging food-borne zoonotic pathogen, its public health concerns and advances in diagnosis and control - a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramees, Thadiyam Puram; Dhama, Kuldeep; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Rathore, Ramswaroop Singh; Kumar, Ashok; Saminathan, Mani; Tiwari, Ruchi; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Arcobacter has emerged as an important food-borne zoonotic pathogen, causing sometimes serious infections in humans and animals. Newer species of Arcobacter are being incessantly emerging (presently 25 species have been identified) with novel information on the evolutionary mechanisms and genetic diversity among different Arcobacter species. These have been reported from chickens, domestic animals (cattle, pigs, sheep, horses, dogs), reptiles (lizards, snakes and chelonians), meat (poultry, pork, goat, lamb, beef, rabbit), vegetables and from humans in different countries. Arcobacters are implicated as causative agents of diarrhea, mastitis and abortion in animals, while causing bacteremia, endocarditis, peritonitis, gastroenteritis and diarrhea in humans. Three species including A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii are predominantly associated with clinical conditions. Arcobacters are primarily transmitted through contaminated food and water sources. Identification of Arcobacter by biochemical tests is difficult and isolation remains the gold standard method. Current diagnostic advances have provided various molecular methods for efficient detection and differentiation of the Arcobacters at genus and species level. To overcome the emerging antibiotic resistance problem there is an essential need to explore the potential of novel and alternative therapies. Strengthening of the diagnostic aspects is also suggested as in most cases Arcobacters goes unnoticed and hence the exact epidemiological status remains uncertain. This review updates the current knowledge and many aspects of this important food-borne pathogen, namely etiology, evolution and emergence, genetic diversity, epidemiology, the disease in animals and humans, public health concerns, and advances in its diagnosis, prevention and control.

  20. Disinfection of the Water Borne Pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Solar Photocatalysis Using Sonochemically Synthesized Reusable Ag@ZnO Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Ranjana, Neha; Misra, Ananyo Jyoti; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Mishra, Amrita; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Tripathy, Suraj K

    2017-07-10

    Water borne pathogens present a threat to human health and their disinfection from water poses a challenge, prompting the search for newer methods and newer materials. Disinfection of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive coccal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus in an aqueous matrix was achieved within 60 and 90 min, respectively, at 35 °C using solar-photocatalysis mediated by sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The efficiency of the process increased with the increase in temperature and at 55 °C the disinfection for the two bacteria could be achieved in 45 and 60 min, respectively. A new ultrasound-assisted chemical precipitation technique was used for the synthesis of Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The characteristics of the synthesized material were established using physical techniques. The material remained stable even at 400 °C. Disinfection efficiency of the Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed in the case of real world samples of pond, river, municipal tap water and was found to be better than that of pure ZnO and TiO₂ (Degussa P25). When the nanoparticle- based catalyst was recycled and reused for subsequent disinfection experiments, its efficiency did not change remarkably, even after three cycles. The sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles thus have a good potential for application in solar photocatalytic disinfection of water borne pathogens.

  1. Disinfection of the Water Borne Pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Solar Photocatalysis Using Sonochemically Synthesized Reusable Ag@ZnO Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Das

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Water borne pathogens present a threat to human health and their disinfection from water poses a challenge, prompting the search for newer methods and newer materials. Disinfection of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive coccal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus in an aqueous matrix was achieved within 60 and 90 min, respectively, at 35 °C using solar-photocatalysis mediated by sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The efficiency of the process increased with the increase in temperature and at 55 °C the disinfection for the two bacteria could be achieved in 45 and 60 min, respectively. A new ultrasound-assisted chemical precipitation technique was used for the synthesis of Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The characteristics of the synthesized material were established using physical techniques. The material remained stable even at 400 °C. Disinfection efficiency of the Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed in the case of real world samples of pond, river, municipal tap water and was found to be better than that of pure ZnO and TiO2 (Degussa P25. When the nanoparticle- based catalyst was recycled and reused for subsequent disinfection experiments, its efficiency did not change remarkably, even after three cycles. The sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles thus have a good potential for application in solar photocatalytic disinfection of water borne pathogens.

  2. Detection and identification of food-borne pathogens of the genera Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter by multiplex PCR in poultry and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, C; Hess, M

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect and differentiate food-borne pathogens of the three genera Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter in a single step procedure. One common reverse primer and three genus-specific forward primers were designed by hybridizing to the 16S rRNA of selected reference strains. Besides the species with significance as food-borne pathogens isolated from poultry meat--Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Arcobacter butzleri and Helicobacter pullorum--several other members of these genera were tested to determine the specificity of the designed multiplex PCR. In total, 20 ATCC and NCTC reference strains of Campyobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter were used to evaluate the PCR. Specific amplificates were obtained from all thermophilic species of Campylobacter as well as from species of Arcobacter and Helicobacter. No amplification product was obtained from the non-thermophilic Campylobacter, C. hyointestinalis and C. fetus. Furthermore, a total of 43 field strains of the three genera isolated from poultry, pigs, cattle and humans were investigated using this PCR. To confirm the classification of 10 H. pullorum strains the 16S rRNAs were sequenced. The developed PCR is a helpful diagnostic tool to detect and differentiate Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter isolated from poultry and poultry products.

  3. Effect of owner-controlled acaricidal treatment on tick infestation and immune response to tick-borne pathogens in naturally infested dogs from Eastern Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschnik, Michael; Feiler, Andrea; Duscher, Georg G; Joachim, Anja

    2013-03-09

    Tick-borne infections resulting from regular tick infestation in dogs are a common veterinary health problem all over the world. The application of repellent and acaricidal agents to prevent transmission of pathogens is a major protection strategy and has been proven to be highly effective in several trials under laboratory and natural conditions in dogs. Despite such promising results, many dog owners still report tick infestation in their dogs although acaricidal agents are used. Information about the current infection status and changes of the infection status regarding tick-borne diseases (TBD) in dogs treated by the owner's controlled acaricide application is lacking. In this study 30 dogs were each treated with permethrin, fipronil + S-methoprene, or served as untreated controls. Application of the acaricide was performed by the owner who decided when and how often to use the spot on preparation. Over a period of 11 months, dogs were clinically examined and sampled for antibody responses against Babesia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi s. l., and TBE virus before the study started, 6 months later and at the end of the investigation period. The permethrin acaricide was applied on average 3.40 times within the examination period, whereas the fipronil + S-methoprene medication was applied 3.03 times. Approximately 2/3 of all dogs, independent of the group, had a positive immune response to one or more pathogens. Three dogs developed clinical symptoms of canine babesiosis, all other dogs remained healthy. Individual number of ticks per dog or number of infections per dog did not correlate with the application rate, and the number of ticks per dog did not influence the number of infections per dog. As owners did not apply the acaricides regularly no influence on the number of infections could be documented although the number of ticks was clearly reduced by the application of the spot-on drugs. Clinical disease in dogs exposed to tick-borne

  4. Blood-borne parasites in the Black Vulture Coragyps atratus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    campbell

    Biodiversity, USA marianlwahl@gmail.com. Abstract. Blood parasites of 17 Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) were surveyed. The birds were captured from two sites- a garbage dump in Miramar, Puntarenas and a beach in Cuajiniquil, Guanacaste, ... Mosquitoes are the primary vectors. (Atkinson et al. 1991, Ritchie et al.

  5. Blood-borne parasites in the Black Vulture Coragyps atratus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    campbell

    parasitemia with few life stages present. Density of microfilariae was not measured - no standardized protocol for evaluation of microfilaria density exists. Microfilarial infections demonstrate high levels of periodicity in the blood stream, with the level of periodicity varying greatly by species (Kloss et al. 2003, Nogami et al.

  6. A multiscale Cauchy-Born meshfree model for deformability of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. W.; Ademiloye, A. S.; Liew, K. M.

    In normal physiological and healthy conditions, red blood cells (RBCs) deform readily as they pass through the microcapillaries and the spleen, however, upon invasion by the malaria parasite, the host RBC membrane begins to lose their deformability. In spite of the progress in understanding malaria pathogenesis, the primary mechanism responsible for the loss of deformability remains unclear. In this paper, we examine the effects of Plasmodium falciparum infection and maturation on the deformability of parasitized or infected red blood cells (iRBCs) by means of a three-dimensional (3D) multiscale red blood cell (RBC) framework. This multiscale framework is developed based on the Cauchy-Born rule and the meshfree IMLS-Ritz method. The atomistic scale strain energy density function of the RBC membrane was computed using a selected representative cell based on the membrane spectrin network. The results obtained from our numerical simulations affirm that the presence of malaria infection significantly increases the rigidity of RBC membrane. It was observed that in the trophozoite and schizont infection stages, biconcave cell geometry leads to better prediction than nearly spherical geometry in comparison with experimental studies. Furthermore, we confirm that increase in temperature also results to increased stiffening of the cell membrane. Lastly, the observed decrease in the deformability of iRBC membrane may be primarily due to the structural remodeling and changes in the microstructure of the membrane rather than the change in cell shape.

  7. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial potentials of Lactobacillus helveticus strains isolated from traditional cheese in Sinkiang China against food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xin; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Muhammad, Zafarullah; Luo, Guang-Wen; Liang, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Na-Na; Huo, Gui-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus, an obligatory hetero-fermentative LAB, is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) and is gaining popularity for application in dairy products. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a remarkable role in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria in food products, without disturbing the sensory attributes of the food. In this study, the screening of the antimicrobial potential of Lactobacillus helveticus KLDS 1.8701 against four food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43889 in vitro was inspected using the Oxford cup method and mixed culture inhibition assays. The organic acid production and antimicrobial potential of the cell-free supernatants (CFS) have been evaluated via different treatments and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analysis results revealed that KLDS 1.8701 exhibited the highest antimicrobial potential compared to other antimicrobial strains. The antimicrobial activity of KLDS 1.8701 resulted from the organic acids in the culture and CFS. From the study, it was found that carbon sources, as well as organic acid production, accelerate the antimicrobial activity of KLDS 1.8701 and the fructooligosaccharides (FOS) were considered the best for improving the proliferation of KLDS 1.8701 and supporting its antimicrobial action. Results of the mixed culture inhibition assays showed that part of the antimicrobial activity resulted from the inhibitory action of the bacteria itself in culture, and this action required cellular contact between the food-borne pathogens and KLDS 1.8701. Conversely, the results of the antimicrobial spectrum assay revealed that some Lactobacilli remained unaffected by KLDS 1.8701. KLDS 1.8701 might also be favorable for use as a supplementary starter in fermented dairy productions. Furthermore, KLDS 1.8701 could survive well under GI tract conditions

  8. Blood-Borne Candidatus Borrelia algerica in a Patient with Prolonged Fever in Oran, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Mouffok, Nadjet; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-11-01

    To improve the knowledge base of Borrelia in north Africa, we tested 257 blood samples collected from febrile patients in Oran, Algeria, between January and December 2012 for Borrelia species using flagellin gene polymerase chain reaction sequencing. A sequence indicative of a new Borrelia sp. named Candidatus Borrelia algerica was detected in one blood sample. Further multispacer sequence typing indicated this Borrelia sp. had 97% similarity with Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis. In silico comparison of Candidatus B. algerica spacer sequences with those of Borrelia hispanica and Borrelia garinii revealed 94% and 89% similarity, respectively. Candidatus B. algerica is a new relapsing fever Borrelia sp. detected in Oran. Further studies may help predict its epidemiological importance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. A serological survey of tick-borne pathogens in dogs in North America and the Caribbean as assessed by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys, Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, and Borrelia burgdorferi species-specific peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Qurollo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tick-borne pathogens cause a spectrum of disease manifestations in both dogs and humans. Recognizing regional and temporal shifts in exposure are important as tick distributions change. To better delineate regional exposure to canine tick-borne pathogens, an expanded set of species-specific peptides were used to detect Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Aph, Anaplasma platys (Apl, Ehrlichia canis (Ec, Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Ech, Ehrlichia ewingii (Eew, and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb antibodies in canine serum. Methods: Archived canine serum samples (n=6,582 collected during 2008–2010 and in 2012 from the US, Canada, and the Caribbean were retrospectively screened for antibodies against Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species-specific peptides. Overall, regional and temporal seroprevalence rates were determined. Results: Overall Bb and Eew were the most seroprevalent pathogens. During 2008–2010, seroprevalence rates increased overall for Aph and Ech, and regionally, Bb and Aph seroprevalence rates increased in the South. Canada had unexpectedly high seroprevalence rates for Ec and Apl. The most common co-exposures were Eew+Ech, followed by Aph+Bb and Eew+Bb. Conclusions: This study demonstrated significant shifts in canine vector-borne disease seroprevalence rates. The use of specific peptides facilitated improved geographic delineation of tick-borne pathogen distributions among dogs, which may enhance epidemiological surveillance of vector-borne pathogens shared by dogs and humans.

  10. Blood transfusion transmission of the tick-borne relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Peter J; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Steeves, Tanner K; Fish, Durland

    2015-03-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a recently discovered relapsing fever spirochete, occurs in hard-bodied ticks wherever Lyme disease is endemic. Human infection is associated with relapsing fever and can cause meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. A few cases of transfusion transmission of other relapsing fever spirochete species have been reported but none for B. miyamotoi. Our objective was to determine whether B. miyamotoi transfusion transmission could occur in a murine transfusion model. Herein, we report transfusion transmission of B. miyamotoi through fresh or stored red blood cells (RBCs) in a mouse model. Inbred mice were transfused with B. miyamotoi-infected murine blood that was either freshly collected or stored for 7 days before transfusion. Recipient blood was then longitudinally examined after transfusion by smear and wet mount for evidence of spirochetemia. Motile spirochetes were observed in immunocompromised (SCID) mouse recipients for 28 days after transfusion of both fresh and stored murine B. miyamotoi-infected RBCs. Transient spirochetemia was observed in immunocompetent DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice, with spirochete clearance occurring within 5 days after transfusion. These data demonstrate that transfusion transmission of B. miyamotoi can occur in mice and suggest that it also may occur in humans. © 2014 AABB.

  11. Bactericidal activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against Staphylococcus aureus and other food borne microbial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spread of antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus strains requires the development of new anti S. aureus agents. The objective of this study was evaluating the antimicrobial activity of the food color additive Phloxine B against S. aureus and other food microbial pathogens. Our result ...

  12. Extreme Heat Resistance of Food Borne Pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium on Chicken Breast Fillet during Cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Asselt, van E.D.; Zwietering, M.H.; Nauta, M.J.; Jonge, de R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the decimal reduction times of bacteria present on chicken fillet in boiling water. The experiments were conducted with Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli. Whole chicken breast fillets were inoculated with the pathogens, stored overnight

  13. A rapid, highly sensitive and culture-free detection of pathogens from whole blood by removal of white blood cells using immuno-magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Sharma, Divya Khandige; Ms, Ragavendar; Mitra, Nivedita

    2016-08-01

    Using anti-human CD45 antibody coated beads, we show a 98% reduction of WBCs from spiked blood samples in 1h, thereby enriching it for pathogens. This enrichment allowed the detection of blood using quantitative PCR; something not observed in unenriched samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of PCR-REBA assay for screening and identifying pathogens directly in whole blood of patients with suspected sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-Y; Kim, J; Kim, S; Park, S D; Kim, H Y; Choi, H K; Uh, Y; Lee, H

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of a broad range of bacterial and fungal pathogens is the key to successful management of patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of PCR-REBA Sepsis-ID test for the detection of BSIs pathogens. EDTA anticoagulated blood for REBA Sepsis-ID assay and blood culture samples from 882 patients with suspected sepsis were simultaneously collected from January 2014 to December 2014. Of 115 patients with positive blood culture, 64 (55·7%) were Gram-positive bacteria, 35 (30·4%) were Gram-negative bacteria, 1 (0·9%) was Candida albicans and 15 (13·0%) were polymicrobial infections. The concordance rate of blood culture system and PCR-REBA Sepsis ID test was 83·0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 79·8-84·8, P pathogens by PCR-REBA revealed 81·0% (95% CI, 73·4-86·8, P pathogen by bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing. Although the sensitivity for pathogen identification was not significantly different between PCR-REBA and blood culture (P = 0·5), the combination of the two methods resulted in a significantly increased rate of pathogen detection (P = 0·002). The results of this study suggested that PCR-REBA may be helpful when added to blood culture in the diagnosis and management of sepsis. PCR-REBA Sepsis-ID test is a useful tool for the rapid identification of pathogenic isolates in whole blood to ensure adequate treatment for the causative agents of BSIs. Although the cost of molecular diagnostic assays is higher than the cost of conventional methods, clinical and economic cost-benefit analysis is still needed. PCR-REBA may provide essential information for accelerating therapeutic decisions to ensure effective treatment with antibiotics in the acute phase of pathogen infection. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Rapid and efficient clearance of blood-borne virus by liver sinusoidal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha P Ganesan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The liver removes quickly the great bulk of virus circulating in blood, leaving only a small fraction to infect the host, in a manner characteristic of each virus. The scavenger cells of the liver sinusoids are implicated, but the mechanism is entirely unknown. Here we show, borrowing a mouse model of adenovirus clearance, that nearly all infused adenovirus is cleared by the liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC. Using refined immunofluorescence microscopy techniques for distinguishing macrophages and endothelial cells in fixed liver, and identifying virus by two distinct physicochemical methods, we localized adenovirus 1 minute after infusion mainly to the LSEC (∼90%, finding ∼10% with Kupffer cells (KC and none with hepatocytes. Electron microscopy confirmed our results. In contrast with much prior work claiming the main scavenger to be the KC, our results locate the clearance mechanism to the LSEC and identify this cell as a key site of antiviral activity.

  16. Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov. (Ascomycota: Ophiostomatales), a soil-borne agent of human sporotrichosis with mild-pathogenic potential to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2016-02-01

    A combination of phylogeny, evolution, morphologies and ecologies has enabled major advances in understanding the taxonomy of Sporothrix species, including members exhibiting distinct lifestyles such as saprobes, human/animal pathogens, and insect symbionts. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS1/2 + 5.8s sequences split Sporothrix genus in two well-defined groups with dissimilar ecologies. Species embedded in the Sporothrix schenckii complex are frequently agents of human and animal sporotrichosis, and some of these are responsible for large sapronoses and zoonoses around the warmer temperate regions of the world. At the other extreme, basal saprophytic species evolved in association with decaying wood and soil, and are rarely found to cause human disease. We propose to create a new taxa, Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov., to accommodate strains collected from a clinical case of onychomycosis as well as from environmental origins in Chile. Multigene analyses based on ITS1/2 + 5.8s region, beta-tubulin, calmodulin and translation elongation factor 1α revealed that S. chilensis is a member of the Sporothrix pallida complex, and the nearest taxon is Sporothrix mexicana, a rare soil-borne species, non-pathogenic to humans. The ITS region serves as a primary barcode marker, while each one of the protein-coding loci easily recognized species boundaries providing sufficient information for species identification. A disseminated model of murine sporotrichosis revealed a mild-pathogenic potential, with lung invasion. Although S. chilensis is not a primary pathogen, accidental infection may have an impact in the immunosuppressed population. With the introduction of distinct species with similar routes of transmission but different virulence, identification of Sporothrix agents at the species level is mandatory. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Subfornical Organ Mediates Sympathetic and Hemodynamic Responses to Blood-borne Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G.; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) act upon the brain to increase blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate blood brain barrier (BBB), and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a BBB, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery (ICA) injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean BP (MBP), HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to ICA TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in MBP, HR and RSNA in response to intravenous (IV) injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. PMID:23670302

  18. Enhanced Detection of Cancer Biomarkers in Blood-Borne Extracellular Vesicles Using Nanodroplets and Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Jovel, Juan; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Lewis, John D; Zemp, Roger J

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of personalized medicine approaches will be greatly improved by the development of noninvasive methods to interrogate tumor biology. Extracellular vesicles shed by solid tumors into the bloodstream have been under recent investigation as a source of tumor-derived biomarkers such as proteins and nucleic acids. We report here an approach using submicrometer perfluorobutane nanodroplets and focused ultrasound to enhance the release of extracellular vesicles from specific locations in tumors into the blood. The released extracellular vesicles were enumerated and characterized using micro flow cytometry. Only in the presence of nanodroplets could ultrasound release appreciable levels of tumor-derived vesicles into the blood. Sonication of HT1080-GFP tumors did not increase the number of circulating tumor cells or the metastatic burden in the tumor-bearing embryos. A variety of biological molecules were successfully detected in tumor-derived extracellular vesicles, including cancer-associated proteins, mRNAs, and miRNAs. Sonication of xenograft HT1080 fibrosarcoma tumors released extracellular vesicles that contained detectable RAC1 mRNA with the highly tumorigenic N92I mutation known to exist in HT1080 cells. Deep sequencing serum samples of embryos with sonicated tumors allowed the identification of an additional 13 known heterozygous mutations in HT1080 cells. Applying ultrasound to HT1080 tumors increased tumor-derived DNA in the serum by two orders of magnitude. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced extracellular vesicle release by ultrasound stimulation and suggests that nanodroplets/ultrasound offers promise for genetic profiling of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness by stimulating the release of extracellular vesicles. Cancer Res; 77(1); 3-13. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Replication, Intracellular Trafficking, and Pathogenicity in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D.; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route. PMID

  20. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yu

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin and microtubules (Nocodazole are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002 virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1 as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5, pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Achazi, Katharina; Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route.

  2. Antibacterial activity of selenium-enriched lactic acid bacteria against common food-borne pathogens in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingpeng; Wang, Jing; Yang, Kun; Liu, Miaomiao; Qi, Yiman; Zhang, Tingjing; Fan, Mingtao; Wei, Xinyuan

    2018-03-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for human health and animal nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory activities of Se-enriched lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, against pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes in vitro. The results indicated that the accumulation amount of Se by Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus reached 12.05 ± 0.43 µg/mL and 11.56 ± 0.25 µg/mL, respectively, accompanied by the relative maximum living cells when sodium selenite was 80 µg/mL. Oxford cup double plate assay showed that bacterial culture solution and cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) from Se-enriched LAB exerted stronger antibacterial activity than those from the non-Se strains. The growth of pathogenic bacterial culture with CFCS at any growth stages was worse than that without CFCS; moreover, the inhibiting effect of CFCS of Se-enriched LAB was more significant than that of non-Se strains. Results from a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry showed that elemental Se nanoparticles, which characteristically energy peak around 1.42 keV, were deposited on the cell surfaces of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus. In addition, CFCS of Se-enriched LAB induced more serious cell structure damage of pathogenic bacteria than did non-Se LAB. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TrpA1 Regulates Defecation of Food-Borne Pathogens under the Control of the Duox Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jo Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen expulsion from the gut is an important defense strategy against infection, but little is known about how interaction between the intestinal microbiome and host immunity modulates defecation. In Drosophila melanogaster, dual oxidase (Duox kills pathogenic microbes by generating the microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS, hypochlorous acid (HOCl in response to bacterially excreted uracil. The physiological function of enzymatically generated HOCl in the gut is, however, unknown aside from its anti-microbial activity. Drosophila TRPA1 is an evolutionarily conserved receptor for reactive chemicals like HOCl, but a role for this molecule in mediating responses to gut microbial content has not been described. Here we identify a molecular mechanism through which bacteria-produced uracil facilitates pathogen-clearing defecation. Ingestion of uracil increases defecation frequency, requiring the Duox pathway and TrpA1. The TrpA1(A transcript spliced with exon10b (TrpA1(A10b that is present in a subset of midgut enteroendocrine cells (EECs is critical for uracil-dependent defecation. TRPA1(A10b heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes is an excellent HOCl receptor characterized with elevated sensitivity and fast activation kinetics of macroscopic HOCl-evoked currents compared to those of the alternative TRPA1(A10a isoform. Consistent with TrpA1's role in defecation, uracil-excreting Erwinia carotovora showed higher persistence in TrpA1-deficient guts. Taken together, our results propose that the uracil/Duox pathway promotes bacteria expulsion from the gut through the HOCl-sensitive receptor, TRPA1(A10b, thereby minimizing the chances that bacteria adapt to survive host defense systems.

  4. Profile of GenMark's ePlex® blood culture identification fungal pathogen panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubon, Danièle; Dard, Céline; Garnaud, Cécile; Cornet, Muriel

    2018-02-01

    Fungemia presents high morbi-mortality and thus rapid microbiological diagnosis may contribute to appropriate patient management. In the last decade, kits based on molecular technologies have become available and health care institutes are increasingly facing critical investment choices. Although all these tools aim to achieve rapid fungal detection and species identification, they display different inherent characteristics. Areas covered: Considering technologies allowing detection and identification of fungal species in a sepsis context, the market proposes either tests on positive blood culture or tests on patient's whole blood. In this review, the authors describe and compare the ePlex® Blood Culture Identification Fungal Pathogen (BCID-FP) test, a fully automated one-step single-use cartridge assay that has been designed to detect identify frequent or rare but emerging, fungal species, from positive blood culture. A comparison with the competing kits is provided. Expert commentaries: The ePlex BCID-FP test provides a diversified and rather relevant panel. Its easy-to-use cartridges allow flexible use around the clock. Nevertheless, prospective clinical studies assessing the time-to-result benefit on antifungal stewardship and on hospital length of stay are not available yet. New tools aim to benefit clinicians and patients, but they should be accompanied by supervision of result interpretation and adaptation of antifungal stewardship.

  5. Multiplex detection of nine food-borne pathogens by mPCR and capillary electrophoresis after using a universal pre-enrichment medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar-Rodríguez, Germán; Fernández, Javier; Marín, Laura; Muñiz, Juan; González, Isabel; Lombó, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Routine microbiological quality analyses in food samples require, in some cases, an initial incubation in pre-enrichment medium. This is necessary in order to ensure that small amounts of pathogenic strains are going to be detected. In this work, a universal pre-enrichment medium has been developed for the simultaneous growth of Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Cronobacter sakazakii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae family (38 species, 27 genera), Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. (two species, 13 strains). Growth confirmation for all these species was achieved in all cases, with excellent enrichments. This was confirmed by plating on the corresponding selective agar media for each bacterium. This GVUM universal pre-enrichment medium could be useful in food microbiological analyses, where different pathogenic bacteria must be detected after a pre-enrichment step. Following, a mPCR reaction for detection of all these pathogens was developed, after designing a set of nine oligonucleotide pairs from specific genetic targets on gDNA from each of these bacteria, covering all available strains already sequenced in GenBank for each pathogen type. The detection limits have been 1 Genome Equivalent (GE), with the exception of the Fam. Enterobacteriaceae (5 GEs). We obtained amplification for all targets (from 70 to 251 bp, depending on the bacteria type), showing the capability of this method to detect the most important industrial and sanitary food-borne pathogens from a universal pre-enrichment medium. This method includes an initial pre-enrichment step (18 h), followed by a mPCR (2 h) and a capillary electrophoresis (30 min); avoiding the tedious and long lasting growing on solid media required in traditional analysis (1–4 days, depending on the specific pathogen and verification procedure). An external testing of this method was conducted in order to compare classical and mPCR methods. This evaluation was

  6. Pathogen reduction by ultraviolet C light effectively inactivates human white blood cells in platelet products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohler, Petra; Müller, Meike; Winkler, Carla; Schaudien, Dirk; Sewald, Katherina; Müller, Thomas H; Seltsam, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Residual white blood cells (WBCs) in cellular blood components induce a variety of adverse immune events, including nonhemolytic febrile transfusion reactions, alloimmunization to HLA antigens, and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). Pathogen reduction (PR) methods such as the ultraviolet C (UVC) light-based THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system were developed to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection. As UVC light targets nucleic acids, it interferes with the replication of both pathogens and WBCs. This preclinical study aimed to evaluate the ability of UVC light to inactivate contaminating WBCs in platelet concentrates (PCs). The in vitro and in vivo function of WBCs from UVC-treated PCs was compared to that of WBCs from gamma-irradiated and untreated PCs by measuring cell viability, proliferation, cytokine secretion, antigen presentation in vitro, and xenogeneic GVHD responses in a humanized mouse model. UVC light was at least as effective as gamma irradiation in preventing GVHD in the mouse model. It was more effective in suppressing T-cell proliferation (>5-log reduction in the limiting dilution assay), cytokine secretion, and antigen presentation than gamma irradiation. The THERAFLEX UV-Platelets (MacoPharma) PR system can substitute gamma irradiation for TA-GVHD prophylaxis in platelet (PLT) transfusion. Moreover, UVC treatment achieves suppression of antigen presentation and inhibition of cytokine accumulation during storage of PCs, which has potential benefits for transfusion recipients. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Blood-borne LPS is rapidly eliminated by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells via HDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhili; Mates, Jessica M.; Cheplowitz, Alana M.; Hammer, Lindsay P.; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Phillips, Gary S.; Wewers, Mark D.; Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Robinson, John M.; Anderson, Clark L.; Ganesan, Latha P.

