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Sample records for blocks sperm maturation

  1. Posttesticular sperm maturation, infertility, and hypercholesterolemia

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    Marjorie Whitfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a key molecule in the mammalian physiology of especial particular importance for the reproductive system as it is the common precursor for steroid hormone synthesis. Cholesterol is also a recognized modulator of sperm functions, not only at the level of gametogenesis. Cholesterol homeostasis regulation is crucial for posttesticular sperm maturation, and imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect these posttesticular events. Metabolic lipid disorders (dyslipidemia affect male fertility but are most of the time studied from the angle of endocrine/testicular consequences. This review will focus on the deleterious effects of a particular dyslipidemia, i.e., hypercholesterolemia, on posttesticular maturation of mammalian spermatozoa.

  2. SPERM MATURATIONAL DEFECT AFTER CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE TREATMENT

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    Z. N. Kashmiri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During normal spermatogenesis, most of the round spermatid’s cytoplasm was phagocytosed as ‘residual bodies’ by the Sertoli cell at spermiogenesis, and only a small cytoplasmic residue i.e. ‘cytoplasmic droplet’ remains applied to the elongated spermatid after release from the germinal epithelium. A characteristic morphological change on spermatozoa during epididymal transit was the caudal migration of the cytoplasmic droplet away from the neck via the principal piece, however, while studying the Cyclophosphamide (CPA induced sperm morphological changes from the cauda epididymis in male Wistar rat, Rattus norvegicus using phase contrast microscope it was noticed that the sub-chronic and acute doses of CPA caused retention of cytoplasmic droplet on the mid-piece. Thus from the foregoing it was concluded that beside CPA being an inhibitor of spermatogenesis, it also interferes with the maturation of spermatozoa by the retention of cytoplasmic droplet perhaps due to alteration in epididymal secretory and absorptive functions thus leading to infertility.

  3. Effects of Aging on Spermatogenesis, Sperm Maturation and Fertility in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-ju CHEN; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate effects of aging on spermatogenesis in testis, sperm maturation in epididymis, and fertility in mice.Methods Testicular specimens, caput epididymal sperm and cauda epididymal sperm were obtained from Kuming mice (18-month aged group, n=15; 6-month young group as control, n=15). The testicular histological examinations and quantitative evaluations on spermatogenesis were performed. Sperm parameters including sperm density, sperm viability, sperm motility, and normal morphological rate were assessed. The fertilization rate and embryo development were measured by in vitro fertilization and embryo culture.Results The histological changes of testes in aged mice were mainly seminiferous tubule atrophy and hypospermatogenesis. In aged testes, a significant decline was found in the numbers of round spermatids and elongated spermatids per Sertoli cell (P<0.01). Sperm density, sperm motility and normal morphological rate in caput epididymis and cauda epididymis in aged mice significantly decreased (P<0. 05). The fertilization rate and embryo development of aged group were lower than those in the control(P< 0.01).Conclusions Spermatogenesis and sperm functions could be maintained in the aging male. However, aging affects spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, which leads to lower the quality of sperm, including sperm fertilizing capacity. The development of embryo from aging sperm would have more abnormalities.

  4. Sialylation Facilitates the Maturation of Mammalian Sperm and Affects Its Survival in Female Uterus.

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    Ma, Xue; Pan, Qian; Feng, Ying; Choudhury, Biswa P; Ma, Qianhong; Gagneux, Pascal; Ma, Fang

    2016-06-01

    Establishment of adequate levels of sialylation is crucial for sperm survival and function after insemination; however, the mechanism for the addition of the sperm sialome has not been identified. Here, we report evidence for several different mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of the mature sperm sialome. Directly quantifying the source of the nucleotide sugar CMP-beta-N-acetylneuraminic acid in epididymal fluid indicates that transsialylation occurs in the upper epididymis. Western blots for the low-molecular-mass sialoglycoprotein (around 20-50 kDa) in C57BL/6 mice epididymal fluid reflect that additional sialome could be obtained by glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored sialoglycopeptide incorporation during epididymal transit in the caput of the epididymis. Additionally, we found that in Cmah (CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase)-/- transgenic mice, epididymal sperm obtained sialylated-CD52 from seminal vesicle fluid (SVF). Finally, we used Gfp (green fluorescent protein)+/+ mouse sperm to test the role of sialylation on sperm for protection from female leukocyte attack. There is very low phagocytosis of the epididymal sperm when compared to that of sperm coincubated with SVF. Treating sperm with Arthrobacter ureafaciens sialidase (AUS) increased phagocytosis even further. Our results highlight the different mechanisms of increasing sialylation, which lead to the formation of the mature sperm sialome, as well as reveal the sialome's function in sperm survival within the female genital tract. PMID:27075617

  5. Sperm bundles in the seminal vesicles of sexually mature Lasius ant males.

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    Burnett, William E; Heinze, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In many insects, sperm cells are produced in bundles with their heads being held together by a glycoprotein matrix secreted by a cyst cell. Mature sperm cells in the seminal vesicles are usually free, but in sawflies and several other insects, such structures (spermatodesmata) remain intact and sperm cells may be ejaculated as bundles. Here we report the occurrence of spermatodesmata in mature males of the ant Lasius pallitarsis. Microscopic investigations of the abdominal contents of males immediately prior to their nuptial flights showed that the anterior ends of numerous sperm cells were embedded in an oval-shaped 20 by 30 micrometer extracellular fibrous cap. Individual sperm ranged in length from 55 to 75 micrometers with an average overall length of 65 micrometers. The bulb-shaped heads of the sperm were relatively small, only about 1.5 micrometers in length and about 1.1 micrometers in diameter. The diameter of the sperm tails was approximately 1 micrometer. Observations of live preparations of the spermatodesmata showed increasingly active undulating wave-like movement of the sperm tails as the slide preparations aged. This appears to be the first case of sperm bundles being present in the seminal vesicles of mature ant males--males that are immediately poised to complete their nuptial mating flight.

  6. Sperm bundles in the seminal vesicles of sexually mature Lasius ant males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Burnett

    Full Text Available In many insects, sperm cells are produced in bundles with their heads being held together by a glycoprotein matrix secreted by a cyst cell. Mature sperm cells in the seminal vesicles are usually free, but in sawflies and several other insects, such structures (spermatodesmata remain intact and sperm cells may be ejaculated as bundles. Here we report the occurrence of spermatodesmata in mature males of the ant Lasius pallitarsis. Microscopic investigations of the abdominal contents of males immediately prior to their nuptial flights showed that the anterior ends of numerous sperm cells were embedded in an oval-shaped 20 by 30 micrometer extracellular fibrous cap. Individual sperm ranged in length from 55 to 75 micrometers with an average overall length of 65 micrometers. The bulb-shaped heads of the sperm were relatively small, only about 1.5 micrometers in length and about 1.1 micrometers in diameter. The diameter of the sperm tails was approximately 1 micrometer. Observations of live preparations of the spermatodesmata showed increasingly active undulating wave-like movement of the sperm tails as the slide preparations aged. This appears to be the first case of sperm bundles being present in the seminal vesicles of mature ant males--males that are immediately poised to complete their nuptial mating flight.

  7. Adnexal Torsion during Pregnancy after Oocyte In Vitro Maturation and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycle

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    Simone Giulini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of right adnexal torsion during pregnancy after an oocyte in vitro maturation and intracitoplasmic sperm injection cycle in patient with polycystic ovary syndrome. A 31-year-old woman with a typical clinical disorder of polycystic ovarian syndrome was included in an oocyte in vitro maturation program. Right adnexal torsion occurred two days after embryo transfer, and laparoscopy detorsion was successfully performed with preservation of adnexa. The patient had a full-term pregnancy and delivered a healthy infant at 40 weeks of gestation. To our knowledge this is the first report of adnexal torsion after an oocyte in vitro maturation and intracitoplasmic sperm injection program.

  8. Post Testicular Sperm Maturational Changes in the Bull: Important Role of the Epididymosomes and Prostasomes

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    Julieta Caballero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After spermatogenesis, testicular spermatozoa are not able to fertilize an oocyte, they must undergo sequential maturational processes. Part of these essential processes occurs during the transit of the spermatozoa through the male reproductive tract. Since the sperm become silent in terms of translation and transcription at the testicular level, all the maturational changes that take place on them are dependent on the interaction of spermatozoa with epididymal and accessory gland fluids. During the last decades, reproductive biotechnologies applied to bovine species have advanced significantly. The knowledge of the bull reproductive physiology is really important for the improvement of these techniques and the development of new ones. This paper focuses on the importance of the sperm interaction with the male reproductive fluids to acquire the fertilizing ability, with special attention to the role of the membranous vesicles present in those fluids and the recent mechanisms of protein acquisition during sperm maturation.

  9. Sperm Nuclear Expansion and Meiotic Maturation in Normal and Gynogenetic Eggs of the Scallop, Chlamys farreri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sperm nuclear expansion, meiosis and the association of the male and female pronuclei leading to the four-cell stage in normal Chlamys farreri eggs were observed under a fluorescence microscope. The effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the fertilizing sperm were also examined. Both normal and UV-irradiated sperm nuclei enlarged at three distinct phases (phase A, metaphase Ⅰ; phase B, polar body formation; and phase C, female pronuclear development and expansion) that were temporally correlated with meiotic process of the maternal chromosomes. Sperm nuclei underwent a rapid, initial enlargement during phase A, but condensed slightly during phase B, then re-enlarged during phase C. The effects of UV irradiation were not apparent during transformation of the sperm nucleus into a male pronucleus, and there was not any apparent effect on meiotic maturation and development of the female pronucleus. However, the rate of expansion of the UV-irradiated sperm nuclei and the size of male pronuclei were reduced apparently. Unlike the female pronucleus, the male pronucleus derived from sperm genome inactivated by UV irradiation did not form chromosomes, but became a dense chromatin body (DCB). At mitotic anaphase, DCB did not participate in the karyokinesis of the first cleavage as evidenced by chromosomal nondisjunction, demonstrating the effectiveness of using UV irradiation to induce gynogenetic scallop embryos.

  10. Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa.

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    Piña-Guzmán, B; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, M; Marchetti, F; Hernández-Ochoa, I; Solís-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B

    2009-07-15

    Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl-parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm, possibly via oxidative damage. This study investigated the stages of spermatogenesis susceptible to be targeted by Me-Pa exposure that impact on spermatozoa function and their ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. Spermatozoa were examined for DNA damage by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (%DFI), lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production, sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 fluorochrome, and fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Alterations on DNA integrity (%DFI and NT-positive cells) in spermatozoa collected at 7 and 28 dpt, and decreases in sperm quality and induced-AR were observed; reduced MMP and LPO were observed at 7 dpt only. Negative correlations between LPO and sperm alterations were found. Altered sperm functional parameters evaluated either in vitro or in vivo were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism of the detrimental effects of Me-Pa exposure in male germ cells.

  11. Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina-Guzman, Belem; Sanchez-Gutierrez, M.; Marchetti, Francesco; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Solis-Heredia, M.J .; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2009-05-03

    Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm. Oxidative damage has been involved in the genotoxic and reproductive effects of OP. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Me-Pa on spermatozoa function and ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. DNA damage was evaluated by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (percentDFI); lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production; sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR); mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 flurochrome; and, fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Results showed alterations in DNA integrity (percentDFI and NT-positive cells) at 7 and 28 dpt, in addition to decreased sperm quality and a decrease in induced-AR; reduced MMP and LPO was observed only at 7 dpt. We found negative correlations between LPO and all sperm alterations. Altered sperm functional parameters were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times, evaluated either in vitro or in vivo. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism ofthe detrimental effects of Me-Pa in male germ cells.

  12. Supramolecular organization of the sperm plasma membrane during maturation and capacitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roy Jones; Peter S. James; Liz Howes; Andreas Bruckbauer; David Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In the present study, a variety of high resolution microscopy techniques were used to visualize the organization and motion of lipids and proteins in the sperm's plasma membrane. We have addressed questions such as the presence of diffusion barriers, confinement of molecules to specific surface domains, polarized diffusion and the role of cholesterol in regulating lipid rafts and signal transduction during capacitation. Methods: Atomic force microscopy identified a novel region (EqSS) within the equatorial segment of bovine, porcine and ovine spermatozoa that was enriched in constitutively phosphorylated proteins. The EqSS was assembled during epididymal maturation. Fluorescence imaging techniques were then used to follow molecular diffusion on the sperm head. Results: Single lipid molecules were freely exchangeable throughout the plasma membrane and showed no evidence for confinement within domains. Large lipid aggregates, however, did not cross over the boundary between the post-acrosome and equatorial segment suggesting the presence of a molecular filter between these two domains. Conclusion: A small reduction in membrane cholesterol enlarges or increases lipid rafts concomitant with phosphorylation of intracellular proteins. Excessive removal of cholesterol, however, disorganizes rafts with a cessation of phosphorylation. These techniques are forcing a revision of long-held views on how lipids and proteins in sperm membranes are assembled into larger complexes that mediate recognition and fusion with the egg.

  13. A molecular approach on sperm changes during epididymal maturation, ejaculation and in vitro capacitation of boar spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Fàbrega Coll, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa acquire functionality during epididymal maturation and ability to penetrate and fertilize the oocyte during capacitation. Sperm quality results indicated that both epididymal maturation and ejaculation are key events for further capacitation, because only ejaculated spermatozoa are capable to undergo the set of changes leading to capacitation. Epididymal maturation is associated with a progressive loss of phosphotyrosine residues followed by a subtle increase after in vi...

  14. Effects of dietary energy on sexual maturation and sperm production in Holstein bulls.

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    Harstine, B R; Maquivar, M; Helser, L A; Utt, M D; Premanandan, C; DeJarnette, J M; Day, M L

    2015-06-01

    In prepubertal bulls and heifers of dairy and beef breeds, puberty can be induced to occur earlier than typical with targeted high-energy diets due to precocious activation of the endocrine mechanisms that regulate puberty. Precocious activation of puberty in bulls intended for use in the AI industry has the potential to hasten and perhaps increase sperm production. It was hypothesized that feeding bulls a high-energy diet beginning at 8 wk of age would advance the prepubertal rise in LH and lead to advanced testicular maturation and age at puberty. From 58 to 230 ± 0.3 d of age, Holstein bulls received either a high-energy diet (HE;n = 9; targeted ADG 1.5 kg/d) or a control diet (CONT;n = 10; targeted ADG 0.75 kg/d). Thereafter, all bulls were fed a similar diet. The HE treatment increased LH secretion at 125 d of age, testosterone concentrations from 181 to 210 d, and scrotal circumference (SC) from 146 to 360 d of age relative to the CONT treatment. Beginning at 241 ± 5 d of age, semen collection (artificial vagina) was attempted every 14 d in bulls from the HE (n = 8) and CONT (n = 7) treatment until each bull attained puberty (ejaculate containing 50 × 10 spermatozoa with 10% motility). To assess semen production as mature bulls, semen was collected thrice weekly beginning at 541 ± 5 d of age until slaughter at 569 ± 5 d of age. After slaughter, epididymal and testicular measurements were collected and testicular tissue was fixed to determine seminiferous tubule diameter. Age at puberty did not differ between treatments (310 ± 35 d). Although testis and epididymal weight and testis volume were greater (P treatment, sperm production of mature bulls did not differ between treatments. Diameter of seminiferous tubules also did not differ between treatments. We conclude that the HE advanced aspects of sexual maturation and increased testes size, but this was not reflected in hastened puberty or sperm production in the present experiment. PMID:26115263

  15. Lipocalin 2 binds to membrane phosphatidylethanolamine to induce lipid raft movement in a PKA-dependent manner and modulates sperm maturation.

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    Watanabe, Hitomi; Takeo, Toru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Sakoh, Kazuhito; Berger, Thorsten; Nakagata, Naomi; Mak, Tak W; Kondoh, Gen

    2014-05-01

    Mammalian sperm undergo multiple maturation steps after leaving the testis in order to become competent for fertilization, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. In terms of identifying factors crucial for these processes in vivo, we found that lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), which is known as an innate immune factor inhibiting bacterial and malarial growth, can modulate sperm maturation. Most sperm that migrated to the oviduct of wild-type females underwent lipid raft reorganization and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein shedding, which are signatures of sperm maturation, but few did so in Lcn2 null mice. Furthermore, we found that LCN2 binds to membrane phosphatidylethanolamine to reinforce lipid raft reorganization via a PKA-dependent mechanism and promotes sperm to acquire fertility by facilitating cholesterol efflux. These observations imply that mammals possess a mode for sperm maturation in addition to the albumin-mediated pathway.

  16. Effect of active immunization against GnRH on testosterone concentration, libido and sperm quality in mature AI boars

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    Bilskis Ronaldas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of the Improvac on testosterone concentration in blood serum, sexual behavior and sperm quality in matured AI boars. A total of nine Danish Landrace AI boars were included in the analysis. Methods The trial period lasted for 15 weeks and was divided into four periods: Control period: three weeks before vaccination; Period I – four weeks after first vaccination; Period II – four weeks after second vaccination, Period III – four weeks after third vaccination. Blood and sperm samples were collected at weekly intervals. Freshly collected sperm samples were analyzed. Results Testosterone concentration correlated with libido (r = 0.531; p  Conclusions Results from this study indicate that active immunization of sexually matured boars against GnRH has negative impact on testosterone concentration, sexual behavior, volume of ejaculate and total number of normal spermatozoa in ejaculate.

  17. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

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    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  18. Hyaluronan blocks oligodendrocyte progenitor maturation and remyelination through TLR2

    OpenAIRE

    Sloane, J. A.; Batt, C.; Ma, Y.; Harris, Z. M.; Trapp, B; Vartanian, T.

    2010-01-01

    Failure of remyelination is largely responsible for sustained neurologic symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS). MS lesions contain hyaluronan deposits that inhibit oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) maturation. However, the mechanism behind this inhibition is unclear. We report here that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is expressed by oligodendrocytes and is up-regulated in MS lesions. Pathogen-derived TLR2 agonists, but not agonists for other TLRs, inhibit OPC maturation in vitro. Hyaluronan-med...

  19. Characterization of nucleohistone and nucleoprotamine components in the mature human sperm nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Claudia Lalancette; David Miller; Stephen A. Krawetz

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To simultaneously determine the localization of histones and protamines within human sperm nuclei. Methods: Immunofluorescence of the core histones and protamines and fluorescence in situ hybridization of the telomere region of chromosome 16 was assessed in decondensed human sperm nuclei. Results: Immunofluorescent localiza- tion of histones, protamine 1 (PRM1) and protamine 2 (PRM2) along with fluorescence in situ hybridization localiza- tion of chromosome 16 telomeric sequences revealed a discrete distribution in sperm nuclei. Histones localized to the posterior ring region (i.e. the sperm nuclear annulus), whereas PRM1 and PRM2 appeared to be dispersed throughout the entire nucleus. Conclusion: The co-localization of the human core sperm histones with the telomeric regions of chromosome 16 is consistent with the reorganization of specific non-protamine regions into a less compacted state. (Asian J Androl, 2008 Jul; 10: 535-541)

  20. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

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    L.S.L.S. Reis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion, scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by electroejaculation, were evaluated soon after collection for motility, vigor and wave motion under an optical microscope. Sperm membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial activity were evaluated under a fluorescent microscope using probe association (FITC-PSA, PI, JC-1, H342. The sperm were classified into eight integrity categories depending on whether they exhibited intact or damaged membranes, an intact or damaged acrosomal membrane, and high or low mitochondrial potential. The results show that bulls have a low amount of sperm with intact membranes at puberty, and the sperm show low motility, vigor, and wave motion; however, in bulls at early sexual maturity, the integrity of the sperm membrane increased significantly. The rate of sperm membrane damage was negatively correlated with motility, vigor, wave motion, and testosterone in the bulls, and a positive correlation existed between sperm plasma membrane integrity and scrotal circumference. The integrity of the acrosomal membrane was not influenced by puberty. During puberty and into early sexual maturity, bulls show low sperm mitochondrial potential, but when bulls reached sexual maturity, high membrane integrity with high mitochondrial potential was evident.

  1. Birth after human chorionic gonadotropin-primed oocyte in vitro maturation and fertilization with testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory patient

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    González-Ortega, Claudia; Piña-Aguilar, Raul Eduardo; Cancino-Villareal, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Antonio Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of in vitro maturation (IVM) with surgical retrieved testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory female. Human chorionic gonadotropin-primed IVM, testicular biopsy for sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection with fresh sperm were performed. Fourteen cumulus-oocyte complexes were obtained in germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, eight oocytes reached metaphase II, seven presumptive zygotes were obtained, and three cleavage stages embryos in day 2 were transferred producing a singleton pregnancy. A single healthy newborn was obtained. Our results suggest that IVM may be an alternative for in vitro fertilization in normo-ovulatory women even if surgical retrieval of sperm is needed. Further research is required to depict contributing factors to the success of IVM in indications different from polycystic ovaries syndrome and the role of male gamete. PMID:27803591

  2. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    OpenAIRE

    L. S. L. S. Reis; A.A. Ramos; A.S. Camargos; E. Oba

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion), scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot) and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by e...

  3. Relationship between sperm nuclear maturity and outcomes of in vitro fertilization%精子核成熟度与体外受精结局的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛冉冉; 江莉

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨精子核成熟度与体外受精(IVF)结局的关系.方法 采用精子苯胺蓝染色试验对95例接受IVF的不育患者进行精子核成熟度检测,分析不成熟精子率与精液其他相关指标及IVF结局相关指标的相关性.结果 Spearman相关分析示不成熟精子率与精液密度、活率、处理后正常形态率、IVF受精率、正常受精率呈负相关(r=-0.209、-0.266、-0.369、-0.343、-0.253,P均<0.05),与处理前正常形态率、卵裂率、优质胚胎率无相关性.结论 精子核成熟度可影响精液常规参数及IVF受精率、正常受精率;精子核成熟度检测对预测IVF结局有一定作用.%Objective To evaluate the relationship between sperm nuclear maturity and outcomes of in vitro fertilisation ( IVF). Methods The sperm nuclear maturity of 95 infertile couples participating in 1VF program was analyzed by aniline blue staining, then correlation between the rate of immature sperm and conventional semen parameters, IVF outcomes was analyzed. Results A significant negative relationship was found between the rate of immature sperm and sperm density and motility, normal morphology rate after treatment, IVF fertilization rate, normal fertilisation rate(r= -0.209, —0.266, -0.369, -0.343, -0.253, allP<0.05), however, no correlation was found between the rate of immature sperm and normal morphomogy sperm rate, cleavage rate, good quality embryo rate. Conclusions The sperm nuclear maturity can affect semen parameters of the conventional and IVF fertilization rates and normal fertilization rate; measurement of sperm nuclear maturity might have a certain extent clinical significance for predicting IVF fertilization rate.

  4. Fertilization of in vitro matured human oocytes by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using ejaculated and testicular spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Qian; Ting Feng; Juan Chen; Ling-Bo Cai; Jia-Yin Liu; Yun-Dong Mao; Wei Ding; Jia-Hao Sha

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the fertilization competence of spermatozoa from ejaculates and testicle when the oocytes were matured in vitro following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Methods: Fifty-six completed cycles in 46women with polycystic ovarian syndrome were grouped according to the semen parameters of their male partners.Group 1 was 47 cycles that presented motile and normal morphology spermatozoa in ejaculates and Group 2 was the other nine cycles where male partners were diagnosed as obstructive azoospermia and spermatozoa could only be oocytes were matured in vitro and inseminated by ICSI. The spermatozoa from testes were retrieved by testicular fine needle aspiration. Results: A total of 449 and 78 immature oocytes were collected and cultured for 48 hours,75.5 % (339/449) and 84.6 % (66/78) oocytes were matured in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The percentage of oocytes achieving normal fertilization was significantly higher in Group 1 than that in Group 2 (72.9 % vs. 54.5 %,P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the rates of oocytes cleavage and clinical pregnancies in these two groups [87.4% (216/247) vs. 88.9% (32/36); 21.3% (10/47) vs. 44.4 % (4/9)]. A total of 15 babies in the two groups were healthy delivered at term. Conclusion: It appears that IVM combined with ICSI using testicular spermatozoa can produce healthy infants, while the normal fertilization rate of in vitro matured oocytes after ICSI using testicular spermatozoa was significantly lower than using the ejaculated spermatozoa.

  5. GOAT SPERM SURFACE ALTERATION DURING EPIDIDYMAL MATURATION: AN EVALUATION BY MARINE BIOACTIVE COMPOUND FROM TELESCOPIUM TELESCOPIUM

    OpenAIRE

    HEMBRAM, Manik Lai; Datta, Uttam; Dasgupta, Raju

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bio-active compounds from marine flora and fauna contain various types of pharmacologically active novel biomolecules enriched with different types of lectins. Lectins, with high saccharide binding specificities have been considered important probe to monitor the changes in plasmamembrance during physiological maturation of spermatozoa. Cytosol fraction, isolated from the spermatheca and / or ovotestis gland of a marine mollusc Telescopium telescopium, specific for sialic acid, has b...

  6. Assessment of the Maturity of eGoverment Building Blocks for Public Administrations in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoosel, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a maturity assessment of a set of generic building blocks for public administrations in the EU. In the European e-SENS project, various generic building blocks are developed, such as eID, eSignature, eDelivery and eDocument building blocks. They should be used by

  7. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  8. Elucidation of the involvement of p14, a sperm protein during maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of caprine spermatozoa.

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    Pinki Nandi

    Full Text Available Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilization. Although progress is being made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little has been yet explored about the potential role(s of individual sperm cell protein during this process. Therefore elucidation of the role of different sperm proteins in the process of capacitation might be of great importance to understand the process of fertilization. The present work describes the partial characterization of a 14-kDa protein (p14 detected in goat spermatozoa using an antibody directed against the purified protein. Confocal microscopic analysis reveals that the protein is present in both the intracellular and extracellular regions of the acrosomal and postacrosomal portion of caudal sperm head. Though subcellular localization shows that p14 is mainly cytosolic, however it is also seen to be present in peripheral plasma membrane and soluble part of acrosome. Immuno-localization experiment shows change in the distribution pattern of this protein upon induction of capacitation in sperm cells. Increased immunolabeling in the anterior head region of live spermatozoa is also observed when these cells are incubated under capacitating conditions, whereas most sperm cells challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187 to acrosome react, lose their labeling almost completely. Intracellular distribution of p14 also changes significantly during acrosome reaction. Interestingly, on the other hand the antibody raised against this 14-kDa sperm protein enhances the forward motility of caprine sperm cells. Rose-Bengal staining method shows that this anti-p14 antibody also decreases the number of acrosome reacted cells if incubated with capacitated sperm cells before induction of acrosome reaction. All these results taken together clearly indicate that p14 is intimately involved and plays a critical role in the acrosomal membrane fusion event.

  9. Adenosine Modulates the Oocyte Developmental Competence by Exposing Stages and Synthetic Blocking during In Vitro Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2016-06-01

    Purine metabolism is known factor for nuclear maturation of oocytes through both follicle cells and oocyte itself. However, it is largely unknown the roles of purine metabolism in the oocyte competence for fertilization and early development. In this study, the effects of adenosine in oocyte competence for development were examined using adenosine and its synthetic inhibitors. Adenosine treatment from GV intact stage for 18 hr (fGV) caused of decrease the fertilization rate but of increase the cleavage rate compared from the other stage treatment groups. Hadacidin did not effect on fertilization rate but increased cleavage rate without stage specificity. Adenosine did not block the effects of hadacidin with the exception of fGV group. By the inhibition of purine synthetic pathways the fertilization rate was decreased in the fGV and fGVB groups but increased in the fMII group. Exogenous adenosine caused of decrease fertilization rate in the fGVB group but increase in the fMII group. Cleavage rate was dramatically increased in the adenosine treatment with synthetic inhibitors. It means that the metabolism of purine has stage specific effects on fertilization and cleavage. Exogenous adenosine had only can improve oocyte developmental competence when it treated at GV intact stage. On the other hand, endogenous synthesis in all maturation stage caused of increase the cleavage rate without effects on fertilization. These data suggest that adenosine at GV stage as a paracrine fashion and inhibitions of endogenous adenosine in all stage improve oocyte developmental competence.. PMID:27660830

  10. Effect of radiation leakage of microwave oven on viability and concentration of sperm in mature and prepuberty male rat

    OpenAIRE

    Zare D; Jelodar Gh; SS Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Testes are composed of very active body tissues, which can be affected by exposure to radiofrequency waves. Age of exposure may also be an important factor. This study was carried out to evaluate morphological parameters of rat sperm exposed to microwave radiation at pre and post puberty. Methods: For this experimental study, 18 adults (2 month years old) and 18 prepuberty (1 month years old) male rats were selected and each group divided in two subgroups, control and ...

  11. In vitro maturation, fertilization, embryo development & clinical outcome of human metaphase-I oocytes retrieved from stimulated intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Álvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The major cause of fertilisation failure after ICSI is failure of the oocyte to initiate the biochemical processes necessary for activation. This inability could be ascribed to cytoplasmic immaturity of those gametes even if they had reached nuclear maturity. The activation of a mature oocyte is characterised by release from metaphase II (MII arrest and extrusion of the second polar body, followed by pro-nuclear formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of in vitro matured (IVM metaphase I (MI oocytes subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI at different time intervals after extrusion of the first polar body (1PB in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles. Methods: A total of 8030 oocytes were collected from 1400 ICSI cycles, 5504 MII at the time of cumulus retrieval. Four hundred eight metaphase II (MII (27.1% matured to MII after in vitro culture for 2-26 h and 5389 sibling MII in the moment of oocyte denudation were injected. On the other hand, 49 ICSI cycles containing only MI oocytes at retrieval were injected at three different time intervals after reaching the MII. The intervals were as follows: 2-6 h (n=10, 8-11 h (n=4 and 23-26 h (n=10. Fertilization and development potential were evaluated in both studies. Results: Fertilization, embryo cleavage and quality were significantly lower in IVM MI compared to MII at time of denudation. Pregnancy rate was higher in group MII. Pregnancy was achieved in three embryo transfers when ICSI was performed within 2-6 h (group I and 8-11 h (group II after PB extrusion. One pregnancy was obtained in group I and a healthy neonate was born. Interpretation & conclusions: Immature oocytes from women whose ovaries have been stimulated could be matured, fertilized by ICSI, cleaved in vitro and to give rise to a live birth. However, the developmental competence of embryos derived from immature oocytes is reduced, compared with sibling in vivo matured oocytes

  12. Activity of clinically relevant antimalarial drugs on Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes in an ATP bioluminescence "transmission blocking" assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Lelièvre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current anti-malarial drugs have been selected on the basis of their activity against the symptom-causing asexual blood stage of the parasite. Which of these drugs also target gametocytes, in the sexual stage responsible for disease transmission, remains unknown. Blocking transmission is one of the main strategies in the eradication agenda and requires the identification of new molecules that are active against gametocytes. However, to date, the main limitation for measuring the effect of molecules against mature gametocytes on a large scale is the lack of a standardized and reliable method. Here we provide an efficient method to produce and purify mature gametocytes in vitro. Based on this new procedure, we developed a robust, affordable, and sensitive ATP bioluminescence-based assay. We then assessed the activity of 17 gold-standard anti-malarial drugs on Plasmodium late stage gametocytes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Difficulties in producing large amounts of gametocytes have limited progress in the development of malaria transmission blocking assays. We improved the method established by Ifediba and Vanderberg to obtain viable, mature gametocytes en masse, whatever the strain used. We designed an assay to determine the activity of antimalarial drugs based on the intracellular ATP content of purified stage IV-V gametocytes after 48 h of drug exposure in 96/384-well microplates. Measurements of drug activity on asexual stages and cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells were also obtained to estimate the specificity of the active drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The work described here represents another significant step towards determination of the activity of new molecules on mature gametocytes of any strain with an automated assay suitable for medium/high-throughput screening. Considering that the biology of the forms involved in the sexual and asexual stages is very different, a screen of our 2 million-compound library may allow us to discover novel anti

  13. Insect radiosensitivity: dose curves and dose-fractionation studies of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm of 4 insect species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaChance, L.E.; Graham, C.K. (Department of Agriculture, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1984-06-01

    Males of 4 species of insects: Musca domestica L. (housefly) (Diptera), Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (milkweed bug) (Hemiptera), Anagasta kuhniella (Zeller) (mealmoth) (Lepidoptera) and Heliothis virescens (Fab.) (tobacco budworm) (Lepidoptera) were irradiated as adults. Dose-response curves for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm were constructed. The curves were analyzed mathematically and compared with theoretical computer simulated curves requiring 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 'hits' for the induction of a dominant lethal mutation. The 4 species belonging to 3 different orders of insects showed a wide range in radiation sensitivity and vastly different dose-response curves. When the data were analyzed by several mathematical models the authors found that a logistic response curve gave reasonably good fit with vastly different parameters for the 4 species. Dose-fractionation experiments showed no reduction in the frequency of lethal mutations induced in any species when an acute dose was fractionated into 2 equal exposures separated by an 8-h period.

  14. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs and ii the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs. NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly.

  15. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  16. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Gantt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nelfinavir (NFV is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs. Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  17. Cellular mechanisms regulating sperm-zona pellucida interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew T Reid; Kate Redgrove; R John Aitken; Brett Nixon

    2011-01-01

    For mammalian spermatozoa to exhibit the ability to bind the zona pellucida(ZP)they must undergo three distinct phases of maturation,namely,spermatogenesis(testis),epididymal maturation(epididymis)and capacitation(female reproductive tract).An impressive array of spermatozoa surface remodeling events accompany these phases of maturation and appear critical for recognition and adhesion of the outer vestments of the oocyte,a structure known as the ZP.It is becoming increasingly apparent that species-specific zona adhesion is not mediated by a single receptor.Instead,compelling evidence now points toward models implicating a multiplicity of receptor-ligand interactions.This notion is in keeping with emerging research that has shown that there is a dynamic aggregation of proteins believed to be important in sperm-ZP recognition to the regions of sperm that mediate this binding event.Such remodeling may in turn facilitate the assembly of a multimeric zona recognition complex(MZRC).Though formation of MZRCs raises questions regarding the nature of the block to polyspermy,formation and assembly of such a structure would no doubt explain the strenuous maturation process that sperm endure on their sojourn to functional maturity.

  18. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  19. miR-150, a microRNA expressed in mature B and T cells, blocks early B cell development when expressed prematurely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Beiyan; Wang, Stephanie; Mayr, Christine; Bartel, David P; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-04-24

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of approximately 22-nt noncoding RNAs that can posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. Several miRNAs are specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells. Here we show that one such miRNA, miR-150, is mainly expressed in the lymph nodes and spleen and is highly up-regulated during the development of mature T and B cells; expression of miR-150 is sharply up-regulated at the immature B cell stage. Overexpression of miR-150 in hematopoietic stem cells, followed by bone marrow transplantation, had little effect on the formation of either mature CD8- and CD4-positive T cells or granulocytes or macrophages, but the formation of mature B cells was greatly impaired. Furthermore, premature expression of miR-150 blocked the transition from the pro-B to the pre-B stage. Our results indicate that miR-150 most likely down-regulates mRNAs that are important for pre- and pro-B cell formation or function, and its ectopic expression in these cells blocks further development of B cells.

  20. Different gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist doses for the final oocyte maturation in high-responder patients undergoing in vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Goksan Pabuccu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Efficacy of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRH-a for ovulation in high-responders. Aims: The aim of the current study is to compare the impact of different GnRH-a doses for the final oocyte maturation on cycle outcomes and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS rates in high-responder patients undergoing ovarian stimulation. Settings And Designs: Electronic medical records of a private in vitro fertilization center, a retrospective analysis. Subjects and Methods: A total of 77 high-responder cases were detected receiving GnRH-a. Group I consisted of 38 patients who received 1 mg of agonist and Group II consisted of 39 patients who received 2 mg of agonist. Statistical Analysis: In order to compare groups, Student′s t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Pearson′s Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test were used where appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Number of retrieved oocytes (17.5 vs. 15.0, P = 0.510, implantation rates (46% vs. 55.1%, P = 0.419 and clinical pregnancy rates (42.1% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.744 were similar among groups. There were no mild or severe OHSS cases detected in Group I. Only 1 mild OHSS case was detected in Group II. Conclusion: A volume of 1 or 2 mg leuprolide acetate yields similar outcomes when used for the final oocyte maturation in high-responder patients.

  1. A novel SoxB2 gene is required for maturation of sperm nucleus during spermiogenesis in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Qi, Hai-Yan; Xiong, Liang-Wei; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SRY-related HMG box (Sox) genes are characterized by the presence of a DNA-binding HMG domain and involved in a diverse range of developmental processes. In this study, we identified a novel Sox gene, designated as EsSoxB2-1, from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. The EsSoxB2-1 encodes a protein of 259 amino acids, sharing the highest identity with the beetle Tribolium castaneum SOX21b. Unlike insect Sox21b, however, EsSoxB2-1 is intronless and exhibits a gonad-specific expression pattern at both mRNA and protein level. Two core promoters in 5′ flanking region were demonstrated to be essential for inducing transcriptional regulatory activity. The transcription of EsSoxB2-1 mRNA begins in spermatogonia stage, while the translation of EsSOXB2-1 protein initiates at spermiogenesis stage. Interestingly, EsSOXB2-1 protein was exclusively localized in the nucleus of spermatid and spermatozoa even at the end of acrosome reaction, and was bound to the uncondensed chromatin in nucleoplasm of mature spermatozoa. Knockdown of EsSoxB2-1 by RNAi leads to abnormal transformation of the nucleus during spermiogenesis. Together, these findings demonstrated the requirement of EsSoxB2-1 for the spermatozoa nucleus maturation and also suggested that EsSoxB2-1 would be delivered into fertilized eggs along with chromatins as a paternal transcription factor for regulating early embryonic development. PMID:27561408

  2. Sperm Competition, Sperm Numbers and Sperm Quality in Muroid Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Gómez Montoto; Concepción Magaña; Maximiliano Tourmente; Juan Martín-Coello; Cristina Crespo; Juan José Luque-Larena; Montserrat Gomendio; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm competition favors increases in relative testes mass and production efficiency, and changes in sperm phenotype that result in faster swimming speeds. However, little is known about its effects on traits that contribute to determine the quality of a whole ejaculate (i.e., proportion of motile, viable, morphologically normal and acrosome intact sperm) and that are key determinants of fertilization success. Two competing hypotheses lead to alternative predictions: (a) sperm quantity and qu...

  3. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadi, H.A.S.; Riemsdijk, van E.L.C.; Dance, A.L.; Rajamanickam, G.D.; Kastelic, J.P.; Thundathil, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n = 3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in a

  4. Left-handed sperm removal by male Calopteryx damselflies (Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kaori; Hayashi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Male genitalia in several insect species are asymmetry in right and left shape. However, the function of such asymmetric male genitalia is still unclear. We found that the male genitalia of the damselfly Calopteryx cornelia (Odonata: Calopterygidae) are morphologically symmetric just after emergence but asymmetric after reproductive maturation. Males remove rival sperm stored in the female bursa copulatrix (single spherical sac) and the following spermatheca (Y-shaped tubular sac) prior to their own ejaculation to prevent sperm competition. Males possess the aedeagus with a recurved head to remove bursal sperm and a pair of spiny lateral processes to remove spermathecal sperm. The right lateral process is less developed than the left, and sperm stored in the right spermathecal tube are rarely removed. Experiments involving surgical cutting of each lateral process demonstrated that only the left process functions in spermathecal sperm removal. Thus, males of C. cornelia are left-handed in their sperm removal behaviour at copulation.

  5. Syntaxin and VAMP association with lipid rafts depends on cholesterol depletion in capacitating sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; De Vries, Klaas J; De Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Garcia-Gil, Nuria; Van Gestel, Renske A; Colenbrander, Ben; Gadella, Bart M; Van Haeften, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Sperm cells represent a special exocytotic system since mature sperm cells contain only one large secretory vesicle, the acrosome, which fuses with the overlying plasma membrane during the fertilization process. Acrosomal exocytosis is believed to be regulated by activation of SNARE proteins. In this paper, we identified specific members of the SNARE protein family, i.e., the t-SNAREs syntaxin1 and 2, and the v-SNARE VAMP, present in boar sperm cells. Both syntaxins were predominantly found in the plasma membrane whereas v-SNAREs are mainly located in the outer acrosomal membrane of these cells. Under non-capacitating conditions both syntaxins and VAMP are scattered in well-defined punctate structures over the entire sperm head. Bicarbonate-induced in vitro activation in the presence of BSA causes a relocalization of these SNAREs to a more homogeneous distribution restricted to the apical ridge area of the sperm head, exactly matching the site of sperm zona binding and subsequent induced acrosomal exocytosis. This redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP depends on cholesterol depletion and closely resembles the previously reported redistribution of lipid raft marker proteins. Detergent-resistant membrane isolation and subsequent analysis shows that a significant proportion of syntaxin emerges in the detergent-resistant membrane (raft) fraction under such conditions, which is not the case under those conditions where cholesterol depletion is blocked. The v-SNARE VAMP displays a similar cholesterol depletion-dependent lateral and raft redistribution. Taken together, our results indicate that redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP during capacitation depends on association of these SNAREs with lipid rafts and that such a SNARE-raft association may be essential for spatial control of exocytosis and/or regulation of SNARE functioning.

  6. Characterisation of the Manduca sexta sperm proteome: Genetic novelty underlying sperm composition in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Emma; Zhao, Qian; Borziak, Kirill; Walters, James R; Dorus, Steve

    2015-07-01

    The application of mass spectrometry based proteomics to sperm biology has greatly accelerated progress in understanding the molecular composition and function of spermatozoa. To date, these approaches have been largely restricted to model organisms, all of which produce a single sperm morph capable of oocyte fertilisation. Here we apply high-throughput mass spectrometry proteomic analysis to characterise sperm composition in Manduca sexta, the tobacco hornworm moth, which produce heteromorphic sperm, including one fertilisation competent (eupyrene) and one incompetent (apyrene) sperm type. This resulted in the high confidence identification of 896 proteins from a co-mixed sample of both sperm types, of which 167 are encoded by genes with strict one-to-one orthology in Drosophila melanogaster. Importantly, over half (55.1%) of these orthologous proteins have previously been identified in the D. melanogaster sperm proteome and exhibit significant conservation in quantitative protein abundance in sperm between the two species. Despite the complex nature of gene expression across spermatogenic stages, a significant correlation was also observed between sperm protein abundance and testis gene expression. Lepidopteran-specific sperm proteins (e.g., proteins with no homology to proteins in non-Lepidopteran taxa) were present in significantly greater abundance on average than those with homology outside the Lepidoptera. Given the disproportionate production of apyrene sperm (96% of all mature sperm in Manduca) relative to eupyrene sperm, these evolutionarily novel and highly abundant proteins are candidates for possessing apyrene-specific functions. Lastly, comparative genomic analyses of testis-expressed, ovary-expressed and sperm genes identified a concentration of novel sperm proteins shared amongst Lepidoptera of potential relevance to the evolutionary origin of heteromorphic spermatogenesis. As the first published Lepidopteran sperm proteome, this whole

  7. Evaluation of CD52 positive sperms in subfertile human semen samples: Is there any relationship with main semen parameters?

    OpenAIRE

    Roshanak Aboutorabi; Fatemeh Mazani; Laleh Rafiee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sperm maturation and sperm membrane integration are the most important elements in male fertility. CD52 is one of the antigens. CD52 is a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchored that express on lymphocytes and epididymal cells. This antigen bind to sperm membrane during transition sperm from epididymal duct as well as its relationship with semenogelins in human seminal plasma. The aim of this study was to obtain any association between the percentage of CD52 positive sperms wi...

  8. Studies on P1, P2 Protamine mRNA in Sperms of Human,Rat and Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小芳; 陈晖; 费仁仁; 陈松; 曹坚

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of the protamine Mrna in sperms of human,rat and mouse Methods By means of RT-PCR technique, protamine cDNA fragments were obtained from total RNA of the mature sperms of human, rat and mouse respectively.Results mRNA of protamine gene was found in the mature sperm of human, rat and mouse. The protamine cDNA with an abnormal head obtained by PT-TCR in rat sperm was much less tn number than that in the normal rat sperm.Conclusion mRNA in the sperms might represent the condition of corresponding gene expression during spermatogenesis.

  9. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  10. Management and Breeding Soundness of Mature Bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Colin W

    2016-07-01

    Mature bulls must be fed a balanced ration, vaccinated appropriately, and undergo a breeding soundness evaluation to ensure they meet what is required of a short, but intense breeding season. To be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder, minimum standards for physical soundness, scrotal circumference, sperm motility, and sperm morphology must be achieved using an accepted bull-breeding soundness evaluation format. Sperm production requires approximately 70 days. Heat and stress are the most common insults to spermatogenesis, causing an increase in morphologic abnormalities with obesity-associated scrotal fat accumulation being the most frequent cause of elevated testicular temperature in mature bulls.

  11. Sperm head phenotype and male fertility in ram semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Fernández-Santos, M R; Roldan, E R S; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Garde, J J

    2015-12-01

    Although there is ample evidence for the effects of sperm head shape on sperm function, its impact on fertility has not been explored in detail at the intraspecific level in mammals. Here, we assess the relationship between sperm head shape and male fertility in a large-scale study in Manchega sheep (Ovis aries), which have not undergone any selection for fertility. Semen was collected from 83 mature rams, and before insemination, head shapes were measured for five parameters: area, perimeter, length, width, and p2a (perimeter(2)/2×π×area) using a computer-assisted sperm morphometric analysis. In addition, a cluster analysis using sperm head length and p2a factor was performed to determine sperm subpopulations (SPs) structure. Our results show the existence of four sperm SPs, which present different sperm head phenotype: SP1 (large and round), SP2 (short and elongated), SP3 (shortest and round), and SP4 (large and the most elongated). No relationships were found between males' fertility rates and average values of sperm head dimensions. However, differences in fertility rates between rams were strongly associated to the proportion of spermatozoa in an ejaculate SP with short and elongated heads (P < 0.001). These findings show how the heterogeneity in sperm head shape of the ejaculate has an effect on reproductive success, and highlight the important role of modulation of the ejaculate at the intraspecific level. PMID:26318229

  12. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... male partner produces too few sperm to do artificial insemination (intrauterine insemination [IUI]) or IVF. • The sperm may ... birth defects may actually be due to the infertility and not the treatments used to overcome the ...

  13. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sousa

    Full Text Available Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  14. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Amaral, Alexandra; Baptista, Marta; Tavares, Renata; Caballero Campo, Pedro; Caballero Peregrín, Pedro; Freitas, Albertina; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2011-03-23

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  15. Matrine Inhibits Mouse Sperm Function by Reducing Sperm [Ca2+]i and Phospho-ERK1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrine is a bioactive alkaloid that has a variety of pharmacological effects and is widely used in Chinese medicine. However, its effects on male reproduction are not well known. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vitro toxicity of matrine on mature mouse sperm. Methods: Mouse cauda epididymal sperm were exposed to matrine (10-200 µM in vitro. The viability, motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and fertilization ability of the mouse sperm were examined. Furthermore, the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i, calcium (Catsper and potassium (Ksper currents, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (p-ERK1/2 of the sperm were analyzed. Results: After exposure to 100 µM or more of matrine, mouse cauda epididymal sperm exhibited a significant reduction in total motility, progressive motility, linear velocity and acrosome reaction rate induced by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. As a result, the fertilization ability of mouse sperm was remarkably decreased by matrine. Our data further demonstrated that matrine significantly reduced sperm [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]i-related p-ERK1/2; however, both the CatSper and KSper currents, which are thought to interactively regulate Ca2+ influx in sperm, were not affected by matrine. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that matrine inhibits mouse sperm function by reducing sperm [Ca2+]i and suppressing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2.

  16. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen cry

  17. Role of the epididymis in sperm competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell C. Jones; Jean-Louis Dacheux; Brett Nixon; Heath W. Ecroyd

    2007-01-01

    Although it is generally understood that the testes recruited kidney ducts for reproductive function during the evolution of vertebrates, little is understood of the biological significance of the adaptation. In the context of the evolution of the mammalian epididymis, this report provides evidence that a major role of the epididymis is to enhance a male's chance of achieving paternity in a competitive mating system. A unique example of sperm cooperation in monotremes is used as evidence that the epididymis produces sperm competition proteins to form groups of 100 sperm into bundles that have a forward motility nearly thrice that of individual spermatozoa. As it required 3-h incubation in vitro under capacitation conditions to release motile sperm from the bundles, it is suggested that the monotremes provide an example of capacitation that is quite different from capacitation in higher mammals. It is Suggested that variation between species in the intensity of sperm competition could explain the variation that occurs between species in the amount of post-testicular sperm maturation and storage in the epididymis, an explanation of why the human epididymis does not play as important a role in reproduction as the epididymis of most mammals.

  18. Snail sperm production characteristics vary with sperm competition risk

    OpenAIRE

    Oppliger, A.; Hosken, D J; Ribi, G

    1998-01-01

    Sperm competition is widespread and influences both male investment in spermatogenic tissue and ejaculate characteristics. Sperm competition models assume trade-offs between sperm size and number, although such trade-offs may be difficult to detect. This study examines the effects of sperm competition risk on the sperm production characteristics of the freshwater snail Viviparus ater. In this prosobranch, females mate frequently and store sperm, generating sperm competition. Males produce two...

  19. Larger sperm outcompete smaller sperm in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    LaMunyon, C W; Ward, S.

    1998-01-01

    Sperm competition is generally thought to drive the evolution of sperm miniaturization. Males gain advantage by transferring more sperm, which they produce by dividing limited resources into ever smaller cells. Here, we describe the opposite effect of size on the competitiveness of amoeboid sperm in the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Larger sperm crawled faster and displaced smaller sperm, taking precedence at fertilization. Larger sperm took longer to produce, however, and s...

  20. Sperm midpiece length predicts sperm swimming velocity in house mice

    OpenAIRE

    Firman, Renée C.; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists have argued that there should be a positive relationship between sperm size and sperm velocity, and that these traits influence a male's sperm competitiveness. However, comparative analyses investigating the evolutionary associations between sperm competition risk and sperm morphology have reported inconsistent patterns of association, and in vitro sperm competition experiments have further confused the issue; in some species, males with longer sperm achieve more compe...

  1. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Yasuomi; Kanai-Kitayama, Saeko; Suzuki, Reiichiro; Sato, Reiko; Toma, Kazunori; Geshi, Masaya; Akagi, Satoshi; Nakano, Minoru; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm-oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm-oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  2. Sperm Selection in ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montag M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selection of sperm is a crucial part in assisted reproductive treament (ART. Sperm preparation methods do mainly differentiate according to sperm motility and are indispensable for therapies like intrauterine insemination, in-vitro fertilization (IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Although in the beginning of the era of ICSI andrology was thought to play a minor role, ICSI has offered new options by correlating the treatment outcome to parameters of the individual applied spermatozoon. Hence the possibility for selecting spermatozoa has shifted from parameters which characterize the entire sperm cohort to a single-sperm specific assessment technology. Consequently, sperm selection is a topic which is intensively discussed nowadays. This article gives a comprehensive overview of the technologies which can be applied today and give a prospective on future techniques.

  3. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  4. Evolution of sperm size in nematodes: sperm competition favours larger sperm.

    OpenAIRE

    LaMunyon, C W; Ward, S.

    1999-01-01

    In the free-living rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm size is a determinant of sperm competitiveness. Larger sperm crawl faster and physically displace smaller sperm to take fertilization priority, but not without a cost: larger sperm are produced at a slower rate. Here, we investigate the evolution of sperm size in the family Rhabditidae by comparing sperm among 19 species, seven of which are hermaphroditic (self-fertile hermaphrodites and males), the rest being gonochoristic (...

  5. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A Urra

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT, serotonin (SERT and norepinephrine (NET transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylaminostyryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+, as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909 and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  6. Antigen changes of monoclonal antibody MSH27 in process of post-testicular maturation (in mice)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄大中; 韩之明; 宋祥芬; 齐跃敏; 段崇文; 刘辉; 陈大元

    1999-01-01

    An anti-mouse spermatozoon monoclonal antibody, MSH27, as well as its purified antigen, can block sperm-egg membrane fusion. As a candidate protein for sperm-egg membrane fusion, the sperm antigen was investigated in the process of post-testicular maturation (PTM). The molecule was produced in testes and located on the plasma membrane of the postacrosomal area of the spermatozoon. However, the epitope recognized by the MSH27 (MSH27Ep) was not exposed until the occurrence of the acrosome reaction. In the process of fertilization, spermatozoa must complete the acrosome reaction before penetrating across the zona pellucidas (ZPs) to approach the plasma membrane of eggs. The effects of the acrosome reaction and penetration of the ZP on the exposure of the MSH27Ep were also studied. It was shown that the percentage of the spermatozoa with the MSH27Ep exposed increased followed with their mature status in PTM. In fact, it bad a linear correlativity with the rate of the acrosome reaction. After spermatozoa had

  7. Sperm competition and the evolution of sperm design in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Gomendio Montserrat; Tourmente Maximiliano; Roldan Eduardo RS

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The influence of sperm competition upon sperm size has been a controversial issue during the last 20 years which remains unresolved for mammals. The hypothesis that, when ejaculates compete with rival males, an increase in sperm size would make sperm more competitive because it would increase sperm swimming speed, has generated contradictory results from both theoretical and empirical studies. In addition, the debate has extended to which sperm components should increase i...

  8. Formation and development of sperms in angiosperms

    OpenAIRE

    S. Tatintseva

    2014-01-01

    Spermiogelnesis has been studied in a large number of Angiosperm species characterizing different levels of phylogenetic system. The formation and development of male gamets can be described as formation of sperm cells that undergo ontogenesis which stimulates changes up to full maturity of the pollen grain. The process of ontogenesis is aimed at creating a suitable delivery system by the pollen tube to a female gamete.