    2016-01-01

    During Gram-negative bacterial infections, excessive lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammation and sepsis via action on immune cells. However, the bulk of LPS can be cleared from circulation by the liver. Liver clearance is thought to be a slow process mediated exclusively by phagocytic resident macrophages, Kupffer cells (KC). However, we discovered that LPS disappears rapidly from the circulation, with a half-life of 2–4 minutes in mice and liver eliminates about three quarters of LPS from blood circulation. Using microscopic techniques, we found that ~75% of fluor-tagged LPS in liver became associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and only ~25% with KC. Notably, the ratio of LSEC-KC associated LPS remained unchanged 45 min after infusion, indicating that LSEC independently processes the LPS. Most interestingly, results of kinetic analysis of LPS bioactivity, using modified limulus amebocyte lysate assay, suggest that recombinant factor-C, an LPS binding protein, competitively inhibits HDL-mediated LPS association with LSEC early in the process. Supporting the previous notion 3 min post-infusion, 75% of infused fluorescently-tagged LPS-HDL complex associates with LSEC, suggesting that HDL facilitates LPS clearance. These results lead us to propose a new paradigm of LSEC and HDL in clearing LPS with a potential to avoid inflammation during sepsis. PMID:27534554

  8. Detection of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), in questing ticks (Ixodes ricinus), and in ticks infesting roe deer in southern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overzier, Evelyn; Pfister, Kurt; Herb, Ingrid; Mahling, Monia; Böck, Georg; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2013-06-01

    The hard tick Ixodes ricinus is the most common tick in Central Europe and plays an important role as a vector of several pathogens. In the complex life cycles of these pathogens, the role of wild animals as natural reservoirs has been discussed. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) as a potential reservoir host for Babesia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Rickettsia spp. Therefore, we explored the differences in the infection rates of roe deer and engorged and questing ticks with these pathogens from a single forest site with special attention to coinfection. Blood, spleen, and skin samples of a total of 95 roe deer individuals were screened by molecular methods for these pathogens from September 2010 to January 2012 in the 'Angelberger Forst' (Bavaria, Germany). Moreover, 331 engorged ticks from 44 roe deer individuals and 199 host-seeking ticks from the same area were screened. Altogether, the following prevalence rates and a high diversity of species were detected for the respective pathogens in individual animals and ticks: (i) Babesia spp.: roe deer, 89.5%; engorged ticks, 7.3%; questing ticks: adults, 2.5%, nymphs, 3.3%. Sequencing revealed B. venatorum, B. capreoli, and B. microti. (ii) A. phagocytophilum: roe deer 98.9%; engorged ticks, 86.1%; questing ticks: adults, 8.9%, nymphs, 0.8%. (iii) Rickettsia spp.: roe deer, 0%; engorged ticks, 16.6%; questing ticks: adults, 13.9%, nymphs, 17.5%. Sequencing revealed R. helvetica. Furthermore, several coinfections were detected in both roe deer and ticks. The high prevalence rates of B. capreoli and A. phagocytophilum in roe deer support their role as reservoir hosts for these pathogens, but no evidence for a role of roe deer in the life cycle of R. helvetica could be provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Elevations of inflammatory proteins in neonatal blood are associated with obesity and overweight among 2-year-old children born extremely premature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, Eliana M; O'Shea, T Michael; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Bose, Carl; Allred, Elizabeth N; Fichorova, Raina N; van der Burg, Jelske W; Leviton, Alan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with elevated blood concentrations of inflammation markers. It is not known to what extent inflammation precedes the development of obesity. METHODS: In a cohort of 882 infants born before 28 weeks of gestation, we examined relationships between

  10. Present status of protozoan pathogens causing water-borne disease in northern part of El-Minia Governorate, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Refaat M A; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Mosllem, Fadia A

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the role of different water supplies in the diversity and public health significance of pathogenic protozoan parasites. Most of these organisms have been ubiquitous in waters worldwide. The numbers of waterborne infections indicate a significant risk for their transmission even by drinking water. Hence, a total of 336 water samples were collected during 2009-2013 from different water sources from different areas of northern part of El-Minia Govemnorate, Egypt and were investigated for pathogenic protozoa. They were examined by direct microscopy followed by Modified Ziehl- Neelsen and Giemsa stains. 140 samples (41.7 %) were positive (statistically significant; P value Pwater supplies, followed by Blastocystis hominis (15.87%), Cyclospora caytenensis (11.9%), Entamoeba hiseolytica/dispar (8.73%) Giardia lamblia (6.35%() and Naegleria sp., (3.97%). Moreover, there were 14 samples with mixed parsitic infection: they were Cryptosporidium sp. and B. hominis in six samples, Cryptosporidum sp. and C. caytenenisin five samples and Cryptosporidium sp. and E histolytica/dispar in three samples. The most common contamninated water source was ponds where 32 samples (66.7%) were-positive followed by canal water 30 samples (62.5%). The results were discussed and the recommendations were offered.

  11. A novel pathogenic Mammalian orthoreovirus from diarrheic pigs and Swine blood meal in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmasandra Narayanappa, Athmaram; Sooryanarain, Harini; Deventhiran, Jagadeeswaran; Cao, Dianjun; Ammayappan Venkatachalam, Backiyalakshmi; Kambiranda, Devaiah; LeRoith, Tanya; Heffron, Connie Lynn; Lindstrom, Nicole; Hall, Karen; Jobst, Peter; Sexton, Cary; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2015-05-19

    Since May 2013, outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea have devastated the U.S. swine industry, causing immense economic losses. Two different swine enteric coronaviruses (porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Delta coronavirus) have been isolated from the affected swine population. The disease has been reported from at least 32 states of the United States and other countries, including Mexico, Peru, Dominican Republic, Canada, Columbia, Ecuador, and Ukraine, with repeated outbreaks in previously infected herds. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a novel mammalian orthoreovirus 3 (MRV3) from diarrheic feces of piglets from these outbreaks in three states and ring-dried swine blood meal from multiple sources. MRV3 could not be isolated from healthy or pigs that had recovered from epidemic diarrhea from four states. Several MRV3 isolates were obtained from chloroform-extracted pig feces or blood meal in cell cultures or developing chicken embryos. Biological characterization of two representative isolates revealed trypsin resistance and thermostability at 90°C. NextGen sequencing of ultrapurified viruses indicated a strong homology of the S1 segment to mammalian and bat MRV3. Neonatal piglets experimentally infected with these viruses or a chloroform extract of swine blood meal developed severe diarrhea and acute gastroenteritis with 100% mortality within 3 days postinfection. Therefore, the novel porcine MRV3 may contribute to enteric disease along with other swine enteric viruses. The role of MRV3 in the current outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea in the United States remains to be determined, but the pathogenic nature of the virus warrants further investigations on its epidemiology and prevalence. Porcine orthoreoviruses causing diarrhea have been reported in China and Korea but not in the United States. We have isolated and characterized two pathogenic reassortant MRV3 isolates from swine fecal samples from porcine epidemic diarrhea outbreaks

  12. Willingness to care for blood-borne virus-infected patients in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, T; Wada, K; Arphorn, S; Smith, D R

    2018-03-05

    Although stigma and discrimination by nurses against patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been reported, potential determinants of nurses' willingness to care for these patients have not been well studied in Thailand. To identify factors associated with Thai nurses' willingness to care for patients infected with HIV or HCV. Multivariable logistic regression analysis of data from a questionnaire completed by nurses at a large hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Of 626 nurses, 546 (87%) nurses participated. Eleven per cent (59) and 6% (34) had previously experienced HIV- or HCV-infected blood contamination incidents, respectively. Forty-four per cent (240) and 38% (208) reported unwillingness to care for HIV- or HCV-infected patients, respectively. Willingness to care was less common [adjusted odds ratios 0.51 (0.34-0.74) for HIV and 0.62 (0.42-0.89) for HCV] in nurses aged ≥ 40 years and in those who feared HCV [0.63 (0.37-0.99)], but not HIV [0.84 (0.5-1.26)] transmission. Nurses who had confidence in protecting themselves against infection with HIV [1.84 (1.52-2.04)] and HCV [1.87 (1.45-2.18)], and accepting attitudes towards HIV-infected co-workers [1.39 (1.08-1.66)] but not HCV-infected co-workers [1.16 (0.83-1.5)], were more willing to care for HIV- and HCV-infected patients. Around 4 in 10 Thai nurses in our sample were unwilling to care for HIV- or HCV-infected patients. Minimizing the risk of nosocomial transmission and improving the public perception of infected individuals may help improve nurses' willingness to care for such patients, in Thailand or elsewhere.

  13. Tick (Amblyomma chabaudi) infestation of endemic tortoises in southwest Madagascar and investigation of tick-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Julian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U; Silaghi, Cornelia; Krüger, Andreas; Pothmann, Daniela; Ratovonamana, R Yedidya; Veit, Alexandra; Keller, Christian; Poppert, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the role of endemic ticks as vectors for bacterial and protozoan pathogens for animals and humans in Madagascar and their interaction in anthropogenic habitats where humans, their livestock and native Malagasy species (vectors and hosts) come into more frequent contact than in natural forest ecosystems. The aims of the study were (1) to test whether habitat degradation is associated with increased infestation of tortoises by ticks and (2) to investigate whether ticks carried Babesia, Borrelia or Rickettsia species that might be pathogenic for humans and livestock. We studied hard ticks of two endemic Malagasy tortoises, Astrochelys radiata and Pyxis arachnoides in March and April 2013 in southwest Madagascar. Two tortoise habitats were compared, the National Park of Tsimanampetsotsa and the adjacent degraded pasture and agricultural land at the end of the wet season. Ticks were screened for protozoan and bacterial pathogens via PCR on DNA isolated from ticks using genus-specific primers. Only one out of 42 A. radiata collected from both habitats had ticks. The low prevalence did not allow further analyses of the effect of habitat degradation. Forty-two P. arachnoides were found in the anthropogenic habitat and 36 individuals in the national park. Tick infestation rates of P. arachnoides differed significantly between the two study sites. Tortoises inside the park had lower tick prevalence than outside (8 of 36 (22%) versus 32 of 42 individuals (76%)) and infected animals tended to have fewer ticks inside than outside the park. All ticks collected in both habitats were adults of the ixodid tick Amblyomma chabaudi, which is supposed to be a host-specific tick of P. arachnoides. Screening for Borrelia sp. and Babesia sp. was negative in all ticks. But all A. chabaudi ticks were infected with Rickettsia africae, known to cause spotted fever in humans. Thus, habitat degradation seems to be linked to higher infestation of tortoises with ticks with

  14. The effectiveness of riboflavin and ultraviolet light pathogen reduction technology in eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi from leukoreduced whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Girona-Llobera, Enrique; Alcover, M Magdalena; Riera, Cristina; Fisa, Roser

    2017-06-01

    The parasitic Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by insect vectors. Other infection routes, both in endemic and in nonendemic areas, include organ and marrow transplantation, congenital transmission, and blood transfusion. Asymptomatic chronic chagasic individuals may have a low and transient parasitemia in peripheral blood and, consequently, they can unknowingly transmit the disease via blood transfusion. Riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light pathogen reduction is a method to reduce pathogen transfusion transmission risk based on damage to the pathogen nucleic acids. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of this technology for the elimination of T. cruzi parasites in artificially contaminated whole blood units (WBUs) and thus for decreasing the risk of T. cruzi transfusion transmission. The contaminated WBUs were leukoreduced by filtration and treated with riboflavin and UV light. The level of pathogen reduction was quantified by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as a viability assay. The RNA (cDNA) quantification of the parasites showed a more than 99% reduction of viable T. cruzi parasites after leukoreduction and a complete reduction (100%) after the riboflavin and UV light treatment. Riboflavin and UV light treatment and leukoreduction used in conjunction appears to eliminate significant amounts of viable T. cruzi in whole blood. Both strategies could complement other blood bank measures already implemented to prevent the transmission of T. cruzi via blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Microbial symbiosis and the control of vector-borne pathogens in tsetse flies, human lice, and triatomine bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassera, Davide; Epis, Sara; Pajoro, Massimo; Bandi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis is a widespread biological phenomenon, and is particularly common in arthropods. Bloodsucking insects are among the organisms that rely on beneficial bacterial symbionts to complement their unbalanced diet. This review is focused on describing symbiosis, and possible strategies for the symbiont-based control of insects and insect-borne diseases, in three bloodsucking insects of medical importance: the flies of the genus Glossina, the lice of the genus Pediculus, and triatomine bugs of the subfamily Triatominae. Glossina flies are vector of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness and other pathologies. They are also associated with two distinct bacterial symbionts, the primary symbiont Wigglesworthia spp., and the secondary, culturable symbiont Sodalis glossinidius. The primary symbiont of human lice, Riesia pediculicola, has been shown to be fundamental for the host, due to its capacity to synthesize B-group vitamins. An antisymbiotic approach, with antibiotic treatment targeted on the lice symbionts, could represent an alternative strategy to control these ectoparasites. In the case of triatominae bugs, the genetic modification of their symbiotic Rhodococcus bacteria, for production of anti-Trypanosoma molecules, is an example of paratransgenesis, i.e. the use of symbiotic microorganism engineered in order to reduce the vector competence of the insect host. PMID:24188239

  16. Risk of blood splashes to the eye during surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-25

    Feb 25, 2009 ... The prevalence of blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis. B, hepatitis C and HIV is increasing globally. Sub-Saharan. Africa is one of the worst-affected regions. The risk of infection from these blood-borne pathogens has become a significant occupational hazard for many categories of health care workers ...

  17. A disposable bacterial lysis cartridge (BLC) suitable for an in situ water-borne pathogen detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Lim, Hyun Jeong; Son, Ahjeong; Chua, Beelee

    2015-11-21

    We constructed a disposable bacterial lysis cartridge (BLC) suitable for an in situ pathogen detection system. It had an in-built micro corona discharge based ozone generator that provided ozone for cell lysis. Using a custom sample handling platform, its performance was evaluated with a Gram-positive bacterium of Bacillus subtilis. It was capable of achieving a similar degree of lysis as a commercial ultrasonic dismembrator with a P-1 microprobe in 10 min at an air pump flow rate of 29.4 ml min(-1) and an ozone generator operating voltage of 1600 V. The lysing duration could be significantly reduced to 5 min by increasing the air pump flow rate and the ozone generator operating voltage as well as by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS).

  18. Metabolomes of Potato Root Exudates: Compounds That Stimulate Resting Spore Germination of the Soil-Borne Pathogen Spongospora subterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendres, Mark A; Nichols, David S; Tegg, Robert S; Wilson, Calum R

    2016-10-12

    Root exudation has importance in soil chemical ecology influencing rhizosphere microbiota. Prior studies reported root exudates from host and nonhost plants stimulated resting spore germination of Spongospora subterranea, the powdery scab pathogen of potato, but the identities of stimulatory compounds were unknown. This study showed that potato root exudates stimulated S. subterranea resting spore germination, releasing more zoospores at an earlier time than the control. We detected 24 low molecular weight organic compounds within potato root exudates and identified specific amino acids, sugars, organic acids, and other compounds that were stimulatory to S. subterranea resting spore germination. Given that several stimulatory compounds are commonly found in exudates of diverse plant species, we support observations of nonhost-specific stimulation. We provide knowledge of S. subterranea resting spore biology and chemical ecology that may be useful in formulating new disease management strategies.

  19. A proteomic approach provides new insights into the control of soil-borne plant pathogens by Bacillus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omür Baysal

    Full Text Available Beneficial microorganisms (also known as biopesticides are considered to be one of the most promising methods for more rational and safe crop management practices. We used Bacillus strains EU07, QST713 and FZB24, and investigated their inhibitory effect on Fusarium. Bacterial cell cultures, cell-free supernatants and volatiles displayed varying degrees of suppressive effect. Proteomic analysis of secreted proteins from EU07 and FZB24 revealed the presence of lytic enzymes, cellulases, proteases, 1,4-β-glucanase and hydrolases, all of which contribute to degradation of the pathogen cell wall. Further proteomic investigations showed that proteins involved in metabolism, protein folding, protein degradation, translation, recognition and signal transduction cascade play an important role in the control of Fusarium oxysporum. Our findings provide new knowledge on the mechanism of action of Bacillus species and insight into biocontrol mechanisms.

  20. Biological control of strawberry soil-borne pathogens Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani, using Trichoderma asperellum and Bacillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María PASTRANA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In south-western Spain, Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium solani were found to be associated in strawberry plants with, respectively, charcoal rot, and crown and root rot symptoms. For management of both fungal diseases, the antagonistic effects of two commercial formulations, one based on Trichoderma asperellum T18 strain (Prodigy® and the other on Bacillus megaterium and B. laterosporus (Fusbact®, were evaluated in vitro and under controlled environment and field conditions. Two inoculation methods (root-dipping and soil application and two application times (pre- and post-pathogen inoculation, as preventive and curative treatments, respectively were assessed. Dual plate confrontation experiments demonstrated the antagonistic effects of T. asperellum and Bacillus spp. by inhibiting radial growth of M. phaseolina and F. solani by more than 36%. Preventive application of T. asperellum by root-dipping reduced the incidence of charcoal rot (up to 44% in a growth chamber and up to 65% under field conditions and also reduced disease progression, the percentage of crown necrosis, as well as the level of infection measured as ng of pathogen DNA g-1 plant by quantitative real-time PCR. This treatment was also the most effective for reduction of crown and root rot caused by F. solani (up to 100% in a greenhouse and up to 81% under field conditions. These results were nearly comparable with the control achieved using chemical fungicides. The Bacillus spp.-based formulation was also effective for control of charcoal rot and showed variable results for control of F. solani, depending on the growth conditions.

  1. Multiplex detection of nine food-borne pathogens by mPCR and capillary electrophoresis after using a universal pre-enrichment medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán eVillamizar-Rodríguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine microbiological quality analyses in food samples require, in some cases, an initial incubation in pre-enrichment medium. This is necessary in order to assure that small amounts of pathogenic strains are going to be detected. In this work, a universal pre-enrichment medium has been developed for simultaneous growth of Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Cronobacter sakazakii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae family (thirty eight species, twenty seven genera, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. (two species, thirteen strains. Growth confirmation for all these species was achieved in all cases, with excellent enrichments. This was confirmed by plating on the corresponding selective agar media for each bacterium. This GVUM universal pre-enrichment medium could be useful in food microbiological analyses, where different pathogenic bacteria must be detected after a pre-enrichment step. Following, a mPCR reaction for detection of all these pathogens was developed, after designing a set of nine oligonucleotide pairs from specific genetic targets on gDNA from each of these bacteria, covering all available strains already sequenced in GenBank for them. The detection limits have been 1 Genome Equivalent, with the exception of Fam. Enterobacteriaceae (5 GEs. We obtained amplification for all targets (from 70 to 251 bp, depending on the bacteria type, showing the capability of this method to detect the most important industrial and sanitary food-borne pathogens from a universal pre-enrichment medium. This method includes an initial pre-enrichment step (18 h, followed by a mPCR (2 h and a capillary electrophoresis (30 min; avoiding the tedious and long lasting growing on solid media required in traditional analysis (1 to 4 days, depending on the specific pathogen and verification procedure. An external testing of this method was conducted in order to compare classical and mPCR methods. This

  2. Diarrhoeal Health Risks Attributable to Water-Borne-Pathogens in Arsenic-Mitigated Drinking Water in West Bengal are Largely Independent of the Microbiological Quality of the Supplied Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debapriya Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing discussion about the possibility of arsenic mitigation measures in Bengal and similar areas leading to undesirable substitution of water-borne-pathogen attributable risks pathogens for risks attributable to arsenic, in part because of uncertainties in relative pathogen concentrations in supplied and end-use water. We try to resolve this discussion, by assessing the relative contributions of water supply and end-user practices to water-borne-pathogen-attributable risks for arsenic mitigation options in a groundwater arsenic impacted area of West Bengal. Paired supplied arsenic-mitigated water and end-use drinking water samples from 102 households were collected and analyzed for arsenic and thermally tolerant coliforms [TTC], used as a proxy for microbiological water quality, We then estimated the DALYs related to key sequelae, diarrheal diseases and cancers, arising from water-borne pathogens and arsenic respectively. We found [TTC] in end-use drinking water to depend only weakly on [TTC] in source-water. End-user practices far outweighed the microbiological quality of supplied water in determining diarrheal disease burden. [TTC] in source water was calculated to contribute <1% of total diarrheal disease burden. No substantial demonstrable pathogen-for-arsenic risk substitution attributable to specific arsenic mitigation of supplied waters was observed, illustrating the benefits of arsenic mitigation measures in the area studied.

  3. Rural Residents in China Are at Increased Risk of Exposure to Tick-Borne Pathogens Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As emerging tick born rickettsial diseases caused by A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis have become a serious threat to human and animal health throughout the world. In particular, in China, an unusual transmission of nosocomial cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis occurred in Anhui Province in 2006 and more recent coinfection case of A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis was documented in Shandong Province. Although the seroprevalence of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (former human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, HGE has been documented in several studies, these data existed on local investigations, and also little data was reported on the seroprevalence of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME in China. In this cross-sectional epidemiological study, indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay (IFA proposed by WHO was used to detect A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis IgG antibodies for 7,322 serum samples from agrarian residents from 9 provinces/cities and 819 urban residents from 2 provinces. Our data showed that farmers were at substantially increased risk of exposure. However, even among urban residents, risk was considerable. Seroprevalence of HGA and HME occurred in diverse regions of the country and tended to be the highest in young adults. Many species of ticks were confirmed carrying A. phagocytophilum organisms in China while several kinds of domestic animals including dog, goats, sheep, cattle, horse, wild rabbit, and some small wild rodents were proposed to be the reservoir hosts of A. phagocytophilum. The broad distribution of vector and hosts of the A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis, especially the relationship between the generalized susceptibility of vectors and reservoirs and the severity of the disease’s clinical manifestations and the genetic variation of Chinese HGA isolates in China, is urgently needed to be further investigated.

  4. Pregnancy history and blood-borne microvesicles in middle aged women with and without coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Garovic, Vesna D; Bailey, Kent R; Lahr, Brian D; Mielke, Michelle M; White, Wendy M; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-10-01

    Having a history of preeclampsia increases the risk for future coronary artery calcification (CAC). This study evaluated the association of blood-borne, cell-derived microvesicles (MV) with CAC in middle-aged women. Twelve pre-selected, antigen-specific MV were measured by digital flow cytometry in the blood of age- and parity-matched women (median age 60 years) without a history of cardiovascular events, but with either a history of preeclampsia (PE, n = 39) or normotensive pregnancy (NP, n = 40). CAC was determined by computed tomography. CAC scores ranged from 0 to 47 and 0-602 Agatston Units in the NP and PE groups, respectively. Waist circumference and insulin resistance were greatest in PE women with CAC. MV positive for tissue factor or stem/progenitor cell antigen (CD117) differed between NP and PE groups. In univariate analysis, those positive for tissue factor, ICAM-1, stem cells, and adipocytes (P16-set) antigens associated with CAC in the PE group. Principal components (PC) analysis reduced the MV variables to three independent dimensions. PC1 showed a modest correlation with CAC scores in the PE group (ρ = 0.31, p = 0.06) and associated with CAC in a multivariable model on pooled groups that included all 3 PC variables when adjusted for pregnancy status (p = 0.03). The association was lost when corrected for body mass index or waist circumference. In women with a history of PE and elevated metabolic risk profile, a group of specific antigen-positive MV associated with CAC. These MV may reflect cellular processes associated with CAC. Their diagnostic potential for CAC remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Riboflavin-ultraviolet light pathogen reduction treatment does not impact the immunogenicity of murine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormey, Christopher A; Santhanakrishnan, Manjula; Smith, Nicole H; Liu, Jingchun; Marschner, Susanne; Goodrich, Raymond P; Hendrickson, Jeanne E

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) illumination/pathogen reduction effectively inactivates white blood cells (WBCs) in whole blood. Given that cotransfused WBCs may impact recipient immune responses, we hypothesized that pathogen reduction of whole blood may alter responses to RBC antigens. Transgenic mice expressing a model (HOD) antigen, authentic human (hGPA or KEL) antigens, or natural fluorescence (uGFP) on their RBCs were utilized as blood donors. Recipients were transfused with fresh whole blood to which riboflavin had been added or fresh whole blood treated by UV illumination/pathogen reduction treatment after the addition of riboflavin. Posttransfusion RBC recovery, survival, and alloimmunization were measured by flow cytometry. UV illumination/pathogen reduction treatment did not alter RBC antigen expression, and recipients of treated syngeneic RBCs had persistently negative direct antiglobulin tests. Greater than 75% of treated and untreated syngeneic RBCs were recovered 24 hours posttransfusion in all experiments, although alterations in the long-term posttransfusion survival of treated RBCs were observed. Treated and untreated KEL RBCs induced similar recipient alloimmune responses, with all recipients making anti-KEL glycoprotein immunoglobulins (p > 0.05). Alloimmune responses to treated HOD or hGPA RBCs were no different from untreated RBCs (p > 0.05). Pathogen inactivation treatment of fresh whole murine blood with riboflavin and UV illumination does not impact the rate or magnitude of RBC alloimmunization to three distinct RBC antigens. Further, UV illumination/pathogen reduction appears safe from an immunohematologic standpoint, with no immunogenic neoantigens detected on treated murine RBCs. Future studies with fresh and stored human RBCs are warranted to confirm these findings. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Families Living with Blood-Borne Viruses: The Case for Extending the Concept of “Serodiscordance”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Persson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “serodiscordance” (mixed infection status is primarily associated with epidemiological concerns about HIV transmission risk in couples. We make the case for extending this concept to include families with mixed HIV and viral hepatitis status. Social research on couples with mixed HIV and hepatitis C status has laid an important foundation for illuminating how experiences of serodiscordance within intimate partnerships are much broader than concerns about risk. This body of work attests to serodiscordance holding promise as a valuable concept for understanding viral infections as socially situated and intensely relational phenomena. However, serodiscordance is still limited as a concept because of its near universal focus on couples. It is rarely applied to wider relationships, including family networks beyond the couple. Despite evidence in the literature that families are affected by blood-borne viruses in multiple social, emotional, financial, and generational ways, the concept of serodiscordance does not capture these broader dynamics. Making serodiscordance more inclusive is an important step in recognising the diverse ways families’ everyday lives, relationships, and futures can be entangled with HIV, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B, and for understanding how today’s era of effective treatment options might shape the “family life” of viral infections.

  7. Antibacterial Activities of Kelussia odoratissima and Teucrium polium Essential Oils in Combination of Synthetic Silver Nanoparticles against Food- borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid azizi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the interaction of silver nanoparticles with antibacterial effects of Kelussia odoratissima and Teucrium polium essential oils consolidated trial based on calculation of MIC and FIC index or differential inhibitory concentration and simple method checkboard designed and implemented. Essential oil of the plants extracted by hydro-distillation using clevenger apparatus. In this study, common food contaminant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157: H7, Salmonella enterica and Ps. aureogenosa were used. The results showed that the antibacterial properties of the essential oil of Teucrium is stronger (MIC between 0.16 to 1.25 mg/ ml than of the oil of Kelussia (MIC between 0.3 to 2.5 mg/ml. Antibacterial properties of silver nanoparticles (MIC between 0.006 to 0.025 mg were stronger significantly. Calculate the differential inhibitory concentration index (FICi implies the existence of synergistic and additive effect between silver nanoparticles and oil of both plant which will depend on the type of pathogen. This means that the combined use of silver nanoparticles and essential oil of the plant especially Teucrium essential oils strong inhibitory effect with lower concentrations of the essential oils was observed. Antagonistic interaction between silver nanoparticles and oil treatments in any of these two plants were observed.

  8. Blood-feeding patterns of native mosquitoes and insights into their potential role as pathogen vectors in the Thames estuary region of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, V A; Hernández-Triana, L M; England, M E; Medlock, J M; Mertens, P P C; Logan, J G; Wilson, A J; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N; Carpenter, S

    2017-03-27

    The range of vertebrate hosts on which species of mosquito blood-feed is an important parameter for identifying potential vectors and in assessing the risk of incursion and establishment of vector-borne pathogens. In the United Kingdom, studies of mosquito host range have collected relatively few specimens and used techniques that could only broadly identify host species. This study conducted intensive collection and analysis of mosquitoes from a grazing marsh environment in southeast England. This site provides extensive wetland habitat for resident and migratory birds and has abundant human nuisance biting mosquitoes. The aim was to identify the blood-feeding patterns of mosquito species present at the site which could contribute to the transmission of pathogens. Twice-weekly collections of mosquitoes were made from Elmley Nature Reserve, Kent, between June and October 2014. Mosquitoes were collected using resting boxes, by aspiration from man-made structures and using a Mosquito Magnet Pro baited with 1-octen-3-ol. Blood-fed specimens were classified according to the degree of blood meal digestion using the Sella scale and vertebrate origin determined using sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I gene. Mosquitoes that were morphologically cryptic were identified to species level using multiplex PCR and sequencing methods. A total of 20,666 mosquitoes of 11 species were collected, and 2,159 (10.4%) were blood-fed (Sella scale II-VI); of these 1,341 blood-fed specimens were selected for blood meal analysis. Vertebrate origin was successfully identified in 964 specimens (72%). Collections of blood-fed individuals were dominated by Anopheles maculipennis complex (73.5%), Culiseta annulata (21.2%) and Culex pipiens form pipiens (10.4%). Nineteen vertebrate hosts comprising five mammals and 14 birds were identified as hosts for mosquitoes, including two migratory bird species. Feeding on birds by Culex modestus and Anopheles

  9. Pathogens Causing Blood Stream Infections and their Drug Susceptibility Profile in Immunocompromised Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, M.; Mirza, I.A.; Ikram, A.; Hussain, A.; Ghafoor, T.; Shujat, U.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the types of pathogens causing blood stream infections and their drug susceptibility profile in immunocompromised patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to September 2012. Methodology: Blood culture bottles received from immunocompromised patients were dealt by two methods, brain heart infusion (BHI) broth based manual method and automated BACTEC system. The samples yielding positive growth from either of two methods were further analyzed. The identification of isolates was done with the help of biochemical reactions and rapid tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was carried out as per recommendations of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Out of the 938 blood culture specimens received from immunocompromised patients, 188 (20%) yielded positive growth. Out of these, 89 (47.3%) isolates were Gram positive and Gram negative each, while 10 (5.3%) isolates were fungi (Candida spp.). In case of Gram positive isolates, 75 (84.3%) were Staphylococcus spp. and 51 (67%) were Methicillin resistant. Amongst Gram negative group 49 (55.1%) isolates were of enterobacteriaceae family, while 40 (44.9%) were non-lactose fermenters (NLF). In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococci revealed 100% susceptibility to vancomycin and linezolid. The enterobacteriaceae isolates had better susceptibility against amikacin 85.7% compared to tigecycline 61.2% and imipenem 59.2%. For NLF, the in vitro efficacy of aminoglycosides was 72.5%. Conclusion: The frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative organisms causing blood stream infections in immunocompromised patients was equal. Vancomycin in case of Gram positive and amikacin for Gram negative organisms revealed better in vitro efficacy as compared to other antibiotics. (author)

  10. Cord blood thyroid tests in boys born with and without cryptorchidism: correlations with birth parameters and in utero xenobiotics exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker-Davis, Francoise; Ferrari, Patricia; Boda-Buccino, Mireille; Wagner-Mahler, Kathy; Pacini, Patricia; Gal, Jocelyn; Azuar, Pierre; Fenichel, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    In utero exposure to environmental chemicals can result in reproductive toxicity via endocrine disruption mechanisms. Whether some of those contaminants also have an impact on fetal thyroid function or pathways, and, thus, potentially on neuropsychological development, is still debated. We used samples from a cord blood (CB) and milk bank, established for a research on cryptorchidism and xenobiotic exposure to compounds known for their anti-androgenic and/or estrogenic activity, to study CB thyroid tests and their correlation with CB and milk xenobiotics concentrations in boys born in Nice area. No difference was found in thyroid tests between 60 cryptorchid boys and 76 matched controls (median thyroid stimulating hormone 5.97 vs. 6.55 mUI/L, free thyroxine [fT4] 13.1 vs. 12.9 pmol/L, free triiodothyronine [fT3] 1.9 vs. 2.1 pmol/L), with no influence of season of birth, gestational age, maternal smoking, or mode of delivery (except for higher fT4 in control boys born vaginally). FT4 was correlated with fetal growth only in cryptorchid boys. Since we had previously shown differences between cryptorchid and controls exposure, we studied correlations of thyroid tests with xenobiotics in control boys only. All tested CB or maternal milk was contaminated by one or more selected xenobiotics, mainly polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylène (DDE), dibutylphthalate, hexachlorobenzene, and bisphenol A. We found a significant negative correlation between fT4 and concentrations of PCB118, PC180, and DDE in milk (respectively r = -0.342, p xenobiotics, except for a weak negative trend with CB bisphenol A (r = -0.25, p = 0.077). CB thyroid tests are within normal range in cryptorchid boys, similar to controls. Our data in controls suggest a possible weak correlation between in utero exposure to some xenobiotics (PCBs, DDE) and fT3 and fT4 CB concentrations, with usually negative correlations with fT4 and positive with fT3 concentrations, which we

  11. Distribution Frequency and Incidence of Seed-borne Pathogens of Some Cereals and Industrial Crops in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Lević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 41 species of fungi were isolated from seed samples of barley, maize, soybean,and sunflower collected at different locations in Serbia. The majority of detected speciesoccurred on barley (35 of 41 species or 87.8% comparing to soybean (17 of 41 species or41.5%, sunflower (16 of 41 species or 39.0% and maize (15 of 41 species or 36.9%. Speciesbelonging to genera Alternaria, Chaetomium, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Penicillium and Rhizopuswere present on seeds of all four plant species. Alternaria species were dominant on soybean,barley and sunflower seeds (85.7%, 84.7% and 76.9%. F. verticillioides and Penicilliumspp. were mainly isolated from maize seeds (100 and 92.3% respectively, while other specieswere isolated up to 38.5% (Chaetomium spp. and Rhizopus spp.. F. graminearum, F. proliferatum,F. poae and F. sporotrichioides were the most common Fusarium species isolatedfrom barley (51.1-93.3%, while on the soybean seeds F. oxysporum (71.4%, F. semitectum(57.1% and F. sporotrichioides (57.1% were prevalent. Frequency of Fusarium species onsunflower seeds varied from 7% (F. equiseti, F. graminearum, F. proliferatum and F. subglutinansto 15.4% (F. verticillioides. Statistically significant negative correlation (r = –0.678* wasdetermined for the incidence of F. graminearum and Alternaria spp., as well as, Fusarium spp.and Alternaria spp. (r = –0.614*, on barley seeds. The obtained results revealed that seedbornepathogens were present in most seed samples of important cereals and industrialcrops grown under different agroecological conditions in Serbia. Some of the identifiedfungi are potential producers of mycotoxins, thus their presence is important in termsof reduced food safety for humans and animals. Therefore, an early and accurate diagnosisand pathogen surveillance will provide time for the development and the applicationof disease strategies.

  12. Versatile Antagonistic Activities of Soil-Borne Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. against Phytophthora infestans and Other Potato Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Caulier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The world potato is facing major economic losses due to disease pressure and environmental concerns regarding pesticides use. This work aims at addressing these two issues by isolating indigenous bacteria that can be integrated into pest management strategies. More than 2,800 strains of Bacillus-like and Pseudomonas-like were isolated from several soils and substrates associated with potato agro-systems in Belgium. Screenings for antagonistic activities against the potato pathogens Alternaria solani, Fusarium solani (BCCM-MUCL 5492, Pectobacterium carotovorum (ATCC 15713, Phytophthora infestans (CRA-W10022 and Rhizoctonia solani (BCCM-MUCL 51929 were performed, allowing the selection of 52 Bacillus spp. and eight Pseudomonas spp. displaying growth inhibition of at least 50% under in vitro conditions, particularly against P. infestans. All 60 bacterial isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and further characterized for the production of potential bio-active secondary metabolites. The antagonistic activities displayed by the selected strains indicated that versatile metabolites can be produced by the strains. For instance, the detection of genes involved bacilysin biosynthesis was correlated with the strong antagonism of Bacillus pumilus strains toward P. infestans, whereas the production of both bio-surfactants and siderophores might explain the high antagonistic activities against late blight. Greenhouse assays with potato plants were performed with the most effective strains (seven Bacillus spp. and four Pseudomonas spp. in order to evaluate their in vivo antagonistic effect against P. infestans. Based on these results, four strains (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 17A-B3, Bacillus subtilis 30B-B6, Pseudomonas brenneri 43R-P1 and Pseudomonas protegens 44R-P8 were retained for further evaluation of their protection index against P. infestans in a pilot field trial. Interestingly, B. subtilis 30B-B6 was shown to significantly

  13. Molecular Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogen Diversities in Ticks from Livestock and Reptiles along the Shores and Adjacent Islands of Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Omondi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although diverse tick-borne pathogens (TBPs are endemic to East Africa, with recognized impact on human and livestock health, their diversity and specific interactions with tick and vertebrate host species remain poorly understood in the region. In particular, the role of reptiles in TBP epidemiology remains unknown, despite having been implicated with TBPs of livestock among exported tortoises and lizards. Understanding TBP ecologies, and the potential role of common reptiles, is critical for the development of targeted transmission control strategies for these neglected tropical disease agents. During the wet months (April–May; October–December of 2012–2013, we surveyed TBP diversity among 4,126 ticks parasitizing livestock and reptiles at homesteads along the shores and islands of Lake Baringo and Lake Victoria in Kenya, regions endemic to diverse neglected tick-borne diseases. After morphological identification of 13 distinct Rhipicephalus, Amblyomma, and Hyalomma tick species, ticks were pooled (≤8 individuals by species, host, sampling site, and collection date into 585 tick pools. By supplementing previously established molecular assays for TBP detection with high-resolution melting analysis of PCR products before sequencing, we identified high frequencies of potential disease agents of ehrlichiosis (12.48% Ehrlichia ruminantium, 9.06% Ehrlichia canis, anaplasmosis (6.32% Anaplasma ovis, 14.36% Anaplasma platys, and 3.08% Anaplasma bovis,, and rickettsiosis (6.15% Rickettsia africae, 2.22% Rickettsia aeschlimannii, 4.27% Rickettsia rhipicephali, and 4.95% Rickettsia spp., as well as Paracoccus sp. and apicomplexan hemoparasites (0.51% Theileria sp., 2.56% Hepatozoon fitzsimonsi, and 1.37% Babesia caballi among tick pools. Notably, we identified E. ruminantium in both Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus pools of ticks sampled from livestock in both study areas as well as in Amblyomma falsomarmoreum (66.7% and Amblyomma nuttalli (100

  14. Isolation, taxonomic identification and hydrogen peroxide production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis T31, isolated from Mongolian yoghurt: inhibitory activity on food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batdorj, B; Trinetta, V; Dalgalarrondo, M; Prévost, H; Dousset, X; Ivanova, I; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J-M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains from Mongolian tarag (a traditionally homemade yoghurt) displaying antimicrobial activities against food-borne pathogens, identify inhibitory substances and study the kinetics of their production. Inhibitory substance-producing bacterial strains were isolated from tarag. From 300 bacterial clones, 31 were able to inhibit the growth of the indicator strain Lactobacillus bulgaricus 340. One of the most active strains was identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis strain T31 by using cluster analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprints. The antimicrobial substance was inactivated by catalase, demonstrating the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Production of H(2)O(2) was studied under aerated and nonaerated culture conditions. The amount of H(2)O(2) in the culture supernatant increased during bacterial growth and reached a maximum (5.12 mmol l(-1)) at the early stationary phase under aerated conditions (agitated cultures). H(2)O(2) was not detected in the culture performed without agitation. In mixed cultures performed in milk with either Lact. delbrueckii subsp. lactis T31 in the presence of Escherichia coli, or Lact. delbrueckii subsp. lactis T31 in the presence of Listeria innocua under aerated and nonaerated conditions, a significant decrease in pathogen count was observed in aerated cultures. The significant decrease in Listeria viability observed in aerated mixed cultures of Lact. delbrueckii subsp. lactis T31 is mainly because of H(2)O(2) production. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis T31 could be used as a protective culture in food industries or as a probiotic to prevent intestinal and urogenital infections.

  15. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Blood-Borne Transmitted Infections among Male Patients with Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Yıldız

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the patients who have antisocial personality disorder (ASPD and the healthy individuals in terms of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs and Blood-Borne Transmitted Infections (BTIs prevalences. Methods: This study is a prospective, single-center, open-label, non-randomized controlled clinical study. There were two groups in the study. The patient group consistsed of 100 males who were diagnosed as ASPD with a clinical interview form. The control group consisted of 98 healthy males who did not have any psychiatric disorder. Dermatologic examination was performed, and clinical findings were recorded. Results: The mean age of the patient group was 21.96±2.40 (range 20-37 years. The mean age of the control group was 24.20±2.88 (21-36 years. The most common disease was gonorrhea (25% followed by genital wart (11%, molluskum contagiosum (5%, HBsAg (4%, and HSV-2 seropositivity (4% in the patients group. In the control group, HSV-2 seropositivity (4.08%, genital wart (3.06%, molluskum contagiosum (3.06%, and gonorrhe (1.02% were commonly seen in the control group. STDs and/or BVTIs were found more common in the patients group (82% than that in the control group (45.91% (X2=30.62, p=0.000. Conclusions: The patients with ASPD are at greater risk than normal population to catch a STDs or BTIs because of their lower educational levels and riskier behaviors. This condition entertains a risk in the general population and the patients themselves.

  16. Sensitive and rapid RT-qPCR quantification of pathogenic Candida species in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    For accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of candidiasis, we developed a highly sensitive quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) system for five Candida species that have been reported to be the major causes of bloodstream fungal infection (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei), together with a system for all pathogenic Candida species. Cells of each fungal species spiked into human peripheral blood (PB) were specifically detected at a lower detection limit of 10(0) cell/1 mL PB by this system using the newly developed specific primer sets targeting 18S or 26S rRNA of the five Candida species, together with the existing group primer set. The total count of the five Candida spp. as the sum of those obtained by using the five species primer sets was equivalent to the count obtained by using the group primer set, indicating that the group set covered the major five Candida spp. in human blood with the same degree of accuracy as the species primer sets. The RT-qPCR counts of the Candida species were in good agreement with CFU counts obtained by their culture on CHROMagar™, with a lower detection limit of 10(0)cell/mL of PB. Candida rRNA molecules were stably stored for at least 7 days at 4°C by keeping the blood specimens in an RNA stabilizing reagent. These results strongly suggest that this sensitive system is useful for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Candida bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome Sequence ofBacillus cereusFORC_021, a Food-Borne Pathogen Isolated from a Knife at a Sashimi Restaurant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Han Young; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yoon, Hyunjin; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Kim, Heebal; Jeong, Hee Gon; Choi, Sang Ho; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2016-12-28

    Bacillus cereus causes food-borne illness through contaminated foods; therefore, its pathogenicity and genome sequences have been analyzed in several studies. We sequenced and analyzed B. cereus strain FORC_021 isolated from a sashimi restaurant. The genome sequence consists of 5,373,294 bp with 35.36% GC contents, 5,350 predicted CDSs, 42 rRNA genes, and 107 tRNA genes. Based on in silico DNA-DNA hybridization values, B. cereus ATCC 14579 T was closest to FORC_021 among the complete genome-sequenced strains. Three major enterotoxins were detected in FORC_021. Comparative genomic analysis of FORC_021 with ATCC 14579 T revealed that FORC_021 harbored an additional genomic region encoding virulence factors, such as putative ADP-ribosylating toxin, spore germination protein, internalin, and sortase. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity testing showed that FORC_021 exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity toward INT-407 human epithelial cells. This genomic information of FORC_021 will help us to understand its pathogenesis and assist in managing food contamination.

  18. Study on the Chemical Constituents and Antibacterial Activity of Kelussia odoratissima and Teucrium polium Essential Oils against Some Food Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mansour Mashreghi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research the essential oils (EOs of Kelussia odoratissima and Teucrium polium were extracted by hydrodistillation. Extracted essential oils constituents were analyzed by gas chromatograph (GC and GC/mass spectrometry and the essential oils constituents identified according to retention time and mass spectrum. Then minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of the essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes، Escherichia coli O157H7, Salmonella enterica, and Pseudomonas aureogenosa were determined by microdilution technique using ELISA reader. The results showed that there are differences between the essential oils constituents as the main constituents in Kelussia odoratissima were (Z-ligustilide, (Z-3-butylidene-phthalide, limonene+-phellandren B. The main constituents of Teucrium polium essential oils were β-caryophylene, Germacrene D, γ-cadinene, (Z- nerolidol, camphor, β-pinene, α- camphene, linalool, α-humulene. The MIC of Kelussia odoratissima EO was between 0.31 mg/ml (for S. aureus to 2.5 mg/ml (for Salmonella enterica but MIC of the Teucrium polium EO was between 0.16 mg/ml (for S. aureus and 1.25 mg/ml (for Salmonella enterica. In conclusion, indigenous medicinal plants could be used for effective control of food borne pathogens as a complementary method that has less unfavorable effect on organoleptic attitudes of each products

  19. Divergent response profile in activated cord blood T cells from first-born child implies birth-order-associated in utero immune programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragh, M; Larsen, J M; Thysen, A H; Rasmussen, M A; Wolsk, H M; Bisgaard, H; Brix, S

    2016-03-01

    First-born children are at higher risk of developing a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of 'birth-order effects' on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. We studied the association between birth order and the functional response of stimulated cord blood T cells. Purified cord blood T cells were polyclonally activated with anti-CD3-/anti-CD28-coated beads in a subgroup of 28 children enrolled in the COPSAC2010 birth cohort. Expression levels of seven activation markers on helper and cytotoxic T cells as well as the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-10 was measured in the supernatants. IL-10 secretion (P = 0.007) and CD25 expression on CD4(+) helper T cells (P = 0.0003) in the activated cord blood T cells were selectively reduced in first-born children, while the percentage of circulating CD4(+) CD25(+) cord blood T cells was independent of birth order. First-born infants display a reduced anti-inflammatory profile in T cells at birth. This possible in utero 'birth-order' T-cell programming may contribute to later development of immune-mediated diseases by increasing overall immune reactivity in first-born children as compared to younger siblings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Prevalence study and risk factor analysis of selected bacterial, protozoal and viral, including vector-borne, pathogens in cats from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attipa, Charalampos; Papasouliotis, Kostas; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Baneth, Gad; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Sarvani, Elpida; Knowles, Toby G; Mengi, Sena; Morris, David; Helps, Chris; Tasker, Séverine

    2017-03-13

    Feline infectious agent studies are lacking in Cyprus. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for various feline infectious agents, including feline vector-borne pathogens (FVBP), in cats from Cyprus. A cross-sectional, descriptive, multicentre study was performed on 174 feline samples [138 owned and 36 shelter-feral, including both healthy (43) and non-healthy (131), cats] from private veterinary clinics from all six districts of Cyprus. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were used to detect Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" (CMhm) and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" (CMt). The population was tested for four FVBP including Bartonella henselae and Leishmania spp. using qPCR, while conventional PCR assays were used to detect Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. and Hepatozoon spp. Serological assays were performed to detect Leishmania infantum antibodies, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigen and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies. Statistical analysis was performed to test associations and possible risk factors between variables and infectious agents. Ninety-six (55.2%) of the 174 cats were PCR-positive for at least one infectious agent. Forty-six cats (26.4%) were haemoplasma positive, including 13 (7.5%) for Mhf, 36 (20.7%) for CMhm and 12 (6.9%) for CMt. Sixty-six cats (37.9%) were positive for Hepatozoon spp., while 19 (10.9%) were positive for B. henselae, four (2.3%) for Leishmania spp. and one (0.6%) for Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. Sequencing revealed the presence of Hepatozoon felis, L. infantum and Anaplasma platys. Of the 164 cats that underwent retroviral serology, 10 (6.1%) were FeLV-positive and 31 (18.9%) were FIV-positive, while L. infantum serology was positive in 7 (4.4%) of the 160 cats tested. Multivariable logistic regression revealed significant associations for various infectious agents including L. infantum with each of Hepatozoon spp. and CMt

  1. Comparison of pathogen DNA isolation methods from large volumes of whole blood to improve molecular diagnosis of bloodstream infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J M Loonen

    Full Text Available For patients suffering from bloodstream infections (BSI molecular diagnostics from whole blood holds promise to provide fast and adequate treatment. However, this approach is hampered by the need of large blood volumes. Three methods for pathogen DNA isolation from whole blood were compared, i.e. an enzymatic method (MolYsis, 1-5 ml, the novel non-enzymatic procedure (Polaris, 1-5 ml, and a method that does not entail removal of human DNA (Triton-Tris-EDTA EasyMAG, 200 µl. These methods were evaluated by processing blood spiked with 0-1000 CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Downstream detection was performed with real-time PCR assays. Polaris and MolYsis processing followed by real-time PCRs enabled pathogen detection at clinically relevant concentrations of 1-10 CFU/ml blood. By increasing sample volumes, concurrent lower cycle threshold (Ct values were obtained at clinically relevant pathogen concentrations, demonstrating the benefit of using larger blood volumes. A 100% detection rate at a concentration of 10 CFU/ml for all tested pathogens was obtained with the Polaris enrichment, whereas comparatively lower detection rates were measured for MolYsis (50-67% and EasyMAG (58-79%. For the samples with a concentration of 1 CFU/ml Polaris resulted in most optimal detection rates of 70-75% (MolYsis 17-50% and TTE-EasyMAG 20-36%. The Polaris method was more reproducible, less labour intensive, and faster (45 minutes (including Qiagen DNA extraction vs. 2 hours (MolYsis. In conclusion, Polaris and MolYsis enrichment followed by DNA isolation and real-time PCR enables reliable and sensitive detection of bacteria and fungi from 5 ml blood. With Polaris results are available within 3 hours, showing potential for improved BSI diagnostics.

  2. The United States Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Study: evidence for vector-borne transmission of the parasite that causes Chagas disease among United States blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Paul T; Stramer, Susan L; Townsend, Rebecca L; Kamel, Hany; Ofafa, Karen; Todd, Charles W; Currier, Mary; Hand, Sheryl; Varnado, Wendy; Dotson, Ellen; Hall, Chris; Jett, Pamela L; Montgomery, Susan P

    2012-09-01

    Screening US blood donors for Trypanosoma cruzi infection is identifying autochthonous, chronic infections. Two donors in Mississippi were identified through screening and investigated as probable domestically acquired vector-borne infections, and the US T. cruzi Infection Study was conducted to evaluate the burden of and describe putative risk factors for vector-borne infection in the United States. Blood donors who tested enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay repeat reactive and positive by radioimmunoprecipitation assay, and whose mode of infection could not be identified, were evaluated with a questionnaire to identify possible sources of infection and by additional serologic and hemoculture testing for T. cruzi infection. Of 54 eligible donors, 37 (69%) enrolled in the study. Fifteen (41%) enrollees had four or more positive serologic tests and were considered positive for T. cruzi infection; one was hemoculture positive. Of the 15, three (20%) donors had visited a rural area of an endemic country, although none had stayed for 2 or more weeks. All had lived in a state with documented T. cruzi vector(s) or infected mammalian reservoir(s), 13 (87%) reported outdoor leisure or work activities, and 11 (73%) reported seeing wild reservoir animals on their property. This report adds 16 cases, including one from the Mississippi investigation, of chronic T. cruzi infection presumably acquired via vector-borne transmission in the United States to the previously reported seven cases. The estimated prevalence of autochthonous infections based on this study is 1 in 354,000 donors. Determining US foci of vector-borne transmission is needed to better assess risk for infection. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Development of an animal-borne blood sample collection device and its deployment for the determination of cardiovascular and stress hormones in phocid seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshio; Suzuki, Ippei; Wong, Marty K S; Milne, Ryan; Moss, Simon; Sato, Katsufumi; Hall, Ailsa

    2016-10-01

    An animal-borne blood sampler with data-logging functions was developed for phocid seals, which collected two blood samples for the comparison of endocrinological/biochemical parameters under two different conditions. The sampler can be triggered by preset hydrostatic pressure, acceleration (descending or ascending), temperature, and time, and also manually by light. The sampling was reliable with 39/50 (78%) successful attempts to collect blood samples. Contamination of fluids in the tubing to the next blood sample was seals ( Phoca vitulina ), the automated blood-sampling method was less stressful than direct blood withdrawal, as evidenced by lower levels of stress hormones ( P seal blood. Using the sampler, plasma levels of cardiovascular hormones, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), AVP, and ANG II were compared in grey seals ( Halichoerus grypus ), between samples collected when the animals were on land and in the water. HPLC analyses determined that [Met 12 ] ANP (1-28) and various forms of angiotensins (ANG II, III, and IV) were circulating in seal blood. Although water immersion profoundly changes the plasma levels of cardiovascular hormones in terrestrial mammals, there were only tendencies toward an increase in ANP ( P = 0.069) and a decrease in AVP ( P = 0.074) in the seals. These results suggest that cardiovascular regulation in phocid seals may have undergone adaptation during evolution of the carnivore to a semiaquatic lifestyle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Prevalence and estimated incidence of blood-borne viral pathogen infection in organ and tissue donors from northern Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariadis, G; Plitt, S S; O'Brien, S; Yi, Q-L; Fan, W; Preiksaitis, J K

    2007-01-01

    To determine the potential safety benefit of introducing nucleic acid testing (NAT) in tissue and organ donors, the risk of virus transmission was examined in a Canadian population. Anonymous data on Northern Alberta tissue and organ donors from 1998 to 2004 were used to determine the seroprevalence and estimate the seroincidence and residual risk of HIV, HBV, HCV and HTLV infection. Of the 3372 donors identified, 71.1% were surgical bone, 13.2% were living organ and 15.6% were deceased organ/tissue donors. Seroprevalence was: HIV 0.00%, HBV 0.09%, HCV 0.48% and HTLV 0.03%. Incidence (/100,000 p-yrs) and residual risks (/100,000 donors) could only be estimated for HBV (24.2 and 3.9) and HCV (11.2 and 2.2). Risk estimates were higher for deceased donors than surgical bone donors. HCV had the highest prevalence and HBV had the highest estimated incidence. HIV and HTLV risks were extremely low precluding accurate quantification. In this region of low overall viral prevalence, HCV NAT would be most effective in deceased organ donors. In surgical bone donors the cost of implementing NAT is high without significant added safety benefit.

  5. Epidemiological study of pathogens collected from blood for a period of a year (2008-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio A. Debbia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. An epidemiological study, addressed to identify the pathogens isolated from blood, and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns, was conducted. Methods. 12 laboratories, homogeneously distributed in a Northern area of Italy, were required to collected all consecutive non-duplicated strains isolated from blood during February 2008 to February 2009 and sent them to the reference laboratory. Results. A total of 1092 microorganisms were collected, including 653 gram-positive, 385 gram-negative and 54 fungi. Escherichia coli 234, Staphylococcus epidermidis 205, S. aureus 142, S. hominis 87, Enterococcus faecalis 47, S. haemolyticus 33, Klebsiella pneumoniae 33, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 32, Candida albicans 28, Enterobacter cloacae 21 were the prevalent microrganisms found. Samples were collected mainly from medicine (255 strains, intensive care units (154, surgery (99, infectious diseases (93, paediatrics (62 and nephrology (62. Antibiotic resistance (in % in staphylococci was 65.7 (methicillin, 33.5 (gentamicin, 61.8 (azithromycin, 59.6 (erythromycin, 45.2 (ciprofloxacin 14.8 (chloramphenicol, 2.0 (teicoplanin, and 24.1 (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole no vancomycin-resistant strain was found. Enterococci showed resistance to vancomycin (10.8, ampicillin (34.4, gentamycin (42.9, ciprofloxacin (42.2 teicoplanin (7.6, erythromycin (54.7 and chloramphenicol (17.5. Enterobacteriaceae exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin(27.0, ampicillin (74.1, ceftazidime (15.8, cefoxitin (14.7, cefepime (13.3, ceftriaxone (15.0, both imipenem and amikacin (0.95, piperacillin-tazobactam (5.1 and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.7. Non fermenting gram negative strains were found resistant to ciprofloxacin (27.3, ceftazidime (9.5, cefepime (14.6, ceftriaxone (81.6, both imipenem and amikacin (18.6, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.2, and piperacillin-tazobactam (7.5. Conclusions.These data show a prevalent incidence of gram-positive (59.7 % in comparison to

  6. Quantification of periodontal pathogens in vascular, blood, and subgingival samples from patients with peripheral arterial disease or abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuero, Elena; Lindahl, Christeel; Marín, María José; Renvert, Stefan; Herrera, David; Ohlsson, Ola; Wetterling, Thomas; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this investigation is to quantify periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Campylobacter rectus, and Tannerella forsythia) in vascular, blood, and subgingival samples. As a secondary objective, two molecular bacterial identification methods (nested polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and quantitative PCR [qPCR]) are compared. Seventy consecutive patients provided a vascular lesion, a blood sample, and 36 subgingival samples. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and qPCR was used to determine the prevalence and amounts of the target pathogens in each sample. Nested PCR was performed only in the samples from vascular lesions. Periodontal examination was performed in 42 patients. Mann-Whitney U or χ(2) tests were used to compare microbiologic results according to periodontal diagnosis. All targeted periodontal pathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, or C. rectus) were detected in subgingival samples, with a prevalence rate of 72.2%, 47.2%, 74.3%, and 82.9%, respectively. In 7.1% and 11.4% of vascular and blood samples, bacterial DNA was detected. One patient was positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans in the three types of samples. No differences were found in the levels of targeted bacteria when comparing patients with and without periodontitis. Prevalence rates obtained with nested PCR were significantly higher than those obtained with qPCR. The presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was demonstrated in vascular, blood, and subgingival samples in one of 36 patients. These results, although with a very low frequency, may support the hypothesis of a translocation of periodontal pathogens from subgingival microbiota to the bloodstream and then to atheromatous plaques in carotid or other peripheral arteries. Nested PCR is not an adequate method for identifying DNA of periodontal pathogens in low quantities because of the high number of false-negative results.

  7. The influence of the cell free solution of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food borne-pathogens in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Nurten; Özogul, Fatih; Özogul, Yesim

    2015-04-15

    The function of cell-free solutions (CFSs) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on tyramine and other biogenic amine production by different food borne-pathogens (FBPs) was investigated in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) using HPLC. Cell free solutions were prepared from four LAB strains. Two different concentrations which were 50% (5 ml CFS+5 ml medium/1:1) and 25% (2.5 ml CFS+7.5 ml medium/1:3) CFS and the control without CFS were prepared. Both concentration of CFS of Streptococcus thermophilus and 50% CFS of Pediococcus acidophilus inhibited tyramine production up to 98% by Salmonella paratyphi A. Tyramine production by Escherichia coli was also inhibited by 50% CFS of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 25% CFS of Leuconostoc lactis. subsp. cremoris. The inhibitor effect of 50% CFS of P. acidophilus was the highest on tyramine production (55%) by Listeria monocytogenes, following Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris (20%) whilst 25% CFS of Leu. mes. subsp. cremoris and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis showed stimulator effects (160%). The stimulation effects of 50% CFS of S. thermophilus and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis were more than 70% by Staphylococcus aureus comparing to the control. CFS of LAB strains showed statistically inhibitor effect since lactic acid inhibited microbial growth, decreased pH quickly and reduced the formation of AMN and BAs. Consequently, in order to avoid the formation of high concentrations of biogenic amines in fermented food by bacteria, it is advisable to use CFS for food and food products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity in chickens with orally administered recombinant chicken-borne Lactobacillus saerimneri expressing FimA and OmpC antigen of O78 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sun-Ting; Ding, Guo-Jie; Huang, Xue-Wei; Wang, Zi-Wei; Wang, Li; Yu, Mei-Ling; Shi, Wen; Jiang, Yan-Ping; Tang, Li-Jie; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Yi-Jing

    2018-03-01

    Avian colibacillosis is responsible for economic losses to poultry producers worldwide. To combat this, we aimed to develop an effective oral vaccine for chicken against O78 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) infection through a Lactobacillus delivery system. Eight Lactobacillus strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens were evaluated based on their in vitro adherence ability to assess their potential as a delivery vector. Fimbrial subunit A (FimA) and outer-membrane protein C (OmpC) of APEC with and without fusion to dendritic cell-targeting peptide (DCpep) and microfold cell-targeting peptide (Co1) were displayed on the surface of Lactobacillus saerimneri M-11 and yielded vaccine groups (pPG-ompC-fimA/M-11 and pPG-ompC-fimA-Co1-DCpep/M-11, respectively). The colonization of the recombinant strains in vivo was assessed and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of orally administered recombinant strains in chickens were evaluated. The colonization of the recombinant strains in vivo revealed no significant differences between the recombinant and wild-type strains. Chickens orally administered with vaccine groups showed significantly higher levels of OmpC/FimA-specific IgG in serum and mucosal IgA in cecum lavage, nasal lavage and stool compared to the pPG/M-11 group. After challenge with APEC CVCC1553, better protective efficacy was observed in chickens orally immunized with pPG-ompC-fimA/M-11 and pPG-ompC-fimA-Co1-DCpep/M-11, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. Recombinant chicken-borne L. saerimneri M-11 showed good immunogenicity in chickens, suggesting that it may be a promising vaccine candidate against APEC infections. However, the activity of mammalian DCpep and Co1 was not significant in chickens.