  9. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  10. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 10th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  11. A role for the WH-30 protein in sperm-sperm adhesion during rouleaux formation in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, S P; Swann, N J; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1993-03-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa participate in specific cell adhesion phenomena during their development and functional lifespan; this includes interaction with Sertoli cells, the zona pellucida, and the oolemma. In some species such as the guinea pig, an additional sperm-sperm adhesion occurs during epididymal maturation which results in the formation of rouleaux in which the sperm heads are stacked one upon the other and the periacrosomal plasma membranes of adjacent sperm are linked by periodic cross-bridges. In this study, we have used a monoclonal antibody to investigate the role of the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface in the formation of the junctional zones between adjacent guinea pig sperm in rouleaux. WH-30 monoclonal antibodies caused a dose- and time-dependent dissociation of rouleaux and an increase in the percentage of single, acrosome-intact sperm; there were no effects on sperm motility (maintained at 80-90%) or ultrastructure during the 120-min incubations. The maximal effect of about 80% single sperm was obtained with a 1:4 dilution of the WH-30 hybridoma supernatant or 5-50 micrograms/ml of purified WH-30 IgG. In contrast, incubation of sperm in AH-20 IgG, myeloma cell supernatants, or purified, nonspecific mouse IgG1 had no effect on rouleaux. Treatment of sperm with a WH-30 Fab fragment resulted in almost complete dissociation of rouleaux without any observed effect on sperm motility or acrosomal status. Surface labeling of sperm followed by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE revealed that the WH-30 antibody recognizes a single polypeptide of 43-45 kDa. Using immunofluorescence, the WH-30 protein was localized over the entire surface of the sperm head (whole-head pattern), and immunogold labeling showed that WH-30 is localized in the glycocalyx on both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the periacrosomal and postacrosomal plasma membranes. These results indicate that the WH-30 protein on the sperm surface is a cell adhesion protein which is involved in

  12. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in the sperm fibrous sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albani Elena

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sperm protein 17 (Sp17 is a highly conserved mammalian protein characterized in rabbit, mouse, monkey, baboon, macaque, human testis and spermatozoa. mRNA encoding Sp17 has been detected in a range of murine and human somatic tissues. It was also recognized in two myeloma cell lines and in neoplastic cells from patients with multiple myeloma and ovarian carcinoma. These data all indicate that Sp17 is widely distributed in humans, expressed not only in germinal cells and in a variety of somatic tissues, but also in neoplastic cells of unrelated origin. Methods Sp17 expression was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy on spermatozoa. Results Here, we demonstrate the ultrastructural localization of human Sp17 throughout the spermatozoa flagellar fibrous sheath, and its presence in spermatozoa during in vitro states from their ejaculation to the oocyte fertilization. Conclusion These findings suggest a possible role of Sp17 in regulating sperm maturation, capacitation, acrosomal reaction and interactions with the oocyte zona pellucida during the fertilization process. Further, the high degree of sequence conservation throughout its N-terminal half, and the presence of an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP-binding motif within this region, suggest that Sp17 might play a regulatory role in a protein kinase A-independent AKAP complex in both germinal and somatic cells.

  13. Molecular kinetics of proteins at the surface of porcine sperm before and during fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P S; Gadella, B M

    2009-01-01

    Fertilization is a decisive moment in life and enables the combination of the DNA from two gametes to ultimately form a new organism. The sperm surface, especially the head area, has distinguishable subdomains that are involved in distinct fertilization processes. It is known that the sperm head surface undergoes constant remodelling during epididymal maturation and migration in the male and female genital tract. But intriguingly, the identity, origin and spatial ordering of proteins at the sperm surface that are involved in mammalian fertilization are essentially unknown. This review deals with sperm surface protein modifications that are under somatic cell control. As soon as the sperm is released from the seminiferous tubules it is subjected to these modifications. These surface reorganisations continue until the sperm reside in the fallopian tube where they meet the oocyte and may fertilize it. Most likely, a selective process allows only functionally mature and intact sperm to optimally interact and fertilize the oocyte. Recent data suggest that even the perivitelline fluid is involved in sperm surface remodelling as it contains factors which could facilitate the first penetrating sperm to fertilize the oocyte. In this contribution, the kinetics of proteins at the sperm surface will be overviewed. Better understanding of this would help to design strategies to improve male fertility or to devise novel contraceptives.

  14. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  15. Fully effective contraception in male and female guinea pigs immunized with the sperm protein PH-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primakoff, P; Lathrop, W; Woolman, L; Cowan, A; Myles, D

    1988-10-01

    Immunization of male and female animals with extracts of whole sperm cells is known to cause infertility. Also, men and women who spontaneously produce antisperm antibodies are infertile but otherwise healthy. Although the critical sperm antigens are unknown, these observations have led to the proposal that sperm proteins might be useful in the development of a contraceptive vaccine. The guinea pig sperm surface protein PH-20 is essential in sperm adhesion to the extracellular coat (zona pellucida) of the egg, a necessary initial step in fertilization. Here, we report that 100% effective contraception was obtained in male and female guinea pigs immunized with PH-20. Antisera from immunized females had high titres, specifically recognized PH-20 in sperm extracts, and blocked sperm adhesion to the egg zona pellucida in vitro. The contraceptive effect was long-lasting and reversible: immunized females, mated at intervals of six to fifteen months after immunization, progressively regained fertility. PMID:3419530

  16. Efficacy of testicular sperm chromatin condensation assay using aniline blue-eosin staining in the IVF-ET cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yong-Seog; Kim, Myo Kyung; Lee, Sun-Hee; Cho, Jae Won; Song, In Ok; Seo, Ju Tae

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to evaluate testicular sperm chromatin condensation using aniline blue-eosin (AB-E) staining and its effects on IVF-ET. Methods Chromatin condensation was analyzed using AB-E staining in 27 cases of testicular sperm extraction. There were 19 cases of obstructive azoospermia (OA) and 8 cases of non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) in IVF-ET. Mature sperm heads were stained red-pink whereas immature sperm heads were stained dark blue. The percentage of sperm chro...

  17. Objective evaluation of the morphology of human epididymal sperm heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, C; Pérez-Sánchez, F; Schulze, H; Bergmann, M; Oberpenning, F; Yeung, C; Cooper, T G

    2000-04-01

    Spermatozoa were obtained from nine epididymal regions of six epididymides taken from five men undergoing castration for prostatic carcinoma (53-76 years) and from one man with testicular cancer (38 years). Spermatozoa were obtained by mincing tissue in phosphate-buffered saline, making air dried smears and staining with Hemacolor. The percentage of sperm heads categorised subjectively as normal (of uniform shape) or otherwise was calculated for each region. This confirmed that grossly swollen sperm heads (previously shown to be artefacts) were only present in proximal regions of the duct. A computer-aided sperm morphology analyser (Sperm Class Analyzer(R)) was used to provide objective measurements of sperm head area, perimeter, length and width of the uniform sperm heads and revealed that there was a gradual and statistically significant decline in sperm head size upon maturation, as occurs in other species. There was no significant difference between the morphometric parameters of spermatozoa obtained from the distal cauda epididymis and those obtained from the ejaculates of young normozoospermic patients. PMID:10762433

  18. Location of the Protein of RSG6,a Predominantly Expressed Gene in Rice Sperm Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Li-qiong; Miao chen; Zeng yu; Wang Sheng-hua; Xu ying; Tang Lin; BAI Yu; Chen Fang

    2004-01-01

    Using Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis, here the localization of RSG6 protein was determined in various tissues of rice. Western blot showed only a weak signal in mature pollen. Nevertheless, according to the result of immunohistochemistry with DAB and fluorescent staining, the expression of RSG6 protein appeared to begin at the bicellular microspore stage, and then keep activity in the sperm cells of mature pollens. The fluorescence pattern showed RSG6 polypeptide was present close to or attached to the surface of the isolated sperm cells. And this suggested that RSG6 might take an important part in the process of recognition of sperm cell and ovum.

  19. Accessory sperm: a biomonitor of boar sperm fertilization capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardón, Florencia; Evert, Meike; Beyerbach, Martin; Weitze, Karl-Fritz; Waberski, Dagmar

    2005-04-15

    The number of accessory sperm found in the zona pellucida of porcine embryos was correlated to their individual quality and to the embryo quality range found within a single sow. Our goal was to determine whether accessory sperm counts provide semen evaluation with additional, useful information. Accessory sperm count was highest when only normal embryos were found in a given sow and diminished if oocytes or degenerated embryos were present (P<0.01). Within a given sow, normal embryos had higher (P<0.05) accessory sperm counts than degenerated embryos, although not when oocytes were also present. Fertilization capacity of sperm is optimal when only normal embryos are found in a given sow; this capacity is indicated by high accessory sperm counts. A decrease in fertilization capacity is reflected in diminishing accessory sperm counts. The boar had a significant effect (P<0.01) on accessory sperm count, but not on the percentage of normal embryos; this suggests that accessory sperm may be more sensitive indicators of the fertilization capacity of sperm than the percentage of normal embryos. We conclude that accessory sperm count can be used for the detection of compensable defects in sperm and is a valid parameter for assessing sperm fertilization capacity.

  20. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P 60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. PMID:26268795

  1. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced changes in sperm morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When developing spermatogenic cells are exposed to radiation, chemical carcinogens or mutagens, the transformation in the morphology of the mature sperm can be used to determine the severity of the exposure. In this study five groups of mice with three mice per group received testicular doses of X irradiation at dosage levels ranging from 0 rad to 120 rad. A random sample of 100 mature sperm per mouse was analyzed five weeks later for the quantitative morphologic transformation as a function of dosage level. The cells were stained with gallocyanin chrome alum (GCA) so that only the DNA in the sperm head was visible. The ACUity quantitative microscopy system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was used to scan the sperm at a sampling density of 16 points per linear micrometer and with 256 brightness levels per point. The contour of each cell was extracted using conventional thresholding techniques on the high-contrast images. For each contour a variety of shape features was then computed to characterize the morphology of that cell. Using the control group and the distribution of their shape features to establish the variability of a normal sperm population, the 95% limits on normal morphology were established. Using only four shape features, a doubling dose of approximately 39 rad was determined. That is, at 39 rad exposure the percentage of abnormal cells was twice that occurring in the control population. This compared to a doubling dose of approximately 70 rad obtained from a concurrent visual procedure

  2. Effects of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection on Sperm Viability in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the effects of testicular infection of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) on mature sperm viability at different periods following MCMV inoculation in mice, 91 BALB/c mice without MCMV infection were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (n=56) and a control group (n= 35). The mice in the experimental group were treated by inoculating MCMV intratesticularly, while those in the controlled group were directly inoculated with DMEM without MCMV. The mice in both groups were sacrificed separately on the day 1,1.5, 2, 4, 6, 9 and 14 post-inoculation (D1, 1.5,2, 4, 6, 9 and 14 PI). The MCMV M83 mRNA gene was detected in the testis by in situ hybridization (ISH) with MCMV late-mRNA probe labeled with digoxin.Sperm viability of mature sperm in the epididymis cauda was measured. The results demonstrated the positive signal of ISH of MCMV was found mainly in the cytoplasm of the testicular interstitial cells and spermatogenic cells in the experimental group. Compared with that in the controlled group, the sperm viability in the experimental group was decreased significantly on D1 PI and D1.5PI (P< 0.05). No statistically significant difference in the sperm viability was found after D2 PI between two groups (P>0.05). This suggested that sperm viability in mice might be descended significantly shortly after MCMV infection and might return to normal with time, indicating that MCMV acute infection might temporarily degrade sperm quality and influence procreation transiently.

  3. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  4. Epididymis cholesterol homeostasis and sperm fertilizing ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Saez; Aurélia Ouvrier; Jo(e)l R Drevet

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol, being the starting point of steroid hormone synthesis, is a long known modulator of both female and male reproductive physiology especially at the level of the gonads and the impact cholesterol has on gametogenesis. Less is known about the effects cholesterol homeostasis may have on postgonadic reproductive functions. Lately, several data have been reported showing how imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect the post-testicular events of sperm maturation that lead to fully fertile male gametes. This review will focus on that aspect and essentially centers on how cholesterol is important for the physiology of the mammalian epididymis and spermatozoa.

  5. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    as the use of donated sperm continuously has been debated as an ethical issue, and increasingly been regulated. In this presentation I will discuss how Denmark became a destination for fertility travelling (sperm donation) as a result of various subversive strategies of family making. The article inquires......During the past two decades, Denmark has developed in to an important destination for fertility travellers in need of donor sperm. Furthermore, two of the largest sperm banks in Europe have been established in Denmark, exporting sperm globally. This development has taken place at the same time...... into how the bending of boundaries by “inappropriate parents”, fertility travellers, private sperm banks and fertility clinics have been part in negotiating the changes of the legislation in practice, and thus been part of developing a Danish industry of sperm banking. The presentation is based on a multi...

  6. Sperm length, sperm storage and mating system characteristics in bumblebees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Høeg, Jens Thorvald;

    2003-01-01

    -term storage of sperm, using three bumblebee species with different mating systems as models. We show that individual males produce only one size-class of sperm, but that sperm length is highly variable among brothers, among unrelated conspecific males, and among males of different species. Males of Bombus...... hypnorum, a species with multiple-mating queens, have longer sperm than males of B. terrestris and B. lucorum whose queens are single mated. Although the sample size on the species level was too small to perform a phylogenetic analysis, this finding supports the hypothesis that, all other things being...... equal, multiple mating may select for longer sperm. Sperm length was positively correlated with male body size in B. terrestris and possibly in B. hypnorum, but not in B. lucorum. The variance of sperm length within single B. terrestris males before mating was consistently higher than the variance...

  7. Shallow food for deep divers: Dynamic foraging behavior of male sperm whales in a high latitude habitat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teloni, Valeria; Johnson, M.P.; Miller, P.J.O.;

    2008-01-01

    Groups of female and immature sperm whales live at low latitudes and show a stereotypical diving and foraging behavior with dives lasting about 45 min to depths of between 400 and 1200 m. In comparison, physically mature male sperm whales migrate to high latitudes where little is known about...

  8. Cryopreservation of human failed-matured oocytes followed by in vitro maturation: vitrification is superior to the slow freezing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZhiGuo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oocyte cryopreservation is an important method used in a number of human fertility circumstances. Here, we compared the survival, in vitro maturation, fertilization, and early embryonic development rates of frozen-thawed human immature oocytes using two different cryopreservation methods. Methods A total of 454 failed-matured oocytes [germinal vesicle (GV and metaphase I (MI stages] were collected from 135 patients (mean age 33.84 +/- 5.0 y who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles between February 2009 and December 2009 and randomly divided into a slow freezing group [1.5 mol/L-1, 2-propanediol (PROH + 0.2 mol/l sucrose] and vitrification group [20% PROH + 20% ethylene glycol (EG + 0.5 mol/l sucrose]. Results The vitrification protocol yielded a better survival rate than the slow freezing protocol at each maturation stage assessed. Regardless of the maturation stage (GV + MI, the slow freezing protocol had a significantly lower survival rate than the vitrification protocol (p in vitro maturation (21.2 vs. 54.0%, respectively; p 0.05. For the GV-matured oocytes, no fertilized eggs were obtained in the slow-freezing group, while a 19.0% (4/21 fertilization rate was observed in the vitrification group. For the MI-matured oocytes, fertilization rates for the slow freezing and vitrified groups were 36% and 61.1%, respectively, but no significant difference was found between the two groups (PIn the Methods section in the MS, all procedures were compliant with ethical guidelines, i.e. approved by the Ethical Committee of our university and Informed Consent signed by each patient. > 0.05. In the GV vitrification group, no embryo formed; however, in the MI slow freezing group, 12 oocytes were fertilized, but only two achieved cleavage and were subsequently blocked at the 2-cell stage. In the MI vitrification group, a total of 22 embryos were obtained, five of which developed to the blastocyst stage. Conclusions

  9. Correlation study between sperm concentration, hyaluronic acid-binding capacity and sperm aneuploidy in Hungarian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokánszki, Attila; Molnár, Zsuzsanna; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Balogh, Erzsébet; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Varga, Attila; Jakab, Attila; Oláh, Éva

    2012-12-01

    Infertile men with low sperm concentration and/or less motile spermatozoa have an increased risk of producing aneuploid spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding may reduce genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to evaluate the presence of aneuploidies. This study examined spermatozoa of 10 oligozoospermic, 9 asthenozoospermic, 9 oligoasthenozoospermic and 17 normozoospermic men by HA binding and FISH. Mean percentage of HA-bound spermatozoa in the normozoospermic group was 81%, which was significantly higher than in the oligozoospermic (Psex chromosomes (P=0.014) and chromosome 17 (P=0.0019), diploidy (P=0.03) and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (P=0.004) were significantly higher in the oligoasthenozoospermic group compared with the other groups. There were statistically significant relationships (Pchromosome aberrations (r=-0.668) and between HA binding and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (r=-0.682). HA binding and aneuploidy studies of spermatozoa in individual cases allow prediction of reproductive prognosis and provision of appropriate genetic counselling. Infertile men with normal karyotypes and low sperm concentrations and/or less motile spermatozoa have significantly increased risks of producing aneuploid (diminished mature) spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding, based on a binding between sperm receptors for zona pellucida and HA, may reduce the potential genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. In the present study we examined sperm samples of 45 men with different sperm parameters by HA-binding assay and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Mean percentage of HA-bound spermatozoa in the normozoospermic group was significantly higher than the oligozoospermic, the asthenozoospermic and the oligoasthenozoospermic groups. Using FISH, disomy of sex

  10. A medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling and blocks cytoskeletal organization and survival in mature osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids, important components of a normal diet, have been reported to play a role in bone metabolism. Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are responsible for many bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the impact of a medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, on the osteoclast differentiation, function, and survival induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). Capric acid inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages and suppressed RANKL-induced IκBα phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Capric acid further blocked the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK without affecting JNK or p38. The induction of NFATc1 in response to RANKL was also attenuated by capric acid. In addition, capric acid abrogated M-CSF and RANKL-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization, which is crucial for the efficient bone resorption of osteoclasts. Capric acid also increased apoptosis in mature osteoclasts through the induction of Bim expression and the suppression of ERK activation by M-CSF. Together, our results reveal that capric acid has inhibitory effects on osteoclast development. We therefore suggest that capric acid may have potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone resorption-associated disorders.

  11. Sperm surface protein PH-20 is bifunctional: one activity is a hyaluronidase and a second, distinct activity is required in secondary sperm-zona binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, G R; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1996-07-01

    In previous studies, we have found that the sperm membrane protein PH-20 acts during two different stages of fertilization. On acrosome-intact sperm, PH-20 has a hyaluronidase activity that is required for sperm penetration through the cumulus cell layer that surrounds the oocyte. On acrosome-reacted sperm, PH-20 has a required function in sperm-zona binding (secondary binding). Because hyaluronic acid (HA) has been detected in the zona pellucida, secondary sperm-zona adhesion could depend on repetitive binding and hydrolysis of HA by PH-20 acting as a hyaluronidase. Alternatively, PH-20 may be bifunctional and have a second, different activity required for secondary binding. To distinguish between these two possibilities, in this study we used reagents that inhibit either PH-20's function in sperm-zona binding or its hyaluronidase activity. We found that an anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 90%) had no effect on hyaluronidase activity. Conversely, apigenin, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, blocked PH-20 hyaluronidase activity 93% without inhibiting sperm-zona binding. Similarly, another anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited hyaluronidase activity 95% only partially inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 45%). We also extensively pretreated oocytes with hyaluronidase to remove all accessible HA on or in the zona pellucida and found little or no effect on secondary sperm-zona binding. Our results suggest that PH-20 is bifunctional and has two activities: a hyaluronidase activity and a second, separate activity required for secondary sperm-zona binding. PMID:8793062

  12. The effects of cryopreservation on the morphometric dimensions of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) epididymal sperm heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteso, M C; Fernández-Santos, M R; Soler, A J; Montoro, V; Quintero-Moreno, A; Garde, J J

    2006-06-01

    Computer-automated sperm-head morphometry was used in this study to determine the effects of cryopreservation on red deer sperm-head morphometry. Epididymal sperm samples were collected from 40 mature stags and were divided. One portion was diluted at room temperature in a Tris-citrate egg yolk medium, containing 6% glycerol. A microscope slide was prepared from single extended sperm samples prior to freezing. The remainder of each sample was frozen in nitrogen vapours. After thawing, sperm smears were prepared as described above. All slides were air dried and stained with Hemacolor. The sperm-head dimensions for length, width, area, perimeter and shape factor (length/width), for a minimum of 135 spermatozoa were determined for each slide by means of the Sperm-Class Analyser (SCA). Firstly, our results show that cryopreservation substantially reduced (p < 0.001) sperm motility and plasma membrane and acrosome integrities. In addition, sperm heads were significantly smaller in cryopreserved spermatozoa than in the companion extended samples for area (32.05 microm2 vs 32.56 microm2; p < 0.05), length (8.46 microm vs 8.53 microm; p < 0.0001) and shape factor (1.833 vs 1.849; p < 0.0001) for all stags. These differences were found within 29 of 40 stags (75%) for at least three of the morphometric parameters. The individual variability (CV) of sperm head measurements from extended samples was negatively correlated (p < 0.005) with the per cent of change in sperm head measurements after cryopreservation for area (r = -0.465), width (r = -0.483) and perimeter (r = -0.375). Thus, the lower the sperm head variability in the extended samples, the greater the sperm change as a consequence of the cryopreservation. These results suggest that the variability (heterogeneity) in sperm head dimensions of individual stags may be a good indicator of sperm freezability.

  13. Drosophila sperm swim backwards in the female reproductive tract and are activated via TRPP2 ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köttgen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sperm have but one purpose, to fertilize an egg. In various species including Drosophila melanogaster female sperm storage is a necessary step in the reproductive process. Amo is a homolog of the human transient receptor potential channel TRPP2 (also known as PKD2, which is mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In flies Amo is required for sperm storage. Drosophila males with Amo mutations produce motile sperm that are transferred to the uterus but they do not reach the female storage organs. Therefore Amo appears to be a mediator of directed sperm motility in the female reproductive tract but the underlying mechanism is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amo exhibits a unique expression pattern during spermatogenesis. In spermatocytes, Amo is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER whereas in mature sperm, Amo clusters at the distal tip of the sperm tail. Here we show that flagellar localization of Amo is required for sperm storage. This raised the question of how Amo at the rear end of sperm regulates forward movement into the storage organs. In order to address this question, we used in vivo imaging of dual labelled sperm to demonstrate that Drosophila sperm navigate backwards in the female reproductive tract. In addition, we show that sperm exhibit hyperactivation upon transfer to the uterus. Amo mutant sperm remain capable of reverse motility but fail to display hyperactivation and directed movement, suggesting that these functions are required for sperm storage in flies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Amo is part of a signalling complex at the leading edge of the sperm tail that modulates flagellar beating and that guides a backwards path into the storage organs. Our data support an evolutionarily conserved role for TRPP2 channels in cilia.

  14. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B.; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schärer, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm ...

  15. Proteomics and the genetics of sperm chromatin condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael Oliva; Judit Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis involves extremely marked cellular, genetic and chromatin changes resulting in the generation of the highly specialized sperm cell. Proteomics allows the identification of the proteins that compose the spermatogenic cells and the study of their function. The recent developments in mass spectrometry (MS) have markedly increased the throughput to identify and to study the sperm proteins. Catalogs of thousands of testis and spermatozoan proteins in human and different model species are becoming available, setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and possibly the future development of specific treatments. The present review intends to summarize the key genetic and chromatin changes at the different stages of spermatogenesis and in the mature sperm cell and to comment on the presently available proteomic studies.

  16. Sexing sperm of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cervantes, Román; Córdova-Izquierdo, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The ability to preselect or predetermine the sex of offspring prior to conception is a highly desired technological tool for assisted female breeding programs specifically for milk production, and in males, for meat production and increasing livestock numbers. The current technology is based on the well-known differences in X- and Y-sperm in the amount of DNA. The technology uses modified flow cytometric instrumentation for sorting X- and Y-bearing sperm. The method can be validated on the basis of live births, laboratory reanalysis of sorted sperm for DNA content, and embryo biopsy for sex determination. Currently, the sex of animals has been predetermined with 90 % accuracy by sexing spermatozoa. In the bovine breeding industry, flow cytometric sperm sexing has not fulfilled its original promise. Sexed sperm doses are too expensive for widespread application while the fertility of sexed sperm doses is lower than unsexed ones. Essentially all bovine sexed semen is frozen and then applied through artificial insemination (AI) or in vitro fertilization. There is still a need in the animal breeding industry to develop a technique for sperm sexing that provides sufficient spermatozoa for AI doses, does not compromise sperm fertility, and is widely applicable to a range of species. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art in sex preselection in domestic animals and some wildlife species using flow cytometric sperm-sorting of X from Y sperm based on DNA differences. PMID:22829354

  17. TRY-5 is a sperm-activating protease in Caenorhabditis elegans seminal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction.

  18. Sperm counts and sperm sex ratio in male infertility patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael L Eisenberg; Lata Murthy; Kathleen Hwang; Dolores J Lamb; Larry I Lipshultz

    2012-01-01

    In recent years,investigators have noted a trend toward a declining proportion of male births in many industrialized nations.While men bear the sex-determining chromosome,the role of the female partner as it pertains to fertilization or miscarriage may also alter the gender ratio.We attempted to determine a man's secondary sex ratio (F1 generation) by directly examining the sex chromosomes of his sperm.We examined our male infertility clinic database for all men who had undergone a semen fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).Patient demographic and semen parameters were recorded.Chi-squared analysis was used to compare gender ratios (Ychromosomes/total chromosomes).Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict the odds of possessing a Y-bearing sperm after accounting for demographic and semen parameters.A total of 185 men underwent sperm FISH.For the entire cohort,the proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm was 51.5%.Men with less than five million motile sperm had a significantly lower proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm (50.8%) compared to men with higher sperm counts (51.6%; P=0.02).After multivariable adjustment,a higher sperm concentration,total motile sperm count and semen volume significantly increased the odds of having a Y chromosome-bearing sperm (P<0.01).As a man's sperm production declines,so does the proportion of Y chromosome-bearing sperm.Thus,a man's reproductive potential may predict his ability to sire male offspring.

  19. Comparison of four methods to evaluate sperm DNA integrity between mouse caput and cauda epididymidis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serafín Pérez-Cerezales; Alberto Miranda; Alfonso Gutiérrez-Adán

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that transit through the epididymis involves an increase in the compaction of sperm chromatin,which acquires fully condensed status at the caput epididymidis.The purpose of this study was to compare the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay,the comet assay,the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test by analysing spermatozoa from the caput and cauda epididymidis in order to demonstrate the ability of each technique to discriminate between different degrees of sperm maturity related to chromatin compaction and DNA fragmentation.Our results suggest that some populations of DNA-fragmented spermatozoa associated with immature sperm can only be identified using the comet assay and the SCSA but not with the SCD test or the TUNEL assay.

  20. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    as the use of donated sperm continuously has been debated as an ethical issue, and increasingly been regulated. In this presentation I will discuss how Denmark became a destination for fertility travelling (sperm donation) as a result of various subversive strategies of family making. The article inquires......-sited ethnography drawing on ethnographic research including observations and interviews from fertility clinics and sperm banks in Denmark during 2002/2003 and 2011- 2013, legislative documents and websites of fertility clinics and sperm banks. The presentation is methodologically inspired by Adele Clarke...

  1. Sperm function test

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Talwar; Suryakant Hayatnagarkar

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give ins...

  2. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru;

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  3. Structure of chromatin, protein transitions, and post-translational histone modifications in several sperm models

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Katryn Lucille

    2008-01-01

    [eng] The study of chromatin structure in several simple sperm models of increasing complexity was performed. Species demonstrating different types of sperm nuclear protein transitions and structural changes in spermatic chromatin during spermiogenesis were selected as models for comparison: "H" (non-histone proteins are removed), "H->P" (protamine displaces histones), and "H->Pp->P" (precursor protamine displaces histones, and subsequently is converted into the mature protamine). This study ...

  4. Relative testis size and sperm morphometry across mammals: no evidence for an association between sperm competition and sperm length.

    OpenAIRE

    Gage, Matthew J.g.; Robert P Freckleton

    2003-01-01

    Understanding why there is extensive variation in sperm form and function across taxa has been a challenge because sperm are specialized cells operating at a microscopic level in a complex environment. This comparative study collates published data to determine whether the evolution of sperm morphometry (sperm total length and separate component dimensions) is associated with sperm competition (when different males' sperm mix and compete for a female's ova) across 83 mammalian species. We use...