  9. Molecular detection of feline arthropod-borne pathogens in cats in Cuiabá, state of Mato Grosso, central-western region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gandolfi Miceli

    Full Text Available Hemotrophic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas, Bartonellasp., Hepatozoon sp. and Cytauxzoon felis are prominent pathogens that circulate between cats and invertebrate hosts. The present study aimed to detect the presence of DNA from hemoplasmas,Bartonella sp., Hepatozoon sp. andCytauxzoon felis, and then confirm it by means of sequencing, in blood samples from cats in Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. From February 2009 to February 2011, blood samples with added EDTA were collected from 163 cats that were being housed in four different animal shelters in the city of Cuiabá, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil and from 15 cats that were admitted to the veterinary hospital of the Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT. Out of the 178 cats sampled, 15 (8.4% were positive for hemoplasmas: four (2.2% forMycoplasma haemofelis, 12 (6.7% for ‘Candidatus M. haemominutum’ and one (0.5% for ‘Candidatus M. turicensis’. One cat (0.5%, a patient that was attended at the veterinary hospital, was coinfected with M. haemofelis, ‘Candidatus M. haemominutum’ and ‘Candidatus M. turicensis’, based on sequencing confirmation. Four cats were positive for Bartonella spp.: three (1.7% for B. henselae and one (0.5% for B. clarridgeiae. None of the animals showedCytauxzoon sp. or Hepatozoon sp. DNA in their blood samples. This study showed that cats housed in animal shelters in the city of Cuiabá, state of Mato Grosso, are exposed to hemoplasmas andBartonella species.

  10. Use of prawn blood agar hemolysis to screen for bacteria pathogenic to cultured tiger prawns Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C I; Liu, W Y; Shyu, C Z

    2000-11-14

    A newly developed prawn blood agar consisting of 1 ml of tiger prawn hemolymph in medium containing 200 ppm Rose Bengal was used to determine the hemolytic activity of 35 isolates of bacteria obtained from cultured tiger prawns Penaeus monodon and their rearing water. For comparison, the hemolytic activity of these isolates was also determined in sheep blood agar. Nine isolates (25.7% of total) showed different hemolytic reactions on prawn blood agar and sheep blood agar. From the 35 isolates, 8 with various hemolytic characteristics were selected and the relationship between the type of hemolytic activity and pathogenicity was determined and compared. Four isolates that showed hemolytic activity in prawn blood agar caused high mortality to cultured tiger prawns. By contrast, a significantly lower mortality rate was observed for tiger prawns injected with 4 isolates that did not exhibit hemolytic activity on prawn blood agar. Results further showed that mortality did not correlate with hemolytic activity determined using sheep blood agar. Prawn blood agar containing P. monodon hemocytes was faster and more accurate for determining prawn hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates.

  11. Molecular evidence of tick-borne hemoprotozoan-parasites (Theileria ovis and Babesia ovis) and bacteria in ticks and blood from small ruminants in Northern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouadi, Atef; Leulmi, Hamza; Boucheikhchoukh, Mehdi; Benakhla, Ahmed; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Using qPCR, standard PCR and/or sequencing, we investigated the presence of tick-associated microorganisms in ticks and blood from sheep and goats from Souk Ahras, Algeria. Borrelia theileri, was detected in (7/120, 5.8%) blood from sheep and (13/120, 10.8%) goats. Anaplasma ovis was screened in (38/73, 52%) Rhipicephalus bursa and (5/22, 22.7%) R. turanicus and in (74/120, 61.7%), (65/120, 54.2%) blood of sheep and goats respectively. Coxiella burnetii tested positive in R. bursa (4/73, 5.5%) and (7/120, 5.8%) blood of sheep and (2/120, 1.7%) goats. Theileria ovis was detected in (50/147, 34%) R. bursa and (3/22, 13.6%) R. turanicus and in (64/120, 53.3%) blood of sheep and (25/120, 20.8%) goats. Babesia ovis was screened positive in (23/147, 15.6%) R. bursa and (7/48, 14.6%) R. turanicus. Our findings expand knowledge about the repertoire of tick-borne microorganisms present in ectoparasites and/or the blood of small ruminants in Algeria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiplex tandem PCR: a novel platform for rapid detection and identification of fungal pathogens from blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna; Sorrell, Tania C; Chen, Sharon; Stanley, Keith; Iredell, Jonathan; Halliday, Catriona

    2008-09-01

    We describe the first development and evaluation of a rapid multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the detection and identification of fungi directly from blood culture specimens that have been flagged as positive. The assay uses a short-cycle multiplex amplification, followed by 12 simultaneous PCRs which target the fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 region, elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1-alpha), and beta-tubulin genes to identify 11 fungal pathogens: Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis complex, Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans complex, Fusarium solani, Fusarium species, and Scedosporium prolificans. The presence or absence of a fungal target was confirmed by melting curve analysis. Identification by MT-PCR correlated with culture-based identification for 44 (100%) patients. No cross-reactivity was detected in 200 blood culture specimens that contained bacteria or in 30 blood cultures without microorganisms. Fungi were correctly identified in five specimens with bacterial coinfection and in blood culture samples that were seeded with a mixture of yeast cells. The MT-PCR assay was able to provide rapid (detection and identification of fungal pathogens directly from blood culture specimens.

  13. A Probabilistic Model in Cross-Sectional Studies for Identifying Interactions between Two Persistent Vector-Borne Pathogens in Reservoir Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Vaumourin, Elise; Gasqui, Patrick; Buffet, Jean-Philippe; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Vourc'h, Gwenael

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: In natural populations, individuals are infected more often by several pathogens than by just one. In such a context, pathogens can interact. This interaction could modify the probability of infection by subsequent pathogens. Identifying when pathogen associations correspond to biological interactions is a challenge in cross-sectional studies where the sequence of infection cannot be demonstrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we modelled the probabi...

  14. [Antibacterial actin of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Part 2). Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on bactericidal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entani, E; Asai, M; Tsujihata, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohta, M

    1997-05-01

    Bactericidal effects of various kinds of AWASEZU (processed vinegar, 2.5% acidity) on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other bacteria were examined. the order of bactericidal activities was NIHAIZU (3.5% NaCl was added) > SANBA-IZU (3.5% NaCl and 10% sucrose were added) > plain vinegar (spirit vinegar) > AMAZU (10% sucrose was added). This indicates that their activities were enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride and suppressed by the addition of sugar. On the other hand, when soy sauce was used instead of sodium chloride, the order of bactericidal activities was plain vinegar > AMAZU > NIHAIZU > SANBAIZU. This is mainly because their activities were suppressed by the increase in the pH value. The effect of sodium chloride (0.01-15%) and temperature (10-50 degrees C) on bactericidal activities against E. coli O157:H7 in spirit vinegar (0.5-2.5% acidity) was further examined. When vinegar was used in combination with sodium chloride, predominant synergism on the bactericidal activity was observed. Their activities were markedly enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride in proportion to the concentration. In addition to this, at higher temperatures spirit vinegar killed bacteria much more rapidly. It should be noted that the bactericidal activity of spirit vinegar was extremely enhanced by the combined use of the addition of sodium chloride and the rise of temperature. For example, in 2.5% acidity vinegar, the time required for 3 log decrease in viable cell numbers at 20 degrees C was shortened to 1/140-fold by the addition of 5% sodium chloride, shortened to 1/51-fold by the rise of the reaction temperature at 40 degrees C, and shortened to 1/830-fold; 0.89 minutes by both the addition of 5% sodium chloride and the rise of temperature at 40 degrees C. In order to propose the methods to prevent food poisoning by bacterial infection, bactericidal activities of vinegar solution containing sodium chloride on cooking tools and

  15. A Broad-Spectrum Infection Diagnostic that Detects Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) in Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Mark; Rottman, Martin; Shapiro, Nathan I; Seiler, Benjamin; Lombardo, Patrick; Gamini, Nazita; Tomolonis, Julie; Watters, Alexander L; Waterhouse, Anna; Leslie, Dan; Bolgen, Dana; Graveline, Amanda; Kang, Joo H; Didar, Tohid; Dimitrakakis, Nikolaos; Cartwright, David; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-07-01

    Blood cultures, and molecular diagnostic tests that directly detect pathogen DNA in blood, fail to detect bloodstream infections in most infected patients. Thus, there is a need for a rapid test that can diagnose the presence of infection to triage patients, guide therapy, and decrease the incidence of sepsis. An Enzyme-Linked Lectin-Sorbent Assay (ELLecSA) that uses magnetic microbeads coated with an engineered version of the human opsonin, Mannose Binding Lectin, containing the Fc immunoglobulin domain linked to its carbohydrate recognition domain (FcMBL) was developed to quantify pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in whole blood. This assay was tested in rats and pigs to explore whether it can detect infections and monitor disease progression, and in prospectively enrolled, emergency room patients with suspected sepsis. These results were also compared with data obtained from non-infected patients with or without traumatic injuries. The FcMBL ELLecSA was able to detect PAMPS present on, or released by, 85% of clinical isolates representing 47 of 55 different pathogen species, including the most common causes of sepsis. The PAMP assay rapidly (blood cultures were negative and bacteriocidal antibiotics were administered. In patients with suspected sepsis, the FcMBL ELLecSA detected infection in 55 of 67 patients with high sensitivity (>81%), specificity (>89%), and diagnostic accuracy of 0·87. It also distinguished infection from trauma-related inflammation in the same patient cohorts with a higher specificity than the clinical sepsis biomarker, C-reactive Protein. The FcMBL ELLecSA-based PAMP assay offers a rapid, simple, sensitive and specific method for diagnosing infections, even when blood cultures are negative and antibiotic therapy has been initiated. It may help to triage patients with suspected systemic infections, and serve as a companion diagnostic to guide administration of emerging dialysis-like sepsis therapies. Copyright © 2016 The

  16. Reagent deposition for rapid multiplex pathogen identification in human blood culture samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Machado, Ana Manuel; Dufva, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Blood stream infections led to 135,000 deads annually in EU and fast treatment significantly increases the survival rate. This condition is diagnosed by means of blood cultures (19 Mill blood cultures are drawn annually in EU). In this work, a multiplex peptide nucleic acid / fluorescence in...

  17. Prevalence of Blood-Borne Viruses in Health Care Workers of a Northern District in Pakistan: Risk Factors and Preventive Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zuhaib Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood-borne viral infections like viral hepatitis are highly prevalent in Pakistan. There is also a potential threat of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV spread in the country. Health care workers (HCWs are a high risk population for acquiring such viral infections and potential spread to the patients. This study aimed to determine the frequency of three blood-borne viruses: HCV, HBV, and HIV in HCWs of district Malakand in northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK province of Pakistan. Moreover, risk factors and preventive behaviors among HCWs were investigated in detail. Materials and Methods. Prevalence was investigated using serological assays followed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR based characterization. A total of 626 health care workers working at 17 different health care units, belonging to 6 different job categories, were included in this study. Results. HIV was not detected in the HCWs while rate of prevalence of HCV and HBV was far less (0.8 % and 0.64 %, resp. as compared to general population (4.7%–38%. The majority of HCWs were aware of the mode of spread of these viruses and associated risk factors. Needle stick injury was found to be the most important risk factor for possible acquisition of these infections.

  18. The transcriptome of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583 reveals adaptive responses to growth in blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi C Vebø

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococcus faecalis plays a dual role in human ecology, predominantly existing as a commensal in the alimentary canal, but also as an opportunistic pathogen that frequently causes nosocomial infections like bacteremia. A number of virulence factors that contribute to the pathogenic potential of E. faecalis have been established. However, the process in which E. faecalis gains access to the bloodstream and establishes a persistent infection is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To enhance our understanding of how this commensal bacterium adapts during a bloodstream infection and to examine the interplay between genes we designed an in vitro experiment using genome-wide microarrays to investigate what effects the presence of and growth in blood have on the transcriptome of E. faecalis strain V583. We showed that growth in both 2xYT supplemented with 10% blood and in 100% blood had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the V583 genome. We identified several immediate changes signifying cellular processes that might contribute to adaptation and growth in blood. These include modulation of membrane fatty acid composition, oxidative and lytic stress protection, acquisition of new available substrates, transport functions including heme/iron transporters and genes associated with virulence in E. faecalis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in blood in vitro has a profound impact on its transcriptome, which includes a number of virulence traits. Observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed new insight into physiological features and metabolic capacities which enable E. faecalis to adapt and grow in blood. A number of the regulated genes might potentially be useful candidates for development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of E. faecalis infections.

  19. Pathogenic triad in bacterial meningitis: pathogen invasion, NF-κB activation and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-He eHuang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs: pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-B activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC. This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease.

  20. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  1. Future perspectives, applications and challenges of genomic epidemiology studies for food-borne pathogens: A case study of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) of the O157:H7 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Mark; Cebula, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    The shiga-toxin (Stx)-producing human pathogen Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is a highly pathogenic subgroup of Stx-producing E. coli (STEC) with food-borne etiology and bovine reservoir. Each year in the U. S., approximately 100,000 patients are infected with enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) of the O157:H7 serotype. This food-borne pathogen is a global public health threat responsible for widespread outbreaks of human disease. Since its initial discovery in 1982, O157:H7 has rapidly become the dominant EHEC serotype in North America. Hospitalization rates among patients as high as 50% have been reported for severe outbreaks of human disease. Symptoms of disease can rapidly deteriorate and progress to life-threatening complications such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), the leading cause of kidney failure in children, or Hemorrhagic Colitis. In depth understanding of the genomic diversity that exists among currently circulating EHEC populations has broad applications for improved molecular-guided biosurveillance, outbreak preparedness, diagnostic risk assessment, and development of alternative toxin-suppressing therapeutics.

  2. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John A.; Kremer, Philip H. C.; Manso, Ana S.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R.; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood–brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness. PMID:28348877

  3. Treatment of blood with a pathogen reduction technology using ultraviolet light and riboflavin inactivates Ebola virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cap, Andrew P; Pidcoke, Heather F; Keil, Shawn D; Staples, Hilary M; Anantpadma, Manu; Carrion, Ricardo; Davey, Robert A; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Taylor, Audra L; Gonzales, Richard; Patterson, Jean L; Goodrich, Raymond P

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion of plasma from recovered patients after Ebolavirus (EBOV) infection, typically called "convalescent plasma," is an effective treatment for active disease available in endemic areas, but carries the risk of introducing other pathogens, including other strains of EBOV. A pathogen reduction technology using ultraviolet light and riboflavin (UV+RB) is effective against multiple enveloped, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are similar in structure to EBOV. We hypothesized that UV+RB is effective against EBOV in blood products without activating complement or reducing protective immunoglobulin titers that are important for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD). Four in vitro experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of UV+RB on green fluorescent protein EBOV (EBOV-GFP), wild-type EBOV in serum, and whole blood, respectively, and on immunoglobulins and complement in plasma. Initial titers for Experiments 1 to 3 were 4.21 log GFP units/mL, 4.96 log infectious units/mL, and 4.23 log plaque-forming units/mL. Conditions tested in the first three experiments included the following: 1-EBOV-GFP plus UV+RB; 2-EBOV-GFP plus RB only; 3-EBOV-GFP plus UV only; 4-EBOV-GFP without RB or UV; 5-virus-free control plus UV only; and 6-virus-free control without RB or UV. UV+RB reduced EBOV titers to nondetectable levels in both nonhuman primate serum (≥2.8- to 3.2-log reduction) and human whole blood (≥3.0-log reduction) without decreasing protective antibody titers in human plasma. Our in vitro results demonstrate that the UV+RB treatment efficiently reduces EBOV titers to below limits of detection in both serum and whole blood. In vivo testing to determine whether UV+RB can improve convalescent blood product safety is indicated. © 2016 AABB.

  4. Comparing the Accuracy Rate of Two Different Universal Primers in Enteric Pathogen Diagnosis From Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Soleimani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detecting enteric bacteria in blood by culture is a slow assay with low accuracy rate. PCR might be a suitable alternative assay but as several species can cause bacteremia, it is necessary to use universal primers. Objectives: In this study we evaluated and compared two pairs of universal primers in detecting four enteric bacteria in blood, which are common causes of bacteremia in human. Materials and Methods: Standard strains of E. faecalis, S. typhi, E. coli, and S. Aeruginosa, were used in this study. A serially diluted bacterial suspension of all strains was made for inoculation to four sets of defibrinated sheep blood which were used to prepare blood specimens with different bacterial contents for performing routine assay and PCR. PCR was performed using two different universal primers designed from two ribosomal genes, 16sr RNA and 23sr RNA. Results: PCR with 16sr RNA universal primer showed more accuracy rate than both blood culture and PCR with 23sr RNA universal primer. Mean time for performing PCR assay and blood culture was eight and 48 hours, respectively. Conclusions: Both PCR with 16sr RNA and 23sr RNA universal primers have more accuracy rate than blood culture and are faster in detection of bacteremia. PCR with 16sr RNA universal primer is more accurate than both PCR with 16sr RNA universal primer and blood culture for diagnosis of bacteremia.

  5. Recent Progress in the Diagnosis of Pathogenic Candida Species in Blood Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoompoung, Pakpoom; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2016-06-01

    Candidemia has become an emerging invasive fungal disease. Prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal agent is crucial to reduce the mortality of candidemia. The conventional blood culture method, which is considered the gold standard for candidemia diagnosis, has a low sensitivity and is time-consuming to perform. Recently, several novel advanced diagnostic methods that have a higher sensitivity and a shorter turnaround time than the conventional blood culture method have been developed for the early detection of Candida in blood samples or in blood culture broth. Most of these newer methods were developed using various molecular techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization, and a number of DNA-based techniques including in-house and commercial polymerase chain reactions. In this article, we review and summarize the novel molecular methods that have been recently used for the detection and identification of Candida organisms in blood specimens.

  6. Multiplex Tandem PCR: a Novel Platform for Rapid Detection and Identification of Fungal Pathogens from Blood Culture Specimens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Anna; Sorrell, Tania C.; Chen, Sharon; Stanley, Keith; Iredell, Jonathan; Halliday, Catriona

    2008-01-01

    We describe the first development and evaluation of a rapid multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the detection and identification of fungi directly from blood culture specimens that have been flagged as positive. The assay uses a short-cycle multiplex amplification, followed by 12 simultaneous PCRs which target the fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 region, elongation factor 1-α (EF1-α), and β-tubulin genes to identify 11 fungal pathogens: Candida albicans, Candida dublin...

  7. Efficient uptake of blood-borne BK and JC polyomavirus-like particles in endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and renal vasa recta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Simon-Santamaria

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs are specialized scavenger cells that mediate high-capacity clearance of soluble waste macromolecules and colloid material, including blood-borne adenovirus. To explore if LSECs function as a sink for other viruses in blood, we studied the fate of virus-like particles (VLPs of two ubiquitous human DNA viruses, BK and JC polyomavirus, in mice. Like complete virions, VLPs specifically bind to receptors and enter cells, but unlike complete virions, they cannot replicate. 125I-labeled VLPs were used to assess blood decay, organ-, and hepatocellular distribution of ligand, and non-labeled VLPs to examine cellular uptake by immunohisto- and -cytochemistry. BK- and JC-VLPs rapidly distributed to liver, with lesser uptake in kidney and spleen. Liver uptake was predominantly in LSECs. Blood half-life (∼1 min, and tissue distribution of JC-VLPs and two JC-VLP-mutants (L55F and S269F that lack sialic acid binding affinity, were similar, indicating involvement of non-sialic acid receptors in cellular uptake. Liver uptake was not mediated by scavenger receptors. In spleen, the VLPs localized to the red pulp marginal zone reticuloendothelium, and in kidney to the endothelial lining of vasa recta segments, and the transitional epithelium of renal pelvis. Most VLP-positive vessels in renal medulla did not express PV-1/Meca 32, suggesting location to the non-fenestrated part of vasa recta. The endothelial cells of these vessels also efficiently endocytosed a scavenger receptor ligand, formaldehyde-denatured albumin, suggesting high endocytic activity compared to other renal endothelia. We conclude that LSECs very effectively cleared a large fraction of blood-borne BK- and JC-VLPs, indicating a central role of these cells in early removal of polyomavirus from the circulation. In addition, we report the novel finding that a subpopulation of endothelial cells in kidney, the main organ of polyomavirus persistence, showed

  8. Evaluation of the Verigene® Blood Culture Nucleic Acid test for rapid identification of gram positive pathogens from positive blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese Cellini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The rapid identification of the etiology and the evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility of the bacteria causing bacteremia is of outmost relevance to set up an adequate treatment of sepsis. In this study we evaluated the microarray based method, Verigene Gram-positive blood cultures (BC-GP nucleic acid test (Nanosphere Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA for the identification of Gram positive pathogens from positive blood cultures. The panel BC-GP is capable to identify 13 germs and 3 genes associated with antimicrobial resistance. Materials and Methods. In this study a total of 100 positive, non replicated and monomicrobic blood cultures have been evaluated. For testing on the Verigene platform using the BC-GP assay, 350 L of blood culture media from a positive the blood culture bottle.Results. A total of 100 positive blood cultures were tested by the Verigene BC-GP assay: out of these a total of 100 Gram-positive cocci were identified. The most frequent bacteria identified included staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci. Among staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 25% (15/60, with 38% of S. epidermidis 37% (23/60 and 37% (22/60 other CoNS. All the S. aureus isolates were correctly identified by BC-GP whereas in 2/45 cases (4% BC-GP misidentified CoNS. In the case of enterococci 7/10 were E. faecalis and 3 E. faecium, all of these were correctly identified.Conclusions. The overall agreement with the results obtained by standard procedure is quite elevated (88% and as a consequence the BC-GP panel could be used as a rapid diagnostic tool to give a faster response in the case of bacteremia associated with sepsis.

  9. Indicators of fat distribution, serum lipids, and blood pressure in European women born in 1948--the European Fat Distribution Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, J C; Cigolini, M; Charzewska, J; Ellsinger, B M; Di Biase, G; Björntorp, P; Hautvast, J.G.A.J.; Contaldo, F; Szostak, V; Scuro, L A

    In the spring of 1986, the authors studied the relation between body mass index and anthropometric indicators of fat distribution to cardiovascular risk factors (serum lipids and blood pressure) in approximately 450 women aged 38 years randomly selected from population registers in five European

  10. Vertical distribution of the tick Ixodes ricinus and tick-borne pathogens in the Northern Moravian mountaines correlated with climate warming (Jeseníky mts., Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, M.; Materna, J.; Hönig, Václav; Metelka, L.; Danielová, V.; Harčarik, J.; Kliegrová, S.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2009), s. 139-145 ISSN 1210-7778 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies * tick-borne encephalitis virus * vertical distribution * climate warming Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology

  11. Tick-borne encephalitis virus-specific RT-PCR - a rapid test for detection of the pathogen without viral RNA purification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Cihlářová, Věra; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2004), s. 167-171 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/03/1326 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * tick-borne encephalitis virus * RT-PCR Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.605, year: 2004

  12. Assessing the performance of multiplexed tandem PCR for the diagnosis of pathogenic genotypes of Theileria orientalis using pooled blood samples from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrekidan, Hagos; Gasser, Robin B; Stevenson, Mark A; McGrath, Sean; Jabbar, Abdul

    2017-02-01

    Oriental theileriosis caused by multiple genotypes of Theileria orientalis is an important tick-borne disease of bovines. Here, we assessed the performance of an established multiplexed tandem PCR (MT-PCR) for the diagnosis of the two recognized, pathogenic genotypes (chitose and ikeda) of T. orientalis in cattle using pooled blood samples. We used a total of 265 cattle blood samples, which were divided into two groups according to previous MT-PCR results for individual samples. Samples in group 1 (n = 155) were from a herd with a relatively high prevalence of T. orientalis infection; and those in group 2 (n = 110) were from four herds with a low prevalence. For group 1, 31 and 15 batches of five- and ten-pooled samples (selected at random), respectively, were formed. For group 2, 22 and 11 batches of five- and ten-pooled samples (selected at random), respectively, were formed. DNAs from individual pooled samples in each batch and group were then tested by MT-PCR. For group 1, the apparent prevalences estimated using the 31 batches of five-pooled samples (97%) and 15 batches of ten-pooled samples (100%) were significantly higher compared with individual samples (75%). For group 2, higher apparent prevalences (9% and 36%) were also recorded for the 22 and 11 batches of pooled samples, respectively, compared with individual samples (7%). Overall, the average infection intensity recorded for the genotypes of chitose and ikeda were considerably lower in pooled compared with individual samples. The diagnostic specificities of MT-PCR were estimated at 95% and 94%, respectively, when batches of five- and ten-pooled samples were tested, and 94% for individual samples. The diagnostic sensitivity of this assay was estimated at 98% same for all individual, five- and ten-pooled samples. This study shows that screening batches of five- and ten-pooled blood samples from cattle herds are similar to those obtained for individual samples, and, importantly, that the reduced cost

  13. Tattoo Pigments Are Observed in the Kupffer Cells of the Liver Indicating Blood-Borne Distribution of Tattoo Ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Sejersen, Tobias; Qvortrup, Klaus; Lerche, Catharina M; Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattoo pigments are deposited in the skin and known to distribute to regional lymph nodes. Tattoo pigments are small particles and may be hypothesized to reach the blood stream and become distributed to peripheral organs. This has not been studied in the past. The aim of the study was to trace tattoo pigments in internal organs in mice extensively tattooed with 2 different tattoo ink products. Three groups of mice were studied, i.e., 10 tattooed black, 10 tattooed red, and 5 untreated controls. They were tattooed on the entire back with commercial tattoo inks, black and red. Mice were sacrificed after 1 year. Samples were isolated from tattooed skin, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney, and lung. Samples were examined for deposits of tattoo pigments by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM identified intracellular tattoo pigments in the skin and in lymph nodes. TEM in both groups of tattooed mice showed tattoo pigment deposits in the Kupffer cells in the liver, which is a new observation. TEM detected no pigment in other internal organs. Light microscopy showed dense pigment in the skin and in lymph nodes but not in internal organs. The study demonstrated black and red tattoo pigment deposits in the liver; thus, tattoo pigment distributed from the tattooed skin via the blood stream to this important organ of detoxification. The finding adds a new dimension to tattoo pigment distribution in the body, i.e., as observed via the blood in addition to the lymphatic pathway. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Prevalence, clinical staging and risk for blood-borne transmission of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Yves; Gétaz, Laurent; Wolff, Hans; Holst, Marylise; Mauris, Anne; Tardin, Aglaé; Sztajzel, Juan; Besse, Valérie; Loutan, Louis; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Jannin, Jean; Albajar Vinas, Pedro; Luquetti, Alejandro; Chappuis, François

    2010-02-02

    Migration of Latin Americans to the USA, Canada and Europe has modified Chagas disease distribution, but data on imported cases and on risks of local transmission remain scarce. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for Chagas disease, staged the disease and evaluated attitudes towards blood transfusion and organ transplant among Latin American migrants in Geneva, Switzerland. This cross-sectional study included all consecutive Latin American migrants seeking medical care at a primary care facility or attending two Latino churches. After completing a questionnaire, they were screened for Chagas disease with two serological tests (Biomérieux ELISA cruzi; Biokit Bioelisa Chagas). Infected subjects underwent a complete medical work-up. Predictive factors for infection were assessed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis.1012 persons (females: 83%; mean age: 37.2 [SD 11.3] years, Bolivians: 48% [n = 485]) were recruited. 96% had no residency permit. Chagas disease was diagnosed with two positive serological tests in 130 patients (12.8%; 95%CI 10.8%-14.9%), including 127 Bolivians (26.2%; 95%CI 22.3%-30.1%). All patients were in the chronic phase, including 11.3% with cardiac and 0.8% with digestive complications. Predictive factors for infection were Bolivian origin (OR 33.2; 95%CI 7.5-147.5), reported maternal infection with T. cruzi (OR 6.9; 95%CI 1.9-24.3), and age older than 35 years (OR 6.7; 95%CI 2.4-18.8). While 22 (16.9%) infected subjects had already donated blood, 24 (18.5%) and 34 (26.2%) considered donating blood and organs outside Latin America, respectively. Chagas disease is highly prevalent among Bolivian migrants in Switzerland. Chronic cardiac and digestive complications were substantial. Screening of individuals at risk should be implemented in nonendemic countries and must include undocumented migrants.

  15. Pathogen inactivation by riboflavin and ultraviolet light illumination accelerates the red blood cell storage lesion and promotes eryptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Syed M; Chen, Deborah; Schubert, Peter; Perruzza, Darian L; Bhakta, Varsha; Devine, Dana V; Sheffield, William P

    2017-03-01

    Pathogen reduction treatment using riboflavin and ultraviolet light illumination (Mirasol) effectively reduces the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. This treatment is currently licensed for only platelets and plasma products, while its application to whole blood (WB) to generate pathogen-inactivated red blood cells (RBCs) is under development. RBC storage lesion, constituting numerous morphologic and biochemical changes, influences RBC quality and limits shelf life. Stored RBCs further show enhanced susceptibility to RBC programmed cell death (eryptosis) characterized by increased cytosolic Ca 2+ -provoked membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Using a "pool-and-split" approach, we examined multiple variables of RBC storage lesion and eryptosis in RBC units, derived from Mirasol-treated or untreated WB, after 4 to 42 days of storage, under blood bank conditions. In comparison to untreated RBC units, Mirasol treatment significantly altered membrane microvesiculation, supernatant hemoglobin, osmotic fragility, and intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels but did not influence membrane CD47 expression and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels. Mirasol-treated RBCs showed significantly higher PS exposure after 42, but not after not more than 21, days of storage, which was accompanied by enhanced cytosolic Ca 2+ activity, ceramide abundance, and oxidative stress, but not p38 kinase activation. Mirasol treatment significantly augmented PS exposure, Ca 2+ entry, and protein kinase C activation after energy depletion, a pathophysiologic cell stressor. Mirasol-treated RBCs were, however, more resistant to cell shrinkage. Prolonged storage of Mirasol-treated RBCs significantly increases the proportion of eryptotic RBCs, while even short-term storage enhances the susceptibility of RBCs to stress-induced eryptosis, which could reduce posttransfusion RBC recovery in patients. © 2016 AABB.

  16. Pathogen exposure and blood chemistry in the Washington population of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. LeAnn; Schuler, Krysten L.; Thomas, Nancy J.; Webb, Julie L.; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Ip, Hon S.; Dubey, J.P.; Frame, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-01

    Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from Washington State, United States were evaluated in 2011 to determine health status and pathogen exposure. Antibodies to Brucella spp. (10%) and influenza A virus (23%) were detected for the first time in this population in 2011. Changes in clinical pathology values (serum chemistries), exposure to pathogens, and overall health of the population over the last decade were assessed by comparing 2011 data to the data collected on this population in 2001–2002. Several serum chemistry parameters were different between study years and sexes but were not clinically significant. The odds of canine distemper virus exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2001–2002 (80%) compared to 2011 (10%); likelihood of exposure significantly increased with age. Prevalence of exposure to Sarcocystis neurona was also higher in 2001–2002 (29%) than in 2011 (0%), but because testing methods varied between study years the results were not directly comparable. Exposure to Leptospira spp. was only observed in 2001–2002. Odds of Toxoplasma gondii exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2011 (97%) than otters in 2001–2002 (58%). Substantial levels of domoic acid (n = 2) and saxitoxin (n = 2) were found in urine or fecal samples from animals sampled in 2011. No evidence of calicivirus or Coxiella burnetii exposure in the Washington population of northern sea otters was found in either 2001–2002 or 2011. Changes in exposure status from 2001–2002 to 2011 suggest that the Washington sea otter population may be dealing with new disease threats (e.g., influenza) while also increasing their susceptibility to diseases that may be highly pathogenic in naïve individuals (e.g., canine distemper).

  17. Toxicants in folk remedies: Implications of elevated blood lead in an American-born infant due to imported diaper powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Mateusz P.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Law, Terence; Kellogg, Mark; Woolf, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Though most childhood lead exposure in the USA results from ingestion of lead-based paint dust, non-paint sources are increasingly implicated. We present interdisciplinary findings from and policy implications of a case of elevated blood lead (13–18 mcg/dL, reference level diaper powder. Analyses showed the powder contains 62 % lead by weight (primarily lead oxide) and elevated antimony [1000 parts per million (ppm)], arsenic (55 ppm), bismuth (110 ppm), and thallium (31 ppm). These metals are highly bioaccessible in simulated gastric fluids, but only slightly bioaccessible in simulated lung fluids and simulated urine, suggesting that the primary lead exposure routes were ingestion via hand-mouth transmission and ingestion of inhaled dusts cleared from the respiratory tract. Four weeks after discontinuing use of the powder, the infant’s venous blood lead level was 8 mcg/dL. Unregulated, imported folk remedies can be a source of toxicant exposure. Additional research on import policy, product regulation, public health surveillance, and culturally sensitive risk communication is needed to develop efficacious risk reduction strategies in the USA. The more widespread use of contaminated folk remedies in the countries from which they originate is a substantial concern.

  18. Tattoo Pigments Are Observed in the Kupffer Cells of the Liver Indicating Blood-Borne Distribution of Tattoo Ink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Steen Sejersen, Tobias; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    tattoo pigments in internal organs in mice extensively tattooed with 2 different tattoo ink products. MATERIAL/METHODS: Three groups of mice were studied, i.e., 10 tattooed black, 10 tattooed red, and 5 untreated controls. They were tattooed on the entire back with commercial tattoo inks, black and red......AIM: Tattoo pigments are deposited in the skin and known to distribute to regional lymph nodes. Tattoo pigments are small particles and may be hypothesized to reach the blood stream and become distributed to peripheral organs. This has not been studied in the past. The aim of the study was to trace....... Mice were sacrificed after 1 year. Samples were isolated from tattooed skin, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney, and lung. Samples were examined for deposits of tattoo pigments by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). RESULTS: TEM identified intracellular tattoo pigments...

  19. Sporothrix chilensis sp. nov. (Ascomycota : Ophiostomatales), a soil-borne agent of human sporotrichosis with mild-pathogenic potential to mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    A combination of phylogeny, evolution, morphologies and ecologies has enabled major advances in understanding the taxonomy of Sporothrix species, including members exhibiting distinct lifestyles such as saprobes, human/animal pathogens, and insect symbionts. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS1/2 + 5.8s

  20. Early determinants of blood pressure and renal function : follow-up of very preterm born individuals young adulcy [vroege determinanten van bloeddruk en nierfunctie : follow-up van zeer prematuur geborenen tot in young volwassenheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer-Veen, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In summary, the studies described in this thesis suggest that premature birth affects renal function and blood pressure at (young) adult age, and especially when born both SGA and premature. Minor differences are already detectable at young adult age. The biological mechanism is likely to originate

  1. Strong concordance between transcriptomic patterns of spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes in response to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Erin E; Orr, Megan; Li, Xianyao; Zhou, Huaijun; Johnson, Timothy J; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Liu, Peng; Nolan, Lisa K; Lamont, Susan J

    2012-12-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes morbidity in chickens and exhibits zoonotic potential. Understanding host transcriptional responses to infection aids the understanding of protective mechanisms and serves to inform future colibacillosis control strategies. Transcriptomes of spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of the same individual birds in response to APEC infection were compared to identify common response patterns and connecting pathways. More than 100 genes in three contrasts examining pathology and infection status were significantly differentially expressed in both tissues and similarly regulated. Tissue-specific differences in catalytic activity, however, appear between birds with mild and severe pathology responses. Early expression differences, between birds with severe pathology and uninfected controls, in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in PBLs precede spleen responses in the p53 and cytokine-cytokine receptor pathways. Tissue bianalysis is useful in identifying genes and pathways important to the response to APEC, whose role might otherwise be underestimated in importance.

  2. IRIDOID GLYCOSIDES FROM LINARIA GENISTIFOLIA (L. MILL. IN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF SOIL-BORNE FUNGAL PATHOGENS OF WHEAT AND SOME STRUCTURE CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mashcenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological activity of the iridoid glycosides extract from Linaria genistifolia (L. Mill. has been investigated, namely its influence on the resistance of the winter wheat Odesschi 51 plant to the caused by the Fusarium oxysporum and Helminthosporium avenae pathogenic fungi root rot. Our results indicate that summary iridoid glycosides from this plant, containing four major known compounds: 5-O-allosylantirrinoside, antirrinoside, linarioside and 6-β-hidroxiantirride, can be successfully employed in biological control of the afore-mentioned wheat pathogens: it stimulates wheat grains germination and embryonic root growth in conditions of fungal infection. 1H and 13C NMR characteristics of 5-O-allosylantirrinoside in Py-d5 are for the first time presented. Structures of two conformers of 5-O-allosylantirrinoside in D2O and Py-d5 solutions are proposed, based on the experimental NMR evidence and molecular modelling studies.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Clove ( Syzigium aromaticum L .) Essential Oil and Gamma Irradiation against Some Food-Borne Pathogens in Minced Chicken Meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibriel, A.Y.; ALI, H.G.M.; Abdeldaiem, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of clove essential oil ( Syzigium aromaticum L.) against five strains of pathogenic bacteria namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus was investigated in vitro. The essential oil of clove exhibited antibacterial activity against tested microorganisms. Comparatively, 25, 50 and 100 ml/l concentrations of clove essential oil were of less inhibitory effect than 200, 300 and 500 ml/l concentrations. However, S. aureus showed less sensitivity towards clove essential oil inhibition; however Salmonella typhimurium was strongly inhibited by clove essential oil. Then, the effect of clove essential oil at two concentrations (3 and 5% v/w) and combined treatments between gamma irradiation at doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy and clove essential oil at concentrations as formerly on inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium , Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus inoculated into chicken minced meat was investigated. Addition of clove essential oil to samples of chicken minced meat inoculated with three pathogens reduced the counts of these pathogens, proportionally with increasing concentration. The irradiated samples at doses of 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy and that irradiated at doses 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy of chicken minced and containing 3 and 5% completely inactivation of inoculated pathogens and not detected during cold storage at 4±1°C for 7 days. Accordingly, clove essential oil can be used as natural antimicrobial additive or in combination treatments with gamma irradiation for incorporation in various food products. Also, there is a possibility of using low doses gamma irradiation and low concentrations clove essential oil for treatment of meat products in order to this to reduce the economic cost of products and improving hygienic quality and extend its shelf-life. Therefore clove essential oil could be used as preservative ingredients in

  4. Effect of root exudates of various plants on composition of bacteria and fungi communities with special regard to pathogenic soil-borne fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Piętka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies conducted in the years 1996 - 1998 was to determine the composition of bacteria and fungi populations in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, spring wheat, soybean and potato, and in non-rhizosphere soil. Besides, the effect of root exudates of these plants on the formation of pathogenic fungi communities was established. The microbiological analysis showed that the greatest tolal number of bacteria was found in the rhizospheres of potato and soybean, and the lowest number in non-rhizosphere soil. The smallest total number of fungi was found in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, and the largest in the rhizosphere of soybean. Pathogenic fungi dominated in the rhizospheres of soybean and potato, while non-rhizosphere soil was the poorest in these microorganisms. Among the pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, F.culmorum and F.solani were most frequently isolated. Soybean roots exudated the greatest amount of aminoacids, and acidic aminoacids, which have a positive effect on the development of phytopathogens, dominated in their content. On the other hand, the best quantitative and qualitative composition of aminoacids was found out in the root exudates of winter wheat, since they conlained big amounts of alkaline and aromatic aminoacids.

  5. An In Vitro Method for Studying the Three-Way Interaction between Soybean, Rhizophagus irregularis and the Soil-Borne Pathogen Fusarium virguliforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. Giachero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we described an in vitro system adequate for investigating the pathosystem soybean/arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF/Fusarium virguliforme. Pre-mycorrhized plantlets with Rhizophagus irregularis were infected by F. virguliforme either locally via a plug of gel supporting mycelium (Method 1 or via a macroconidia suspension applied to the medium surface (Method 2. Root colonization by the AMF and infection by the pathogen were similar to the usual observations in pot experiments. Within a period of 18 days, more than 20% of the roots were colonized by the AMF and infection by the pathogen was observed in all the plants. In presence of AMF, a decrease in symptoms and in the level of root tissue infection was noticed. With Method 1, smaller necrotic lesions were observed in the pre-mycorrhized plantlets. In Method 2, pathogen infection was slower but more homogenous. These results demonstrated the suitability of the in vitro cultivation system to study the pathosystem soybean/AMF/F. virguliforme. We propose this in vitro cultivation system for studying the mechanisms involved in the biocontrol conferred by AMF against F. virguliforme in soybean.

  6. Laboratory simulation reveals significant impacts of ocean acidification on microbial community composition and host-pathogen interactions between the blood clam and Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Shanjie; Liu, Saixi; Su, Wenhao; Shi, Wei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Yan, Maocang; Liu, Guangxu

    2017-12-01

    It has been suggested that climate change may promote the outbreaks of diseases in the sea through altering the host susceptibility, the pathogen virulence, and the host-pathogen interaction. However, the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the pathogen components of bacterial community and the host-pathogen interaction of marine bivalves are still poorly understood. Therefore, 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and host-pathogen interaction analysis between blood clam (Tegillarca granosa) and Vibrio harveyi were conducted in the present study to gain a better understanding of the ecological impacts of ocean acidification. The results obtained revealed a significant impact of ocean acidification on the composition of microbial community at laboratory scale. Notably, the abundance of Vibrio, a major group of pathogens to many marine organisms, was significantly increased under ocean acidification condition. In addition, the survival rate and haemolytic activity of V. harveyi were significantly higher in the presence of haemolymph of OA treated T. granosa, indicating a compromised immunity of the clam and enhanced virulence of V. harveyi under future ocean acidification scenarios. Conclusively, the results obtained in this study suggest that future ocean acidification may increase the risk of Vibrio pathogen infection for marine bivalve species, such as blood clams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood-borne interleukin-1β acts on the subfornical organ to upregulate the sympathoexcitatory milieu of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Yu, Yang; Felder, Robert B

    2018-03-01

    We previously reported that microinjection of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) into the subfornical organ (SFO) elicits a pressor response accompanied by increases in inflammation and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity in the SFO and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The present study sought to determine whether blood-borne IL-1β induces similar neurochemical changes in the SFO and PVN and, if so, whether increased inflammation and RAS activity at the SFO level orchestrate the sympathoexcitatory response to circulating IL-1β. In urethane-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats, intravenous injection of IL-1β (500 ng) increased blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity, and mRNA for angiotensin-converting enzyme, angiotensin II type 1a receptor, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-1β, as well as the tumor necrosis factor-α p55 receptor and the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO and PVN. Pretreatment with SFO microinjections of the angiotensin II type 1a receptor blocker losartan (1 µg), the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (1 µg), or the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor NS-398 (2 µg) attenuated expression of these excitatory mediators in the SFO and downstream in the PVN and the IL-1β-induced pressor responses. An SFO lesion minimized the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory and RAS components as well as c-Fos, an indicator of neuronal excitation, in the PVN. These studies demonstrate that circulating IL-1β, which increases in cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension and heart failure, acts on the SFO to increase inflammation and RAS activity in the SFO and PVN and that intervening in these neurochemical processes in the SFO can significantly reduce the sympathetic response.

  8. HIV, Other Blood-Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmitted Infections amongst Expatriates and Travellers to Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gemma; Lobo, Roanna; Brown, Graham; Macri, Chloe; Smith, Hannah; Maycock, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    In some high-income countries, a proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), other blood-borne virus (BBV) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses have been reported as acquired overseas in low- and middle-income countries. A review was conducted to explore HIV, other BBV or STI related knowledge, risk behavior and acquisition amongst expatriates and travelers, particularly males, travelling from high to low- and middle-income countries. Seven academic databases were searched for 26 peer reviewed articles that met inclusion criteria. Significant variability in the studies was noted, in age, travel duration and frequency and outcomes/risk factors measured and reported on. Risk factors described included longer duration of stay; being single; travel for romance or sex; alcohol and other drug use; lack of travel advice; being male; higher number of sexual partners; and inconsistent condom use. Vaccination, pre-travel health advice, and having fewer sexual partners were described as protective. Studies are needed focusing on the social context in which risk-taking occurs. Better collaboration is essential to deliver comprehensive health promotion interventions alongside more consistent pre- and post- travel testing and advice. Policy measures are crucial, including consistent evaluation indicators to assess impacts of HIV, other BBVs or STIs in the context of mobility. Risks and responses for these epidemics are shared globally. PMID:27999275

  9. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Psychosocial Interventions to Reduce Drug and Sexual Blood Borne Virus Risk Behaviours Among People Who Inject Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Gail; Swan, Davina; Widyaratna, Kideshini; Marquez-Arrico, Julia Elena; Hughes, Elizabeth; Mdege, Noreen Dadirai; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Tirado-Munoz, Judit

    2017-07-01

    Opiate substitution treatment and needle exchanges have reduced blood borne virus (BBV) transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID). Psychosocial interventions could further prevent BBV. A systematic review and meta-analysis examined whether psychosocial interventions (e.g. CBT, skills training) compared to control interventions reduced BBV risk behaviours among PWID. 32 and 24 randomized control trials (2000-May 2015 in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration and Clinical trials, with an update in MEDLINE to December 2016) were included in the review and meta-analysis respectively. Psychosocial interventions appear to reduce: sharing of needles/syringes compared to education/information (SMD -0.52; 95% CI -1.02 to -0.03; I 2  = 10%; p = 0.04) or HIV testing/counselling (SMD -0.24; 95% CI -0.44 to -0.03; I 2  = 0%; p = 0.02); sharing of other injecting paraphernalia (SMD -0.24; 95% CI -0.42 to -0.06; I 2  = 0%; p < 0.01) and unprotected sex (SMD -0.44; 95% CI -0.86 to -0.01; I 2  = 79%; p = 0.04) compared to interventions of a lesser time/intensity, however, moderate to high heterogeneity was reported. Such interventions could be included with other harm reduction approaches to prevent BBV transmission among PWID.

  10. HIV, Other Blood-Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmitted Infections amongst Expatriates and Travellers to Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gemma; Lobo, Roanna; Brown, Graham; Macri, Chloe; Smith, Hannah; Maycock, Bruce

    2016-12-16

    In some high-income countries, a proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), other blood-borne virus (BBV) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses have been reported as acquired overseas in low- and middle-income countries. A review was conducted to explore HIV, other BBV or STI related knowledge, risk behavior and acquisition amongst expatriates and travelers, particularly males, travelling from high to low- and middle-income countries. Seven academic databases were searched for 26 peer reviewed articles that met inclusion criteria. Significant variability in the studies was noted, in age, travel duration and frequency and outcomes/risk factors measured and reported on. Risk factors described included longer duration of stay; being single; travel for romance or sex; alcohol and other drug use; lack of travel advice; being male; higher number of sexual partners; and inconsistent condom use. Vaccination, pre-travel health advice, and having fewer sexual partners were described as protective. Studies are needed focusing on the social context in which risk-taking occurs. Better collaboration is essential to deliver comprehensive health promotion interventions alongside more consistent pre- and post- travel testing and advice. Policy measures are crucial, including consistent evaluation indicators to assess impacts of HIV, other BBVs or STIs in the context of mobility. Risks and responses for these epidemics are shared globally.

  11. Deceased Organ Donors With a History of Increased Risk Behavior for the Transmission of Blood-Borne Viral Infection: The UK Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Patrick B; Summers, Dominic M; Robb, Matthew; Hulme, William; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Watson, Christopher J E; Neuberger, James; Bradley, J Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Deceased organ donors are routinely screened for behaviors that increase the risk of transmissible blood-borne viral (BBV) infection, but the impact of this information on organ donation and transplant outcome is not well documented. Our aim was to establish the impact of such behavior on organ donation and utilization, as well transplant recipient outcomes. We identified all UK deceased organ donors from 2003 to 2015 with a disclosed history of increased risk behavior (IRB) including intravenous drug use (IVDU), imprisonment and increased risk sexual behavior. Of 17 262 potential donors, 659 (3.8%) had IRB for BBV and 285 (1.7%) were seropositive for BBV, of whom half had a history of IRB (mostly IVDU [78.5%]). Of actual donors with IRB, 393 were seronegative for viral markers at time of donation. A history of recent IVDU was associated with fewer potential donors proceeding to become actual organ donors (64% vs 75%, P = 0.007). Donors with IRB provided 1091 organs for transplantation (624 kidneys and 467 other organs). Transplant outcome was similar in recipients of organs from donors with and without IRB. There were 3 cases of unexpected hepatitis C virus transmission, all from an active IVDU donor who was hepatitis C virus seronegative at time of donation, but was found to be viremic on retrospective testing. Donors with a history of IRB provide a valuable source of organs for transplantation with good transplant outcomes and there is scope for increasing the use of organs from such donors.

  12. Survey of selected pathogens and blood parameters of northern yellowstone elk: Wolf sanitation effect implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Meyer, S. M.; White, P.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The restoration or conservation of predators could reduce seroprevalences of certain diseases in prey if predation selectively removes animals exhibiting clinical signs. We assessed disease seroprevalences and blood parameters of 115 adult female elk (Cervus elaphus) wintering on the northern range of Yellowstone National Park [YNP] during 2000-2005 and compared them to data collected prior to wolf (Canis lupus) restoration (WR) in 1995 and to two other herds in Montana to assess this prediction. Blood parameters were generally within two standard deviations of the means observed in other Montana herds (Gravelly-Snowcrest [GS] and Garnet Mountain [GM]), but Yellowstone elk had higher seroprevalences of parainfluenza-3 virus (95% CI YNP = 61.1-78.6, GS = 30.3-46.5) and bovine-virus-diarrhea virus type 1 (95% CI YNP = 15.9-31.9, GM = 0). In comparisons between pre-wolf restoration [pre-WR] (i.e., prior to 1995) seroprevalences with those post-wolf restoration [post-WR] in Yellowstone, we found lower seroprevalences for some disease-causing agents post-wolf restoration (e.g., bovine-virus-diarrhea virus type-1 [95% CI pre-WR = 73.1-86.3, post-WR = 15.9-31.9] and bovine-respiratory syncytial virus [95% CI pre-WR = 70.0-83.8, post-WR = 0]), but similar (e.g., Brucella abortus [95% CI pre-WR = 0-4.45, post-WR = 0-4.74] and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus [95% CI pre-WR = 0, post-WR = 0]) or higher for others (e.g., Anaplasma marginale [95% CI pre-WR = 0, post-WR = 18.5-38.7] and Leptospira spp. [95% CI pre-WR = 0.5-6.5, post-WR = 9.5-23.5]). Though we did not detect an overall strong predation effect through reduced disease seroprevalence using retrospective comparisons with sparse data, our reference values will facilitate future assessments of this issue.

  13. Evaluation of antibacterial effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil on three food-borne pathogens in vegetables by propidium monoazide quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azizkhani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs have long been applied as flavoring agents in foods. Nowadays, due to the antimicrobial properties of EOs, they have been used as natural food preservatives. In this study, initial experiments were performed in order to elucidate the minimum bactericidal concentration of Rosmarinus officinalis L.EO on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes. Thereafter, PMA-qPCR was applied in order to selectively quantify living cells within a bacterial population treated with rosemary EO. Inactivation was obtained at EO concentrations of 1%, 0.45%, 0.9% for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica, respectively. L. monocytogenes were totally killed within 45 min while it took 90 min for E. coli O157:H7and S. enterica. It was concluded that rosemary EO has the potential to be used as a natural food additive or bio-preservative since it was able to irreversibly inactivate the three tested pathogens at lower concentrations and short exposition times in comparison with the other EOs. In addition, PMA-qPCR approach proved quantitatively precise and specific to selectively detect live pathogenic bacteria in vegetables following inactivation with rosemary EO.

  14. Synergetic effect of combined fumaric acid and slightly acidic electrolysed water on the inactivation of food-borne pathogens and extending the shelf life of fresh beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, C-N; Mansur, A-R; Kim, G-H; Oh, D-H

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate synergetic effect of slight acidic electrolysed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) on inactivation of total viable count (TVC) and Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in fresh beef and to study shelf life and sensory quality of beef. Inoculated samples was dipped for 1, 3 and 5 min and immersed at 25, 40 and 60°C in SAEW, strong acidic electrolysed water (StAEW) and SAWE + FA. Treated meat was air-packaged and stored at 4 or 10°C. During storage, sampling was performed at 2-day intervals for microbiological and sensory changes. TVC was decontaminated at 40°C for 3 min by more than 3·70 log CFU g(-1) , and examined pathogens were reduced by more than 2·60 log CFU g(-1) with SAEW + FA treatment. This treatment prolonged shelf life of beef meat up to 9 and 7 days when stored at 4 and 10°C, respectively. The combined treatment of SAEW + FA showed greater bactericidal effect and prolonged shelf life compared with individual treatments. Combined treatment of SAEW and FA can be a suitable hurdle technology reducing bacteria in fresh beef, substantially enhancing their microbial safety and decreasing pathogens growth during storage. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Riboflavin and ultraviolet light for pathogen reduction of murine cytomegalovirus in blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Shawn D; Saakadze, Natia; Bowen, Richard; Newman, James L; Karatela, Sulaiman; Gordy, Paul; Marschner, Susanne; Roback, John; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Two studies were performed to test the effectiveness of riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light treatment (Mirasol PRT, Terumo BCT) against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). The first study utilized immune-compromised mice to measure the reduction of cell-free MCMV. A second study used a murine model to evaluate the ability of Mirasol PRT to prevent transfusion-transmitted (TT)-MCMV infection. Human plasma was inoculated with MCMV and then treated with Mirasol PRT. The viral titer was measured using an infectious dose 50% assay in nude mice. Mice were euthanized on Day 10 posttransfusion, and their spleens were tested for the presence of MCMV DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Mirasol PRT was also evaluated to determine its effectiveness in preventing TT-MCMV in platelets (PLTs) stored in PLT additive solution. PLTs were inoculated with either cell-associated MCMV or cell-free MCMV and then treated with Mirasol PRT. Mice were transfused with treated or untreated product and were euthanized 14 days posttransfusion. Blood and spleens were assayed for MCMV DNA by real-time-PCR. Using nude mice to titer MCMV, a modest 2.1-log reduction was observed in plasma products after Mirasol PRT treatment. TT-MCMV was not observed in the mouse transfusion model when either cell-free or cell-associated MCMV was treated with Mirasol PRT; MCMV transmission was uniformly observed in mice transfused with untreated PLTs. These results suggest that using riboflavin and UV light treatment may be able to reduce the occurrence of transmission of human CMV from infectious PLTs and plasma units. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Prevalence, genetic diversity and potential clinical impact of blood-borne and enteric protozoan parasites in native mammals from northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda; Reiss, Andrea; Jackson, Bethany; Warren, Kristin; Paparini, Andrea; Gillespie, Graeme; Stokeld, Danielle; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2017-04-30

    A molecular survey was conducted to provide baseline information on the prevalence, genetic diversity and potential clinical impacts of blood-borne and enteric protozoans in native wild mammals from the Northern Territory (NT). A total of 209 blood and 167 faecal samples were collected from four target species; the northern brown bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus), common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) and brush-tailed rabbit-rat (Conilurus penicillatus). Blood samples were screened by PCR at the 18S rRNA gene for trypanosomes, piroplasms and haemogregarines, with faecal samples tested for Cryptosporidium spp. at the 18S rRNA locus, and for Giardia spp. at the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) and 18S rRNA loci. The potential clinical impact was investigated by associating clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters with presence or absence of infection. Overall, 22.5% (95% CI: 17.0-28.8%) of the animals tested were positive for haemoprotozoans. Trypanosomes were found in 26.6% (95% CI: 18.7-35.7%) of the bandicoots and were identified as Trypanosoma vegrandis G6, except for one unique genotype, most similar to T. vegrandis G3 (genetic distance=7%). The prevalence of trypanosomes in possums was 23.7% (95% CI: 11.4-40.2%), and the genotypes identified clustered within the T. noyesi clade. The presence of Babesia sp. and Hepatozoon sp. was confirmed in bandicoots only, both at a prevalence of 9.7% (95% CI: 2.7-9.2%). The total prevalence of intestinal protozoan parasites observed was relatively low (3%; 95% CI: 1.0-6.9%). No evidence of clinical disease associated with protozoan parasitic infection was observed, however bandicoots positive for Trypanosoma exhibited a significantly lower packed cell volume (PCV) compared to negative bandicoots (p=0.046). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first research conducted in the NT to characterise protozoan parasites in threatened native mammals using both molecular and

  17. Pathogenicity of seed-borne and seedling fungi of groundnut cv. Tatu/ Patogenicidade de fungos associados às sementes e plântulas de amendoim cv. Tatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cristina Santiago

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Seeds and seedlings of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea cv. Tatu were investigated under laboratory and green house conditions to detect and identify any seed-borne pathogenic fungi present, besides determining the pathogenicity and the seed damages. The fungi detected were Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, Cercospora arachidicola, Rhizopus sp., Penicillium sp., Cladosporium sp. and Phoma sp.. The most frequently isolated fungi were Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp.. These fungi were transmitted by seeds and caused damping-off before and after seedling emergence.Sementes e plântulas de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea cv. Tatu foram avaliadas em condições de laboratório e casa de vegetação com o objetivo de detectar e identificar a presença de fungos patogênicos associados às sementes, além de determinar a patogenicidade e os danos por eles causados. Os fungos detectados foram Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, Cercospora arachidicola, Rhizopus sp., Penicillium sp., Cladosporium sp. e Phoma sp.. Os fungos mais freqüentes foram A. niger e Penicillium sp.. Estes fungos foram transmitidos através das sementes e causaram tombamento de pré e pósemergência nas plântulas.