  5. Mouse egg integrin alpha 6 beta 1 functions as a sperm receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, E A; Huovila, A P; Sutherland, A E; Stephens, L E; Calarco, P G; Shaw, L M; Mercurio, A M; Sonnenberg, A; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G; White, J M

    1995-06-30

    Binding between sperm and egg plasma membranes is an essential step in fertilization. Whereas fertilin, a mammalian sperm surface protein, is involved in this crucial interaction, sperm receptors on the egg plasma membrane have not been identified. Because fertilin contains a predicted integrin ligand domain, we investigated the expression and function of integrin subunits in unfertilized mouse eggs. Polymerase chain reactions detected mRNAs for alpha 5, alpha 6, alpha v, beta 1, beta 3, and beta 5. Immunofluorescence revealed alpha 6 beta 1 and alpha v beta 3 on the plasma membrane. GoH3, a function-blocking anti-alpha 6 monoclonal antibody, abolished sperm binding, but a nonfunction-blocking anti-alpha 6 monoclonal antibody, a function-blocking anti-alpha v beta 3 polyclonal antibody, and an RGD peptide had no effect. Somatic cells bound sperm avidly, but only if they expressed alpha 6 beta 1. A peptide analog of the fertilin integrin ligand domain inhibited sperm binding to eggs and alpha 6 beta 1+ cells and diminished GoH3 staining of eggs. Our results indicate a novel role for the integrin alpha 6 beta 1 as a cell-cell adhesion receptor that mediates sperm-egg binding. PMID:7600577

  6. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  7. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples

  8. Sperm function test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  9. Sperm function test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation. They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation. Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count, structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology. Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test, should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test. They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test. Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test to the oocyte during fertilization.

  10. Sperm storage in caecilian amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehnel Susanne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female sperm storage has evolved independently multiple times among vertebrates to control reproduction in response to the environment. In internally fertilising amphibians, female salamanders store sperm in cloacal spermathecae, whereas among anurans sperm storage in oviducts is known only in tailed frogs. Facilitated through extensive field sampling following historical observations we tested for sperm storing structures in the female urogenital tract of fossorial, tropical caecilian amphibians. Findings In the oviparous Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis, aggregated sperm were present in a distinct region of the posterior oviduct but not in the cloaca in six out of seven vitellogenic females prior to oviposition. Spermatozoa were found most abundantly between the mucosal folds. In relation to the reproductive status decreased amounts of sperm were present in gravid females compared to pre-ovulatory females. Sperm were absent in females past oviposition. Conclusions Our findings indicate short-term oviductal sperm storage in the oviparous Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis. We assume that in female caecilians exhibiting high levels of parental investment sperm storage has evolved in order to optimally coordinate reproductive events and to increase fitness.

  11. Surgical sperm retrieval: Techniques and their indications

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Rupin

    2011-01-01

    Men with azoospermia can father a child through intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection if sperm can be retrieved from their epididymis or testis. Several percutaneous and open surgical procedures have been described to retrieve sperm. The various techniques and their merits are discussed in this review. In men with obstructive azoospermia, epididymal sperm can usually be retrieved by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA). If PESA fails then testicular sperm are obtained by needle aspirat...

  12. Effect of supplemented diet with maturation plant extract on reproductive performance of Etroplus suratansis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Albin Dhas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to understand the effect of herbal maturation diet on reproductive successes in Etroplus suratensis. Three herbal maturation diets (EXD1, EXD2, EXD3 and one control diet (EXD0 were prepared with different combinations of herbal ingredients and normal diet ingredients. The experimental animal were observed for the success in reproductive performance like Gonado Somatic Index (GSI, fecundity, striping response, percentage of fertilization, percentage of hatching, percentage of deformed and formed larvae, volume of milt, number of sperm cell, percentage of sperm motility, sperm survival time, percentage of active sperm. The EXD3 diet combination increased the GSI (3.14, fecundity (1325, striping responds (87.23, percentage of fertilization (96.45 percentage of hatching (91.89, percentage of formed larvae (87.53, volume of milt (287 μl, number of sperm cell per μl (1912 percentage of sperm motility (94.18, time of sperm survival (72′15″ and percentage of active sperm cells (92.27 and reduced deformed larva percentage (4.36. From this observation it is more evident that the combination of EXD3 was the best combination and it could be utilized for the formulation of maturation diets for E. suratensis.

  13. Factors influencing boar sperm cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Hernández, M; Carvajal, G; Vázquez, J M; Martínez, E A

    2006-10-01

    Optimal sperm cryopreservation is a prerequisite for the sustainable commercial application of frozen-thawed boar semen for AI. Three experiments were performed to identify factors influencing variability of postthaw sperm survival among 464 boar ejaculates. Sperm-rich ejaculate fractions were cryopre-served using a standard freezing-thawing procedure for 0.5-mL plastic straws and computer-controlled freezing equipment. Postthaw sperm motility (assessed with a computer-assisted semen analysis system) and viability (simultaneously probed by flow cytometry analysis after triple-fluorescent stain), evaluated 30 and 150 min postthaw, were used to estimate the success of cryopreservation. In the first experiment, 168 unselected ejaculates (1 ejaculate/boar), from boars of 6 breeds with a wide age range (8 to 48 mo), were cryopreserved over a 12-mo period to evaluate the predictive value of boar (breed and age), semen collection, transport variables (season of ejaculate collection, interval between collections, and ejaculate temperature exposure), initial semen traits, and sperm quality before freezing on sperm survival after freezing-thawing. In Exp. 2, 4 ejaculates from each of 29 boars, preselected according to their initial semen traits and sperm quality before freezing, were collected and frozen over a 6-mo period to evaluate the influence of interboar and intraboar ejaculate variability in the survival of sperm after cryopreservation. In Exp. 3, 12 ejaculates preselected as for Exp. 2, from each of 15 boars with known good sperm cryosurvival, were collected and frozen over a 12-mo period to estimate the sustainability of sperm cryosurvival between ejaculates over time. Boar and semen collection and transport variables were not predictive of sperm cryosurvival among ejaculates. Initial semen traits and sperm quality variables observed before freezing explained 23.2 and 10.9%, respectively, of the variation in postthaw sperm motility and viability. However, more that

  14. Sperm competition experiments between lines of crickets producing different sperm lengths.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, E. H.; Gage, M J

    2001-01-01

    Sperm numbers can be important determinants of fertilization success in sperm competition. However, the importance of variation in sperm size is less well understood. Sperm size varies significantly both between and within species and comparative studies have suggested that some of this variance can be explained by sperm competition. In this study we examine whether variation in sperm length has consequences for fertilization precedence using controlled sperm competition experiments in the fi...

  15. RNA in human sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Pires Martins; Stephen A. Krawetz

    2005-01-01

    We have yet to develop a fundamental understanding of the molecular complexities of human spermatozoa. This encompasses the unique packaging and structure of the sperm genome along with their paternally derived RNAs in preparation for their delivery to the egg. The diversity of these transcripts is vast, including several anti-sense molecules resembling known regulatory micro-RNAs. The field is still grasping with its delivery to the oocyte at fertilization and possible significance. It remains tempting to analogize them to maternally-derived transcripts active in early embryo patterning. Irrespective of their role in the embryo, their use as a means to assess male factor infertility is promising.

  16. Sperm preparation for ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schill Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The onset of clinical assisted reproduction, a quarter of a century ago, required the isolation of motile spermatozoa. As the indication of assisted reproduction shifted from mere gynaecological indications to andrological indications during the years, this urged andrological research to understand the physiology of male germ cell better and develop more sophisticated techniques to separate functional spermatozoa from those that are immotile, have poor morphology or are not capable to fertilize oocytes. Initially, starting from simple washing of spermatozoa, separation techniques, based on different principles like migration, filtration or density gradient centrifugation evolved. The most simple and cheapest is the conventional swim-up procedure. A more sophisticated and most gentle migration method is migration-sedimentation. However, its yield is relatively small and the technique is therefore normally only limited to ejaculates with a high number of motile spermatozoa. Recently, however, the method was also successfully used to isolate spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Sperm separation methods that yield a higher number of motile spermatozoa are glass wool filtration or density gradient centrifugation with different media. Since Percoll® as a density medium was removed from the market in 1996 for clinical use in the human because of its risk of contamination with endotoxins, other media like IxaPrep®, Nycodenz, SilSelect®, PureSperm® or Isolate® were developed in order to replace Percoll®. Today, an array of different methods is available and the selection depends on the quality of the ejaculates, which also includes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by spermatozoa and leukocytes. Ejaculates with ROS production should not be separated by means of conventional swim-up, as this can severely damage the spermatozoa. In order to protect the male germ cells from the influence of ROS and to stimulate

  17. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates. PMID:27260333

  18. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Pablo E; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltrán, José Luis; Acevedo, Juan José; Darszon, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies.

  19. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo E Visconti; Dario Krapf; José Luis de la Vega-Beltrán; Juan José Acevedo; Alberto Darszon

    2011-01-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies.

  20. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120). PMID:21521663

  1. Cigarette smoking impairs sperm bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazim R. Chohan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The growing consensus on the negative impact of cigarette smoking on fertility prompted us to compare the rate of sperm respiration in smokers and non-smokers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen samples from 20 smokers and 58 non-smokers consulting at the andrology laboratory for fertility evaluation were used. Smoking was defined as consumption of at least a half a pack per day. A phosphorescence analyzer that measures O2 concentration in sperm suspensions as function of time was used to determine the rate of respiration. In a sealed vial, the rate of sperm respiration (k was defined as -d[O2]/dt; where [O2] was obtained from the phosphorescence decay rate of a palladium phosphor. [O2] in solutions containing sperm and glucose declined linearly with time, showing the kinetics of O2 consumption was zero-order. Inhibition of O2 consumption by cyanide confirmed the oxidations that occurred in the sperm mitochondrial respiratory chain. RESULTS: There were no differences (p > 0.28 between smokers and non-smokers for ejaculate volume, motility, concentration, normal morphology, viability and hypo-osmotic swelling test. The rate (mean ± SD, in µM O2/min/108 sperm of sperm mitochondrial O2 consumption in the smokers was 0.96 ± 0.58 and in the non-smokers 1.39 ± 0.67 (p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of sperm respiration was significantly lower in smokers. This negative impact of cigarette smoking on sperm aerobic metabolism may, in part, explain the lower rate of fertility in smokers.

  2. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuoran Zhang; Jun Liu; Jim Meriano; Changhai Ru; Shaorong Xie; Jun Luo; Yu Sun

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense an...

  3. Microdissection testicular sperm extraction: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Dabaja, Ali A; Schlegel, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) were once considered to be infertile with few treatment options due to the absence of sperm in the ejaculate. In the last two decades, the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and the application of various testicular sperm retrieval techniques, including fine needle aspiration (FNA), conventional testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) have revolutionized treatment in this gr...

  4. Recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti (Dasiprocta aguti) using powdered coconut water (ACP-109c) and Tris extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M A; Peixoto, G C X; Santos, E A A; Castelo, T S; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to compare the use of powdered coconut water (ACP-109c; ACP Biotecnologia, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil) and Tris extenders for recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti. The caudae epididymus and proximal ductus deferens from 10 sexually mature agoutis were subjected to retrograde washing using ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris. Epididymal sperm were evaluated for motility, vigor, sperm viability, membrane integrity, and morphology. Samples were centrifuged, and extended in the same diluents plus egg yolk (20%) and glycerol (6%), frozen in liquid nitrogen, and subsequently thawed at 37°C for 1 min, followed by re-evaluation of sperm characteristics. The two extenders were similarly efficient for epididymal recovery, with regard to the number and quality of sperm recovered. However, for both extenders, sperm quality decreased (P Biotecnologia) group, which was significantly better than 9.7 ± 2.6% motile sperm with 1.2 ± 0.3 vigor in Tris. In conclusion, agouti epididymal sperm were successfully recovered using either ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris extenders; however, ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) was a significantly better extender for processing and cryopreserving these sperm.

  5. Yolk protein is expressed in the insect testis and interacts with sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachimiak Ewa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male and female gametes follow diverse developmental pathways dictated by their distinct roles in fertilization. While oocytes of oviparous animals accumulate yolk in the cytoplasm, spermatozoa slough off most of their cytoplasm in the process of individualization. Mammalian spermatozoa released from the testis undergo extensive modifications in the seminal ducts involving a variety of glycoproteins. Ultrastructural studies suggest that glycoproteins are involved in sperm maturation in insects; however, their characterization at the molecular level is lacking. We reported previously that the circadian clock controls sperm release and maturation in several insect species. In the moth, Spodoptera littoralis, the secretion of glycoproteins into the seminal fluid occurs in a daily rhythmic pattern. The purpose of this study was to characterize seminal fluid glycoproteins in this species and elucidate their role in the process of sperm maturation. Results We collected seminal fluid proteins from males before and after daily sperm release. These samples were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and gels were treated with a glycoprotein-detecting probe. We observed a group of abundant glycoproteins in the sample collected after sperm release, which was absent in the sample collected before sperm release. Sequencing of these glycoproteins by mass spectroscopy revealed peptides bearing homology with components of yolk, which is known to accumulate in developing oocytes. This unexpected result was confirmed by Western blotting demonstrating that seminal fluid contains protein immunoreactive to antibody against yolk protein YP2 produced in the follicle cells surrounding developing oocytes. We cloned the fragment of yp2 cDNA from S. littoralis and determined that it is expressed in both ovaries and testes. yp2 mRNA and YP2 protein were detected in the somatic cyst cells enveloping sperm inside the testis. During the period of sperm

  6. Sperm Dynamics in Spiders (Araneae): Ultrastructural Analysis of the Sperm Activation Process in the Garden Spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Vöcking; Gabriele Uhl; Peter Michalik

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that...

  7. Sperm competition games: optimal sperm allocation in response to the size of competing ejaculates

    OpenAIRE

    Engqvist, Leif; Reinhold, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Sperm competition theory predicts that when males are certain of sperm competition, they should decrease sperm investment in matings with an increasing number of competing ejaculates. How males should allocate sperm when competing with differently sized ejaculates, however, has not yet been examined. Here, we report the outcomes of two models assuming variation in males' sperm reserves and males being faced with different amounts of competing sperm. In the first ‘spawning model’, two males co...

  8. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: 1 Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2 Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  9. Practical Applications of Sperm Selection Techniques as a Tool for Improving Reproductive Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Morrell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern biotechnologies are used extensively in the animal breeding industry today. Therefore, it is essential that sperm handling procedures do not modulate the normal physiological mechanisms occurring in the female reproductive tract. In this paper, the different selection mechanisms occurring in vivo are described briefly, together with their relevance to artificial insemination, followed by a detailed description of the different selection processes used in reproductive biotechnologies. These selection methods included fractionated semen collection, cryopreservation, biomimetic sperm selection, selection based on hyaluronic acid binding, and last, but not least, sperm sex selection. Biomimetic sperm selection for AI or for cryopreservation could improve pregnancy rates and help to reverse the decline in fertility seen in several domestic species over the recent decades. Similarly, selection for hyaluronic acid binding sites may enable the most mature spermatozoa to be selected for IVF or ICSI.

  10. A role for sperm in regulation of egg-laying in the Nematode C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenstein David

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In insects and in mammals, male sperm and seminal fluid provide signaling factors that influence various aspects of female physiology and behavior to promote reproductive success and to compete with other males. It is less apparent how important such signaling is in the context of a self-fertile hermaphrodite species. We have addressed this question in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which can reproduce either by hermaphrodite self-fertilization or by male-hermaphrodite mating. Results We have studied the egg-laying defective mutant, egl-32, and found that the cellular basis of the egl-32 egg-laying phenotype is likely a defect in sperm. First, the time of egl-32 action coincides with the timing of spermatogenesis in the hermaphrodite. Second, egl-32 interacts with genes expressed in sperm. Third, mating experiments have revealed that wild-type sperm can rescue the egg-laying defect of egl-32 mutant animals. Most importantly, introduction of mutant egl-32 sperm into wild-type hermaphrodites or females is sufficient to induce an egg-laying defective phenotype. Conclusion Previous work has revealed that C. elegans sperm release factors that stimulate oocyte maturation and ovulation. Here we describe evidence that sperm also promote egg laying, the release of embryos from the uterus.

  11. Sperm quality improvement after natural anti-oxidant treatment of asthenoteratospermic men with leukocytospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Piomboni; Laura Gambera; Francesca Serafini; Giovanna Campanella; Giuseppe Morgante; Vincenzo De Leo

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the immune-modulating and anti-oxidant effects of beta-glucan, papaya, lactoferrin, and vitamins C and E on sperm characteristics of patients with asthenoteratozoospermia associated with leucocytosis. Methods:Fifty-one patients referred to our Sterility Center for semen analysis were selected. Sperm parameters were assessed before and after patient's treatment with beta-glucan, lactoferrin, papaya, and vitamins C and E. DNA damage was assessed by the acridine orange test and sperm structural characteristics were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Results: After 90 days of treatment, an increase in the percentage of morphologically normal sperm (17.0±5.2 vs. 29.8±6.5) and total progressive motility (19.0±7.8 vs. 34.8±6.8) were detected. Structural sperm characteristics as well as chromatin integrity were also improved after treatment. In terms of leukocyte concentration in seminal fluid, a significant reduction was recorded (2.2±0.9 vs. 0.9±0.2). Conclusion: The treatment of an inflammatory process by the synergic action of immune modulators and anti-oxidants could protect sperm during maturation and migration, leading to improved sperm function.

  12. A high-fat diet negatively affects rat sperm mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, A; Conte, A; Moscatelli, N; Zara, V

    2016-05-01

    Recent evidences have linked abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia to male infertility. Since a defective energy metabolism may play an important role in the impairment of sperm quality, the aim of this study is to investigate the sperm energetic metabolism in rats fed with a high-fat diet, an animal model associated with metabolic syndrome development. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups and fed for 4 weeks a standard diet (control group) or a diet enriched in 35% of fat (high fat group). Liver and adipose tissue weight, plasma glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations were determined. Activities of enzymes involved in sperm energetic metabolism were evaluated by spectrophotometric assays. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption. The administration of a high-fat diet caused a significant increase in body weight of rats and provoked hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia. In these animals, we also observed a reduction in sperm concentration and motility. The investigation of sperm energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet revealed an impairment in the activity of pyruvate and lactate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and respiratory chain complexes. A parallel reduction in the cellular levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and an increase in oxidative damage were also observed. A defective energy metabolism may play an important role in the impairment of sperm quality in the high-fat diet fed rats. PMID:27062222

  13. A comparative analysis of the morphology and evolution of permanent sperm depletion in spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michalik

    Full Text Available Once thought to be energetically cheap and easy to produce, empirical work has shown that sperm is a costly and limited resource for males. In some spider species, there is behavioral evidence that sperm are permanently depleted after a single mating. This extreme degree of mating investment appears to co-occur with other reproductive strategies common to spiders, e.g. genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. Here we corroborate that sperm depletion in the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes is permanent by uncovering its mechanistic basis using light and electron microscopy. In addition, we use a phylogeny-based statistical analysis to test the evolutionary relationships between permanent sperm depletion (PSD and other reproductive strategies in spiders. Male testes do not produce sperm during adulthood, which is unusual in spiders. Instead, spermatogenesis is nearly synchronous and ends before the maturation molt. Testis size decreases as males approach their maturation molt and reaches its lowest point after sperm is transferred into the male copulatory organs (pedipalps. As a consequence, the amount of sperm available to males for mating is limited to the sperm contained in the pedipalps, and once it is used, males lose their ability to fertilize eggs. Our data suggest that PSD has evolved independently at least three times within web-building spiders and is significantly correlated with the evolution of other mating strategies that limit males to monogamy, including genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. We conclude that PSD may be an energy-saving adaptation in species where males are limited to monogamy. This could be particularly important in web-building spiders where extreme sexual size dimorphism results in large, sedentary females and small, searching males who rarely feed as adults and are vulnerable to starvation. Future work will explore possible energetic benefits and the evolutionary lability of PSD relative to other

  14. Impact of dietary fatty acids on muscle composition, liver lipids, milt composition and sperm performance in European eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Baeza, R.; Støttrup, Josianne;

    2015-01-01

    of dietary regime on muscle composition, and liver lipids prior to induced maturation, and the resulting sperm composition and performance. To accomplish this fish were reared on three "enhanced" diets and one commercial diet, each with different levels of fatty acids, arachidonic acid (ARA......), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Neutral lipids from the muscle and liver incorporated the majority of the fatty acid profile, while phospholipids incorporated only certain fatty acids. Diet had an effect on the majority of sperm fatty acids, on the total volume of extractable milt...... induced medium milt volumes but had the highest sperm motility. EPA also seems important for sperm quality parameters since diets with higher EPA percentages had a higher volume of milt and higher sperm motility. In conclusion, dietary fatty acids had an influence on fatty acids in the tissues of male eel...

  15. An antisperm monoclonal antibody inhibits sperm fusion with zona-free hamster eggs but not homologous eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primakoff, P; Hyatt, H

    1986-09-01

    The zona-free hamster egg penetration assay (HEPA) was evaluated as a test for identifying fertilization-blocking antibodies. A monoclonal antibody, AH-20, that binds to the surface of guinea pig sperm was used to test antibody inhibition of sperm-egg fusion. AH-20 strongly inhibited guinea pig sperm fusion with zona-free hamster eggs but had no effect on guinea pig sperm fusion with zona-free guinea pig eggs. No inhibition by AH-20 was found in the homologous fusion assay over a wide range of sperm concentration, fertilization rate, and fertilization index. The results suggest that although guinea pig sperm can fuse with both hamster and guinea pig eggs, some aspect of the fusion mechanism is different in the two cases. The findings also indicate that HEPA, which is frequently used to assess the fertility potential of human sperm, can identify as blockers of sperm-egg fusion antibodies that have no effect on homologous sperm-egg fusion. PMID:3527769

  16. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  17. Effects of indium chloride exposure on sperm morphology and DNA integrity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsin Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indium, a Group IIIA element of the periodic chart and a rare earth metal characterized by high plasticity, corrosion resistance, and a low melting point, is widely used in the electronics industry where released streams can contaminate the environment. Consequently, indium can reach humans mainly by natural ways, which could result in a health hazard. Although reproductive toxicities have been surveyed in some studies in animal models, the infertility effects of sperm function induced by indium compounds have not been greatly investigated. We designed a study to investigate the toxicities of subacute exposure to indium compounds on male sperm function and the process of spermatogenesis in a rodent model. Fourteen Sprague-Dawley rats on postnatal Day (PND 84 were randomly divided into exposure and control groups, and weekly received intraperitoneal injections of indium chloride (1.5 mg/kg body weight and normal saline, respectively, for 8 weeks. Cauda epididymal sperm count, motility, morphology, chromatin DNA integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and testis DNA content were investigated. The indium chloride exposed group showed significant toxicity to sperm function, as well as an increased percentage of sperm morphological abnormality and chromatin DNA damage. Furthermore, positive correlations between abnormal sperm morphology, chromatin DNA damage, and superoxide anion generation were also noted. The results of this study demonstrated the toxic effect of subacute low dose indium exposure during sexual maturation on sperm function, resulting in sperm chromatin DNA damage through an increase in sperm ROS generation in a rodent model.

  18. Reduced developmental competence of immature, in-vitro matured and postovulatory aged mouse oocytes following IVF and ICSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trounson Alan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study highlights basic physiological differences associated with oocyte maturation and ageing. The study explores the fertilizing capacity and resistance to injury of mouse oocytes at different stages of maturation and ageing following IVF and ICSI. Also, the study examines the developmental competence of embryos obtained from these oocytes. The outcome of the study supports views that the mouse can be a model for human IVF suggesting that utilizing in-vitro matured and failed fertilized oocytes to produce embryos mainly when limited number of oocytes is retrieved in a specific cycle, should be carefully considered. Methods Hybrid strain mouse oocytes were inseminated by in-vitro fertilization (IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Oocytes groups that were used were germinal vesicle (GV in-vitro matured metaphase II (IVM-MII, freshly ovulated MII (OV-MII, 13 hrs in-vitro aged MII (13 hrs-MII and 24 hrs in-vitro aged MII (24 hrs-MII. Fertilization and embryo development to the blastocyst stage were monitored up to 5 days in culture for IVF and ICSI zygotes. Sperm head decondensation and pronuclear formation were examined up to 9 hrs in oocytes following ICSI. Apoptotic events in blocked embryos were examined using the TUNNEL assay. Differences between females for the number and quality of GV and OV-MII oocytes were examined by ANOVA analyses. Differences in survival after ICSI, fertilization by IVF and ICSI and embryo development were analysed by Chi-square test with Yates correction. Results No differences in number and quality of oocytes were identified between females. The findings suggest that inability of GV oocytes to participate in fertilization and embryo development initiates primarily from their inability to support initial post fertilization events such as sperm decondensation and pronuclei formation. These events occur in all MII oocytes in similar rates (87–98% for IVF and ICSI. Following

  19. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Blengini, Cecilia S.; Sergio, Naretto; Gabriela, Cardozo; Giojalas, Laura C.; Margarita, Chiaraviglio

    2014-01-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and v...

  20. Effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter blocking on human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, A; Treulen, F; Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Felmer, R; Villegas, J V

    2015-08-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulates a number of essential processes in spermatozoa. Ca(2+) is taken up by mitochondria via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (mCU). Oxygen-bridged dinuclear ruthenium amine complex (Ru360) has been used to study mCU because it is a potent and specific inhibitor of this channel. In bovine spermatozoa, it has been demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium uptake inhibition adversely affects the capacitation process. It has been demonstrated in human spermatozoa that mCU blocking, through Ru360, prevents apoptosis; however, the contribution of the mCU to normal human sperm function has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mCU blocking on human sperm function. Spermatozoa obtained from apparently healthy donors were incubated with 5 and 10 μm Ru360 for 4 h at 37 °C. Viability was assessed using propidium iodide staining; motility was determined by computer-aided sperm analysis, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels using a luminescence-based method, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) using JC-1 staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production using dihydroethidium dye. Our results show that mCU blocking significantly reduced total sperm motility and ATP levels without affecting sperm viability, ΔΨm and ROS production. In conclusion, mCU contributes to the maintenance of sperm motility and ATP levels in human spermatozoa.

  1. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    -specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed...... that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm...... into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource...

  2. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Visser; M.H. Mochtar; A.A. de Melker; F. van der Veen; S. Repping; T. Gerrits

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counsellin

  3. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the signal causes the heart to contract and pump blood. Heart block occurs if the electrical signal is ... degree heart block limits the heart's ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. This type ...

  4. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  5. Bioenergetics of Mammalian Sperm Capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferramosca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After ejaculation, the mammalian male gamete must undergo the capacitation process, which is a prerequisite for egg fertilization. The bioenergetics of sperm capacitation is poorly understood despite its fundamental role in sustaining the biochemical and molecular events occurring during gamete activation. Glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS are the two major metabolic pathways producing ATP which is the primary source of energy for spermatozoa. Since recent data suggest that spermatozoa have the ability to use different metabolic substrates, the main aim of this work is to present a broad overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside sperm mitochondria during capacitation in different mammalian species. Metabolism of glucose and of other energetic substrates, such as pyruvate, lactate, and citrate, is critically analyzed. Such knowledge, besides its obvious importance for basic science, could eventually translate into the development of novel strategies for treatment of male infertility, artificial reproduction, and sperm selection methods.

  6. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  7. Effects of ubiquitin-protea some pathway on mouse sperm capacitation, acrosome reaction and in vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence patterns were used to study changes in the patterns B and AR of mouse sperm after incubation with reagents that would block the UPP. They were the monoclonal antibody against ubiquitinated proteins-UCP1; the polyclonal antibody against ubiquitin anti-Ub, and a special inhibitor against proteasome ALLN. Furthermore, we treated the capacitated sperm or the eggs with these reagents separately and tested whether the normal in vitro fertilization was blocked or not. Results illustrate that UCP1, anti-Ub, and ALLN have little effects on sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction,but they do inhibit fusion of mouse sperm with eggs, which suggests that UPP play an important role in mouse in vitro fertilization.``

  8. Cryopreservation of yamú (Brycon amazonicus) sperm for large scale fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.; Medina-Robles, Mauricio; Cruz-Casallas, Pablo E.