  18. Two Pathogens and One Disease: Detection and Identification of Flea-Borne Rickettsiae in Areas Endemic for Murine Typhus in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    EREMEEVA, MARINA E.; KARPATHY, SANDOR E.; KRUEGER, LAURA; HAYES, ERICA K.; WILLIAMS, ASHLEY M.; ZALDIVAR, YAMITZEL; BENNETT, STEPHEN; CUMMINGS, ROBERT; TILZER, ART; VELTEN, ROBERT K.; KERR, NELSON; DASCH, GREGORY A.; HU, RENJIE

    2018-01-01

    Results of an environmental assessment conducted in a newly emergent focus of murine typhus in southern California are described. Opossums, Didelphis virginiana Kerr, infested with cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis Buché, in the suburban area were abundant. Animal and flea specimens were tested for the DNA of two flea-borne rickettsiae, Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia felis. R. felis was commonly detected in fleas collected throughout this area while R. typhi was found at a much lower prevalence in the vicinity of just 7 of 14 case-patient homes identified. DNA of R. felis, but not R. typhi, was detected in renal, hepatic, and pulmonary tissues of opossums. In contrast, there were no hematologic polymerase chain reaction findings of R. felis or R. typhi in opossums, rats, and cats within the endemic area studied. Our data suggest a significant probability of human exposure to R. felis in the area studied; however, disease caused by this agent is not recognized by the medical community and may be misdiagnosed as murine typhus using nondiscriminatory serologic methods. PMID:23270180

  19. Migrating birds and carnivores introduce ticks and tick borne pathogens to Denmark – but are they also a public health risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene; Vrbová, Erika; Højgaard, Jesper

    Since the end of the ice age, spring migrating birds from Africa and Europe and autumn migrating birds from Northern Scandinavia have entered Denmark, and recently a small wave of long migrating carnivores have started arriving in Denmark from Central Europe. Theoretically, migrating birds could ...... pathogens. We show that the risk is not just theoretical and we suggest that these introductions may have a practical public health impact....... in Danish forest and nature areas can be expected to be of little practical importance. However, some of the infected ticks, introduced by migrating birds, may be deposited in private gardens and public parks that are otherwise not able to sustain a viable tick population. Migrating birds may therefore...

  20. Awareness of the Risk of Exposure to Infectious Material and the Behaviors of Polish Paramedics with Respect to the Hazards from Blood-Borne Pathogens—A Nationwide Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Garus-Pakowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: To determine paramedics’ frequency of contact with blood and other body fluids, as well as the analysis of knowledge of paramedics about blood-borne infections, their attitudes to patients infected with blood-borne viruses, and the post-exposure procedures implemented by paramedics; (2 Methods: An anonymous questionnaire among 190 paramedics working in various health care facilities in Poland (adjusted response rate, 76.3%; (3 Results: 78% of paramedics had contact with potentially infectious material at least several times a week. Paramedics’ knowledge on transferring infection was insufficient. Paramedics with longer employment time and better professional experience suffered fewer injuries with used needles/medical tools (p = 0.079. Most frequently reported factors that prevented the use of personal protective equipment were emergency situations (19.5%, skin irritations and contact allergies (19% and, in the case of protective gloves, reduced manual dexterity (16%. In total, 82% of paramedics were concerned about the risk of being infected with HIV, HBV or HCV as a result of performing their job. In total, 97% of paramedics behaved more carefully while caring for infected patients. In total, 90% of the paramedics never refrained from performing the specific procedures necessary to help the patient whom they knew to be infected; (4 Conclusions: Despite the paramedics’ insufficient theoretical knowledge about the risk of blood-borne infections, the emphasis in the training of future paramedics should be on classes perfecting practical skills, because growing experience significantly reduces the risk of injury.

  1. Primary hemostatic capacity of whole blood: a comprehensive analysis of pathogen reduction and refrigeration effects over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidcoke, Heather F.; McFaul, Steve J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; Parida, Bijaya K.; Mora, Alex G.; Fedyk, Chriselda G.; Valdez-Delgado, Krystal K.; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Reddoch, Kristin M.; Rodriguez, Armando C.; Aden, James K.; Jones, John A.; Bryant, Ron S.; Scherer, Michael R.; Reddy, Heather L.; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Whole blood (WB) has been used in combat since World War I as it is readily available and replaces every element of shed blood. Component therapy has become standard; however, recent military successes with WB resuscitation have revived the debate regarding wider WB use. Characterization of optimal WB storage is needed. We hypothesized that refrigeration preserves WB function and that a pathogen reduction technology (PRT) based on riboflavin and ultraviolet light has no deleterious effect over 21 days of storage. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS WB units were stored for 21 days either at 4°C or 22°C. Half of each temperature group underwent PRT, yielding four final treatment groups (n = 8 each): CON 4 (WB at 4°C); CON 22 (WB at 22°C); PRT 4 (PRT WB at 4°C); and PRT 22 (PRT WB at 22°C). Testing was at baseline, Days 1–7, 10, 14, and 21. Assays included coagulation factors; platelet activation, aggregation, and adhesion; and thromboelastography (TEG). RESULTS Prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time increased over time; refrigeration attenuated the effects on PT (p ≤ 0.009). Aggregation decreased over time (p ≤ 0.001); losses were attenuated by refrigeration (p ≤ 0.001). Refrigeration preserved TEG parameters (p ≤ 0.001) and PRT 4 samples remained within normal limits throughout the study. Refrigeration in combination with PRT inhibited fibrinolysis (p ≤ 0.001) and microparticle formation (p ≤ 0.031). Cold storage increased shear-induced platelet aggregation and ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination (p ≥ 0.032), as well as GPIb-expressing platelets (p ≤ 0.009). CONCLUSION The in vitro hemostatic function of WB is largely unaffected by PRT treatment and better preserved by cold storage over 21 days. Refrigerated PRT WB may be suitable for trauma resuscitation. Clinical studies are warranted. PMID:23301966

  2. Invitro Evaluation Of Antibacterial Activity Of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated From Ergo And Qotchqotcha Ethiopian Traditional Fermented Foods Against Some Selected Food Borne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamenew Fenta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of pathogenic bacteria by lactic acid bacteria LAB isolated directly from foods is an innovative approach. With the aim of determining the anti-bacterial activity of Lactic acid bacteria isolated from ergo and qotchqotcha Ethiopian fermented food 12 samples of each were taken from the 4 different kebeles of Assosa town. Isolation of LAB from the selected samples were carried out using MRS media. The different set of isolates were characterized using primary biochemical tests. Isolates which were gram positive catalase negative and KOH negative were considered to be presumptive LAB and further characterized by using different biochemical tests for further identification. 16 isolates from ergo samples were isolated. Based on Bergeys manual of determinative bacteriology the 16 isolates belonged to four 4 LAB species namely Lactobacillus acidophilus 18.75 Lactobacillus casei 31.25 Streptococcus thermophiles 25 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus 25. Likewise 5 isolates were isolated from Qotchqotcha and the five isolates were found to be Lactobacillus acidophilus 80 and Pediococcus acidilactici 20. Cell free solution from MRS broth culture of theses LAB was prepared and tested against Escherichia coli O157H7 and Staphylococcus aureus using agar-well diffusion method. Of the 16 isolates isolated from ergo 9 of them show antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157H7 with a largest inhibition zone measured about 7.331.20mm by EK0101 and 12 of them show antimicrobial activity against S. aureus with a largest inhibition zone measured about 11.66 0.88mm by EK0201. On the basis of morphological and biochemical test done EK0101 was found to be presumptive Lactobacillus acidophilus and EK0201 to be Streptococcus thermophiles. All of the isolates isolated from Qotchqotcha showed antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms though there was a significant difference in their activity P0.05. The isolate QK0201 showed an inhibition zone of about 6

  3. Detection of Water Borne Protozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Enemark, Heidi L.; Kurtzhals, J.A.L.

    Protozoa of several species play a key role in water borne outbreaks of diarrhea worldwide. Identification of such protozoa depends mainly on parasite detection. However, water contains several hundreds of thousands of microorganisms belonging to different taxa. The exact identification...... of pathogenic protozoa relies on selective isolation and detection that is conducted by experienced technicians. Advanced techniques such as immuno-fluorescent dyes, polymerase chain reaction, and many other techniques, may be used for species-specific identification of pathogenic protozoa. Each diagnostic...

  4. The Prison Economy of Needles and Syringes: What Opportunities Exist for Blood Borne Virus Risk Reduction When Prices Are so High?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Carla; McCredie, Luke; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    A formal Needle and Syringe Program (NSP) is not provided in Australian prisons. Injecting equipment circulates in prisons as part of an informal and illegal economy. This paper examined how this economy generates blood-borne virus (BBV) risk and risk mitigation opportunities for inmates. The HITS-p cohort recruited New South Wales inmates who had reported ever injecting drugs and who had a negative HCV serological test within 12 months prior to enrolment. For this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 participants enrolled in HITS-p. Participants included 10 women and were incarcerated in 12 prisons. A needle/syringe was nominated as being typically priced in the 'inside' prison economy at $100-$150, with a range of $50-$350. Purchase or hire of equipment was paid for in cash (including transactions that occurred outside prison) and in exchange for drugs and other commodities. A range of other resources was required to enable successful needle/syringe economies, especially relationships with visitors and other prisoners, and violence to ensure payment of debts. Strategies to mitigate BBV risk included retaining one needle/syringe for personal use while hiring out others, keeping drug use (and ownership of equipment) "quiet", stealing used equipment from the prison health clinic, and manufacture of syringes from other items available in the prison. The provision of prison NSP would disrupt the inside economies built around contraband needles/syringes, as well as minimise BBV risk. However, any model of prison NSP should be interrogated for any unanticipated markets that could be generated as a result of its regulatory practices.

  5. Evaluation of an e-learning package to improve understanding of blood-borne viruses amongst prison staff in Wales, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen Perrett, Stephanie; Erricker, Mark; Lyons, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide education on blood-borne viruses (BBVs) to prison staff to help reduce stigma within the prisons, improve the care prisoners receive and reduce the risk of occupational transmission. An e-module was used to improve staff understanding of hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and HIV at a prison in Wales, UK. An assessment was used to gather data on prison staff understanding of BBVs prior to undertaking the e-module. In total, 530/697 (76 per cent) prison staff completed the BBV e-module. Average pre- and post-course assessment scores were 8.6/11 and 10.85/11, respectively. Most staff understood the modes of hepatitis transmission, however, gaps in understanding were highlighted. In total, 22 per cent of staff believed HBV and HCV were airborne, 9 per cent believed transmission occurred through sharing cutlery. In total, 31 per cent of staff believed prisoners with hepatitis should declare their status to the prison. Practical implications: The e-module significantly improved staff understanding of BBVs and should be incorporated into future prison training packages. Future education should include how BBVs are not transmitted with an emphasis on casual contact. Medical confidentiality in prisons should also be addressed. Improving understanding will help reduce the stigma of BBVs within prison and improve the multidisciplinary care the prisoner receives. To the authors knowledge this is the first published evaluation of a BBV learning package for custodial staff. Evaluation of this educational package demonstrates a unique and valuable insight into the general understanding of BBVs by prison staff in Wales, UK.

  6. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eDiakogiannis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH, the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (Tm of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The Tm of extracted lipids was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. A trend of increasing Tm values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in Tm value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased Tm values were measured. The Tm changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased Tm. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  7. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis - an important food borne pathogen of high public health significance with special reference to India: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Singh, Shoor Vir; Gupta, Saurabh; Singh, Manju; Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Ashok Kumar; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2017-12-01

    This review underlines the public health significance of 'Indian Bison Type' of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and also its potential as 'zoonotic infection'. In the absence of control programs, bio-load of MAP is increasing and if we take total population of animals (500 million plus) and human beings (1.23 billion plus) into account, the number of infected animals and human beings will run into millions in India. Our research on screening of over 26,000 domestic livestock for MAP infection using 4 different diagnostic tests (microscopy, culture, ELISA and PCR), during last 31 years has shown that the average bio-load of MAP in the livestock population of India is very high (cattle 43%, buffaloes 36%, goats 23% and sheep 41%). 'Mass screening' of 28,291 human samples between 2008-2016 revealed also high bio-load of MAP. It has been proved that MAP is not in-activated during pasteurization and therefore live bacilli are continuously reaching human population by consumption of even pasteurized milk and other milk products. Live bacilli have also been recovered from meat products and the environment thus illustrating the potential of MAP as pathogen of public health concern. However, at present, there is inadequate scientific evidence to confirm a conclusive link between MAP infection and Johne's disease in ruminants and some cases of Crohn's disease in human beings.

  8. Essential oils as antibacterial agents against food-borne pathogens: Are they really as useful as they are claimed to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M I S; Martins, S R; Veríssimo, C S C; Nunes, M J C; Lima, A I G; Ferreira, R M S B; Pedroso, L; Sousa, I; Ferreira, M A S S

    2017-12-01

    Most studies evaluating the use of essential oils (EO) as antibacterial agents focus mainly on minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) rather than minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC). In this work, we compared MICs and MBCs of EO from condiment plants commonly used in Mediterranean Europe, namely Origanum vulgare , Salvia lavandulaefolia , Salvia officinalis , Salvia sclarea and Rosmarinus officinalis , aiming to evaluate their application as disinfecting agents in minimally processed produce. Outbreaks-related pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes , Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Yarrowia lipolytica were used. Results showed that all EO were able to reduce bacterial growth in all bacterial strains tested, particularly O. vulgare . However, fewer EO exhibited bactericidal activities, and were only effective against one or two bacterial strains, hence eliminating the possibility to use them as broad range disinfectants. Furthermore, the necessary concentrations were too high for food application. Hence, our work suggests the need to evaluate MBC rather than MIC and questions EO usefulness in controlling undesired microorganisms. Overall, and despite the large volume of data published on EO, results obtained were not very encouraging for a realistic application on produce and question the viability of EOs as disinfecting agents in food.

  9. Clinical Features and Peripheral Blood T Lymphocyte Subsets in Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease According to Different Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Fang; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Shan-Ming; Chen, Jia-Zhen; Zhou, Ling-Ye; Wang, Ya-Fen; Wang, Gang; Yu, Xia-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Hong

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the changes in lymphocyte subsets that are caused by infection with different pathogens in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease. T lymphocyte subsets were measured in the patients' peripheral blood, and serum, throat swab, and fecal samples were tested for enterovirus. Fecal and throat swab samples exhibited similar positive detection rates, and were significantly more likely to be positive, compared to serum samples (P < 0.01). The EV71-positive group exhibited significantly lower CD4 + TM cell counts (QR: 1.058), compared to the CD4 + TM cell counts in the CoxA16-positive group (QR: 1.391; P < 0.05). Throat swab and fecal samples exhibited significantly higher positive detection rates, compared to serum samples. In addition, EV71-infected children exhibited significantly lower CD4+ T-cell counts, compared to CoxA16-infected children, which suggests that EV71 infection may be associated with a poorer prognosis.

  10. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Berberi, Anita; Siapi, Eleni; Arkoudi-Vafea, Angeliki; Giannopoulou, Lydia; Mastronicolis, Sofia K

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH), the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (T m) of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The T m of extracted lipids was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. A trend of increasing T m values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in T m value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased T m values were measured. The T m changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased T m). Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  11. Chemical composition and in vitro antibacterial activity of essential oil and methanol extract of Echinophora platyloba D.C against some of food-borne pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinophora Platyloba D.C as a medicinal plant is used for preservation of foods and treatment of many diseases in different regions of Iran. The present study was undertaken to determine the chemical composition and investigation of the antibacterial effects of essential oil as well as methanol extract from aerial part of Echinophora Platyloba D.C against S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, S. Thyphimurium and E. coli. Chemical analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS showed that ocimene (26.51%, 2,3-Dimethyl-cyclohexa- 1,3-diene (9.87%, alpha-pinene (7.69% and gamma-dodecanolactone (5.66% were dominant components of essential oil and the main constituents of methanol extract were o- Cymene (28.66%, methanol (8.50%, alpha-pinene (7.42% and gamma-decalactone (5.20%. The essential oil showed strong antimicrobial activity against tested bacteria, whereas the methanol extract almost remained inactive against gram-negative bacteria. The most sensitive bacteria to essential oil and extract of Echinophora Platyloba D.C were L. mono- cytogenes and S. aureus. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of essential oil against L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were 6250 and 12500 ppm, respectively. MIC of methanol extract against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes was 25000 ppm. Therefore, purifying and evaluation of antibacterial effects of the active substances of the essential oil and methanol extract of this plant for future application as antibacterial agents and food preservatives to combat pathogenic and toxigenic microorganisms is recommended.

  12. Two pathogen reduction technologies--methylene blue plus light and shortwave ultraviolet light--effectively inactivate hepatitis C virus in blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Eike; Gravemann, Ute; Friesland, Martina; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Müller, Thomas H; Pietschmann, Thomas; Seltsam, Axel

    2013-05-01

    Contamination of blood products with hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause infections resulting in acute and chronic liver diseases. Pathogen reduction methods such as photodynamic treatment with methylene blue (MB) plus visible light as well as irradiation with shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light were developed to inactivate viruses and other pathogens in plasma and platelet concentrates (PCs), respectively. So far, their inactivation capacities for HCV have only been tested in inactivation studies using model viruses for HCV. Recently, a HCV infection system for the propagation of infectious HCV in cell culture was developed. Inactivation studies were performed with cell culture-derived HCV and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a model for HCV. Plasma units or PCs were spiked with high titers of cell culture-grown viruses. After treatment of the blood units with MB plus light (Theraflex MB-Plasma system, MacoPharma) or UVC (Theraflex UV-Platelets system, MacoPharma), residual viral infectivity was assessed using sensitive cell culture systems. HCV was sensitive to inactivation by both pathogen reduction procedures. HCV in plasma was efficiently inactivated by MB plus light below the detection limit already by 1/12 of the full light dose. HCV in PCs was inactivated by UVC irradiation with a reduction factor of more than 5 log. BVDV was less sensitive to the two pathogen reduction methods. Functional assays with human HCV offer an efficient tool to directly assess the inactivation capacity of pathogen reduction procedures. Pathogen reduction technologies such as MB plus light treatment and UVC irradiation have the potential to significantly reduce transfusion-transmitted HCV infections. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. Molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens of the family Anaplasmataceae in Brazilian brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira, Fischer, 1814) and marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus, Illiger, 1815).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, J A G; Rabelo, E M L; Ribeiro, M F B

    2012-08-01

    Deer are important natural reservoir hosts of Anaplasmataceae. The present study used nested PCR and nucleotide sequencing to evaluate the occurrence of Anaplasmataceae species in 23 free-living and six captive specimens of the cervids Mazama gouazoubira and Blastocerus dichotomus in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Blood samples were tested for the presence of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp. using nPCR assays and sequencing of the msp4, msp1 and 16S rRNA genes. The identity of each sequence was confirmed by comparison with sequences available from GenBank using BLAST software. Of the animals investigated, 93.1% (27/29) were infected with haemoparasites including Anaplasma marginale (79.3%), Ehrlichia chaffeensis (3.4%), Anaplasma bovis (3.4%) and Anaplasma spp. (assigned to A. platys and A. phagocytophilum) (17.2%). Co-infection occurred in 20% (6/29) of the deer examined. Four (13.8%) were infected with A. marginale and Anaplasma sp., one (3.4%) was infected with A. marginale and E. chaffeensis, and one (3.4%) was infected with A. marginale and A. bovis. The results of the present study suggest that cross-protection does not occur in these deer. Immunological cross-reaction occurs when sera are tested diagnostically because these bacteria are closely related taxonomically, reinforcing the importance of molecular diagnosis followed by nucleotide sequencing. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Divergent Response Profile in Activated Cord Blood T cells from First-born Child Implies Birth-order-associated in Utero Immune Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Marie; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2016-01-01

    Background: First-born children are at higher risk for development of a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of ‘birth-order-effects’ on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. Objective: We studied...... programing may contribute to later development of immune-mediated diseases by increasing overall immune reactivity in first-born children as compared to younger siblings....

  15. Photodynamic treatment with mono-phenyl-tri-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin for pathogen inactivation in cord blood stem cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trannoy, Laurence L; van Hensbergen, Yvette; Lagerberg, Johan W M; Brand, Anneke

    2008-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplants and culture of hematopoietic progenitor cells require pathogen-free conditions. The application of a method of pathogen inactivation in red blood cells using photodynamic treatment (PDT) was investigated for the decontamination of cord blood stem cell (CBSC) products. CBSC products, spiked with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, were treated with PDT using mono-phenyl-tri-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (Tri-P(4)) and red light. After PDT, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the CBSC functions were performed. PDT of CBSC products resulted in the inactivation of the bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most resistant. Complete decontamination was achieved when CBSC products were contaminated with low titers of bacteria. PDT had no effect on white blood cell viability, the ex vivo expansion potential of the progenitor cells, and their capacity to differentiate to various hematopoietic cell lineages. However, PDT reduced the engraftment of human CBSCs in NOD/SCID mice, particularly affecting the B-cell lineage engraftment. Pathogen inactivation of CBSC with Tri-P(4)-mediated PDT is feasible at contamination level up to 10 to 20 colony-forming units per mL and can be considered when ex vivo expansion culture is anticipated. However, this treatment is not recommended for transplantation purposes at this time. Further investigations may elucidate why engraftment is diminished.

  16. Knowledge and practice of universal precautions against blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lack of display of universal precautions guidelines; emergency nature of the procedure; insufficient water supply; patient perceived to be at low risk of blood borne pathogens; pressure of time; and universal precautions equipments interferingwith technical skills. Although knowledge of universal precautions is high for both ...

  17. Risk of blood splashes to the eye during surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-25

    Feb 25, 2009 ... B, hepatitis C and HIV is increasing globally. Sub-Saharan ... infection from these blood-borne pathogens has become a significant .... cesarean section. Med Sci Monit 2006; 12(2): CR94-97. 2. Fitch KM, Alvarez IP, Medina RDA, et al. Occupational transmission of. HIV in health care workers. A review.

  18. Nurse-led educational campaign on blood borne pathogens and proper sharps disposal at an urban tertiary hospital in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Otieno

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that even with very high levels of immediate and delayed retention of educational content as measured by exam, the impact of an educational intervention on behavioural change may be much more short-lived. This has implications regarding the need for continuous education to support for workplace safety campaigns.

  19. Use of GetCheckedOnline, a Comprehensive Web-based Testing Service for Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Salway, Travis; Haag, Devon; Fairley, Christopher K; Wong, Jason; Grennan, Troy; Uddin, Zhaida; Buchner, Christopher S; Wong, Tom; Krajden, Mel; Tyndall, Mark; Shoveller, Jean; Ogilvie, Gina

    2017-03-20

    The British Columbia Centre for Disease Control implemented a comprehensive Web-based testing service GetCheckedOnline (GCO) in September 2014 in Vancouver, Canada. GCO's objectives are to increase testing for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs), reach high-prevalence populations facing testing barriers, and increase clinical STI service capacity. GCO was promoted through email invitations to provincial STI clinic clients, access codes to clients unable to access immediate clinic-based testing (deferred testers), and a campaign to gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). The objective of the study was to report on characteristics of GCO users, use and test outcomes (overall and by promotional strategy) during this pilot phase. We used GCO program data, website metrics, and provincial STI clinic records to describe temporal trends, progression through the service pathway, and demographic, risk, and testing outcomes for individuals creating GCO accounts during the first 15 months of implementation. Of 868 clients creating accounts, 318 (36.6%) submitted specimens, of whom 96 (30.2%) tested more than once and 10 (3.1%) had a positive STI diagnosis. The proportion of clients submitting specimens increased steadily over the course of the pilot phase following introduction of deferred tester codes. Clients were diverse with respect to age, gender, and ethnicity, although youth and individuals of nonwhite ethnicity were underrepresented. Of the 506 clients completing risk assessments, 215 (42.5%) were MSM, 89 (17.6%) were symptomatic, 47 (9.3%) were STI contacts, 232 (45.8%) reported condomless sex, 146 (28.9%) reported ≥4 partners in the past 3 months, and 76 (15.0%) reported a recent STI. A total of 63 (12.5%) GCO clients were testing for the first time. For 868 accounts created, 337 (38.8%) were by clinic invitations (0 diagnoses), 298 (34.3%) were by deferred testers (6 diagnoses), 194 (22.4%) were by promotional campaign (3

  20. Innate immune response to a bovine mastitis pathogen profiled in milk and blood monocytes using a systems biology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine mastitis is an inflammatory condition of the mammary gland which leads to reduced milk yield and increased milk somatic cell counts (SCC) resulting in an estimated annual cost to the dairy industry worldwide of ~ 2 billion euros. Mastitis has a complex etiology, with pathogenic, host and envi...

  1. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  2. Changes in the cytokine profile of patients blood with premature rupture of amniotic membranes and their pathogenic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhaylov А.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Pathogenetic study of new diagnostic and prognostic criteria for evaluation of pregnancy in terms of the cytokine profile of blood. Materials and methods: The analysis of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood of 50 pregnant women with preterm rupture of membranes in gestation of 22-34 weeks, who were treated at the Department of Pathology in pregnancy of Saratov Perinatal Center in 2012, was performed. The method of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using test systems «Vector— Best» (Novosibirsk, Russia. Results:.Clinical and laboratory examination revealed an increase levels of IL-1(3, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, while reducing the content of IL-4, IL-10 in blood. Conclusion: Manifest signs of possibility of prenatal rupture of membranes and premature labour in 22-34 weeks gestation are combined with increasing of IL-1(3, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, IL-2 and with decreasing of IL-10, IL-4 level in the blood, which indicates the need for monitoring the content of these cytokines in the blood for the diagnosis and prognosis of pregnancy.

  3. Canine tick-borne diseases in pet dogs from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin O; Tolf, Conny; Tamba, Paula; Stefanache, Mircea; Waldenström, Jonas; Dobler, Gerhard; Chițimia-Dobler, Lidia

    2017-03-23

    Tick-borne diseases are of substantial concern worldwide for animals as well as humans. Dogs have been a human companion for millennia, and their significant impact on human life renders disease in dogs to be of great concern. Tick-borne diseases in dogs represent a substantial diagnostic challenge for veterinarians in that clinical signs are often diffuse and overlapping. In addition, co-infections with two or more pathogens enhance this problem further. Molecular methods are useful to disentangle co-infections and to accurately describe prevalence and geographical distribution of tick-borne diseases. At this point, this information is lacking in many areas worldwide. Romania is one such area, where prevalence and distribution of several important pathogens need to be further investigated. To address this, we screened blood samples from 96 sick dogs with molecular methods for eight different pathogens including Babesia spp., Theileria spp., Hepatozoon spp., Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis", Mycoplasma spp., and Borrelia spp. As many as 45% (43/96) of the dogs in the study were infected with protozoan parasites. Babesia canis was the most frequent of these (28 infected dogs), whereas Hepatozoon canis was detected in 15% (14/96) and Babesia gibsoni was found in a single sample. Bacterial infection with Mycoplasma spp. occurred in 18% (17/96) of the sampled dogs. Obtained bacterial sequences revealed the occurrence of two species: Mycoplasma canis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum". In several cases co-infection with protozoan parasites and Mycoplasma sp. were detected. All dogs were negative for Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis", and for Borrelia spp. The results from the present study reinforce the notion that Babesia canis is an important pathogen in the Romanian dog population. However, more surprisingly, another protozoan species, H. canis, seems to be infecting dogs to a larger extent than

  4. CLINICAL-PATHOGENIC IMPORTANCE OF CORRELATION BETWEEN HISTOCHEMICAL INDICES OF BLOOD SYSTEM AND RHEUMATOID FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Zborovsky

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Relation between rheumatoid factor (RF and levels of Myeloperoxidase (MPO, Na*-K +-A TPh- ase (ATPh-ase, 5'-Nucleotidase (5 ’-NT, Succinate dehydrogenase (SDG in cells of peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients was investigated. 83 RA patients were observed. The activities of MPO, ATP-ase, 5’NT, SDG in blood cells were determined by hystochemical methods. In patients having increasing MPO activity in monocytes, normal level of SDG in lymphocytes and decreasing of 5'NT in monocytes and lymphocytes increasing of RF level was noted in 3 weeks after hystochemical changes (p<0.05. Determination of MPO in monocytes was the most informative test for forecasting of immunological changes in RA. The role of macrophage system in RA is discussed.

  5. Pathogen inactivation efficacy of Mirasol PRT System and Intercept Blood System for non-leucoreduced platelet-rich plasma-derived platelets suspended in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S Y; Kim, I S; Bae, J E; Kang, J W; Cho, Y J; Cho, N S; Lee, S W

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pathogen inactivation (PI) in non-leucoreduced platelet-rich plasma-derived platelets suspended in plasma using the Mirasol PRT System and the Intercept Blood System. Platelets were pooled using the Acrodose PL system and separated into two aliquots for Mirasol and Intercept treatment. Four replicates of each viral strain were used for the evaluation. For bacteria, both low-titre (45-152 CFU/unit) inoculation and high-titre (7·34-10·18 log CFU/unit) inoculation with two replicates for each bacterial strain were used. Platelets with non-detectable bacterial growth and platelets inoculated with a low titre were stored for 5 days, and culture was performed with the BacT/ALERT system. The inactivation efficacy expressed as log reduction for Mirasol and Intercept systems for viruses was as follows: human immunodeficiency virus 1, ≥4·19 vs. ≥4·23; bovine viral diarrhoea virus, 1·83 vs. ≥6·03; pseudorabies virus, 2·73 vs. ≥5·20; hepatitis A virus, 0·62 vs. 0·76; and porcine parvovirus, 0·28 vs. 0·38. The inactivation efficacy for bacteria was as follows: Escherichia coli, 5·45 vs. ≥9·22; Staphylococcus aureus, 4·26 vs. ≥10·11; and Bacillus subtilis, 5·09 vs. ≥7·74. Postinactivation bacterial growth in platelets inoculated with a low titre of S. aureus or B. subtilis was detected only with Mirasol. Pathogen inactivation efficacy of Intercept for enveloped viruses was found to be satisfactory. Mirasol showed satisfactory inactivation efficacy for HIV-1 only. The two selected non-enveloped viruses were not inactivated by both systems. Inactivation efficacy of Intercept was more robust for all bacteria tested at high or low titres. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Molecular Identification of Vertebrate and Hemoparasite DNA Within Mosquito Blood Meals From Eastern North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Jefferson A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To understand local transmission of vector-borne diseases, it is important to identify potential vectors, characterize their host feeding patterns, and determine if vector-borne pathogens are circulating within the region. This study simultaneously investigated these aspects of disease transmission by collecting engorged mosquitoes within two rural study sites in the central Red River Valley of North Dakota. Mosquitoes were identified, midguts were excised, and the blood was expelled from the midguts. DNA was extracted from blood meals and subjected to PCR and direct sequencing to identify the vertebrate origin of the blood. Using different primer sets, PCR was used to screen for two types of vector-borne pathogens, filarioid nematodes and hemosporidian parasites. White-tailed deer were the primary source of blood meals for the eight aedine mosquito species collected. None of the 288 deer-derived blood meals contained filarioid or hemosporidian DNA. In contrast, 18 of 32 Culex tarsalis and three of three Cx. pipiens blood meals contained avian blood, representing eight different species of birds. Of 24 avian-derived blood meals examined, 12 contained Plasmodium DNA, three of which also contained Leucocytozoon DNA (i.e., dual infection). Potential confounding effects resulting from parasite acquisition and development from previous blood meals (e.g., oocysts) were eliminated because host blood had been removed from the midguts prior to DNA extraction. Thus, specific parasite lineages/species could be unequivocally linked to specific vertebrate species. By combining mosquito identification with molecular techniques for identifying blood meal source and pathogens, a relatively small sample of engorged mosquitoes yielded important new information about mosquito feeding patterns and hemosporidia infections in birds. Thorough analyses of wild-caught engorged mosquitoes and other arthropods represent a powerful tool in understanding the local transmission of

  7. Molecular identification of vertebrate and hemoparasite DNA within mosquito blood meals from eastern North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehus, Joseph O; Vaughan, Jefferson A

    2013-11-01

    To understand local transmission of vector-borne diseases, it is important to identify potential vectors, characterize their host feeding patterns, and determine if vector-borne pathogens are circulating within the region. This study simultaneously investigated these aspects of disease transmission by collecting engorged mosquitoes within two rural study sites in the central Red River Valley of North Dakota. Mosquitoes were identified, midguts were excised, and the blood was expelled from the midguts. DNA was extracted from blood meals and subjected to PCR and direct sequencing to identify the vertebrate origin of the blood. Using different primer sets, PCR was used to screen for two types of vector-borne pathogens, filarioid nematodes and hemosporidian parasites. White-tailed deer were the primary source of blood meals for the eight aedine mosquito species collected. None of the 288 deer-derived blood meals contained filarioid or hemosporidian DNA. In contrast, 18 of 32 Culex tarsalis and three of three Cx. pipiens blood meals contained avian blood, representing eight different species of birds. Of 24 avian-derived blood meals examined, 12 contained Plasmodium DNA, three of which also contained Leucocytozoon DNA (i.e., dual infection). Potential confounding effects resulting from parasite acquisition and development from previous blood meals (e.g., oocysts) were eliminated because host blood had been removed from the midguts prior to DNA extraction. Thus, specific parasite lineages/species could be unequivocally linked to specific vertebrate species. By combining mosquito identification with molecular techniques for identifying blood meal source and pathogens, a relatively small sample of engorged mosquitoes yielded important new information about mosquito feeding patterns and hemosporidia infections in birds. Thorough analyses of wild-caught engorged mosquitoes and other arthropods represent a powerful tool in understanding the local transmission of vector-borne

  8. The Eco-Epidemiology of Tick-Borne Hemoparasitic Diseases Using Geographic Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Rafinejad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tick-borne diseases are of the most important diseases in the world including Iran. This survey was conducted to understand the eco-epidemiology of tick-borne hemoparasitic diseases in Qazvin province, Iran, using Geospatial Information System (GIS. Materials and Methods: DNA samples were extracted from livestock blood samples collected from different regions of Qazvin province. 18S rRNA-based PCR targeted Theileria/ Babesia species were done. Initial parameters for mapping the local tick-borne hemoparasitic diseases and raster files were obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization and Iranian Space Agency. Mapping of the parameters in relation to prevalence of these diseases were done. Statistical analysis was used for weighting parameters ranking and predicting spatial distribution in different climatic zones. Results: Vapor pressure, precipitation, and altitude are of several environmental factors correlated with tick abundances. Based on the generated maps and the results of this survey, some predicting results could be used for predicting tick-borne diseases and their control. 9.7% of ruminant blood samples (N=16 were infected with protozoa pathogens from the genera Theileria and all of the specimens were negative regarding to Babesia genera. Conclusion: Results showed that prediction of a very high prevalence of Theileria/ Babesia species and mapping endangered area is possible in different parts of Iran. Based on the environmental conditions, key factors exist for host-seeking and range expansion of ticks.

  9. Survey of spatial distribution of vector-borne disease in neighborhood dogs in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Constantino

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neighborhood dogs may act as reservoirs and disseminators of vector-borne diseases in urban areas. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to ascertain the health status and the vector-borne pathogens infecting dogs living in public areas with high levels of human movement in the city of Curitiba, southern Brazil. Blood samples from 21 neighborhood dogs that were found in nine of 22 bus stations and two public parks were subjected to a complete blood cell (CBC count, serum biochemical profiling, a commercial rapid ELISA test and a commercial real-time PCR panel of vector-borne diseases. The CBC count and serum biochemical profiling were within the normal range for dogs and only 1/21 (4.7% of the dogs was seroreactive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. The commercial real-time PCR panel showed that 7/21 (33.3% of the dogs had Mycoplasma haemocanis infection, 9/21 (42.8% had ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum’ and 4/21 (19.0% had both. No statistical association between infected by the agents found here and abnormalities in physical examinations, laboratory tests or ectoparasite presence was found (p > 0.05. In conclusion, neighborhood dogs showed low prevalence of vector-borne diseases and satisfactory wellbeing, and dogs can be used as sentinels for disease exposure.

  10. Multiplex real-time PCR and blood culture for identification of bloodstream pathogens in patients with suspected sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, H; Lisby, G; Breysse, F

    2009-01-01

    species directly from blood was used, comparatively with BC, in a multicentre trial of patients with suspected bacterial or fungal sepsis. Five hundred and fifty-eight paired samples from 359 patients were evaluated. The rate of positivity was 17% for BC and 26% for SeptiFast. Ninety-six microorganisms...... in the SeptiFast master list, and six BC isolates were identified as a species not included in the SeptiFast master list. With SeptiFast, 186 microorganisms were identified, 12 of which were considered to be contaminants. Of the 174 clinically relevant microorganisms identified with SeptiFast, 50 (29%) were...... detected by BC. More than half of the remaining microorganisms identified with SeptiFast (but not isolated after BC) were also found in routine cultures of other relevant samples taken from the patients. Future clinical studies should assess whether the use of SeptiFast is of significant advantage...

  11. Trends in antibiotic resistance among major bacterial pathogens isolated from blood cultures tested at a large private laboratory network in India, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandra, Sumanth; Mojica, Nestor; Klein, Eili Y; Ashok, Ashvin; Nerurkar, Vidya; Kumari, Mamta; Ramesh, Uma; Dey, Sunanda; Vadwai, Viral; Das, Bibhu R; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-09-01

    There have been no long-term studies on trends in antibiotic resistance (ABR) on a national scale in India. Using a private laboratory network, the ABR patterns of organisms most commonly associated with bacteremia, obtained from patients across India between 2008 and 2014, were examined. A retrospective study of patient blood cultures collected over a 7-year period (January 1, 2008-December 31, 2014) was conducted. Data on the microorganism(s) identified and their antimicrobial susceptibility were obtained from SRL Diagnostics (Mumbai, India). Of 135268 blood cultures, 18695 (14%) had at least one identified pathogen. In addition to continual high rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; approximately 44.2%), high resistance to nalidixic acid among Salmonella Typhi (98%) was observed, and carbapenem resistance increased in both Escherichia coli (7.8% to 11.5%; p=0.332) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (41.5% to 56.6%; presistance was also stable and high for both Acinetobacter species (approximately 69.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (approximately 49%). Resistance was also detected to colistin in the Gram-negatives and to vancomycin and linezolid in S. aureus. Increasing resistance to antibiotics of last-resort, particularly among Gram-negatives, suggests an urgent need for new antibiotics and improved antimicrobial stewardship programs in India. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM AND CYTOGENETIC CHANGES IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD T-LYMPHOCYTES OF PATIENTS WITH ARTHRITIS ASSOCIATED WITH IXODES TICK-BORNE BORRELIOSIS IN THE NORTHERN REGIONS OF SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Ilyinskikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have previously conducted studies that demonstrate the increased level of cytogenetic disturbances in patients with Ixodes tick-borne borreliosis (ITB. The severity of arthritis associated with ITB (AITB is also ascertained to depend on whether the patient has certain HLA-DRB1 alleles.Objective: to assess the association between HLA-DRB1 gene polymorphism and cytogenetic changes in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of patients with AITB.Subjects and methods. 146 patients with AITB, 100 clinically healthy convalescents with ITB (CITB, and a control group of 98 healthy blood donors (HBDs without a history of tick-borne infections were examined using cytogenetic (micronucleus analysis of cytokinesis-blocked peripheral blood T lymphocytes and molecular genetic (PCR analysis of HLA-DRB1 gene polymorphism methods.Results and discussion. The frequency of cytokinesis-blocked lymphocytes with micronuclei in the AITB group was significantly higher than that in the CITB and HBD groups (p<0.01 with the exception of the results obtained in the subgroup of patients with AITB who had the DRB1*10 allele (p>0.05. The highest levels of lymphocytes with micronuclei were observed in AITB patients with the DRB1*17(03, *01, and *04 alleles as compared to those in the CITB and HBD groups (p<0.001. The CITB group showed the most significant increase in the detection rate of lymphocytes with micronuclei in people with the DRB1*01, DRB1*04, or *17(03 alleles. At the same time, there were no significant differences in the number of lymphocytes with micronuclei in the HBD group, depending on the HLA-DRB1 gene alleles (p>0.05. Thus, the patients with AITB had the highest frequency of cytogenetic disorders with the exception of individuals with the DRB1*10 allele.

  13. Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin J; Atkinson, Barry; Czechowski, Donna M; Larsen, Peter A; Meeks, Heather N; Carrera, Juan P; Duplechin, Ryan M; Hewson, Roger; Junushov, Asankadyr T; Gavrilova, Olga N; Breininger, Irena; Phillips, Carleton J; Baker, Robert J; Hay, John

    2011-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is an emerging pathogen in Europe and Asia. We investigated TBEV in Kyrgyzstan by collecting small mammals and ticks from diverse localities and analyzing them for evidence of TBEV infection. We found TBEV circulating in Kyrgyzstan much farther south and at higher altitudes than previously reported.

  14. Visible DNA microarray system as an adjunctive molecular test in the identification of pathogenic fungi directly from a blood culture bottle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturaro, Lais Lovison; Gonoi, Tohru; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Tararam, Cibele Aparecida; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Lyra, Luzia; Trabasso, Plinio; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Moretti, Maria Luiza

    2018-03-07

    A DNA microarray platform, based on the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1, ITS2) of the rRNA gene, was developed to identify 32 fungal pathogens at the species level. The probe sequences were spotted onto polycarbonate slides with a mini-microarray printer, and after the hybridization, the results were visible with the naked eye. The performance of the microarray platform was evaluated against the commercial automated systems (Vitek ® 2 and BD Phoenix™ systems) and DNA sequencing (gold standard). A total of 461 blood culture bottles were tested: 127 positive for fungi, 302 positive for bacteria, and 32 tested negative. Once the microorganisms were identified by automated systems, fungal DNA was extracted directly from the blood culture bottles. The DNA products were tested using the microarray platform, and DNA sequencing was performed. The results of the microarray and DNA sequencing were concordant in 96.7% of cases, and the results from the automated systems and DNA sequencing were concordant in 98.4%. Of all the nucleotide sequences contained in the microarray platform, the microarray failed to identify four fungal isolates (one Candida parapsilosis , two Candida tropicalis, and one Cryptococcus neoformans ). Of note, the microarray detected Candida krusei DNA in two blood cultures from the same patient, whereas the automated system was only positive for Enterococcus faecium. Our microarray system provided reliable and fast fungal identification compared to DNA sequencing and the automated systems. The simplicity of reading the results by the naked eye made this DNA platform a suitable method for fungal molecular diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Antibiotic Use in Thailand: Quantifying Impact on Blood Culture Yield and Estimates of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Julia; Hyder, Joseph A.; Peruski, Leonard F.; Fisher, Cindy; Jorakate, Possawat; Kaewpan, Anek; Dejsirilert, Surang; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Olsen, Sonja J.; Dowell, Scott F.; Chantra, Somrak; Tanwisaid, Kittisak; Maloney, Susan A.; Baggett, Henry C.

    2010-01-01

    No studies have quantified the impact of pre-culture antibiotic use on the recovery of individual blood-borne pathogens or on population-level incidence estimates for Streptococcus pneumoniae. We conducted bloodstream infection surveillance in Thailand during November 2005?June 2008. Pre-culture antibiotic use was assessed by reported use and by serum antimicrobial activity. Of 35,639 patient blood cultures, 27% had reported pre-culture antibiotic use and 24% (of 24,538 tested) had serum anti...

  16. Survey of spatial distribution of vector-borne disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neighborhood dogs may act as reservoirs and disseminators of vector-borne diseases in urban areas. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to ascertain the health status and the vector-borne pathogens infecting dogs living in public areas with high levels of human movement in the city of Curitiba, southern Brazil.

  17. An analysis of the predictive value of the HIV Ag/Ab screening assay within the performance characteristics of the DiaSorin LIAISON XL for the detection of blood-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Khoa T D; Götz, Hannelore; Slingerland, Bibi C G C; Klaasse, Janienne; Schutten, Martin; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H

    2018-05-01

    Correct identification of blood borne viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is crucial in detection and follow up of infection in patients. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the DiaSorin LIAISON XL (LIAISON XL) for screening of HBV, HCV and HIV infection. In addition, we investigated the variability of the signal-to-cuttoff ratio (S/CO) of the LIAISON XL HIV Ag/Ab assay and it's predictive value in subsequent confirmation of HIV-1 infection. We analyzed 16,497 blood samples on which HBV, HCV and HIV screening was performed. We defined A) archived samples previously tested with an arbitrary result in the Abbott ARCHITECT i2000SR system; B) prospectively collected samples which were simultaneously tested on the LIAISON XL and ARCHITECT i2000SR; C) prospectively collected serum samples for HIV testing which were tested solely on the LIAISON XL. The agreements of HBV-, HCV-, and HIV markers between the two compared systems are remarkably high. Among the samples which were prospectively tested for HIV Ab/Ag on the LIASON XL, 229 (1.6%) were reactive of which 141 (61.6%) could be confirmed. Increasing the signal-to-cutoff value to 4 could increase the positive predictive value (PPV) to 88.1% without decreasing sensitivity. The LIAISON XL system proved to be an excellent system for diagnosing HBV, HCV, and HIV. Our data for the first time showed that increasing the HIV S/CO ratio was safe and increased the PPV for confirmed HIV infection in the tested population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Online interventions to address HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rod; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Salway, Travis; Gilbert, Mark; Shoveller, Jean

    2017-11-01

    Globally, young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) continue to experience disproportionately high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs). As such, there are strong public health imperatives to evaluate innovative prevention, treatment and care interventions, including online interventions. This study reviewed and assessed the status of published research (e.g. effectiveness; acceptability; differential effects across subgroups) involving online interventions that address HIV/STBBIs among young gbMSM. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar to identify relevant English-language publications from inception to November 2016. Studies that assessed an online intervention regarding the prevention, care, or treatment of HIV/STBBIs were included. Studies with online interventions show promise at addressing HIV/STBBI among young gbMSM, to date, little emphasis has been placed on assessing: (i) potential differential effects of interventions across subgroups of young gbMSM; (ii) effectiveness studies of interventions in the dissemination phase; and (iii) on some "key" populations of young gbMSM (e.g. those who are: transgender, from low-income settings and/or HIV positive). Future research that unpacks the potentially distinctive experiences of particular subgroups with "real world" interventions is needed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  19. Complete genome sequence, lifestyle, and multi-drug resistance of the human pathogen Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100 isolated from blood samples of a leukemia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium resistens was initially recovered from human infections and recognized as a new coryneform species that is highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. Bacteremia associated with this organism in immunocompromised patients was rapidly fatal as standard minocycline therapies failed. C. resistens DSM 45100 was isolated from a blood culture of samples taken from a patient with acute myelocytic leukemia. The complete genome sequence of C. resistens DSM 45100 was determined by pyrosequencing to identify genes contributing to multi-drug resistance, virulence, and the lipophilic lifestyle of this newly described human pathogen. Results The genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 consists of a circular chromosome of 2,601,311 bp in size and the 28,312-bp plasmid pJA144188. Metabolic analysis showed that the genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 lacks genes for typical sugar uptake systems, anaplerotic functions, and a fatty acid synthase, explaining the strict lipophilic lifestyle of this species. The genome encodes a broad spectrum of enzymes ensuring the availability of exogenous fatty acids for growth, including predicted virulence factors that probably contribute to fatty acid metabolism by damaging host tissue. C. resistens DSM 45100 is able to use external L-histidine as a combined carbon and nitrogen source, presumably as a result of adaptation to the hitherto unknown habitat on the human skin. Plasmid pJA144188 harbors several genes contributing to antibiotic resistance of C. resistens DSM 45100, including a tetracycline resistance region of the Tet W type known from Lactobacillus reuteri and Streptococcus suis. The tet(W) gene of pJA144188 was cloned in Corynebacterium glutamicum and was shown to confer high levels of resistance to tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline in vitro. Conclusions The detected gene repertoire of C. resistens DSM 45100 provides insights into the lipophilic lifestyle and virulence functions of this newly recognized

  20. Complete genome sequence, lifestyle, and multi-drug resistance of the human pathogen Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100 isolated from blood samples of a leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Jasmin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corynebacterium resistens was initially recovered from human infections and recognized as a new coryneform species that is highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. Bacteremia associated with this organism in immunocompromised patients was rapidly fatal as standard minocycline therapies failed. C. resistens DSM 45100 was isolated from a blood culture of samples taken from a patient with acute myelocytic leukemia. The complete genome sequence of C. resistens DSM 45100 was determined by pyrosequencing to identify genes contributing to multi-drug resistance, virulence, and the lipophilic lifestyle of this newly described human pathogen. Results The genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 consists of a circular chromosome of 2,601,311 bp in size and the 28,312-bp plasmid pJA144188. Metabolic analysis showed that the genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 lacks genes for typical sugar uptake systems, anaplerotic functions, and a fatty acid synthase, explaining the strict lipophilic lifestyle of this species. The genome encodes a broad spectrum of enzymes ensuring the availability of exogenous fatty acids for growth, including predicted virulence factors that probably contribute to fatty acid metabolism by damaging host tissue. C. resistens DSM 45100 is able to use external L-histidine as a combined carbon and nitrogen source, presumably as a result of adaptation to the hitherto unknown habitat on the human skin. Plasmid pJA144188 harbors several genes contributing to antibiotic resistance of C. resistens DSM 45100, including a tetracycline resistance region of the Tet W type known from Lactobacillus reuteri and Streptococcus suis. The tet(W gene of pJA144188 was cloned in Corynebacterium glutamicum and was shown to confer high levels of resistance to tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline in vitro. Conclusions The detected gene repertoire of C. resistens DSM 45100 provides insights into the lipophilic lifestyle and virulence functions of

  1. Neuroinvasion of the highly pathogenic influenza virus H7N1 is caused by disruption of the blood brain barrier in an avian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida J Chaves

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV causes central nervous system (CNS lesions in avian and mammalian species, including humans. However, the mechanism used by IAV to invade the brain has not been determined. In the current work, we used chickens infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus as a model to elucidate the mechanism of entry of IAV into the brain. The permeability of the BBB was evaluated in fifteen-day-old H7N1-infected and non-infected chickens using three different methods: (i detecting Evans blue (EB extravasation into the brain, (ii determining the leakage of the serum protein immunoglobulin Y (IgY into the brain and (iii assessing the stability of the tight-junction (TJ proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-1 in the chicken brain at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi. The onset of the induced viremia was evaluated by quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR at the same time points. Viral RNA was detected from 18 hpi onward in blood samples, whereas IAV antigen was detected at 24 hpi in brain tissue samples. EB and IgY extravasation and loss of integrity of the TJs associated with the presence of viral antigen was first observed at 36 and 48 hpi in the telencephalic pallium and cerebellum. Our data suggest that the mechanism of entry of the H7N1 HPAI into the brain includes infection of the endothelial cells at early stages (24 hpi with subsequent disruption of the TJs of the BBB and leakage of virus and serum proteins into the adjacent neuroparenchyma.

  2. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Nucleic Acid-Based Device for the Amplification, Detection, and Identification of Microbial Pathogens Directly From Whole Blood Specimens. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens' classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.

  3. Deforestation: effects on vector-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J F; Molyneux, D H; Birley, M H

    1993-01-01

    This review addresses changes in the ecology of vectors and epidemiology of vector-borne diseases which result from deforestation. Selected examples are considered from viral and parasitic infections (arboviruses, malaria, the leishmaniases, filariases, Chagas Disease and schistosomiasis) where disease patterns have been directly or indirectly influenced by loss of natural tropical forests. A wide range of activities have resulted in deforestation. These include colonisation and settlement, transmigrant programmes, logging, agricultural activities to provide for cash crops, mining, hydropower development and fuelwood collection. Each activity influences the prevalence, incidence and distribution of vector-borne disease. Three main regions are considered--South America, West & Central Africa and South-East Asia. In each, documented changes in vector ecology and behaviour and disease pattern have occurred. Such changes result from human activity at the forest interface and within the forest. They include both deforestation and reafforestation programmes. Deforestation, or activities associated with it, have produced new habitats for Anopheles darlingi mosquitoes and have caused malaria epidemics in South America. The different species complexes in South-East Asia (A. dirus, A. minimus, A. balabacensis) have been affected in different ways by forest clearance with different impacts on malaria incidence. The ability of zoophilic vectors to adapt to human blood as an alternative source of food and to become associated with human dwellings (peridomestic behaviour) have influenced the distribution of the leishmaniases in South America. Certain species of sandflies (Lutzomyia intermedia, Lu. longipalpis, Lu. whitmani), which were originally zoophilic and sylvatic, have adapted to feeding on humans in peridomestic and even periurban situations. The changes in behaviour of reservoir hosts and the ability of pathogens to adapt to new reservoir hosts in the newly

  4. Feasibility of Using the Mosquito Blood Meal for Rapid and Efficient Human and Animal Virus Surveillance and Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Garver, Lindsey S; Bingham, Karen M; Hang, Jun; Jochim, Ryan C; Davidson, Silas A; Richardson, Jason H; Jarman, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Mosquito blood meals taken from humans and animals potentially represent a useful source of blood for the detection of blood-borne pathogens. In this feasibility study, Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were fed with blood meals spiked with dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and harvested at serial time points. These mosquitoes are not competent vectors, and the virus is not expected to replicate. Ingested blood was spotted on Whatman FTA cards and stored at room temperature. Mosquito abdomens were removed and stored at -80°C. Control blood meal aliquots were stored in vials or applied onto FTA cards. After 4 weeks of storage, the samples were extracted using beadbeating and QIAamp Viral RNA kit (Qiagen Sciences, Germantown, MD). Recovered viral RNA was analyzed by DENV-2 TaqMan RT-PCR assay and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Overall viral RNA recovery efficiency was 15% from the directly applied dried blood spots and approximately 20% or higher for dried blood spots made by blotting mosquito midgut on FTA cards. Viral RNA in mosquito-ingested blood decreases over time, but remains detectable 24 hours after blood feeding. The viral sequences in FTA-stored specimens can be maintained at room temperature. The strategy has the potential utility in expedited zoonotic virus discovery and blood-borne pathogen surveillance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Innovative Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Sascha; Brem, Alexander; Muench, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization is a hot topic in innovation management, whereby the phenomenon of “Born Globals” is still limited to research in the domains of Entrepreneurship and International Management. As business model design plays a key role for Born Globals, we link these two concepts. For this, we...... propose hypotheses about the influence of efficiency-centered and novelty-entered business model design on international firm performance. To test these hypotheses, we performed a quantitative survey with 252 founders of international companies in Germany, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Additionally, we...... gained further insights through a case study analysis of 11 Born Globals. The results show that business model design matters to international firm performance and the business model design of Born Globals tends to be more efficiency-centered. Based on a multiple case study, we analyzed business models...

  6. Blood Meal Analysis to Identify Reservoir Hosts for Amblyomma americanum Ticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Lisa S.; Storch, Gregory A.; Thach, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to identify wildlife reservoirs for tick-borne pathogens are frequently limited by poor understanding of tick–host interactions and potentially transient infectivity of hosts under natural conditions. To identify reservoir hosts for lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum)–associated pathogens, we used a novel technology. In field-collected ticks, we used PCR to amplify a portion of the 18S rRNA gene in remnant blood meal DNA. Reverse line blot hybridization with host-specific probes was then used to subsequently detect and identify amplified DNA. Although several other taxa of wildlife hosts contribute to tick infection rates, our results confirm that the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a reservoir host for several A. americanum–associated pathogens. Identification of host blood meal frequency and reservoir competence can help in determining human infection rates caused by these pathogens. PMID:20202418

  7. Arthropod-borne agents in wild Orinoco geese (Neochen jubata) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Karin; Luzzi, Mayara de Cássia; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; de Oliveira, Juliana Paula; Alves Junior, José Roberto Ferreira; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; André, Marcos Rogério

    2017-12-01

    Although Orinoco goose (Neochen jubata) is an anatid species widely distributed in South America, scarce are the reports on the occurrence of arthropod-borne pathogens in this avian species. The present work aimed to verify, by serological and molecular methods, the occurrence of haemosporida piroplasmids and Anaplasmataceae agents in wild Orinoco geese captured in Brazil. Between 2010 and 2014, 62 blood samples were collected from free-living geese captured in the Araguaia River, Goiás State, Brazil. Six geese (10%) were seropositive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, showing titers ranging from 40 and 80. Twenty out of 62 blood samples (32.25%) were positive in nested PCR for hemosporidia (cytochrome b gene). Fifteen and five sequences shared identity with Haemoproteus and Plasmodium, respectively. Six out of 62 blood samples (9.68%) were positive in nested PCR for Babesia spp. (18S rRNA gene); one sequence showed to be closely related to Babesia vogeli. Thirty (48.38%) out of 62 Orinoco geese blood samples were positive in nested cPCR assays for Anaplasmataceae agents (16S rRNA gene): three for Anaplasma spp. and 27 for Ehrlichia. Six geese were simultaneously positive to Haemoproteus and Ehrlichia; three animals were co-positive to different Ehrlichia species/genotypes; and one goose sample was positive for both Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. The present work showed the occurrence of Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Babesia, Plasmodium, and Haemoproteus species in free-living N. jubata in Brazil. The threat of these arthropod-borne pathogens in Orinoco goose's fitness, especially during the breading season, should be assessed in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Body lice of homeless people reveal the presence of several emerging bacterial pathogens in northern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louni, Meriem; Mana, Nassima; Bitam, Idir; Dahmani, Mustapha; Parola, Philippe; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2018-04-17

    Human lice, Pediculus humanus, are obligate blood-sucking parasites. Body lice, Pediculus h. humanus, occur in two divergent mitochondrial clades (A and D) each exhibiting a particular geographic distribution. Currently, the body louse is recognized as the only vector for louse-borne diseases. In this study, we aimed to study the genetic diversity of body lice collected from homeless populations in three localities of northern Algeria, and to investigate louse-borne pathogens in these lice. In this study, 524 body lice specimens were collected from 44 homeless people in three localities: Algiers, Tizi Ouzou and Boumerdès located in northern Algeria. Duplex clade specific real-time PCRs (qPCR) and Cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis were performed in order to identify the mitochondrial clade. Screening of louse-borne pathogens bacteria was based on targeting specific genes for each pathogen using qPCR supplemented by sequencing. All body lice belong to clade A. Through amplification and sequencing of the cytb gene we confirmed the presence of three haplotypes: A5, A9 and A63, which is novel. The molecular investigation of the 524 body lice samples revealed the presence of four human pathogens: Bartonella quintana (13.35%), Coxiella burnetii (10.52%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.76%) and Acinetobacter species (A. baumannii, A. johnsonii, A. berezeniae, A. nosocomialis and A. variabilis, in total 46.94%). To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to show the genetic diversity and presence of several emerging pathogenic bacteria in homeless' body lice from Algeria. We also report for the first time, the presence of several species of Acinetobacter in human body lice. Our results highlight the fact that body lice may be suspected as being a much broader vector of several pathogenic agents than previously thought. Nevertheless, other studies are needed to encourage epidemiological investigations and surveys of louse-associated infections.

  9. [Tick borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, B R

    2005-11-01

    It is known for many years that tick-borne diseases have worldwide a high economical impact on farming industry and veterinary medicine. But only in the last twenty years the importance of such diseases were notified in human medicine by the medical community and the public with emerging of the tick borne encephalitis virus and the description of Borrelia burgdorferi. It is often forgotten that many other infectious agents as bacteria, virus, Rickettsia or protozoa can be transmitted by ticks. Such diseases are rarely diagnosed in Europe either they are overlooked and misdiagnosed or they are connected with special professional activities. The development of new regions for tourism with different out door activities (adventure trips, trekking, hunting) leads to an exposure to different tick borne diseases, which are often misdiagnosed.