    2006-01-01

      To determine the effect of straw size and thawing temperature on cryopreserved sperm quality of yamú (Brycon amazonicus), ovulation and spermiation were induced in sexually mature broodstock using Carp Pituitary Extract. Sperm quality was evaluated by motility, activation time and fertility...... (35 °C or 80 °C water bath) were evaluated. To assess fertility, 2 g of eggs (ca. 2800) were inseminated with 500 μL of frozen-thawed sperm (ca. 75,000 motile spermatozoa/egg) from each straw thawed at 35 °C or 80 °C, or 160 μL (ca. 50,000 motile spermatozoa/egg) of fresh sperm. Large scale fertility...... assays consisted of 40 g eggs inseminated with approximately 5.0 mL (ca. 75,000 motile spermatozoa/egg) of cryopreserved sperm in large straws thawed at 35 °C. The fertilization rate was estimated 6 h post-insemination. In all straws, postthaw motility was significantly lower than for fresh sperm (pb0...

  9. In vitro production of functional sperm in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Hwang; Dolores J Lamb

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis refers to the process by which the production and development of the spermatozoa (the mature male gamete of most sexually reproducing species) occurs.It is a complex,stepwise process of sperm development,taking more than a month depending upon the species involving three specific functional phases:spermatogonial proliferation,meiosis and metamorphosis.1Investigators have been successful in recreating this process in some species of fish;however,this whole process has never been reproduced in vitro in mammals.

  10. Sperm head binding to epithelium of the oviduct isthmus is not an essential preliminary to mammalian fertilization - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R H F

    2011-08-01

    In endeavouring to understand the nature of sperm-oviduct interactions in mammals, attention was focused on experimental models in which fertilization can occur without a preliminary phase of sperm head binding to the isthmus epithelium. The ovarian endocrine milieu imposed on the oviduct tissues plays an important role in the binding phenomenon, although less so after the time of ovulation. Nonetheless, a sperm suspension introduced into the peritoneal cavity or surgical insemination directly into the oviduct ampulla before ovulation can result in fertilization, as can a surgical model in which the isthmus has been resected and the remaining portions of the duct reanastomosed. Mating or artificial insemination after ovulation in pigs permits rapid sperm transport to the site of fertilization, and the frequency of polyspermic penetration increases with the post-ovulatory age of eggs.Strategies underlying sperm binding were considered, especially in terms of preovulatory sperm storage and suppression of full membranous maturation. These, in turn, raised the problem of how sperm binding in vitro to oviduct cells from prepuberal animals or to cells harvested during the luteal phase of the estrous cycle, or to cells from the ampulla or even the tracheal epithelium, can act to regulate sperm storage and maturation with precision. In an evolutionary perspective, preovulatory binding of diverse populations of cells to the endosalpinx may have developed as a form of fine tuning to assist in sperm selection, to synchronize completion of capacitation with the events of ovulation, and to promote monospermic fertilization by a controlled release of competent gametes.

  11. Characterizing mouse male germ cell-specific actin capping protein α3 (CPα3): dynamic patterns of expression in testicular and epididymal sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keizo Tokuhiro; Yasushi Miyagawa; Hiromitsu Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To characterize mouse capping protein α3 (CPα3) during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation. Methods: We produced rat anti-CPα3 antiserum and examined the expression of CPα3 in various mouse tissues using Western blot analysis and the localization of CPα3 in testicular and epididymal sperm using immunohistochemical analyses. We also examined how the localization of CPα3 and β-actin (ACTB) in sperm changed after the acrosomal reaction by performing immunohistochemical analyses using anti-CPα3 antiserum and anti-actin antibody. Results: Western blot analysis using specific antiserum revealed that CPα3 was expressed specifically in testes. Interestingly, the molecular weight of CPα3 changed during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of CPα3 in sperm changed dynamically from the flagellum to the post-acrosomal region of the head during epididymal maturation. The distribution of ACTB was in the post-acrosomal region of the head and the flagellum. After inducing the acrosomal reaction, the CPα3 and ACTB localization was virtually identical to the localization before the acrosomal reaction.Conclusion: CPα3 might play an important role in sperm morphogenesis and/or sperm function.

  12. Markers of human sperm functions in the ICSI era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Monica; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Luconi, Michaela; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    The process of fertilization is crucial for species development and maintenance. Due to social and environmental problems, the number of infertile couples is increasing worldwide. Male and female factors contribute equally, and about 7% of men experiences problems in conceiving a child due to sperm defects. Assisted reproduction techniques (ARTs), including the most invasive intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), are the only available therapy for severe male factor infertility. Whether such techniques are associated with increased birth defects is still debated, and search for alternative options should go on. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of fertilization may lead to the development of new pharmacological strategies to treat infertile men and new male contraceptive agents. In addition, in view of the low predictive power of routine semen analysis, new tests aimed to better predict the fertilization potential could be developed. The present review summarizes current evidence of the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilization in human spermatozoa, with particular emphasis on the main post-ejaculatory maturation events, i.e. sperm capacitation and motility.

  13. Characterisation of Caenorhabditis elegans sperm transcriptome and proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xuan; Zhu, Yingjie; Li, Chunfang; Xue, Peng; Zhao, Yanmei; Chen, Shilin; Yang, Fuquan; Miao, Long

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sperm is transcriptionally and translationally quiescent, complex populations of RNAs, including mRNAs and non-coding RNAs, exist in sperm. Previous microarray analysis of germ cell mutants identified hundreds of sperm genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. To take a more comprehensive view on C. elegans sperm genes, here, we isolate highly pure sperm cells and employ high-throughput technologies to obtain sperm transcriptome and proteome. Results First, sperm transcriptome cons...

  14. Cryopreservation of sea urchin (Evechinus chloroticus) sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Serean L; Hessian, Paul A; Mladenov, Philip V

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed for cryopreserving sperm of the sea urchin, Evechinus chloroticus. Sperm fertilisation ability, mitochondrial function and membrane integrity were assessed before and after cryopreservation. Highest post-thaw fertilisation ability was achieved with lower concentrations (2.5%-7.5%) of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). In contrast, post-thaw mitochondrial function and membrane integrity were higher for sperm frozen in intermediate and high DMSO concentrations (5%-15%). Surprisingly, some sperm frozen in seawater only, without DMSO, were able to survive post-thawing, although the fertilisation ability (10(6) sperm/ml; approximately 50% fertilisation), mitochondrial function and membrane integrity of these sperm were notably lower than of sperm frozen with DMSO (10(6) sperm cells/ml; 2.5%-7.5% DMSO; >85% fertilisation) at the concentrations tested. Amongst sperm from individual males, fertilisation ability varied before and after cryopreservation for both males frozen with and without cryoprotectant. Specific differences among males also varied. Sperm mitochondrial function and membrane integrity was similar among males before cryopreservation but differed considerably after cryopreservation. Cryopreserved sperm were able to fertilise eggs and develop to pluteus stage larvae. This study has practical applications and will provide benefits such as reduced broodstock conditioning costs, control of parental input and opportunities for hybridisation studies. PMID:15375439

  15. Effect of male age on sperm traits and sperm competition success in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, C; Marino, I A M; Boschetto, C; Pilastro, A

    2010-01-01

    Deleterious mutations can accumulate in the germline with age, decreasing the genetic quality of sperm and imposing a cost on female fitness. If these mutations also affect sperm competition ability or sperm production, then females will benefit from polyandry as it incites sperm competition and, consequently, minimizes the mutational load in the offspring. We tested this hypothesis in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a species characterized by polyandry and intense sperm competition, by investigating whether age affects post-copulatory male traits and sperm competition success. Females did not discriminate between old and young males in a mate choice experiment. While old males produced longer and slower sperm with larger reserves of strippable sperm, compared to young males, artificial insemination did not reveal any effect of age on sperm competition success. Altogether, these results do not support the hypothesis that polyandry evolved in response to costs associated with mating with old males in the guppy.

  16. Proteomic changes in mammalian spermatozoa during epididymal maturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. John Aitken; Brett Nixon; Minjie Lin; Adam J. Koppers; Yun H. Lee; Mark A. Baker

    2007-01-01

    Epididymal maturation is associated with the activation of a cAMP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation cascade,which is ultimately associated with the expression of capacitation-dependent sperm functions, such as hyperactivated movement and acrosomal exocytosis. As spermatozoa progress through the epididymis they first acquire the capacity to phosphorylate tyrosine on targets on the principal piece, followed by the midpiece. By the time these cells have reached the cauda epididymidis they can phosphorylate the entire tail from neck to endpiece. This particular pattern of phosphorylation is associated with the ontogeny of fully functional spermatozoa that are capable of fertilizing the oocyte. Proteomic analyses indicate that this change is associated with the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins, creation of a mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of mitochondrial free radical generation. At least in rodent species, activation of sperm mitochondria appears to be a particularly important part of epididymal maturation.

  17. Porcine embryos produced after intracytoplasmic sperm injection using xenogeneic pig sperm from neonatal testis tissue grafted in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honaramooz, Ali; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Dobrinski, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Embryo development after homologous intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with sperm from testis tissue xenografts from pigs or any other farm animal species has not been evaluated critically. Here, we report development of porcine embryos in vitro following ICSI with sperm retrieved from xenografted neonatal pig testis. Small pieces of testis tissue from newborn piglets were grafted under the back skin of castrated immunodeficient mice (n = 4) and the xenografts were collected 8 months after grafting. Spermatozoa were recovered by mincing of the grafted tissue. For comparison, testicular, epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa were also collected from mature boars. Oocytes injected with xenogeneic spermatozoa were either fixed to determine fertilisation processes (n = 89 in five replicates) or allowed to develop in vitro (n = 143 in four replicates). Xenogeneic porcine spermatozoa were fertilisation competent (24% v. 58%, 68%, 62% or 0% for xenogeneic v. control testicular, epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa or no spermatozoa, respectively) and embryos developed to the blastocyst stage (8% v. 22%, 27%, 25% or 0%, respectively). These results demonstrate that porcine spermatozoa derived from immature testis tissue xenografted into mice are fertilisation competent, albeit at a lower rate than testicular, epididymal or ejaculated spermatozoa from control boars, and support embryo development after ICSI. PMID:18842182

  18. Patterns of sperm damage in Chernobyl passerine birds suggest a trade-off between sperm length and integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosell, Ignacio G.; Laskemoen, Terje; Rowe, Melissah; Møller, Anders P.; Mousseau, Timothy A; Albrecht, Tomáš; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific variation in sperm size is enigmatic, but generally assumed to reflect species-specific trade-offs in selection pressures. Among passerine birds, sperm length varies sevenfold, and sperm competition risk seems to drive the evolution of longer sperm. However, little is known about factors favouring short sperm or constraining the evolution of longer sperm. Here, we report a comparative analysis of sperm head abnormalities among 11 species of passerine bird in Chernobyl, presumabl...

  19. Progesterone from the cumulus cells is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte cumulus complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Alejandro Guidobaldi

    Full Text Available Sperm chemotaxis in mammals have been identified towards several female sources as follicular fluid (FF, oviduct fluid, and conditioned medium from the cumulus oophorus (CU and the oocyte (O. Though several substances were confirmed as sperm chemoattractant, Progesterone (P seems to be the best chemoattractant candidate, because: 1 spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor, 2 capacitated spermatozoa are chemotactically attracted in vitro by gradients of low quantities of P; 3 the CU cells produce and secrete P after ovulation; 4 a gradient of P may be kept stable along the CU; and 5 the most probable site for sperm chemotaxis in vivo could be near and/or inside the CU. The aim of this study was to verify whether P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte-cumulus complex (OCC in the rabbit, as a mammalian animal model. By means of videomicroscopy and computer image analysis we observed that only the CU are a stable source of sperm attractants. The CU produce and secrete P since the hormone was localized inside these cells by immunocytochemistry and in the conditioned medium by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, rabbit spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor detected by western blot and localized over the acrosomal region by immunocytochemistry. To confirm that P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the CU, the sperm chemotactic response towards the OCC conditioned medium was inhibited by three different approaches: P from the OCC conditioned medium was removed with an anti-P antibody, the attractant gradient of the OCC conditioned medium was disrupted by a P counter gradient, and the sperm P receptor was blocked with a specific antibody. We concluded that only the CU but not the oocyte secretes P, and the latter chemoattract spermatozoa by means of a cell surface receptor. Our findings may be of interest in assisted reproduction procedures in humans, animals of economic importance and endangered species.

  20. Comparison of DNA Fragmentation Assay in Frozen-Thawed Cat Epididymal Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkitti, P; Sjödahl, A; Bergqvist, A-S; Johannisson, A; Axnér, E

    2016-08-01

    DNA fragmentation of frozen-thawed feline epididymal sperm from corpus and cauda regions was evaluated by three different techniques. The DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was compared between techniques: the sperm chromatin structural assay (SCSA(®) ), acridine orange staining techniques (AOT) and the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD). There were significant differences in DFI among the techniques (p < 0.05) with no correlations. Only DFI values obtained from SCD revealed a significantly higher DFI in corpus compared with cauda spermatozoa (p < 0.05). The discrepancy between techniques might be due to the sensitivity of each technique, differences in severity of DNA damaged that can be detected. The difference in DFI between epididymal regions from SCD technique might indicate different maturational stages of spermatozoa, with less chromatin condensation of spermatozoa in corpus compared with cauda epididymis. PMID:27321406

  1. Low-dose effect of developmental bisphenol A exposure on sperm count and behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie;

    2016-01-01

    /day. In the offspring, growth, sexual maturation, weights and histopathology of reproductive organs, oestrus cyclicity and sperm counts were assessed. Neurobehavioural development was investigated using a behavioural testing battery including tests for motor activity, sweet preference, anxiety and spatial learning....... Decreased sperm count was found at the lowest bisphenol A dose, that is 25 μg/kg/day, but not at the higher doses. Reproductive organ weight and histology were not affected and no behavioural effects were seen in male offspring. In the female offspring, exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A dose resulted...... not significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study using a robust experimental study design, has shown that developmental exposure to 25 μg/kg bw/day bisphenol A can cause adverse effects on fertility (decreased sperm count), neurodevelopment (masculinization of spatial learning in females) and lead...

  2. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  3. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Chan, Philip J.; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  4. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes with cryopreserved testicular sperm aspiration samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, M; Valle, M; Marques, F; Sampaio, M; Geber, S

    2016-04-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be performed with testicular frozen-thawed spermatozoa in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA). Sperm retrieval can be performed in advance of oocyte aspiration, as it may avoid the possibility of no recovery of spermatozoa on the day of oocyte pickup. There are few studies available in the literature concerning the use of frozen-thawed spermatozoa obtained from testicular sperm aspiration (TESA). To evaluate the effects and the outcomes of ICSI with frozen-thawed spermatozoa obtained by TESA, we performed a retrospective analysis of 43 ICSI cycles using frozen-thawed TESA. We obtained acceptable results with a fertilisation rate of 67.9%, an implantation rate (IR) of 17.1%, and clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates of 41.9% and 37.2% respectively. The results of this study suggest that performing ICSI using cryopreserved frozen-thawed testicular spermatozoa with TESA as a first option is a viable, safe, economic and effective method for patients with NOA. PMID:25998234

  5. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  6. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  7. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 mediates the sperm-oviductal epithelial cell interaction to protect human sperm from oxidative damage

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wenxin; 黃聞馨

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major cause of sperm dysfunction. Excessive ROS generation reduces fertilization and enhances DNA damage of spermatozoa. In mammals, including humans, oviduct functions as a sperm reservoir which is created by the binding of spermatozoa to the epithelial lining in the oviduct. Interaction between sperm and oviductal epithelial cells improves the fertilizing ability of and reduces chromatin damage in spermatozoa. However, the mechanism(s) ...

  8. No evidence of trade-offs in the evolution of sperm numbers and sperm size in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourmente, M; Delbarco Trillo, J; Roldan, E R S

    2015-10-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection, in the form sperm competition, has influenced the evolution of several male reproductive traits. However, theory predicts that sperm competition would lead to trade-offs between numbers and size of spermatozoa because increased costs per cell would result in a reduction of sperm number if both traits share the same energetic budget. Theoretical models have proposed that, in large animals, increased sperm size would have minimal fitness advantage compared with increased sperm numbers. Thus, sperm numbers would evolve more rapidly than sperm size under sperm competition pressure. We tested in mammals whether sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers and size, and whether there is a trade-off between these traits. Our results showed that sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers in eutherian and metatherian mammals. There was no evidence of a trade-off between sperm numbers and sperm size in any of the two mammalian clades as we did not observe any significant relationship between sperm numbers and sperm size once the effect of sperm competition was taken into account. Maximization of both numbers and size in mammals may occur because each trait is crucial at different stages in sperm's life; for example size-determined sperm velocity is a key determinant of fertilization success. In addition, numbers and size may also be influenced by diverse energetic budgets required at different stages of sperm formation. PMID:26190170

  9. Pregnancy rates after intracytoplasmic sperm injection in relation to sperm recovery techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Egbase, P. E.; Al-Sharhan, M.; Ing, R.; Grudzinskas, J G

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Methods: Clinical outcome after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was evaluated in relation to three techniques of sperm recovery, mini-Percoll, simple concentration, and centrifugation and washing.

  10. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility. (orig.)

  11. Maturity and maturity models in lean construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Nesensohn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing interest in maturity models in management-related disciplines; which reflects a growing recognition that becoming more mature and having a model to guide the route to maturity can help organisations in managing major transformational change. Lean Construction (LC is an increasingly important improvement approach that organisations seek to embed. This study explores how to apply the maturity models to LC. Hence the attitudes, opinions and experiences of key industry informants with high levels of knowledge of LC were investigated. To achieve this, a review of maturity models was conducted, and data for the analysis was collected through a sequential process involving three methods. First a group interview with seven key informants. Second a follow up discussion with the same individuals to investigate some of the issues raised in more depth. Third an online discussion held via LinkedIn in which members shared their views on some of the results. Overall, we found that there is a lack of common understanding as to what maturity means in LC, though there is general agreement that the concept of maturity is a suitable one to reflect the path of evolution for LC within organisations.

  12. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  13. A role for mouse sperm surface galactosyltransferase in sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Past studies have suggested that mouse sperm surface galactosyltransferase may participate during fertilization by binding N- acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues in the zona pellucida. In this paper, we examined further the role of sperm surface galactosyltransferase in mouse fertilization. Two reagents that specifically perturb sperm surface galactosyltransferase activity both inhibit sperm-zona binding. The presence of the milk protein alpha- lactalbumin specifically modifies the substrate ...

  14. Effects of Sperm Conjugation and Dissociation on Sperm Viability In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Higginson, Dawn M.; Henn, Kali R. H.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm conjugation is an unusual variation in sperm behavior where two or more spermatozoa physically unite for motility or transport through the female reproductive tract. Conjugation has frequently been interpreted as sperm cooperation, including reproductive altruism, with some sperm advancing their siblings toward the site of fertilization while ostensibly forfeiting their own ability to fertilize through damage incurred during conjugate break-up. Conversely, conjugation has been proposed ...

  15. Sperm competition and sperm midpiece size: no consistent pattern in passerine birds

    OpenAIRE

    Immler, S.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2007-01-01

    Sperm competition is thought to be a major force driving the evolution of sperm shape and function. However, previous studies investigating the relationship between the risk of sperm competition and sperm morphometry revealed inconclusive results and marked differences between taxonomic groups. In a comparative study of two families of passerines (Fringillidae and Sylviidae) and also across species belonging to different passerine families, we investigated the relative importance of the phylo...

  16. Sperm competition and sperm length influence the rate of mammalian spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm, Steven A.; Stockley, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Sperm competition typically favours an increased investment in testes, because larger testes can produce more sperm to provide a numerical advantage in competition with rival ejaculates. However, interspecific variation in testis size cannot be equated directly with variation in sperm production rate—which is the trait ultimately selected under sperm competition—because there are also differences between species in the proportion of spermatogenic tissue contained within the testis and in the ...

  17. Mechanism of infertility in male guinea pigs immunized with sperm PH-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, K S; Primakoff, P; Woolman-Gamer, L; Myles, D G

    1997-05-01

    PH-20, a testis-specific protein first expressed in haploid germ cells, is present on the posterior head plasma membrane and inner acrosomal membrane of mature guinea pig sperm. PH-20 is bifunctional, having a hyaluronidase activity that allows sperm to penetrate the cumulus layer and a separate activity required for binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to the zona pellucida. The immunization of male guinea pigs with PH-20 reproducibly results in infertility with a duration of 6-12 mo or longer. In this study, we analyzed the immunopathology in the reproductive tract of PH-20-immunized males to probe the mechanism(s) responsible for the induced infertility and found two separate effects. Remarkably, in almost all infertile, PH-20-immunized males, the caudae epididymides were empty (contained no sperm) or contained only abnormal sperm. The complete loss of normal sperm in the epididymis apparently results in infertility. A second effect was the induction of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), representing the first report of EAO induced by a purified testis/sperm molecule of known functions. PH-20-induced EAO differed from EAO induced by crude testis antigens in two respects: 1) an absence of epididymitis with abscess and granuloma and 2) the presence of antibody on germ cells within seminiferous tubules and inside the cauda epididymidis. The former suggests that crude testis antigens other than PH-20 are responsible for epididymitis, and the latter suggests a possible role of antibody in EAO pathogenesis and infertility induction. Return to fertility, after 6-12 mo, was accompanied by regression of EAO and reappearance of spermatozoa in the caudae epididymides. PMID:9160711

  18. Sperm retention site and its influence on cleavage rate and early development following intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    OpenAIRE

    Yanaihara, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Shinji; Negishi, Momoko; Okai, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has risen to the forefront of reproductive technology. In the present study, the location of the sperm injection was noted, and a prospective study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the sperm retention site on cleavage rates and embryo quality after ICSI.

  19. The Correlation of Sperm Chromatin Decondensation Following In Vitro Exposure to Heparin and Sperm Penetration Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Carrell, Douglas T.; Emery, Benjamin R.; Peterson, C. Matthew

    1998-01-01

    Purpose:The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible correlation of low-dose heparin-induced decondensation of sperm chromatin with sperm concentration, motility, morphology, membrane hypoosmotic response, ejaculate volume, and the ability of sperm to penetrate zona-free hamster oocytes.

  20. Effects of sperm viability on fertilization and embryo cleavage following intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    OpenAIRE

    Poe-Zeigler, Robin; Nehchiri, Fariba; Hamacher, Pamela; Boyd, Catherine; Oehninger, Sergio; Muasher, Suheil; Lanzendorf, Susan E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: In the human, intracytoplasmic sperm injection is typically performed using “viable” sperm which has been mechanically rendered nonmotile. The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of nonviable sperm to fertilize human oocytes and the early developmental normalcy of the resulting embryos.

  1. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  2. At the physical limit - chemosensation in sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strünker, T; Alvarez, L; Kaupp, U B

    2015-10-01

    Many cells probe their environment for chemical cues. Some cells respond to picomolar concentrations of neuropeptides, hormones, pheromones, or chemoattractants. At such low concentrations, cells encounter only a few molecules. The mechanistic underpinnings of single-molecule sensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic cell. Sea urchin sperm offer a unique model to unveil in quantitative terms the principles underlying chemosensation at the physical limit. Here, we discuss the mechanisms of such exquisite sensitivity and the computational operations performed by sperm during chemotactic steering. Moreover, we highlight commonalities and differences between signalling in sperm and photoreceptors and among sperm from different species. PMID:25768273

  3. Microdissection testicular sperm extraction: an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali A Dabaja; Peter N Schlegel

    2013-01-01

    Patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) were once considered to be infertile with few treatment options due to the absence of sperm in the ejaculate.In the last two decades,the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI),and the application of various testicular sperm retrieval techniques,including fine needle aspiration (FNA),conventional testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) have revolutionized treatment in this group of men.Because most men with NOA will have isolated regions of spermatogenesis within the testis,studies have illustrated that sperm can be retrieved in most men with NOA,including Klinefelter's syndrome (KS),prior history of chemotherapy and cryptorchidism.Micro-TESE,when compared with conventional TESE has a higher sperm retrieval rate (SRR) with fewer postoperative complications and negative effects on testicular function.In this article,we will compare the efficacy of the different procedures of sperm extraction,discuss the medical treatment and the role of testosterone optimization in men with NOA and describe the micro-TESE surgical technique.Furthermore,we will update our overall experience to allow counseling on the prognosis of sperm retrieval for the specific subsets of NOA.

  4. SPERM DNA INTEGRITY IN BUFFALO, BULL AND STALLION

    OpenAIRE

    Serafini, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    The interest in sperm DNA integrity evaluation and its relationship to subfertility and infertility loaded to development of several sperm DNA assays. The aim of this study was to compare several sperm DNA assays in buffaloes, bulls and stallions, and to identify the relationships between those DNA assays and traditional sperm features. In Italian Mediterranean Buffalo (IMB) bulls traditional sperm features (motility, viability, acrosome integrity and morphology), sperm DNA integrity (neutral...

  5. Two Types of Assays for Detecting Frog Sperm Chemoattraction

    OpenAIRE

    Burnett, Lindsey A.; Tholl, Nathan; Chandler, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm chemoattraction in invertebrates can be sufficiently robust that one can place a pipette containing the attractive peptide into a sperm suspension and microscopically visualize sperm accumulation around the pipette1. Sperm chemoattraction in vertebrates such as frogs, rodents and humans is more difficult to detect and requires quantitative assays. Such assays are of two major types - assays that quantitate sperm movement to a source of chemoattractant, so-called sperm accumulation assay...

  6. Long sperm fertilize more eggs in a bird

    OpenAIRE

    Bennison, Clair; Hemmings, Nicola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sperm competition, in which the ejaculates of multiple males compete to fertilize a female's ova, results in strong selection on sperm traits. Although sperm size and swimming velocity are known to independently affect fertilization success in certain species, exploring the relationship between sperm length, swimming velocity and fertilization success still remains a challenge. Here, we use the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), where sperm size influences sperm swimming velocity, to determin...

  7. Sperm length evolution in the fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, B.; Dijkstra, M. B.; Mueller, U. G.;

    2009-01-01

    Eusocial insects offer special opportunities for the comparative study of sperm traits because sperm competition is absent (in species with obligatory monandry) or constrained (in lineages where queens mate multiply but never remate later in life). We measured sperm length in 19 species of fungus...... affected sperm length to a minor extent, and only in interaction with other predictor variables, suggesting that sperm competition has not been a major selective force for sperm length evolution in these ants....

  8. Single blastocyst transfer after ICSI from ejaculate spermatozoa, percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE)

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Staffan; Waldenström, Urban; Engström, Ann-Britt; Hellberg, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of IVF following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) from ejaculate, percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE), with subsequent blastocyst culture and single blastocyst transfer.

  9. Role of arachidonic acid cascade in Rhinella arenarum oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Arias-Torres, Ana Josefina; Zelarayán, Liliana Isabel

    2015-08-01

    There are no studies that document the production of prostaglandins (PGs) or their role in Rhinella arenarum oocyte maturation. In this study, we analysed the effect of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandins (PGs) on maturation, activation and pronuclear formation in R. arenarum oocytes. Our results demonstrated that AA was capable of inducing maturation in time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Arachidonic acid-induced maturation was inhibited by indomethacin. PGs from AA hydrolysis, such as prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and, to a lesser extent, PGE2, induced meiosis resumption. Oocyte maturation in response to PGF2α was similar to that produced by progesterone (P4). Oocyte response to PGE1 was scarce. Rhinella arenarum oocyte PGF2α-induced maturation showed seasonal variation. From February to June, oocytes presented low sensitivity to PGF2α. In following periods, this response increased until a maximum was reached during October to January, a close temporal correlation with oocyte response to P4 being observed. The effect of PGF2α on maturation was verified by analysing the capacity of oocytes to activate and form pronuclei after being injected with homologous sperm. The cytological analysis of activated oocytes demonstrated the absence of cortical granules in oocytes, suggesting that PGF2α induces germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and meiosis resumption up to metaphase II. In turn, oocytes matured by the action of PGF2α were able to form pronuclei after fertilization in a similar way to oocyte maturated by P4. In microinjection of mature cytoplasm experiments, the transformation of pre-maturation promoting factor (pre-MPF) to MPF was observed when oocytes were treated with PGF2α. In summary, our results illustrated the participation of the AA cascade and its metabolites in maturation, activation and pronuclei formation in R. arenarum. PMID:24964276

  10. Sperm chromatin structure and male fertility: biological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Erenpreiss; M. Spano; J. Erenpreisa; M. Bungum; A. Giwercman

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Sperm chromatin/DNA integrity is essential for the accurate transmission of paternal genetic information, and normal sperm chromatin structure is important for sperm fertilizing ability. The routine examination of semen, which includes sperm concentration, motility and morphology, does not identify defects in sperm chromatin structure. The origin of sperm DNA damage and a variety of methods for its assessment are described. Evaluation of sperm DNA damage appears to be a useful tool for assessing male fertility potential both in vivo and in vitro. The possible impact of sperm DNA defects on the offspring is also discussed.

  11. Effects of Cadmium on Rat Sperm Motility Evaluated With Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study effects of cadmium on rat sperm motility evaluated with computer assisted sperm analysis. Methods  Different doses of cadmium chloride (0.2,0.4,0.8mg Cd/kg BW) were administrated ip to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Control animals received the same volume of 0.9% NaCl solution. After 7 days, the rats were sacrificed with their testes removed. A part of one testis was used for testicular sperm head counts and daily sperm production observation. The motility of spermatozoa obtained from cauda epididymides using the “diffusion”method was measured by computer assisted sperm analysis(CASA). Results  The sperm head counts and daily sperm production decreased significantly in the high dose group. The motility of spermatozoa in the middle dose group was reduced significantly. No motile sperm was found in the high dose group. The results suggest that germinal epithelium was impaired irreversibly in a short time to produce toxic effects on spermatogenesis at high cadmium doses. Conclusion  Cadmium may reduce sperm motility at a dose far below the dose affecting sperm production at this time point. The motility of sperm is an early and sensitive endpoint for the assessment of cadmium toxicity on male reproduction.

  12. Sperm dynamics in spiders (Araneae: ultrastructural analysis of the sperm activation process in the garden spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Vöcking

    Full Text Available Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that are surrounded by a proteinaceous sheath. These inactive and encapsulated sperm are transferred to the female spermathecae where they are stored for later fertilization. We analyzed the ultrastructural changes of sperm cells during residency time in the female genital system of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We found three clearly distinguishable sperm conditions: encapsulated sperm (secretion sheath present, decapsulated (secretion sheath absent and uncoiled sperm (cell components uncoiled, presumably activated. After insemination, sperm remain in the encapsulated condition for several days and become decapsulated after variable periods of time. A variable portion of the decapsulated sperm transforms rapidly to the uncoiled condition resulting in a simultaneous occurrence of decapsulated and uncoiled sperm. After oviposition, only decapsulated and uncoiled sperm are left in the spermathecae, strongly suggesting that the activation process is not reversible. Furthermore, we found four different types of secretion in the spermathecae which might play a role in the decapsulation and activation process.

  13. Sperm dynamics in spiders (Araneae): ultrastructural analysis of the sperm activation process in the garden spider Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöcking, Oliver; Uhl, Gabriele; Michalik, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sperm inside the female genital tract is an integral phase of reproduction in many animal species. The sperm storage site constitutes the arena for sperm activation, sperm competition and female sperm choice. Consequently, to understand animal mating systems information on the processes that occur from sperm transfer to fertilization is required. Here, we focus on sperm activation in spiders. Male spiders produce sperm whose cell components are coiled within the sperm cell and that are surrounded by a proteinaceous sheath. These inactive and encapsulated sperm are transferred to the female spermathecae where they are stored for later fertilization. We analyzed the ultrastructural changes of sperm cells during residency time in the female genital system of the orb-web spider Argiope bruennichi. We found three clearly distinguishable sperm conditions: encapsulated sperm (secretion sheath present), decapsulated (secretion sheath absent) and uncoiled sperm (cell components uncoiled, presumably activated). After insemination, sperm remain in the encapsulated condition for several days and become decapsulated after variable periods of time. A variable portion of the decapsulated sperm transforms rapidly to the uncoiled condition resulting in a simultaneous occurrence of decapsulated and uncoiled sperm. After oviposition, only decapsulated and uncoiled sperm are left in the spermathecae, strongly suggesting that the activation process is not reversible. Furthermore, we found four different types of secretion in the spermathecae which might play a role in the decapsulation and activation process. PMID:24039790

  14. Methamidophos alters sperm function and DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urióstegui-Acosta, Mayrut; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Piña-Guzmán, Belem [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-UPIBI, D.F. (Mexico); Rafael-Vázquez, Leticia; Solís-Heredia, M.J.; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet, E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Methamidophos (MET) is a highly toxic organophosphate (OP) pesticide that is widely used in developing countries. MET has male reproductive effects, including decreased fertility. We evaluated MET effects on sperm quality, fertilization and DNA integrity, exploring the sensitivity of different stages of spermatogenesis. Adult male mice received MET (3.75 or 5 mg/kg-bw/ip/day/4 days) and were euthanized 1, 28 or 45 days post-treatment (dpt) to evaluate MET's effects on epididymal maturation, meiosis or mitosis, respectively. Spermatozoa were obtained from the cauda epididymis–vas deferens and were evaluated for sperm quality, acrosome reaction (AR; Coomassie staining), mitochondrial membrane potential (by JC-1), DNA damage (comet assay), oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) production), in vitro fertilization and protein phosphorylation (immunodetection), and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. At 1-dpt, MET inhibited AChE (43–57%) and increased abnormal cells (6%). While at 28- and 45-dpt, sperm motility and viability were significantly reduced with an increasing MET dose, and abnormal morphology increased at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days. MDA and mitochondrial activity were not affected at any dose or time. DNA damage (OTM and %DNA) was observed at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days in a time-dependent manner, whereas both parameters were altered in cells from mice exposed to 3.75 mg/kg/day/4 days only at 28-dpt. Depending on the time of collection, initial-, spontaneous- and induced-AR were altered at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days, and the fertilization capacity also decreased. Sperm phosphorylation (at serine and tyrosine residues) was observed at all time points. Data suggest that meiosis and mitosis are the more sensitive stages of spermatogenesis for MET reproductive toxicity compared to epididymal maturation. - Highlights: • Methamidophos alters sperm cell function at different stages of spermatogenesis. • Testicular stages of spermatogenesis are more sensitive to

  15. Adverse effects of long-time exposure to formaldehyde vapour on testicular tissue and sperm parameters in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazdak Razi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Formalin is widely used in industry and in medicine (as tissue fixative and disinfectant.It contains reactive molecules which have been known for its cytotoxic effects. To evaluate the effect of formalin exposure on the testicular tissue and sperm parameter from neonatal period through physical and sexual maturity, 28 male Wister rats were assigned into two equal test and control groups. The test group was exposed to 1.5 ppm of the vapour of 10% formaldehyde in a special chamber for 2 hr per day at 20-26 ˚C and the air pressure of 760-763 atm. After 55 days, the tubular differentiation (TDI and repopulation (RI indexes in testicular tissue, sperm quality parameters, serum total antioxidant capacity and testosterone level were determined. The formaldehyde-exposed animals showed severe seminiferous tubules atrophy, edematous connective tissue, arrested spermatogenesis with negative TDI and RI and vascular thrombosis compared to control group. Histomorphological studies showed a high sperm mortality and abnormality associated with a remarkable decrease in sperm count. Formaldehyde-exposed animals revealed with decreased serum level of testosterone (p < 0.05 and down-regulated antioxidant status versus control group. In conclusion, the current data provide inclusive histological and biochemical information about the chronic exposure to formaldehyde with emphasizing on reproductive disorders including histological adverse effects on the testicular tissue, spermatogenesis, sperm viability, count and the abnormalities which can potentially cause infertility after sexual maturation.

  16. Hypothalamic control of the mammalian sexual maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D

    1977-01-01

    The attainment of sexual maturity is a complex process which requires maturation and interaction not only of gonads and reproductive tract but also of the pituitary and essentially of the neuroendocrine mechanisms which ultimately control gonadotropin secretion. One of the more attractive hypotheses of the sexual maturation presumes the existence of the sensitivity threshold of the regulating system to the negative feedback signal, which differentiates immaturity from maturity. As the subject matures this declines. In an attempt to examine further the maturational alterations of the male hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis, investigations were carried out with regard to simultaneous changes of blood LH, FSH, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels during the course of 24 hr; augmentation of pituitary and blood LH and FSH concentrations under the stimulus of LH-RH as a function of time and age; synthesis and release of LH and FSH in the testosterone-blocked animals at various stages of sexual maturation; and in vitro biotransformation of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites by the pituitaries as a function of age. Evidence from the experimental data could be interpreted as a decrement of the feedback set-points during sexual maturatio as reflected by the transition of the responses obtained under various experimental signals. In parallel to these observations, new evidence was presented regarding not only quantitative but qualitative changes in the pituitary gonadotropins as response to the negative and positive feedback signals. This leads to new thinking with regard to the hypothesis of differential sensitivity.

  17. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P amphibian sperm in general and anurans reversion from internal to external fertilization. Our findings provide a greater understanding of the reproductive biology of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians, and a biological foundation for the further development of reproduction technologies for their sustainable management.

  18. Children conceived after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau, C; Juul, A; Main, K M;

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate current medical knowledge about children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with respect to congenital malformations, chromosome abnormalities and postnatal growth.......The aim of the study was to evaluate current medical knowledge about children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with respect to congenital malformations, chromosome abnormalities and postnatal growth....

  19. Predominance of sperm motion in corners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reza; Graham, Percival J; Liu, Qiaozhi; Sinton, David

    2016-01-01

    Sperm migration through the female tract is crucial to fertilization, but the role of the complex and confined structure of the fallopian tube in sperm guidance remains unknown. Here, by confocal imaging microchannels head-on, we distinguish corner- vs. wall- vs. bulk-swimming bull sperm in confined geometries. Corner-swimming dominates with local areal concentrations as high as 200-fold that of the bulk. The relative degree of corner-swimming is strongest in small channels, decreases with increasing channel size, and plateaus for channels above 200 μm. Corner-swimming remains predominant across the physiologically-relevant range of viscosity and pH. Together, boundary-following sperm account for over 95% of the sperm distribution in small rectangular channels, which is similar to the percentage of wall swimmers in circular channels of similar size. We also demonstrate that wall-swimming sperm travel closer to walls in smaller channels (~100 μm), where the opposite wall is within the hydrodynamic interaction length-scale. The corner accumulation effect is more than the superposition of the influence of two walls, and over 5-fold stronger than that of a single wall. These findings suggest that folds and corners are dominant in sperm migration in the narrow (sub-mm) lumen of the fallopian tube and microchannel-based sperm selection devices. PMID:27211846

  20. Ghost Block

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Filmed on the English south coast 'Ghost Block' depicts the uncanny and eerie atmosphere at the site of a WW2 coastal defence line. The concrete cubes were used as an anti-invasion blockade against potential landing forces. This protection line now slowly decaying and becoming enmeshed into the environment still acts as a defence to repel unwanted visitors. The area is a natural reserve to nesting birds that often lay eggs directly onto the beach surface. The blocks act as a final barrier ...

  1. Sperm Whales Suffer the Bends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Hopkin; 席芳

    2005-01-01

    据原先推测,鲸鱼对由声纳系统导致的疾病具有免疫力,但是两位美国科学家发现,抹香鲸(Sperm whales)正遭受着骨坏死疾病的侵扰,这是由于声纳系统扰乱了鲸鱼的生活习性所致,这种疾病有可能导致它们的搁浅。鲸鱼亟需得到保护!

  2. Comparative assessment of the timing of sexual maturation in male Wistar Han and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Sarah N; Carvallo, Francisco R; Chapin, Robert E; Nowland, William S; Beauchamp, David; Jamon, Raul; Koitz, Rebecca; Winton, Timothy R; Cappon, Gregg D; Hurtt, Mark E

    2013-07-01

    Given the increasing use of Wistar Han (WH) rats in regulatory toxicology studies, these studies were performed to characterize the onset of sexual maturation in maturing WH rats as compared to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Beginning on postnatal day (PND) 38 through PND 91 groups (n=8) of untreated WH rats were evaluated for maturation of the male reproductive system. Testicular spermatid head counts increased beginning on PND 42 until PND 70. Sperm were detected in the caput, corpus, and cauda epididymis on PND 45, 49, and 49, respectively, and counts increased through PND 91. Sperm motility was at adult levels by PND 63. The morphology of the testis/epididymis of all animals at day 70 or older was consistent with qualitative sexual maturity. Based on these endpoints, WH rats were determined to be sexually mature at PND 70, and many of these endpoints evaluated in SD rats exhibited nearly identical trends. PMID:23434729

  3. Assessment of chromatin status (SCSA) in epididymal and ejaculated sperm in Iberian red deer, ram and domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Alvarez, Mercedes; Garde, Jose Julian; Anel, Enrique; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2006-11-01

    Abnormal chromatin condensation is not detected using classical techniques for sperm analysis. SCSA has demonstrated its usefulness in sperm chromatin analysis in several species (human, bull, stallion and boar). In this work, we studied sperm samples from red deer, ram and dog to analyze the differentiation of chromatin structure applying SCSA in epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. Epididymal samples were obtained from the caput, corpus and cauda by means of cuts, and ejaculated ones were obtained by electroejaculation (deer), artificial vagina (ram) and digital manipulation (dog). SCSA results suggested different critical points in sperm maturation (spermatozoa with loose chromatin to more condensed chromatin) among species: from corpus to cauda in ram and from caput to corpus in deer and dog. Moreover, we also detected differences in ruminants and dog, reflected in the appearance of SCSA plots. Indeed, ram and deer samples rendered two peaks within the sperm main population (sperm with condensed chromatin), whereas only one was detected in dog. Although some differences were observed between cauda and ejaculated samples, SCSA parameters indicated good chromatin condensation, making these samples suitable for germplasm banking. Some species-dependent modifications in the analysis of the results may be necessary to take full advantage of its analytical power.

  4. Epidural block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home ... It numbs or causes a loss of feeling in the lower half your body. This lessens the pain of contractions during childbirth. An epidural block may also be used to ...

  5. Audit Maturity Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Uttam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today it is crucial for organizations to pay even greater attention on quality management as the importance of this function in achieving ultimate business objectives is increasingly becoming clearer. Importance of the Quality Management (QM Function in achieving basic need by ensuring compliance with Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI / International Organization for Standardization (ISO is a basic demand from business nowadays. However, QM Function and its processes need to be made much more mature to prevent delivery outages and to achieve business excellence through their review and auditing capability. Many organizations now face challenges in determining the maturity of the QM group along with the service offered by them and the right way to elevate the maturity of the same. The objective of this whitepaper is to propose a new model –the Audit Maturity Model (AMM which will provide organizations with a measure of their maturity in quality management in the perspective of auditing, along with recommendations for preventing delivery outage, and identifying risk to achieve business excellence. This will enable organizations to assess QM maturity higher than basic hygiene and will also help them to identify gaps and to take corrective actions for achieving higher maturity levels. Hence the objective is to envisage a new auditing model as a part of organisation quality management function which can be a guide for them to achieve higher level of maturity and ultimately help to achieve delivery and business excellence.

  6. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C. Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. PMID:25608881

  7. Sperm characterization and identification of sperm sub-populations in ejaculates from pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beracochea, F; Gil, J; Sestelo, A; Garde, J J; Santiago-Moreno, J; Fumagalli, F; Ungerfeld, R

    2014-10-01

    Pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) is a native endangered species. Knowledge of the basic spermiogram characteristics and the morphometric descriptors is necessary to effectively develop sperm cryopreservation. In other species, sperm sub-population is related to sperm cryo-resistance. The objective was to provide a general description of the sperm, including sperm head morphometric descriptors, its repeatability, and the existence of sperm sub-populations. Sperm were obtained from adult males by electroejaculation during the breeding season. The motility score was 3.4 ± 0.2 (mean ± SEM) and progressive motility was 59.4 ± 3.7%. Ejaculated volume was 413.9 ± 51.0 μl, the total number of sperm ejaculated was 321.2 ± 55.4 × 10(6). Also, 63.3 ± 3.1% of the sperm were morphologically abnormal and 23.7 ± 2.3% had acrosome damage. The sperm head length was 7.6 ± 0.01 μm, width 4.4 ± 0.01 μm, area 28.1 ± 0.07 μm(2) and the perimeter was 21.9 ± 0.04 μm. There was a positive relationship among morphometric descriptors and the motility score, overall motility and progressive motility. Also length (P=0.011), width (P=0.003), area (P=0.006) and perimeter (P=0.009) of sperm head obtained in two different collections were positively related. Overall, the low concentration, volume, overall quality and abnormal morphology, and wide variation of these variables may be a limitation for the development of sperm cryopreserved banks. There were three sperm sub-populations with different morphometric characteristics. The morphometric descriptors are maintained similarly among different collections. PMID:25104472

  8. Sperm dumping as a defense against meiotic drive

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Tom; Lewis, Zenobia; Wedell, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Sperm from Drosophila simulans that carry a sex-ratio distorter is preferentially lost from females' sperm-storage organs. This suggests that sperm dumping is a major factor affecting sperm competition in this species, and may have evolved in response to sex-ratio distorters.

  9. Human Sperm Immotility Caused by Degeneration in the Epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether sperm immotility was caused by degeneration in the epididymisMethods Five patients with totally immotile sperm were selected in this study. Testic ular biopsy was used to obtain testicular sperm to evaluate sperm motility. The com bined hypoosmotic swelling-eosin Y exclusion test was carried out to determine the sperm head and tail membrane integrity for the ejaculated and the testicular sperm.The ultrastructure of ejaculated sperm was examined by transmission electron microscope.Results No motile sperm were found in the ejaculated semen samples from 5 patients,whereas 2% to 11% motile testicular sperm extracted from the testicular biopsy tissues were observed. The percentage of testicular sperm with intact head and tail membranes was higher than that of the ejaculated sperm (P< 0. 01). Ultrastructure of the ejacu lated sperm showed marked degenerative features. Seminal plasma from patients did not influence the motility of normal donor sperm.Conclusion Sperm could undergo degenerative changes during transit through and /or storage in the epididymis, which led to lose sperm motility in these patients. Using motile testicular sperm would benefit the treatment for such cases.

  10. Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 (Taeniidae): new data on sperm ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Jordi; Świderski, Zdzisław; Azzouz-Maache, Samira; Pétavy, Anne-Françoise

    2016-06-01

    The present study establishes the ultrastructural organisation of the mature spermatozoon of Echinococcus multilocularis, which is essential for future research on the location of specific proteins involved in the sperm development in this species and also in Echinococcus granulosus. Thus, the ultrastructural characteristics of the sperm cell are described by means of transmission electron microscopy. The spermatozoon of E. multilocularis is a filiform cell, which is tapered at both extremities and lacks mitochondria. It exhibits all the characteristics of type VII spermatozoon of tapeworms, namely a single axoneme, crested bodies, spiralled cortical microtubules and nucleus, a periaxonemal sheath and intracytoplasmic walls. Other characteristics observed in the male gamete are the presence of a >900-nm long apical cone in its anterior extremity and only the axoneme in its posterior extremity. The ultrastructural characters of the spermatozoon of E. multilocularis are compared with those of other cestodes studied to date, with particular emphasis on representatives of the genus Taenia. The most interesting finding concerns the presence of two helical crested bodies in E. multilocularis while in the studied species of Taenia, there is only one crested body. Future ultrastructural studies of other species of the genus Echinococcus would be of particular interest in order to confirm whether or not the presence of two crested bodies is a characteristic of this genus. PMID:26960958

  11. Selenoprotein P in seminal fluid is a novel biomarker of sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Marten; Gralla, Oliver; Behrends, Thomas; Scharpf, Marcus; Endermann, Tobias; Rijntjes, Eddy; Pietschmann, Nicole; Hollenbach, Birgit; Schomburg, Lutz

    2014-01-17

    Hepatically-derived selenoprotein P (SePP) transports selenium (Se) via blood to other tissues including the testes. Male Sepp-knockout mice are infertile. SePP-mediated Se transport to Sertoli cells is needed for supporting biosynthesis of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4) in spermatozoa. GPX4 becomes a structural component of sperm midpiece during sperm maturation, and its expression correlates to semen quality. We tested whether SePP is also present in seminal plasma, potentially correlating to fertility parameters. Semen quality was assessed by sperm density, morphology and motility. SePP was measured by an immunoluminometric assay, and trace elements were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. SePP levels were considerably lower in seminal plasma as compared to serum (0.4±0.1 mg/l vs. 3.5±1.0 mg/l); Se concentrations showed a similar but less pronounced difference (48.9±20.7 μg/l vs. 106.7±17.3 μg/l). Se and Zn correlated positively in seminal fluid but not in serum. Seminal plasma SePP concentrations were independent of serum SePP concentrations, but correlated positively to sperm density and fraction of vital sperm. SePP concentrations in seminal plasma of vasectomized men were similar to controls indicating that accessory sex glands are a testes-independent source of SePP. This notion was corroborated by histochemical analyses localizing SePP in epithelial cells of seminal vesicles. We conclude that SePP is not only involved in Se transport to testes supporting GPX4 biosynthesis but it also becomes secreted into seminal plasma, likely important to protect sperm during storage, genital tract passage and final journey. PMID:24361887

  12. Selenoprotein P in seminal fluid is a novel biomarker of sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Marten; Gralla, Oliver; Behrends, Thomas; Scharpf, Marcus; Endermann, Tobias; Rijntjes, Eddy; Pietschmann, Nicole; Hollenbach, Birgit; Schomburg, Lutz

    2014-01-17

    Hepatically-derived selenoprotein P (SePP) transports selenium (Se) via blood to other tissues including the testes. Male Sepp-knockout mice are infertile. SePP-mediated Se transport to Sertoli cells is needed for supporting biosynthesis of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4) in spermatozoa. GPX4 becomes a structural component of sperm midpiece during sperm maturation, and its expression correlates to semen quality. We tested whether SePP is also present in seminal plasma, potentially correlating to fertility parameters. Semen quality was assessed by sperm density, morphology and motility. SePP was measured by an immunoluminometric assay, and trace elements were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. SePP levels were considerably lower in seminal plasma as compared to serum (0.4±0.1 mg/l vs. 3.5±1.0 mg/l); Se concentrations showed a similar but less pronounced difference (48.9±20.7 μg/l vs. 106.7±17.3 μg/l). Se and Zn correlated positively in seminal fluid but not in serum. Seminal plasma SePP concentrations were independent of serum SePP concentrations, but correlated positively to sperm density and fraction of vital sperm. SePP concentrations in seminal plasma of vasectomized men were similar to controls indicating that accessory sex glands are a testes-independent source of SePP. This notion was corroborated by histochemical analyses localizing SePP in epithelial cells of seminal vesicles. We conclude that SePP is not only involved in Se transport to testes supporting GPX4 biosynthesis but it also becomes secreted into seminal plasma, likely important to protect sperm during storage, genital tract passage and final journey.

  13. Huhe Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Huhe Block is located in the mid-west part of Inner Mogolia Autonomous Region, covering an area of 15 079km2, in the range of 109°40'-112°00'E and 39°23()-40°40'N. Topographically. the Fengzhen hill is to the east, the Yinshan Mounts is to the north, the Hetao Plain and Ordos Plateau are respectively in its west and south.The Yellow River flows across this block. The elevation is 1 000 m in the flat area and in the range of 1 000-1 300m. in the plateau area, good for the development of agriculture and industry as well as husbandry. It belongs to inland plateau climate with annually averaged temperature of 8℃, the minimum being -12℃ in winter and the maximum 22℃ in summer.

  14. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian O′Flaherty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility.

  15. Measurement and significance of sperm morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roelof Menkveld; Cas AG Holleboom; Johann PT Rhemrev

    2011-01-01

    The measurement or evaluation and clinical significance of human sperm morphology has always been and still is a controversial aspect of the semen analysis for the determination of a male's fertility potential.In this review the background of the development of the evaluation criteria for sperm morphology will be discussed.Aspects of criticism on the strict criteria definition and use of the criteria for sperm morphology evaluation will be discussed as well as possible reasons for the decline in normal sperm morphology values and how we can compromise for this phenomenon resulting in the very low normal reference value as published in the 2010 WHO manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen.One of the possible solutions may be to give more attention to a limited number of abnormal sperm morphology categories and the inclusion of sperm morphology patterns.It is concluded in this review that if done correctly and with care and with strict application of existing guidelines as outlined in the 2010 WHO manual,sperm morphology measurement still has a very important role to play in the clinical evaluation of male fertility potential.

  16. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, B M; Juelicher, F [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: ben@pks.mpg.de, E-mail: julicher@pks.mpg.de

    2008-12-15

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  17. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  18. Polyspermy in birds: sperm numbers and embryo survival

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmings, N.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Polyspermy is a major puzzle in reproductive biology. In some taxa, multiple sperm enter the ovum as part of the normal fertilization process, whereas in others, penetration of the ovum by more than one sperm is lethal. In birds, several sperm typically enter the germinal disc, yet only one fuses with the female pronucleus. It is unclear whether supernumerary sperm play an essential role in the avian fertilization process and, if they do, how females regulate the progression of sperm through ...

  19. Female presence influences sperm velocity in the guppy

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, Clelia; Alfredo V Peretti; Pilastro, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    As sperm production is costly, males are expected to strategically allocate resources to sperm production according to mating opportunities. While sperm number adjustments have been reported in several taxa, only a few studies investigated whether sperm quality shows adaptive plasticity as well. We tested this prediction in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata. A total of 46 males were initially stripped of all retrievable sperm before being randomly allocated to one of two treatments simulating di...

  20. In vitro fertilization in ctenophores: sperm entry, mitosis, and the establishment of bilateral symmetry in Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, D; Rouvière, C; Sardet, C

    1991-10-01

    We have found ways to control in vitro fertilization in a ctenophore (Beroe ovata) for the first time. This is based on the existence of a partial block to self-fertilization at the time of gamete release which can be overcome by removal of the egg envelope. It has allowed us to exploit the excellent optical properties of Beroe eggs to make detailed observations on all events from sperm penetration or penetrations in these physiologically polyspermic eggs to first cleavage, and to extend our initial observations (Carré and Sardet, 1984). Sperm entry is characterized by local modifications of the egg cortex in a 70-microns zone around the penetration site or sites. Upon sperm entry, the egg surface contracts and relaxes locally, then a fertilization cone forms and disappears. These events are accompanied by localized exocytosis, growth of a ring of microvilli, thickening of the egg cortex, and gathering of mitochondria around the sperm pronuclei. The female pronucleus then migrates beneath the egg surface toward one or successive sperm pronuclei. The fusion of pronuclei, sperm and egg chromatin intermixing, and mitosis were also observed with exceptional clarity. Furthermore, we have noticed that the direction of the last trajectory of the female pronucleus tends to define the orientation of the mitotic spindle, and as a consequence the position of first unipolar cleavage furrow. This in turn determines the future sagittal plane of the embryo and of the adult B. ovata. PMID:1680762

  1. Outcomes with intracytoplasmic sperm injection of cryopreserved sperm from men with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bechoua, Shaliha; Berki-Morin, Yasmine; Michel, Frédéric; Girod, Sophie; Sagot, Paul; Fauque, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and poor semen quality are the main causes of infertility in men with spinal cord injury (SCI). Different sperm retrieval techniques such as penile vibratory stimulation (PVS), electro-ejaculation (EEJ) or surgical sperm retrieval (SSR) associated or not with sperm cryopreservation can be offered to these patients to preserve their fertility. If fatherhood cannot be achieved naturally, assisted reproductive techniques can be offered to ...