  10. Tick-borne rickettsioses, neglected emerging diseases in rural Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mediannikov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsioses are one of the most important causes of systemic febrile illness among travelers from developed countries, but little is known about their incidence in indigenous populations, especially in West Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overall seroprevalence evaluated by immunofluorescence using six rickettsial antigens (spotted fever and typhus group in rural populations of two villages of the Sine-Saloum region of Senegal was found to be 21.4% and 51% for spotted fever group rickettsiae for Dielmo and Ndiop villages, respectively. We investigated the role of tick-borne rickettsiae as the cause of acute non-malarial febrile diseases in the same villages. The incidence of rickettsial DNA in 204 blood samples from 134 (62M and 72F febrile patients negative for malaria was studied. DNA extracted from whole blood was tested by two qPCR systems. Rickettsial DNA was found in nine patients, eight with Rickettsia felis (separately reported. For the first time in West Africa, Rickettsia conorii was diagnosed in one patient. We also tested 2,767 Ixodid ticks collected in two regions of Senegal (Niakhar and Sine-Saloum from domestic animals (cows, sheep, goats, donkeys and horses by qPCR and identified five different pathogenic rickettsiae. We found the following: Rickettsia aeschlimannii in Hyalomma marginatum rufipes (51.3% and 44.8% in Niakhar and Sine-Saloum region, respectively, in Hyalomma truncatum (6% and 6.8% and in Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (0.5%, only in Niakhar; R. c. conorii in Rh. e. evertsi (0.4%, only in Sine-Saloum; Rickettsia massiliae in Rhipicephalus guilhoni (22.4%, only in Niakhar; Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae in Hyalomma truncatum (13.5%, only in Sine-Saloum; and Rickettsia africae in Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (0.7% and 0.4% in Niakhar and Sine-Saloum region, respectively as well as in Rhipicephalus annulatus (20%, only in Sine-Saloum. We isolated two rickettsial strains from H. truncatum: R. s

  11. Efeito de lodo de esgoto sobre patógenos habitantes do solo e severidade de oídio da soja Effect of sewage sludge in soil-borne pathogens and powdery mildew severity in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Fernando de Araújo

    2009-09-01

    ântulas de soja, nos três cultivos, foi inversamente proporcional à concentração do lodo de Franca, sendo totalmente inibida na concentração de 20%. Nos estudos com R. solani não foram observados efeitos da aplicação do lodo da ETE de Franca sobre o tombamento e a severidade. No primeiro cultivo a resposta ao tombamento foi quadrática para o lodo Barueri, sendo que ocorreu aumento nas concentrações de 1N e 2N, e redução na concentração 4N. No segundo cultivo ocorreu aumento nos índices de tombamento de plantas em relação ao primeiro, com resposta quadrática para o lodo Barueri, mas com ponto de inflexão mínimo na concentração de 1N, sendo que para a concentração 8N o tombamento foi semelhante à testemunha. A severidade da doença no colo das plantas manteve a mesma resposta quadrática para o lodo de Barueri nos dois cultivos, com ponto de máximo na dose 4N. Para M. phaseolina a incidência da doença foi inversamente proporcional à concentração do lodo de Franca. Dessa forma, os resultados não permitem conclusão sobre a indução de supressividade à R. solani e M. phaseolina.Sewage sludge, complying with environmental demands, has potential for use in agriculture. The incorporation of sewage sludge may changes the chemical, physical and biological soil properties, for being rich in macro and micronutrients and organic matter. These changes can provide benefits such as the increase in the availability of nutrients for plants, and the induction of suppressiveness to soilborne plant pathogens and resistance to foliar diseases. However, it may influence negatively the biological and chemical balance of the soil, due to the presence of contaminants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of sewage sludge on the severity soybean (Glycine max powdery mildew (Erysiphe diffusa and on suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina The experiments used soil which received four successive applications of sewage sludge

  12. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  13. Detection of Dysferlin Gene Pathogenic Variants in the Indian Population in Patients Predicted to have a Dysferlinopathy Using a Blood-based Monocyte Assay and Clinical Algorithm: A Model for Accurate and Cost-effective Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastur, Rashna Sam; Gaitonde, Pradnya Satish; Kachwala, Munira; Nallamilli, Babi R R; Ankala, Arunkanth; Khadilkar, Satish V; Atchayaram, Nalini; Gayathri, N; Meena, A K; Rufibach, Laura; Shira, Sarah; Hegde, Madhuri

    2017-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is the most common adult-onset class of muscular dystrophies in India, but a majority of suspected LGMDs in India remain unclassified to the genetic subtype level. The next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based approaches have allowed molecular characterization and subtype diagnosis in a majority of these patients in India. (I) To select probable dysferlinopathy (LGMD2B) cases from other LGMD subtypes using two screening methods (i) to determine the status of dysferlin protein expression in blood (peripheral blood mononuclear cell) by monocyte assay (ii) using a predictive algorithm called automated LGMD diagnostic assistant (ALDA) to obtain possible LGMD subtypes based on clinical symptoms. (II) Identification of gene pathogenic variants by NGS for 34 genes associated with LGMD or LGMD like muscular dystrophies, in cases showing: absence of dysferlin protein by the monocyte assay and/or a typical dysferlinopathy phenotype, with medium to high predictive scores using the ALDA tool. Out of the 125 patients screened by NGS, 96 were confirmed with two dysferlin variants, of which 84 were homozygous. Single dysferlin pathogenic variants were seen in 4 patients, whereas 25 showed no variants in the dysferlin gene. In this study, 98.2% of patients with absence of the dysferlin protein showed one or more variants in the dysferlin gene and hence has a high predictive significance in diagnosing dysferlinopathies. However, collection of blood samples from all over India for protein analysis is expensive. Our analysis shows that the use of the "ALDA tool" could be a cost-effective alternative method. Identification of dysferlin pathogenic variants by NGS is the ultimate method for diagnosing dysferlinopathies though follow-up with the monocyte assay can be useful to understand the phenotype in relation to the dysferlin protein expression and also be a useful biomarker for future clinical trials.

  14. Quantitative studies of lymphoid organs, blood and lymph in inbred athymic and euthymic LEW rats under germfree and specified-pathogen-free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, B; Hougen, H P

    1987-01-01

    , haematological values and differential counts of bone marrow, peripheral blood and lymph. Athymic rats had a lower body weight, less densely populated lymphoid organs, and fewer lymphocytes in the blood and lymph compared with euthymic animals. No difference was seen between athymic rats under germfree and SPF...

  15. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, D.G.; Koopmans, M.; Verhoef, L.; Duizer, E.; Aidara-Kane, A.; Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Langelaar, M.; Threfall, J.; Scheutz, F.; van der Giessen, J.; Kruse, H.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease,

  16. Methods for detecting pathogens in the beef food chain: detecting particular pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main food-borne pathogens of concern in the beef food chain are Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella spp.; however, the presence of other pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter spp., Clostridium spp., Bacillus cereus, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. par...

  17. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O. Falkinham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators.

  18. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-06-09

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators.

  19. Accuracy of LightCycler® SeptiFast for the detection and identification of pathogens in the blood of patients with suspected sepsis: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Dark, Paul; Wilson, Claire; Blackwood, Bronagh; McAuley, Danny F.; Perkins, Gavin D.; McMullan, Ronan; Gates, Simon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is growing interest in the potential utility of molecular diagnostics in improving the detection of life-threatening infection (sepsis). LightCycler® SeptiFast is a multipathogen probebased real-time PCR system targeting DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi present in blood samples within a few hours. We report here the protocol of the first systematic review of published clinical diagnostic accuracy studies of this technology when compared with blood culture in the setting o...

  20. Management of soil-borne diseases of organic vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Hafiza Asma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the rising awareness of the adverse effects of chemical pesticides, people are looking for organically grown vegetables. Consumers are increasingly choosing organic foods due to the perception that they are healthier than those conventionally grown. Vegetable crops are vulnerable to a range of pathogenic organisms that reduce yield by killing the plant or damaging the product, thus making it unmarketable. Soil-borne diseases are among the major factors contributing to low yields of organic produce. Apart from chemical pesticides there are several methods that can be used to protect crops from soil-borne pathogens. These include the introduction of biocontrol agents against soil-borne plant pathogens, plants with therapeutic effects and organic soil amendments that stimulate antagonistic activities of microorganisms to soil-borne diseases. The decomposition of organic matter in soil also results in the accumulation of specific compounds that may be antifungal or nematicidal. With the growing interest in organic vegetables, it is necessary to find non chemical means of plant disease control. This review describes the impact of soil-borne diseases on organic vegetables and methods used for their control.

  1. Nosocomial pathogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic organisms in the environment of the neonatal unit, 92 swabs were randomly collected from cots, incubators and various ...

  2. Seed-borne mycoflora of local and improved wheat ( Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three varieties each of local and improved wheat (Triticum sativum) cultivars were investigated for seed-borne pathogenic mycoflora using the plate technique and laid on completely randomized design. A total 99 fungal isolate grouped into five fungal species namely; Rhizopus nigricans, Mucor spp, Penillium jenseni, ...

  3. Where was Joseph Babinski born?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H A G Teive

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the neurological literature about where Joseph Babinski was born, including a myth propounded by various important authors that he was born in Lima, Peru. However, according to the most consistent biographical data, he was in fact born in Paris, France, and became a medical celebrity there and in Poland as well as around the world.

  4. Importance of seed-borne fungi of sorghum and pearl millet in Burkina Faso and their control using plant extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zida, Elisabeth Pawindé; Sérémé, Paco; Leth, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    recorded on each crop by the blotter test. Six essential oils of plants were investigated for their inhibitory activity against eight pathogenic fungi. Thirty four and 27 fungal species were found in seed samples of sorghum and pearl millet, respectively. Phoma sp. and Fusarium moniliforme infected 95...... pathogens. Development of plant extracts for the control of seed-borne pathogens and public awareness on seed-borne diseases management measures for maintaining quality seed should be increased....

  5. Knowledge of Brucella as a food-borne pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although Brucella spp. are known for causing reproductive losses in domestic livestock, they are also capable of infecting humans and causing clinical disease. Human infection with Brucella is almost exclusively a result of direct contact with infected animals or consumption of products made from un...

  6. Rapid Detection of Arthropod-Borne Pathogens in Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    in ELISA testing. A cone-shaped plastic pestle is attached to a Dremel drill and the mosquito is homogenized. At a laboratory, each Eppendorf tube is...understanding of the current practice for obtaining mosquitoes for testing. We recieved a plastic eppendorf tube and a plastic pestle used to homogenize...circumsporozoite antigen in Anopheline Mosquitoes collected in Southern Thailand . Lee, M., B. A. Harrison, G. E. Lewis, Jr. Am J. Trop Med Hyg 42(4), 1990

  7. Public health risk of some milk borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.A. Zeinhom

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 150 samples of raw milk, 75 each of farm and market milk were collected from different farms and supermarkets in Beni-Suef Governorate, in addition to 30 stool samples from milk handlers and 25 milker's hand swabs were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Aeromonas and Yersinia. Isolates were identified biochemically and serologically. The obtained results revealed that E. coli was detected in a percentage of 26.7% and 16% in the examined raw market and bulk farm milk respectively, while in stool and hand swabs samples were 16.6% and 16%, respectively. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. failed to be detected in any of the examined samples. Additionally, 45% and 16.7% of the recovered E. coli strains from the examined raw market and farm milk samples were enteropathogenic O166, while 55% and 83.3 were untypable, respectively. On the other hand 60% of human stool samples isolates were O 148 and 40% of the isolates were untypable, while 100% of the hand swab isolates were untypable. The results also exhibits isolation rate of Aeromonas hydrophila in a percentage of 24%, 13.3%, 10% and 16% from market milk, farm milk samples, stool and hand swabs respectively. While Yersinea enterocolitica represent 3.3% in the stool samples only. The public health significance of isolated strains as well as suggested control measures were discussed.

  8. Molecular detection of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa in cervids and wild boars from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, André; Parreira, Ricardo; Nunes, Mónica; Casadinho, Afonso; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Campino, Lenea; Maia, Carla

    2016-05-10

    Wildlife can act as reservoir of different tick-borne pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of tick-borne bacteria and protozoa with veterinary and zoonotic importance in cervids and wild boars from the Centre and South of Portugal. One hundred and forty one blood samples from free-ranging ungulates including 73 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 65 wild boars (Sus scrofa) and three fallow deer (Dama dama) were tested for the presence of Anaplasma marginale/A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia spp., Babesia/Theileria spp., Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.), and Rickettsia spp. DNA by PCR. Anaplasma spp. DNA was detected in 33 (43.4 %) cervids (31 red deer and two fallow deer) and in two (3.1 %) wild boars while Theileria spp. were found in 34 (44.7 %) cervids (32 red deer and two fallow deer) and in three (4.6 %) wild boar blood samples. Sequence analysis of msp4 sequences identified A. marginale, A. ovis, while the analysis of rDNA sequence data disclosed the presence of A. platys and A. phagocytophilum and T. capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3. Anaplasma spp./Theileria spp. mixed infections were found in 17 cervids (22.4 %) and in two wild boars (3.1 %). All samples were negative for Babesia sp., B. burgdorferi (s.l.), Ehrlichia sp. or Rickettsia sp. This is the first detection of Anaplasma marginale, A. ovis, A. phagocytophilum, A. platys, Theileria capreoli and Theileria sp. OT3 in cervids and wild boars from Portugal. Further studies concerning the potential pathogenicity of the different species of  Anaplasma and Theileria infecting wild ungulates, the identification of their vector range, and their putative infectivity to domestic livestock and humans should be undertaken.

  9. Deep Sequencing of RNA from Blood and Oral Swab Samples Reveals the Presence of Nucleic Acid from a Number of Pathogens in Patients with Acute Ebola Virus Disease and Is Consistent with Bacterial Translocation across the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Miles W; Haldenby, Sam; Rickett, Natasha Y; Pályi, Bernadett; Garcia-Dorival, Isabel; Liu, Xuan; Barker, Gary; Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Fara Raymond; Williamson, E Diane; Laws, Thomas R; Kerber, Romy; Sissoko, Daouda; Magyar, Nóra; Di Caro, Antonino; Biava, Mirella; Fletcher, Tom E; Sprecher, Armand; Ng, Lisa F P; Rénia, Laurent; Magassouba, N'faly; Günther, Stephan; Wölfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Matthews, David A; Hiscox, Julian A

    2017-01-01

    In this study, samples from the 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus outbreak from patients in Guinea with Ebola virus disease (EVD) were analyzed to discover and classify what other pathogens were present. Throat swabs were taken from deceased EVD patients, and peripheral blood samples were analyzed that had been taken from patients when they presented at the treatment center with acute illness. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and bioinformatics were used to identify the potential microorganisms. This approach confirmed Ebola virus (EBOV) in all samples from patients diagnosed as acute positive for the virus by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in deployed field laboratories. Nucleic acid mapping to Plasmodium was also used on the patient samples, confirming results obtained with an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) conducted in the field laboratories. The data suggested that a high Plasmodium load, as determined by sequence read depth, was associated with mortality and influenced the host response, whereas a lower parasite load did not appear to affect outcome. The identifications of selected bacteria from throat swabs via RNA-seq were confirmed by culture. The data indicated that the potential pathogens identified in the blood samples were associated with translocation from the gut, suggesting the presence of bacteremia, which transcriptome data suggested may induce or aggravate the acute-phase response observed during EVD. Transcripts mapping to different viruses were also identified, including those indicative of lytic infections. The development of high-resolution analysis of samples from patients with EVD will help inform care pathways and the most appropriate general antimicrobial therapy to be used in a resource-poor setting. IMPORTANCE Our results highlight the identification of an array of pathogens in the blood of patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD). This has not been done before, and the data have important implications for the

  10. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Helena Urso Pitassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%. Sixteen donors (3.2% were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  11. Born Level Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  12. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  13. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashika El Ridi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  14. Vector-borne diseases in Haiti: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chetrit, Eli; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Haiti lies on the western third of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean, and is one of the poorest nations in the Western hemisphere. Haiti attracts a lot of medical attention and support due to severe natural disasters followed by disastrous health consequences. Vector-borne infections are still prevalent there with some unique aspects comparing it to Latin American countries and other Caribbean islands. Although vector-borne viral diseases such as dengue and recently chikungunya can be found in many of the Caribbean islands, including Haiti, there is an apparent distinction of the vector-borne parasitic diseases. Contrary to neighboring Carribbean islands, Haiti is highly endemic for malaria, lymphatic filariasis and mansonellosis. Affected by repeat natural disasters, poverty and lack of adequate infrastructure, control of transmission within Haiti and prevention of dissemination of vector-borne pathogens to other regions is challenging. In this review we summarize some aspects concerning diseases caused by vector-borne pathogens in Haiti. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New trends in emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Niels

    2007-12-15

    The emergence of pathogens is the result of a number of impact in all parts of the food chain. The emerging technologies in food production explain how new pathogens can establish themselves in the food chain and compromise food safety. The impact of the food technology is analysed for several bacteria, such as Yersinia, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter pullorum, Enterobacter sakazakii, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis, prions related to vCJD and others. The importance of the ability of many microbes to form VBNC forms is elaborated on. Research on culture independent methods may address this outstanding issue to the better understanding of emerging pathogens. The "demerging" of pathogens also occur, and examples of this are explained. The reaction of bacteria to stresses and sublethal treatments, and how exposure to one stress factor can confer resistance to other stresses, literally speaking causing contagious resistance, are explained. The implication of this e.g. in modern approaches of food preservation, such as Minimally processed Foods, is considerable. Intestinal colonization of EHEC may be regulated by Quorum sensing, and this ability of microbes plays an important role in the colonization of microbes in food and on food processing equipment, an important factor in the emergence of pathogens. The emergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an opportunistic human pathogen, used for centuries for food and production of alcoholic beverages, calls for research in molecular tools to distinguish between probiotic and clinical strains. Cyclospora cayetanensis and Norovirus outbreaks can no longer be designated as emerging pathogens, they share however one characteristic in the epidemiology of emerging nature, the importance of the hygiene in the primary production stage, including supply of potable water, and the application of GMP and the HACCP principles in the beginning of the food chain. Hepatitis E virus is a potential emerging food borne

  16. Editorial ~ CIDER is Born

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson, Canada Research Chair in Distance Education

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available With significant male trepidation, I want to share a birth story with IRRODL readers. This month, after a seemingly endless gestation, the Canadian Institute for Distance Education Research (CIDER was born. Like most births, this new presence began with a blissful consummation, when I accepted the Canada Research Chair in Distance education at Athabasca University. After a very short honeymoon, a couple of miscarriages, and a few lover's spats that marked the relationship between the Center for Distance Education and myself, we struggled to determine the type of protégée we wanted to birth. The within the womb (in house development of the visible image and website took shape, which like all gestations, was marked by some lower backache, punctuated by a few graphic images that turned out to be false labour.

  17. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpis, U; Crook, D; Oksi, J

    1999-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a zoonotic arbovirus infection endemic to Russia and Eastern and Central Europe. Despite being a common and serious life-threatening disease for which a mass vaccination program was implemented in Austria, there is only limited reference to this disease in the English-language literature. TBE is transmitted to humans usually by the bite of a tick (either Ixodes persulcatus or Ixodes ricinus); occasionally, cases occur following consumption of infected unpasteurized milk. Transmission is seasonal and occurs in spring and summer, particularly in rural areas favored by the vector. TBE is a serious cause of acute central nervous system disease, which may result in death or long-term neurological sequelae. Effective vaccines are available in a few countries. The risk for travelers of acquiring TBE is increasing with the recent rise in tourism to areas of endemicity during spring and summer.

  18. Vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon J.; Bicout, Dominique; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    After a request from the Europea n Commission, EFSA’s Panel on Animal Health and Welfaresummarised the main characteristics of 36 vector-borne disease s (VBDs) in 36 web-based storymaps.The risk of introduction in the EU through movement of livestock or pets was assessed for eac h of the36 VBDs...... individually, using a semiquantitative Metho d to INTegrate all relevant RISK aspects(MINTRI SK model), which was further modified to a European scale into the EFSA-VBD-RISK-m odel .Only eight of the 36 VBD-agents had an overall rate of introduction in the EU (being the combinationof the rate of entry, vector...... transmission and establishment) which was estimated to be above 0.001introductions per year. These were Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, bluetongue virus, WestNile virus, Schmallenberg virus, Hepatozoon canis, Leishmania infantum, Bunyamwera virus andHighlands J. virus. For these eight dise ases...

  19. Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Rickettsiales pathogens of veterinary and public health significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Farhan Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum are the most important tick-borne bacteria of veterinary and public health significance in the family Anaplasmataceae. The objective of current review is to provide knowledge on ecology and epidemiology of A. phagocytophilum and compare major similarities and differences of A. marginale and A. phagocytophilum. Bovine anaplasmosis is globally distributed tick-borne disease of livestock with great economic importance in cattle industry. A. phagocytophilum, a cosmopolitan zoonotic tick transmitted pathogen of wide mammalian hosts. The infection in domestic animals is generally referred as tick-borne fever. Concurrent infections exist in ticks, domestic and wild animals in same geographic area. All age groups are susceptible, but the prevalence increases with age. Movement of susceptible domestic animals from tick free non-endemic regions to disease endemic regions is the major risk factor of bovine anaplasmosis and tick-borne fever. Recreational activities or any other high-risk tick exposure habits as well as blood transfusion are important risk factors of human granulocytic anaplasmosis. After infection, individuals remain life-long carriers. Clinical anaplasmosis is usually diagnosed upon examination of stained blood smears. Generally, detection of serum antibodies followed by molecular diagnosis is usually recommended. There are problems of sensitivity and cross-reactivity with both the Anaplasma species during serological tests. Tetracyclines are the drugs of choice for treatment and elimination of anaplasmosis in animals and humans. Universal vaccine is not available for either A. marginale or A. phagocytophilum, effective against geographically diverse strains. Major control measures for bovine anaplasmosis and tick-borne fever include rearing of tick-resistant breeds, endemic stability, breeding Anaplasma-free herds, identification of regional vectors, domestic/wild reservoirs and control, habitat modification

  20. Identification of pathogenic microorganisms directly from positive blood vials by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nonnemann, Bettina; Tvede, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a promising and fast method for identifying fungi and bacteria directly from positive blood cultures. Various pre-treatment methods for MALDI-TOF MS identification have been reported for this purpose. In......-house results for identification of bacterial colonies by MALDI-TOF MS using a cut-off score of 1.5 did not reduce the diagnostic accuracy compared with the recommended cut-off score of 1.8. A 3-month consecutive study of positive blood cultures was carried out in our laboratory to evaluate whether......% with the value of 1.5. The overall identification rate was 63% (cut-off 1.5) and 54% (cut-off 1.8). Seventy-seven per cent of fungal species were identified with both log scores. MALDI-TOF MS was in this study found to be a powerful tool in fast diagnosis of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi and to a lesser...

  1. Neglected intravascular pathogens, Babesia vulpes and haemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneval, Martina; Miterpáková, Martina; Hurníková, Zuzana; Blaňarová, Lucia; Víchová, Bronislava

    2017-08-30

    Wild animals, especially canids, are important reservoirs of vector-borne pathogens, that are transmitted by the ticks and other bloodsucking arthropods. In total, 300 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), shot by the hunters in eastern and northern Slovakia, were screened for the presence of vector-borne pathogens by PCR-based methods Blood samples were obtained from nine red foxes and tissue samples originated from 291 animals (the liver tissue samples from 49 foxes and spleen samples from 242 red foxes). Babesia vulpes and haemotropic Mycoplasma species were identified by amplification and sequencing of 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene fragments, respectively. Overall, the presence of these pathogens was recorded in 12.3% of screened DNA samples. Altogether 9.7% (29/300) of investigated foxes carried DNA of Babesia spp. In total, 12 out of 29 Babesia spp. PCR - positive amplicons were further sequenced and identified as B. vulpes (41.4%; 12/29), remaining 17 samples are referred as Babesia sp. (58.6%; 17/29). Overall prevalence of B. vulpes reached 4.0% (n=300). Thirteen (4.3%) samples tested positive for distinct Mycoplasma species. To the best of our knowledge, this study brings the first information on B. vulpes infection in red foxes in Slovakia, and the first data on the prevalence and diversity of haemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in European red fox population. Moreover, co-infections with B. vulpes and Mycoplasma spp. were confirmed in 1.7% of tested DNA samples. The relatively high rates of blood pathogen' prevalence and species diversity in wild foxes indicate the role of the fox population in the maintenance of the parasites in sylvatic cycles and strengthen the assumption that foxes play an important role in spreading of infectious microorganisms within and outside the natural foci. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato detected in the blood of Norwegian patients with erythema migrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarsten, H; Grankvist, A; Høyvoll, L; Myre, I B; Skarpaas, T; Kjelland, V; Wenneras, C; Noraas, S

    2017-08-01

    The most common tick-borne human disease in Norway is Lyme borreliosis. Ticks in Norway also harbour less known disease-causing agents such as Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Borrelia miyamotoi and Rickettsia helvetica. However, human infections caused by these pathogens have never been described in Norway. The main aims of the study were to evaluate the contribution of several tick-borne bacterial agents, other than Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, to zoonotic diseases in Norway and to determine their clinical pictures. Blood samples from 70 symptomatic tick-bitten adults from the Agder counties in southern Norway were screened for seven tick-borne pathogens by using a commercial multiplex PCR-based method and by singleplex real-time PCR protocols. Most patients (65/70) presented with a rash clinically diagnosed as erythema migrans (EM). The most frequently detected pathogen DNA was from Ca. N. mikurensis and was found in the blood of 10% (7/70) of the patients. The Ca. N. mikurensis-infected patients presented with an EM-like rash as the only symptom. B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA was present in the blood of 4% (3/70) of the study participants. None had detectable Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Rickettsia typhus group or spotted fever group, Francisella tularensis, Coxiella burnetii or Bartonella spp. DNA in the blood. The commercially available multiplex PCR bacteria flow chip system failed to identify half of the infected patients detected by corresponding real-time PCR protocols. The recovery of Ca. N. mikurensis DNA was higher in the pellet/plasma fraction of blood than from whole blood. To conclude, Ca. N. mikurensis appeared to be the etiological agent in patients with EM in a surprisingly large fraction of tick-bitten persons in the southern part of Norway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Limited sharing of tick-borne hemoparasites between sympatric wild and domestic ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Ria R; Mutinda, Mathew; Ezenwa, Vanessa O

    2016-08-15

    Tick-borne hemoparasites (TBHs) are a group of pathogens of concern in animal management because they are associated with a diversity of hosts, including both wild and domestic species. However, little is known about how frequently TBHs are shared across the wildlife-livestock interface in natural settings. Here, we compared the TBHs of wild Grant's gazelle (Nanger granti) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in a region of Kenya where these species extensively overlap. Blood samples collected from each species were screened for piroplasm and rickettsial TBHs by PCR-based amplification of 18S/16S ribosomal DNA, respectively. Overall, 99% of gazelle and 66% of sheep were positive for Babesia/Theileria, and 32% of gazelle and 47% sheep were positive for Anaplasma/Ehrlichia. Sequencing a subset of positive samples revealed infections of Theileria and Anaplasma. Sequences sorted into seven phylogenetically distinct genotypes-two Theileria, and five Anaplasma. With the exception of a putatively novel Anaplasma lineage from Grant's gazelle, these genotypes appeared to be divergent forms of previously described species, including T. ovis, A. ovis, A. bovis, and A. platys. Only one genotype, which clustered within the A. platys clade, contained sequences from both gazelle and sheep. This suggests that despite niche, habitat, and phylogenetic overlap, the majority of circulating tick-borne diseases may not be shared between these two focal species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Children born of ICSI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S

    2007-12-01

    Studies on children born as a result of IVF or ICSI present significant methodological differences and have been conducted on highly heterogeneous populations. Regarding perinatal data, there is a consensus of opinion on the increased risk of prematurity, growth retardation and perinatal mortality, even after maternal factors and the presence or absence of multiple pregnancies have been taken into account. There is no significant difference in the studies between ICSI and IVF, which are often not individualised. The results of birth defects following IVF treatment are contradictory in the literature. The risk of birth defects following ICSI can be caused by male infertility (chromosome abnormality rate, microdeletion of the Y chromosome, genetic fingerprint) or by the technique used (no selection of the fertilising spermatozoon, disturbance of the meiotic spindle, risk of introduction of foreign materials, risk of infection). Analysis of the literature is complicated because of methodological biases. Thus, according to the studies, the risks of defects following ICSI are identical or increased compared with those following IVF. In the long term, synthesis of the studies does not allow any certainty regarding the growth of children, their cognitive or psychomotor development, the risk of cancers or epigenetic diseases. The current data is more reassuring than worrying, but the good current studies on child development should be developed in terms of number, cohort size and monitoring period.

  5. Essential veterinary education in water-borne transmission of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, D D

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the author reviews the reasons for the current interest in waterborne transmission of infectious agents in the veterinary curriculum. In addition, the paper provides short summaries of some of the major zoonotic outbreaks that have caused this new interest in water-borne diseases. Some curricular recommendations are made, including: basic training in modern methodologies in microbiology; a brief introduction to water and sewage treatment, with some discussion of pathogens in relation to the basic treatment processes of flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, disinfection, denitrification and phosphorus removal; and an introduction to the regulations being promulgated to reduce the pathogen loading of water on farms.

  6. Laboratory diagnosis of tick-borne African relapsing fevers: latest developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien eFotso Fotso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, relapsing fevers caused by ectoparasite-borne Borrelia species are transmitted by ticks, with the exception of Borrelia recurrentis, which is a louse-borne spirochete. These tropical diseases responsible for mild to deadly spirochetemia. Cultured B. crocidurae, B. duttonii and B. hispanica circulate alongside at least six species which have not yet been cultured in vectors. Direct diagnosis is hindered by the use of non-specific laboratory tools. Indeed, microscopic observation of Borrelia spirochaeta in smears of peripheral blood taken from febrile patients lacks sensitivity and specificity. Although best visualised using dark-field microscopy, the organisms can also be detected using Wright-Giemsa or acridine orange stains.. PCR-based detection of specific sequences in total DNA extracted from a specimen can be used to discriminate different relapsing fever Borreliae. In our laboratory, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for the specific detection of B. duttonii/recurrentis and B. crocidurae: Multispacer Sequence Typing accurately identified cultured relapsing fever borreliae and