  2. Ovarian fluid mediates the temporal decline in sperm viability in a fish with sperm storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Gasparini

    Full Text Available A loss of sperm viability and functionality during sperm transfer and storage within the female reproductive tract can have important fitness implications by disrupting fertilization and impairing offspring development and survival. Consequently, mechanisms that mitigate the temporal decline in sperm function are likely to be important targets of selection. In many species, ovarian fluid is known to regulate and maintain sperm quality. In this paper, we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata, a highly polyandrous freshwater fish exhibiting internal fertilization and sperm storage, to determine whether ovarian fluid (OF influences the decline in sperm viability (the proportion of live sperm in the ejaculate over time and whether any observed effects depend on male sexual ornamentation. To address these questions we used a paired experimental design in which ejaculates from individual males were tested in vitro both in presence and absence of OF. Our results revealed that the temporal decline in sperm viability was significantly reduced in the presence of OF compared to a saline control. This finding raises the intriguing possibility that OF may play a role in mediating the decline in sperm quality due to the deleterious effects of sperm ageing, although other possible explanations for this observation are discussed. Interestingly, we also show that the age-related decline in sperm viability was contingent on male sexual ornamentation; males with relatively high levels of iridescence (indicating higher sexual attractiveness exhibited a more pronounced decline in sperm viability over time than their less ornamented counterparts. This latter finding offers possible insights into the functional basis for the previously observed trade-off between these key components of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection.

  3. Aquaporin3 is a sperm water channel essential for postcopulatory sperm osmoadaptation and migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Chen; Hongying Peng; Li Lei; Ying Zhang; Haibin Kuang; Yujing Cao; Qi-xian Shi; Tonghui Ma; Enkui Duan

    2011-01-01

    In the journey from the male to female reproductive tract,mammalian sperm experience a natural osmotic decrease (e.g.,in mouse,from ~415 mOsm in the cauda epididymis to ~310 mOsm in the uterine cavity). Sperm have evolved to utilize this hypotonic exposure for motility activation,meanwhile efficiently silence the negative impact of hypotonic cell swelling. Previous physiological and pharmacological studies have shown that ion channel-controlled water influx/efflux is actively involved in the process of sperm volume regulation; however,no specific sperm proteins have been found responsible for this rapid osmoadaptation. Here,we report that aquaporin3 (AQP3) is a sperm water channel in mice and humans. Aqp3-deficient sperm show normal motility activation in response to hypotonicity but display increased vulnerability to hypotonic cell swelling,characterized by increased tail bending after entering uterus. The sperm defect is a result of impaired sperm volume regulation and progressive cell swelling in response to physiological hypotonic stress during male-female reproductive tract transition. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the cell volume expansion begins at cytoplasmic droplet,forcing the tail to angulate and form a hairpin-like structure due to mechanical membrane stretch. The tail deformation hampered sperm migration into oviduct,resulting in impaired fertilization and reduced male fertility. These data suggest AQP3 as an essential membrane pathway for sperm regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that balances the "trade-off" between sperm motility and cell swelling upon physiological hypotonicity,thereby optimizing postcopulatory sperm behavior.

  4. Evaluation of Sperm Parameters of Infertile Men with Retrograde Ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-xing ZHONG; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate sperm parameters of infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.Methods Twelve infertile men with retrograde ejaculation (group A) were enrolled into this study. Sperm samples were obtained from the postejaculation urine. After sperm recovery and washing procedure, sperm parameters were assessed. Twelve semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control (group B).Results In all retrograde cases, motile sperm with forward movement were observed in the medium. Motility of group A was significantly lower than that of group B (P<0. 01).In group A, sperm motility ranged from 11% to 56%, sperm with intact both head and tail membranes was 42.2 ± 12.3%, sperm count ranged (13-85)×106/ml, and the sperm survival time was highly shortened. Sperm with normal morphology and intact acrosome were observed in retrograde specimens.Conclusion Sperm parameters recovered from retrograde specimens were highly variable between subjects. The toxicity of urine caused deleterious to sperm functions.Motile sperm could be collected by sperm recovery procedure. Sperm parameters could meet the requirement for the use of assisted reproductive techniques for treating infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.

  5. Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) and sperm head vacuoles: state of the art in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrix, Anne; Rives, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 10 years after the first publication introducing the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), many questions remained about sperm vacuoles: frequency, size, localization, mode of occurrence, biological significance and impact on male fertility potential. Many studies have tried to characterize sperm vacuoles, to determine the sperm abnormalities possibly associated with vacuoles, to test the diagnostic value of MSOME for male infertility or to question the benefits of intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). METHODS We searched PubMed for articles in the English language published in 2001-2012 regarding human sperm head vacuoles, MSOME and IMSI. RESULTS A bibliographic analysis revealed consensus for the following findings: (i) sperm vacuoles appeared frequently, often multiple and preferentially anterior; (ii) sperm vacuoles and sperm chromatin immaturity have been associated, particularly in the case of large vacuoles; (iii) teratozoospermia was a preferred indication of MSOME and IMSI. CONCLUSION The high-magnification system appears to be a powerful method to improve our understanding of human spermatozoa. However, its clinical use remains unclear in the fields of male infertility diagnosis and assisted reproduction techniques (ARTs). PMID:23825157

  6. Computer-assisted sperm analysis parameters in young fertile sperm donors and relationship with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréour, Thomas; Jean, Miguel; Mirallie, Sophie; Barriere, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Sperm parameter values have been shown to decline with age, according to conventional sperm analysis. However, the effect of age on sperm kinematic parameters has been rarely studied, especially in young fertile men. Here, we studied Computer-Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA) parameters in a large cohort of men with proven fertility, in order to determine if there is a decline with age in this young fertile population. This retrospective analysis of CASA parameters was conducted on all donors included in the sperm donor programme in the Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) Centre of the University Hospital of Nantes between 2006 and 2009. Sperm concentration, motility, and kinetic parameters were recorded by a HTM-Ceros system and compared in 3 groups of sperm donors according to their age: donors were analyzed. Values for ALH, VCL, LIN, and STR significantly decreased with age. Sperm concentration, motile sperm proportion, and other kinetic parameters did not differ significantly among the groups. The use of CASA allowed the identification of ALH, VCL, LIN, and STR age-related decrease in young men with proven fertility.

  7. Sperm nuclear histone H2B: correlation with sperm DNA denaturation and DNA stainability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Armand Zini; Xiaoyang Zhang; Maria San Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To examine the relationship between sperm DNA damage and sperm nuclear histone (H2B) staining. Methods:We evaluated sperm samples from 14 consecutive asthenoteratozoospermic infertile men and six consecutive fertile controls. Sperm nuclear histone (H2B) staining and sperm chromatin integrity (assessed by sperm chromatin structure assay and expressed using the percentage of (I) DNA fragmentation index [%DFI] and (ii) high DNA stainability [%HDS)]) were evaluated. Results: Histone H2B immunocytochemistry demonstrated two nuclear staining patterns: (I) focal punctate staining; and (ii) diffuse staining. Infertile men had a higher mean percentage of spermatozoa exhibiting diffuse H2B staining than did fertile men (7.7% ± 4.6% vs. 1.6% ± 1.2%, respectively, P < 0.01). We observed significant relationships between the proportion of spermatozoa with diffuse nuclear histone staining and both sperm %DFI (r= 0.63, P < 0.01) and sperm %HDS (r= 0.63, P < 0.01). Conclusion: The data demonstrate that infertile men have a higher proportion of spermatozoa with diffuse histone H2B than do fertile men and suggest that sperm DNA damage might, at least in part, be due to abnormally high histone H2B levels.

  8. Carbohydrates mediate sperm-ovum adhesion and triggering of the acrosome reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DaulatR.P.Tulsiani

    2000-01-01

    The fertilization process is the net result of a complex sequence of events that collectively result in the fusion of the opposite gametes. The male gamete undergoes continuous morphological and biochemical modifications during sperm development in the testis (spermatogenesis), maturation in the epididymis, and capacitation in the female reproductive tract. Only the capacitated spermatozoa are able to recognize and bind to the bioactive glycan residue(s) on the ovum's extracellular coat, the zona pellucida (ZP). Sperm-zona binding in the mouse and several other species is believed to take place in two stages. First, capacitated (acrosome-intact) spermatozoa loosely and reversibly adhere to the zona-intact ovum. In the second stage tight irreversible binding occurs. Both types of bindings are attributed to the presence of glycan- binding proteins (receptors) on the sperm plasma membrane and their complementary bioactive glycan units (ligands) on the surface of the ZP. The carbohydrate-mediated adhesion event initiates a signal transduction cascade resulting in the exocytosis of acrosomal contents. This step is believed to be prerequisite which allows the hypemctivated acrosome-reacted spermatozoa to penetrate the ZP and fertilize the ovum. This review focuses on the role of carbohydrate residues in sperm-ovum interaction, and triggering of the acrosome reaction. I have attempted to discuss extensive progress that has been made to enhance our understanding of the well programmed multiple molecular events necessary for successful fertilization. This review will identify these events, and discuss the functional significance of carbohydrates in these events.

  9. Widespread Epigenetic Abnormalities Suggest a Broad DNA Methylation Erasure Defect in Abnormal Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Kimberly; Yang, Allen; Laird, Peter W.; Sokol, Rebecca Z.

    2007-01-01

    Background Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis. Methodology/Principal Finding We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm. Conclusions This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line. PMID:18074014

  10. Widespread epigenetic abnormalities suggest a broad DNA methylation erasure defect in abnormal human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Houshdaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line.

  11. Heat shock suppresses mating and sperm transfer in the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H J; Qian, Q; Liu, X D

    2014-06-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor in determining the population size of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in summer. High temperatures inhibit survival, development and fecundity of this insect. However, biological responses of female and male adults to heat shock, and physiological mechanism of high temperature suppressing population development are still ambiguous. We experimentally tested the impact of heat shock (5 h day-1) on biological traits, spermatogenesis and sperm transfer of adults of C. medinalis. The result showed that heat exposure to 39 and 40 °C for 5 h reduced longevity and copulation frequency of adults, and hatchability of eggs. Immediate survival rate of males was lower than that of females after 3 days of exposure to 41 °C. The oviposition period, copulation frequency, fecundity of adults and hatchability of eggs were significantly lower when male adults were exposed to 40 or 41 °C for 3 days. Heat shock decreased frequency and success rate of mating when males were exposed, and it also resulted in postponement of mating behaviour and prolongation of mating duration as both the female and male adults were exposed. Heat shock did not affect spermatogenesis, but significantly inhibited sperms maturation. Moreover, males could not ejaculate sperm into females during copulation when these male moths received heat shock. Heat shock remarkably suppressed mating behaviour and sperm transfer, which led to a dramatic decline of rice leaf folder populations.

  12. Current approach to male infertility treatment: sperm selection procedure based on hyaluronic acid binding ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zobova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection into an oocyte is widely used throughout the world in assisted reproductive technologies programs in the presence of male infertility factor. However, this approach can allow selection of a single sperm, which is carrying different types of pathologies. Minimizing of any potential risks, entailing the occurrence of abnormalities in the embryos development (apoptosis, fragmentation of embryos, alterations in gene expression, aneuploidies is a very important condition for reducing the potential negative consequences resulting the manipulation with gametes. Processes that could be influenced by the embryologist must be fulfilled in safe and physiological way as much as it is possible. Data of numerous publications reporting about the positive effects of using the technology of sperm selection by hyaluronic acid binding, let make a conclusion about the high prospects of this approach in the treatment of male infertility by methods of in vitro fertilization. The selection of sperm with improved characteristics, which determine the maturity and genetic integrity, provides an opportunity to improve the parameters of pre-implantation embryogenesis, having thus a positive effect on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  13. Separation of Sperm Cells of Rhododendron simsii%杜鹃精细胞的分离

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉红; 于金金; 吴晓琛; 田惠桥

    2013-01-01

    The mature pollen of Rhododendron simsii is bicellular, containing one vegetative cell and one germ cell, with the sperm cells forming in pollen tube. Semi vitro technique was used in style pollinated to make pollen tube sprout from style. Then the pollen tube burst by osmotic shock method and released a pair of sperm cells which connected to vegetative nucleus. The sperm cells separated kept activities proved by FDA method. A fairly large number of separated sperm cells could be collected by micromanipulator.%  杜鹃成熟花粉为二胞型,含一个营养细胞和一个生殖细胞,其精细胞在花粉管中形成。应用半离体技术培养杜鹃已授粉花柱,使花粉管从花柱中长出,再用渗透压冲击法促使花粉管破裂,释放出一对与营养核相连的精细胞。分离的精细胞经FDA方法检测,证明具活性。用显微操作仪可收集数量较多的分离精细胞。

  14. Establishment of a normal medakafish spermatogonial cell line capable of sperm production in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TongmingLiu; HaobinZhao; WeijiaWang; RongLiu; TianshengChen; JiaorongDeng; JianfangGui

    2005-01-01

    Spermatogonia are the male germ stem cells that continuously produce sperm for the next generation. Spermatogenesis is a complicated process that proceeds through mitotic phase of stem cell renewal and differentiation, meiotic phase, and postmeiotic phase of spermiogenesis. Full recapitulation of spermatogenesis in vitro has been impossible, as generation of normal spermatogonial stem cell lines without immortalization and production of motile sperm from these cells after long-term culture have not been achieved. Here we report the derivation of a normal spermatogonial cell line from a mature medakafish testis without immortalization. After 140 passages during 2 years of culture, this cell line retains stable but growth factor-dependent proliferation, a diploid karyotype, and the phenotype and gene expression pattern of spermatogonial stem cells. Furthermore, we show that this cell line can undergo meiosis and spermiogenesis to generate motile sperm.Therefore, the ability of continuous proliferation and sperm production in culture is an intrinsic property of medaka spermatogonial stem cells, and immortalization apparently is not necessary to derive male germ cell cultures. Our findings and cell line will offer a unique opportunity to study and recapitulate spe rmatogenesis in vitro and to develop approaches for germ-line transmission.

  15. Protective effect of royal jelly on the sperm parameters and testosterone level and lipid peroxidation in adult mice treated with oxymetholone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Zahmatkesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters, testosterone level, and malondialdehyde (MDA production in mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult male NMRI mice weighing 30±2 g were used. All the animals were divided into 4 groups. Control group: received saline 0.1 ml/mouse/day orally for 30 days. Royal Jelly group (RJ: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Oxymetholone group: the received Oxymetholone (OX at dose of 5 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Royal Jelly+Oxymetholone group: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg/day orally concomitant with OX administration. Sperm count, sperm motility, viability, maturity, and DNA integrity were analyzed. Furthermore, serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were determined. Results: In Oxymetholone group, sperm count, motility as well as testosterone concentration reduced significantly (p

  16. Moving towards maturity in business model definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten; Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    The field of business models has, as is the case with all emerging fields of practice, slowly matured through the development of frameworks, models, concepts and ideas over the last 15 years. New concepts, theories and models typically transcend a series of maturity phases. For the concept...... of Business Models, we are at the verge of moving from phase 2 to 3, after having spent a lot of time during the 1990’s and 2000’s arguing for the importance of understanding business models properly and discussing the content and potential building blocks of them. Therefore, in terms of maturity – the time...... for focusing on the more complex and dynamic aspects of business models seems to be right - right now!...

  17. A microtubule organizing centre (MTOC) is responsible for the production of the sperm flagellum in Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Coccoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Francesco; Roversi, Pio Federico; Gottardo, Marco; Callaini, Giuliano; Mercati, David; Dallai, Romano

    2015-05-01

    A microtubule organizing centre (MTOC) has been described in the spermatid of the hemipteran Matsucoccus feytaudi (Coccoidea). This structure, revealed as a fluorescent ring by treatment with γ-tubulin antibody, gives rise to a bundle of microtubules which surrounds the elongated cylindrical nucleus. This microtubule bundle has been considered an atypical sperm flagellum provided with sperm motility. A comparison of the M. feytaudi MTOC with the material associated with the centriole of Drosophila melanogaster spermatids confirms the great similarity between the two structures, both involved in the nucleation of microtubules. Like the D. melanogaster material associated with the centriole, the M. feytaudi MTOC is a transient structure which disappears or degenerates at the end of spermiogenesis and is no longer visible in the mature sperm.

  18. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  19. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  20. Effect of prolonged cryptorchidism on germ cell apoptosis and testicular sperm count

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlbahaBarqawi; HeraldTrummer; RandallMeacham

    2004-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the long term effect of experimental cryptorchidism on germ cell apoptotic rate and testicular sperm content in adult rats.Methods:Bilateral cryptorchidism was created in 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by surgically manipulating the testes into the abdominal cavity and closing the internal inguinal ring.The rats were sacrificed and the testes removed 6 hours and 2,4,7,21,28 and 56 days after cryptorchidism.Germ cell apoptosis was quantified by means of TUNEL assay and apoptosis was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy.Results:The rate of apoptosis peaked at 4 days of cryptorchidism and then progressively declined to a nadir at 14 days of cryptorchidism.At 56 days of cryptorchidism,the germinal epithelium was largely depleted by the apoptotic process and only a few mature sperm were seen within the testis.At this point,a few tubules were seen to be repopulating with primary spermatocytes and the level of germ cell apoptosis began to increase marginally.Testicular sperm count (TSC) began to decline rapidly at day 7 of cryptorchidism.Only a few mature sperm were found in the testes of rats following 56 days of cryptorchidism.Multinucleated giant cells (MGC) were most numerous within the seminiferous tubules at day 4.At day 7,35% of MGCs were TUNEL positive.At all subsequent time points,however,MGCs fail to stain positive for apoptosis.This resumption of increased apoptosis coincided with the appearance of a population of primary spermatocytes in some seminiferous tubules.Moreover,there was not a corresponding increase in the number of mature sperm after 56 days of cryptorchidism.Conclusion:The decline in germ cell apoptosis after 4 days of cryptorchidism can be attributed to be the result of an overall depletion of germ cells.It appears that after a prolonged cryptorchidism (56 days),there is a limited resumption of spermatogenesis presumably as a result of a decrease in the maturing germ cells undergoing programmed cell death

  1. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  2. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  3. Effect of melatonin on maturation capacity and fertilization of Nili-Ravi buffalo (Bubalus bubalis oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nagina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of melatonin supplementation of in vitro maturation media on in vitro maturation (IVM and in vitro fertilization (IVF rate of buffalo oocytes. Cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs were aspirated from follicles of 2-8 mm diameter. In experiment I, COCs were matured in IVM medium supplemented with 0 (control, 250, 500, and 1000 μM melatonin for 22-24 hours in CO2 incubator at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 and at 95% relative humidity. The maturation rate did not differ in media supplemented with melatonin at 250 μM, 500 μM, 1000 μM and control (0 μM. In experiment II, the matured oocytes were fertilized in 50 μl droplets of Tyrode’s Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (TALP medium having 10 ug/ml heparin for sperm (2 million/ml capacitation. The fertilization droplets were then kept for incubation at 5% CO2, 39°C and at 95% relative humidity for 18 hours. The fertilization rate was assessed by sperm penetration and pronuclear formation. Fertilization rate was improved when maturation medium was supplemented with 250 μM melatonin compared to control. In conclusion, melatonin supplementation to serum free maturation media at 250 μM improved the fertilization rate of buffalo oocytes.

  4. Quantification of adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and creatine phosphate in sterlet spermatozoa during maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, P; Dzyuba, B; Fedorova, G; Grabic, R; Cosson, J; Rodina, M

    2015-11-01

    Sturgeon spermatozoa maturation during their passage through the kidney is a prerequisite for initiation of motility. Samples of sterlet () testicular sperm (TS) were matured in vitro by incubation in seminal fluid (SF) or in SF supplemented with carbonyl cyanide -chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP; a respiration uncoupling agent). Sperm was diluted in activation medium (AM) containing 10 m Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.5) and 0.25% Pluronic, and spermatozoon motility was assessed. Samples were taken and fixed in 3 perchloric acid at 3 points in the incubation process. Quantification of ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate (CrP) was conducted using liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. We observed a significant decrease in CrP during artificial maturation of TS in SF. In contrast, ATP and ADP were not significantly affected. Addition of CCCP to SF halted maturation and led to significantly lower CrP whereas ADP significantly increased and ATP was unaffected. Dilution of matured and immature TS with AM led to a significant decrease of ATP and CrP and an increase of ADP compared with their levels before dilution, although immature TS were not motile. Energy dependency of TS maturation in sturgeon was confirmed, which suggests that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is needed for maturation of sturgeon TS. PMID:26641041

  5. Effect of Ca Ionophore On Blastocyst Production Following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Caprine Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, S D; Pathak, J; Agarwal, S; Kushwah, B; Sikarwar, Aks

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcium ionophore activation on blastocyst production following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes. A total of 470 in vitro-matured oocytes were selected and randomly divided in to three groups. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered by slicing the Caprine ovaries were matured in TCM199 supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) + 10% follicular fluid + FSH (5 μg/ml) + LH (10 μg/ml) + estradiol (1 μg/ml) + EGF (10 ng/ml) + BSA (3 mg/ml) for 27 h in humidified atmosphere at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 in CO2 incubator. After 27 h of culture, selected COCs (n = 470) were separated from cumulus cells by treating with 0.1% hyaluronidase enzyme and passing repeatedly through a fine pipette and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1, (n = 168) matured oocytes were injected with injection micropipette without sperm as control. In group 2, (n = 152) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette. In group 3, (n = 150) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette and then activated with 5 μm Ca ionophore for 5 min. The oocytes of all groups were then culture in RVCL media for embryo development. The cleavage rate was observed after 48-72 h of injection. The cleavage rate and blastocyst production in group 1, 2 and 3 were 0.00 and 0.00, 18.42 and 3.57 and 61.33% and 16.30%, respectively. The result indicated that mechanical activation failed to induce cleavage in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes, whereas chemical activation of intracytoplasmic sperm-injected in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes showed significantly higher cleavage rate and blastocyst production as compare to non-activated oocytes. PMID:27170442

  6. Lifestyle influences human sperm functional quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mnica Ferreira; Joana Vieira Silva; Vladimiro Silva; Antnio Barros; Margarida Fardilha

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the impact of acute lifestyle changes on human sperm functional quality.Methods:In the academic festivities week, young and apparently healthy male students who voluntarily submit themselves to acute lifestyle alterations(among the potentially important variations are increase in alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco consumption and circadian rhythm shifts) were used as a model system.Sperm samples were obtained before and after the academic week and compared by traditional semen analysis(n=54) and also tested for cleavedPolyADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) protein, an apoptotic marker(n=35).Results:Acute lifestyle changes that occurred during the academic week festivities(the study model) resulted both in a significant reduction in sperm quality, assessed by basic semen analysis(decrease in sperm concentration, total number of spermatozoa, progressive and non-progressive motility and increase in sperm morphological abnormalities) and by an increase in the expression of the apoptotic marker, cleavedPARP, in the ejaculate.Conclusions:Acute lifestyle changes have clear deleterious effects on sperm quality.We propose cleavedPARP as a novel molecular marker, valuable for assessing spermquality in parallel with the basic semen analysis method.

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in sperm traits in scorpionflies (Mecoptera : Panorpidae): Consequences of larval history and seasonality on sperm length and sperm transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Andreas; Engels, Sierk; Engqvist, Leif; Sauer, Klaus Peter

    2009-01-01

    We examined effects of seasonality, larval food availability and larval rearing density on sperm length, sperm transfer rates and body size in the bivoltine scorpionfly Panorpa vulgaris. Males of the first annual generation were larger and had larger sperm. Comparing individuals of two summer genera

  8. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification.

  9. MONTHLY VARIATION IN SPERM MOTILITY IN COMMON CARP ASSESSED USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperm motility variables from the milt of the common carp Cyprinus carpio were assessed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system across several months (March-August 1992) known to encompass the natural spawning period. Two-year-old pond-raised males obtained each mo...

  10. SMART USE OF COMPUTER-AIDED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA) TO CHARACTERIZE SPERM MOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) has evolved over the past fifteen years to provide an objective, practical means of measuring and characterizing the velocity and parttern of sperm motion. CASA instruments use video frame-grabber boards to capture multiple images of spermato...

  11. Measuring project portfolio management maturity

    OpenAIRE

    Hänninen, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is researching portfolio management maturity in organizations that have project type of work. The objective of the thesis is to define what factors affect portfolio management maturity, how the maturity level can be evaluated and create a method for measuring current level of maturity. The thesis also provides maturity level improvement suggestions. Why is maturity measurement useful? The organizations that have project type of work often have some standardized practices. But t...

  12. Sperm-attractant peptide influences the spermatozoa swimming behavior in internal fertilization in Octopus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisa, Emilia; Salzano, Anna Maria; Moccia, Francesco; Scaloni, Andrea; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Marine invertebrates exhibit both chemokinesis and chemotaxis phenomena, induced in most cases by the release of water-borne peptides or pheromones. In mollusks, several peptides released during egg-laying improve both male attraction and mating. Unlike other cephalopods, Octopus vulgaris adopts an indirect internal fertilization strategy. We here report on the identification and characterization of a chemoattractant peptide isolated from mature eggs of octopus females. Using two-chamber and time-lapse microscopy assays, we demonstrate that this bioactive peptide is able to increase sperm motility and induce chemotaxis by changing the octopus spermatozoa swimming behavior in a dose-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that chemotaxis in the octopus requires the presence of extracellular calcium and membrane protein phophorylation at tyrosine. This study is the first report on a sperm-activating factor in a non-free-spawning marine animal.

  13. Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in the Biological Functions Associated with Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi W. Ijiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In sexual reproduction, two gamete cells (i.e., egg and sperm fuse (fertilization to create a newborn with a genetic identity distinct from those of the parents. In the course of these developmental processes, a variety of signal transduction events occur simultaneously in each of the two gametes, as well as in the fertilized egg/zygote/early embryo. In particular, a growing body of knowledge suggests that the tyrosine kinase Src and/or other protein-tyrosine kinases are important elements that facilitate successful implementation of the aforementioned processes in many animal species. In this paper, we summarize recent findings on the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in many sperm-related processes (from spermatogenesis to epididymal maturation, capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis, and fertilization.

  14. Altered histone retention and epigenetic modifications in the sperm of infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael Oliva; Josep Luís Ballescà

    2012-01-01

    It is well know that the nuclei of spermatogenic cells experience one of the most extremely marked chromatin changes known in cells.At the end of spermatogenesis,the histones are removed in many species and the DNA is condensed by the highly positively charged protamines forming highly compact nucleoprotamine complexes.1-3 In the human mature sperm cell,the nucleoprotamine complexes condense most of the DNA,while 5%-15% of the DNA remains associated to nucleosomes.4,5 For many years,it was thought that the only function of the sperm cell was to transmit the patemal genomic DNA into the next generation.1 This idea started to change with the discovery of sex-specific imprinting of genes mediated through DNA methylation differences set during gametogenesis,and epigenetically transmitted to the next generation.

  15. Effect of lead chloride on spermatogenesis and sperm parameters in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AntdnioGraca; JoaoRamalho-Santos; MariadeLourdesPereira

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of acute lead chloride exposure on testis and sperm parameters in mice.Methods: PbC12, 74 mg/kg, was daily administered to sexually mature male mice for 3 days and the effects on the testicular histology and ultrastructure as well as the motility and density of spermatozoa in cauda epididymis were observed. An additional group of mice were treated for 1-3 days and were allowed to recover for 32 days to determine the reversibility of lead-induced changes. Results: The testicular weight, seminiferous tubular diameter and sperm counts were significantly decreased following 3 days of PbCl2 treatment, but were unaffected by shorterterm exposures. The changes caused by lead are mostly reversible. Conclusion: Acute lead chloride exposure injures the fertility parameters of male mice and the effects are partially reversible. (Asian JAndrol 2004 Sep; 6: 237-241)

  16. One-shot genitalia are not an evolutionary dead end - Regained male polygamy in a sperm limited spider species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalik Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monogynous mating systems with extremely low male mating rates have several independent evolutionary origins and are associated with drastic adaptations involving self-sacrifice, one-shot genitalia, genital damage, and termination of spermatogenesis immediately after maturation. The combination of such extreme traits likely restricts evolutionary potential perhaps up to the point of making low male mating rates irreversible and hence may constitute an evolutionary dead end. Here, we explore the case of a reversion to multiple mating from monogynous ancestry in golden orb-web spiders, Nephila senegalensis. Results Male multiple mating is regained by the loss of genital damage and sexual cannibalism but spermatogenesis is terminated with maturation, restricting males to a single loading of their secondary mating organs and a fixed supply of sperm. However, males re-use their mating organs and by experimentally mating males to many females, we show that the sperm supply is divided between copulations without reloading the pedipalps. Conclusion By portioning their precious sperm supply, males achieve an average mating rate of four females which effectively doubles the maximal mating rate of their ancestors. A heritage of one-shot genitalia does not completely restrict the potential to increase mating rates in Nephila although an upper limit is defined by the available sperm load. Future studies should now investigate how males use this potential in the field and identify selection pressures responsible for a reversal from monogynous to polygynous mating strategies.

  17. The effects of pyridaben pesticide on the DNA integrity of sperms and early in vitro embryonic development in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Ebadi Manas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyridaben, a pyridazinone derivative, is a new acaricide and insecticide for control of mites and some insects such as white flies, aphids and thrips. Objective: This study was designed to elucidate how pyridaben can affect the sperms' morphological parameters, its DNA integrity, and to estimate the effect of various quantities of pyridaben on in vitro fertilization rate. Materials and Methods: In this study, 80 adult male Balb/C strain mice were used. Animals were divided into control and two test groups. Control group received distilled water. The test group was divided into two subgroups, viz, high dose (212 mg/kg/day and low dose (53 mg/kg/day and they received the pyridaben, orally for duration of 45 days. The spermatozoa were obtained from caudae epididymides on day 45 in all groups. Sperm viability, protamin compression (nuclear maturity, DNA double-strand breaks, and in vitro fertilizing (IVF ability were examined. Results: The pyridaben treatment provoked a significant decrease in sperm population and viability in epididymides. The data obtained from this experiment revealed that, the pyridaben brings about negative impact on the sperm maturation and DNA integrity in a time-dependent manner, which consequently caused a significant (p<0.05 reduction in IVF capability. Embryo developing arrest was significantly (p<0.05 higher in treated than the control group. Conclusion: Theses results confirmed that, the pyridaben is able to induce DNA damage and chromatin abnormalities in spermatozoa which were evident by low IVF rate.

  18. Protective Effect of Melatonin on the Quality of Spermatogenesis and Sperm Parameters in the Mice Treated with Acetylsalicylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mohammad Ghasemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Melatonin, the most important secretary hormone of pineal gland, as a powerful antioxidant has a high potent for neutralizing the toxicity of drugs. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the effect of melatonin on testicular damage and sperm parameters deficiency induced by acetylsalicylic acid, in adult male mice. Materials & Methods: Male NMRI mice were divided into 4 groups: 1 control 2 acetylsalicylic acid treated group 3 melatonin treated group 4 Melatonin-acetylsalicylic acid treated group. Acetylsalicylic acid was administered at a dose of 50mg/kg orally through gavage for 14 days. Melatonin was administered in dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 days intraperitoneally. The control mice were received vehicle (normal saline orally through gavage. The animals were sacrificed and their testes and epididymis were dissected on the 15th day after the treatment. Evaluations were made by determining Johnson's score, epididymal sperm count, and sperm morphology and sperm motility. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test. Results: Acetylsalicylic acid treated mice showed a reduction in Johnson's score and quality of spermatogenesis (P<0.05, sperm count, normal morphology and motility percent (P<0.001, compared to the control. Melatonin in group 4, significantly increased maturation of seminiferous tubules (P<0.05, and quality and quantity of sperm parameters (P<0.05 in comparison with group 2. Conclusion: It seems that intraperitoneal administration of melatonin for 5 days is a potentially beneficial agent to improve the quality of spermatogenesis and sperm parameters in testis damaged by acetylsalicylic acid, probably by decreasing oxidative stresses. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:29-36

  19. Proteomics of ionomycin-induced ascidian sperm reaction: Released and exposed sperm proteins in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Shiori; Shirae-Kurabayashi, Maki; Otsuka, Kei; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Sperm proteins mediating sperm-egg interaction should be exhibited on the sperm surface, or exposed or released when sperm approach an egg. In ascidians (protochordates), sperm undergo a sperm reaction, characterized by enhanced sperm motility and mitochondrial swelling and shedding on contact with the vitelline coat (VC) or by treatment with Ca(2+) ionophore. Here, proteomic analysis was conducted on sperm exudates and sperm surface proteins using ionomycin-induced sperm reaction and cell-impermeable labeling in Ciona intestinalis type A (C. robusta). In the exudate from sperm treated with ionomycin, membrane proteins including a possible VC receptor CiUrabin were abundant, indicating the release of membranous compartments during sperm reaction. Among the surface proteins XP_009859314.1 (uncharacterized protein exhibiting homology to HrTTSP-1) was most abundant before the sperm reaction, but XP_004227079.1 (unknown Ig superfamily protein) appears to be most abundantly exposed by the sperm reaction. Moreover, proteins containing a notable set of domains, astacin-like metalloprotease domain and thrombospondin type 1 repeat(s), were found in this fraction. Possible roles in fertilization as well as localizations and behaviors of these proteins are discussed. PMID:26223815

  20. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Zhou; Li Chen; Jie Li; Hongjun Li; Zhiwei Hong; Min Xie; Shengrong Chen; Bing Yao

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed tha...

  1. A laboratory modification to testicular sperm preparation technique improves spermatogenic cell yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Ozkavukcu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Testicular sperm extraction is a common procedure used to find spermatogenic cells in men with nonobstructive azoospermia. The laboratory processing of biopsied testicular tissues needs to be performed meticulously to acquire a high yield of cells. In this study, the effectiveness of mincing the tissues after testicular biopsy was assessed using histological evaluation, as was the possible adverse effect of residual tissue on the migration of spermatogenic cells during density gradient centrifugation. Our results indicate that testicular residual tissue, when laid on the density gradient medium along with the sperm wash, hinders the spermatogenic cells' forming a pellet during centrifugation, and therefore impairs the intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedure. Whereas the mean number of recovered cells from the sperm wash medium (SWM with residual tissue is 39.435 ± 24.849, it was notably higher (60.189 ± 28.214 cells in the SWM without minced tissues. The remaining tissue contained no functional seminiferous tubules or spermatogenic cells in histological sections. In conclusion, the remaining residual tissue after mincing biopsied testicular tissue does not add any functional or cellular contribution to spermatogenic cell retrieval; in fact, it may block the cellular elements in the accompanying cell suspension from migrating through the gradient layers to form a pellet during centrifugation and cause loss of spermatogenic cells.

  2. A laboratory modification to testicular sperm preparation technique improves spermatogenic cell yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkavukcu, Sinan; Ibis, Ebru; Kizil, Sule; Isbacar, Suheyla; Aydos, Kaan

    2014-01-01

    Testicular sperm extraction is a common procedure used to find spermatogenic cells in men with nonobstructive azoospermia. The laboratory processing of biopsied testicular tissues needs to be performed meticulously to acquire a high yield of cells. In this study, the effectiveness of mincing the tissues after testicular biopsy was assessed using histological evaluation, as was the possible adverse effect of residual tissue on the migration of spermatogenic cells during density gradient centrifugation. Our results indicate that testicular residual tissue, when laid on the density gradient medium along with the sperm wash, hinders the spermatogenic cells' forming a pellet during centrifugation, and therefore impairs the intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedure. Whereas the mean number of recovered cells from the sperm wash medium (SWM) with residual tissue is 39.435 ± 24.849, it was notably higher (60.189 ± 28.214 cells) in the SWM without minced tissues. The remaining tissue contained no functional seminiferous tubules or spermatogenic cells in histological sections. In conclusion, the remaining residual tissue after mincing biopsied testicular tissue does not add any functional or cellular contribution to spermatogenic cell retrieval; in fact, it may block the cellular elements in the accompanying cell suspension from migrating through the gradient layers to form a pellet during centrifugation and cause loss of spermatogenic cells. PMID:25038178

  3. Boundaries of Ethics, Sperm on the Border –The Globalization of Danish Sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    as sperm donation in parliamentary debates, and in the media, often raises ethical questions. This presentation inquires into how the bending of boundaries by “inappropriate parents”, fertility travelers, private sperm banks and fertility clinics have been part in negotiating the changes of the legislation...... of “ethical” does to a technology and its users such as in the case of the globalization of Danish sperm, as well as I will question how understandings of normality, sexuality, race, age, gender and kinship become part of the negotiations of “the ethical”, or in the doing of ethics in practice......? The presentation is based on a multi-sited ethnography drawing on ethnographic research including observations and interviews from fertility clinics and sperm banks in Denmark during 2002/2003 and 2011- 2013, legislative documents and parliamentary debates and websites of fertility clinics and sperm banks. I...

  4. Testicular Sperm Extraction and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection: Outcomes in a specialist fertility centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, J A; Fanning, D M; Davis, N F; Ward, F; Shamoun, O; Brinsden, P

    2015-10-01

    Assisted reproduction with testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are fertility treatment options for couples with severe oligospermia or azoospermia. A retrospective review was performed of 146 TESE procedures in a specialist fertility centre in Ireland. The indication for TESE was obstructive azoospermia (OA) in 59% (n = 80) and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) in 41% (n = 56). Sperm retrieval rates after TESE were determined and the pregnancy rates per ICSI cycle number were evaluated. Sperm retrieval rates were 99% (n = 79/80) and 32% (n = 18/56) for OA and NOA men respectively. Fifty-eight couples proceeded to ICSI. Overall 114 ICSI cycles were performed and 33 cycles resulted in fertilisation (29%). Our sperm retrieval and pregnancy rates are consistent with international studies and support the ongoing role for TESE and ICSI as successful assisted reproductive techniques for male factor infertility in Ireland. PMID:26625647

  5. Different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems highly influence sperm motility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryshpolets, S; Kowalski, R K; Dietrich, G J; Dzyuba, B; Ciereszko, A

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we examined different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems (CRISMAS, Hobson Sperm Tracker, and Image J CASA) on the exact same video recordings to evaluate the differences in sperm motility parameters related to the specific CASA used. To cover a wide range of sperm motility parameters, we chose 12-second video recordings at 25 and 50 Hz frame rates after sperm motility activation using three taxonomically distinct fish species (sterlet: Acipenser ruthenus L.; common carp: Cyprinus carpio L.; and rainbow trout: Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) that are characterized by essential differences in sperm behavior during motility. Systematically higher values of velocity and beat cross frequency (BCF) were observed in video recordings obtained at 50 Hz frame frequency compared with 25 Hz for all three systems. Motility parameters were affected by the CASA and species used for analyses. Image J and CRISMAS calculated higher curvilinear velocity (VCL) values for rainbow trout and common carp at 25 Hz frequency compared with the Hobson Sperm Tracker, whereas at 50 Hz, a significant difference was observed only for rainbow trout sperm recordings. No significant difference was observed between the CASA systems for sterlet sperm motility at 25 and 50 Hz. Additional analysis of 1-second segments taken at three time points (1, 6, and 12 seconds of the recording) revealed a dramatic decrease in common carp and rainbow trout sperm speed. The motility parameters of sterlet spermatozoa did not change significantly during the 12-second motility period and should be considered as a suitable model for longer motility analyses. Our results indicated that the CASA used can affect motility results even when the same motility recordings are used. These results could be critically altered by the recording quality, time of analysis, and frame rate of camera, and could result in erroneous conclusions.

  6. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendeluk Gabriela Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010. A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03, achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms.

  7. The Influence of Sperm Morphology, Total Motile Sperm Count of Semen and the Number of Motile Sperm Inseminated in Sperm Samples on the Success of Intrauterine Insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Saharkhiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aimed to analyze the prognostic value of sperm morphology , totalmotile sperm count (TMSC and the number of motile sperm inseminated (NMSI on the outcomeof intrauterine insemination (IUI.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out 445 women undergoing 820IUI cycles. All of the patients underwent controlled ovarian hyper stimulation with clomiphencitrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG followed by intrauterine inseminationwith the husband’s sperm. Pregnancy rate (PR per cycle in correlation to sperm morphology,TMSC and NMSI was obtained. Statistical analysis of the data was done by the SPSS version13 (Chicago,USA.Results: A total of 81 clinical pregnancies were obtained for a pregnancy rate per cycle of 9.9%.When the TMSC was 5×106 to <10×106, the PR per cycle was significantly higher than thesubgroups <1×106, 1×106 to <5×106 and ≥10×106 (15%, 5.6%, 5.1%, 10.8%, respectively. Spermmorphology was in itself a significant factor that affected the likelihood of IUI success. Nonetheless,the most significant difference of the PR per cycle with sperm morphology was in the subgroup <5% (2.1% vs. 97.9%.When the NMSI was ≥10×106, the PR per cycle was significantly higher thanthe subgroups<5×106 and 5×106 to< 10× 106 (11.2%, 4.1%, 5.2%, respectively.Conclusion: The study showed that TMSC 5×106 to < 10×106 and normal sperm morphology ≥ 5%and NMSI ≥ 10×106 are useful prognostic factors of IUI cycles.

  8. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  9. Replication and Translation of Sperm-introduced Hepatitis B Virus Genes in Embryonic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ju Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Given that hepatitis B virus (HBV can infect human sperm cells and HBV genes introduced by sperm can be transcribed in developing embryos, we sought to confirm the presence of mature HBV antigens and to assess the mechanism of viral gene replication in embryonic cells. Methods: Human sperm were transfected with recombinant plasmids pIRES2-EGFP-HBs or pIRES2-EGFP-HBc and were then used to fertilize zona-free golden hamster ova. Two-celled embryos with and without green fluorescence were collected for detection of HBV DNA or protein by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, immunofluorescence assay (IA, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: 1. Positive FISH signals for HBs- and HBc-DNA were observed in the sperm nuclei and in the nuclei of the two-celled embryos in the test samples but were not detected in the controls. 2. Positive IA signals for HBsAg or HBcAg were detected within the cytoplasm of the two-celled embryos in the test samples but not in the controls. 3. Using ELISA, the level of HBsAg in a single two-celled embryo was 0.064 ng/ ml. Likewise, HBcAg was detected in the five-embryo experimental group. Conclusion: The sperm-introduced HBV S or C genes were able to replicate concomitantly host embryo genome via a semiconservative mode of DNA replication and were able to express viral proteins in the embryonic cells.

  10. Experimental evolution of sperm competitiveness in a mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Leigh W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When females mate with multiple partners, sperm from rival males compete to fertilise the ova. Studies of experimental evolution have proven the selective action of sperm competition on male reproductive traits. However, while reproductive traits may evolve in response to sperm competition, this does not necessarily provide evidence that sperm competitive ability responds to selection. Indeed, a study of Drosophila failed to observe divergence in sperm competitive ability of males in lines selected for enhanced sperm offence and defence. Results Adopting the naturally polygamous house mouse (Mus domesticus as our vertebrate model, we performed an experimental evolution study and observed genetic divergence in sperm quality; males from the polygamous selection lines produced ejaculates with increased sperm numbers and greater sperm motility compared to males from the monogamous lines. Here, after 12 generations of experimental evolution, we conducted competitive matings between males from lineages evolving under sperm competition and males from lineages subject to relaxed selection. We reduced variation in paternity arising from embryo mortality by genotyping embryos in utero at 14 days gestation. Our microsatellite data revealed a significant paternity bias toward males that evolved under the selective regime of sperm competition. Conclusion We provide evidence that the sperm competitiveness phenotype can respond to selection, and show that improved sperm quality translates to greater competitive fertilisation success in house mice.

  11. The development of cat testicular sperm cryopreservation protocols: Effects of tissue fragments or sperm cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Thuwanut, Paweena; Morrell, Jane M

    2016-01-15

    In endangered animals that have been found dead or sterilized for medical reasons, testis is the ultimate source of haploid DNA or sperm. Thus, preservation of testicular sperm may be performed to rescue their genetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate protocols for testicular sperm freezing: as tissue fragments or cell suspension in domestic cats as a model. A pair of testes from each cat (n = 9) were cut into eight equal pieces. Four randomly selected pieces were cryopreserved as: (1) tissue pieces using two-step freezing; (2) tissue pieces using a slow passive cooling device (CoolCell); (3) sperm suspension after single-layer centrifugation (SLC) through colloids; and (4) sperm suspension without being processed through SLC. A testicular piece from each cat served as fresh control. Testicular sperm membrane and DNA integrity were evaluated before, and after, the cryopreservation process. In addition, spermatogenic cell types (testicular sperm, spermatogonia, spermatocyte, and spermatid) present in the suspension samples were counted before and after SLC. The results found that testicular sperm membrane integrity in the suspension after SLC process was higher than that in the fragment form neither using the two-step nor CoolCell freezing, both before and after freezing (before freezing: 92.3 ± 3.4 vs. 81 ± 4.5 and 80.0 ± 7.0; after freezing: 84.5 ± 4.6 vs. 71.2 ± 12 and 76.2 ± 4.6; P ≤ 0.05). Testicular sperm DNA integrity was, however, not different among groups. Furthermore, the samples processed through the SLC had higher ration of sperm cells: other spermatogenic cells than those were not processed through the SLC (88.9 ± 3.8 vs. 30 ± 7.9; P ≤ 0.05). In summary, testicular sperm cryopreserved as a minced suspension is considered suitable in terms of preventing sperm membrane integrity, and SLC is considered a selection tool for enriching haploid sperm cells from castrated or postmortem cats.

  12. Effect of relaxin on human sperm functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlin, Alberto; Menegazzo, Massimo; Gianesello, Lisa; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Relaxin is a circulating hormone with functions in pregnancy, parturition, and other aspects of female reproduction. It is also secreted from the prostate gland into the seminal fluid; however, the role of relaxin in male reproduction is debated. Studies conducted in the past have suggested possible actions on human spermatozoa, but the data were contrasting. Here, we show that the relaxin receptor RXFP1 (Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1) is expressed in human spermatozoa, and it mainly localizes in the astrodome. In vitro studies on human sperm demonstrated that this hormone attenuates the natural decline in sperm motility and maintains higher mitochondrial activity and lower apoptosis level. Furthermore, relaxin induced an increase in sperm hyperactivation, intracellular calcium and cAMP, and acrosome reaction. These effects were abolished by the use of the specific anti-RXFP1 antibody. Relaxin concentrations were low in the blood (x ± SD, 0.16 ± 0.03 nM) and very high in the seminal plasma (x ± SD, 10.3 ± 4.0 nM), confirming its secretion mainly by the prostate. Taken together, these data demonstrate that relaxin influences positively many sperm functions linked to fertilizing ability, and it preserves sperm functionality, with possible practical value in assisted reproduction techniques. PMID:21903973

  13. Sperm Membrane Behaviour during Cooling and Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieme, H; Oldenhof, H; Wolkers, W F

    2015-09-01

    Native sperm is only marginally stable after collection. Cryopreservation of semen facilitates transport and storage for later use in artificial reproduction technologies, but cryopreservation processing may result in cellular damage compromising sperm function. Membranes are thought to be the primary site of cryopreservation injury. Therefore, insights into the effects of cooling, ice formation and protective agents on sperm membranes may help to rationally design cryopreservation protocols. In this review, we describe membrane phase behaviour of sperm at supra- and subzero temperatures. In addition, factors affecting membrane phase transitions and stability, sperm osmotic tolerance limits and mode of action of cryoprotective agents are discussed. It is shown how cooling only results in minor thermotropic non-cooperative phase transitions, whereas freezing causes sharp lyotropic fluid-to-gel phase transitions. Membrane cholesterol content affects suprazero membrane phase behaviour and osmotic tolerance. The rate and extent of cellular dehydration coinciding with freezing-induced membrane phase transitions are affected by the cooling rate and ice nucleation temperature and can be modulated by cryoprotective agents. Permeating agents such as glycerol can move across cellular membranes, whereas non-permeating agents such as sucrose cannot. Both, permeating and non-permeating protectants preserve biomolecular and cellular structures by forming a protective glassy state during freezing. PMID:26382025

  14. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and chromosomally abnormal spermatozoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. in 't Veld; F.J.M. Broekmans (Frank); H.F. de France; P.L. Pearson; M.H. Pieters; R.J. van Kooij

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAn infertile couple was referred for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) because of primary infertility and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) in the male. It was observed that although the sperm cells presented with an unusual head size and multiple tai

  15. Gulf of Mexico sperm whale photo-ID catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photo-identification data on sperm whales occupying the north central Gulf of Mexico have been collected during vessel surveys. Photographs of sperm whales are...

  16. Prognostic factors for sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Vieira, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Testicular sperm retrieval techniques associated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection have changed the field of male infertility treatment and given many azoospermic men the chance to become biological fathers. Despite the current use of testicular sperm extraction, reliable clinical and laboratory prognostic factors of sperm recovery are still absent. The objective of this article was to review the prognostic factors and clinical use of sperm retrieval for men with non-obstructive azoospermia. The PubMed database was searched for the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms azoospermia, sperm retrieval, and prognosis. Papers on obstructive azoospermia were excluded. The authors selected articles that reported successful sperm retrieval techniques involving clinical, laboratory, or parenchyma processing methods. The selected papers were reviewed, and the prognostic factors were discussed. No reliable positive prognostic factors guarantee sperm recovery for patients with non-obstructive azoospermia. The only negative prognostic factor is the presence of AZFa and AZFb microdeletions. PMID:23503961

  17. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced...... a number of interesting results, it has some potential pitfalls that have rarely been discussed. In the present paper, I review the major findings of ecology and evolution studies employing sperm viability staining and outline the method's principle limitations. The key problem is that the viability assay...... may itself kill sperm, which is likely to confound many common experimental designs in addition to producing artificially low estimates of sperm viability. I further suggest that sperm number should be routinely measured in sperm viability studies, as it may be an important but overlooked source...

  18. Third Party Reproduction: Sperm, Egg, and Embryo Donation and Surrogacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ages of 21 and 34. SPERM DONATION Artificial insemination using donor sperm has been practiced for over ... with the emergence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), artificial donor insemination has been performed exclusively with frozen and quarantined ...

  19. Effect of environmental pH on sperm kinematic characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, Hiva; Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Dissing, Marianne Charlotte;

    2015-01-01

    differences in the details of the sperm movement (kinematics) of human sperm provided by computerized sperm analysis systems. This study was designed to assess the effect of two different media pH levels on kinematic parameters of the human sperm. Samples were prepared using the 40%/80% Pureception (Sage, USA......) density gradient and resuspended in customized sperm culture media with pH levels of 7.9 and 8.3 (Origio, Denmark). Kinematic parameters of the sperm in both groups were analyzed using the Sperm Class Analyzer (Microptic S.L., Spain) at 0, 6 and 24 hours following the addition of media. Results....... Linearity and Wobble showed significant difference after 24 hours. This study demonstrated a difference in the sperm motion pattern and velocity in different environmental pH levels. Based on these findings, further investigations are required to elucidate knowledge about possible effect of marginal pH...

  20. Long Maturity Forward Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    to be statistically significant. Secondly, the expectations hypothesis is analyzed for the long maturity region of the forward rate curve using "forward rate" regressions. The expectations hypothesis is numerically close to being accepted but is statistically rejected. The findings provide mixed support......The paper aims to improve the knowledge of the empirical properties of the long maturity region of the forward rate curve. Firstly, the theoretical negative correlation between the slope at the long end of the forward rate curve and the term structure variance is recovered empirically and found...

  1. In vivo survival of domestic cat oocytes after vitrification, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C E; Gómez, M C; Kagawa, N; Kuwayama, M; Leibo, S P; Dresser, B L

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated: (1) cleavage rate after IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes after vitrification (experiment 1); and (2) fetal development after transfer of resultant ICSI-derived embryos into recipients (experiment 2). In vivo-matured cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered from gonadotropin-treated donors at 24 h after LH treatment. In vitro-matured oocytes were obtained by mincing ovaries (from local veterinary clinics) and placing COCs into maturation medium for 24 h. Mature oocytes were denuded and cryopreserved in a vitrification solution of 15% DMSO, 15% ethylene glycol, and 18% sucrose. In experiment 1, for both in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes, cleavage frequencies after IVF of control and vitrified oocytes and after ICSI of vitrified oocytes were not different (P > 0.05). After vitrification, blastocyst development occurred only in IVF-derived, in vitro-matured oocytes. In experiment 2, 18 presumptive zygotes and four two-cell embryos derived by ICSI of vitrified in vitro-matured oocytes and 19 presumptive zygotes produced from seven in vivo- and 12 in vitro-matured oocytes were transferred by laparoscopy into the oviducts of two recipients, respectively. On Day 21, there were three fetuses in one recipient and one fetus in the other. On Days 63 and 66 of gestation, four live kittens were born. In vivo viability of zygotes and/or embryos produced via ICSI of vitrified oocytes was established by birth of live kittens after transfer to recipients. PMID:22015162

  2. Sperm competition in the absence of fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Singson, A; Hill, K L; L'Hernault, S. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hermaphrodite self-fertilization is the primary mode of reproduction in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. However, when a hermaphrodite is crossed with a male, nearly all of the oocytes are fertilized by male-derived sperm. This sperm precedence during reproduction is due to the competitive superiority of male-derived sperm and results in a functional suppression of hermaphrodite self-fertility. In this study, mutant males that inseminate fertilization-defective sperm were used to reveal t...

  3. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  4. Sperm preparation: state-of-the-art-physiological aspects and application of advanced sperm preparation methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ralf Henkel

    2012-01-01

    For assisted reproduction technologies (ART),numerous techniques were developed to isolate spermatozoa capable of fertilizing oocytes.While early methodologies only focused on isolating viable,motile spermatozoa,with progress of ART,particularly intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI),it became clear that these parameters are insufficient for the identification of the most suitable spermatozoon for fertilization.Conventional sperm preparation techniques,namely,swim-up,density gradient centrifugation and glass wool filtration,are not efficient enough to produce sperm populations free of DNA damage,because these techniques are not physiological and not modeled on the stringent sperm selection processes taking place in the female genital tract.These processes only allow one male germ cell out of tens of millions to fuse with the oocyte.Sites of sperm selection in the female genital tract are the cervix,uterus,uterotubal junction,oviduct,cumulus oophorus and the zona pellucida.Newer strategies of sperm preparation are founded on:(i) morphological assessment by means of‘motile sperm organelle morphological examination (MSOME)'; (ii) electrical charge; and (iii) molecular binding characteristics of the sperm cell.Whereas separation methods based on electrical charge take advantage of the sperm's adherence to a test tube surface or separate in an electrophoresis,molecular binding techniques use Annexin V or hyaluronic acid (HA) as substrates.Techniques in this category are magnet-activated cell sorting,Annexin V-activated glass wool filtration,flow cytometry and picked spermatozoa for ICSI (PICSI) from HA-coated dishes and HA-containing media.Future developments may include Raman microspectrometry,confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy and polarization microscopy.

  5. Cryopreservation of mutton snapper ( Lutjanus analis) sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Eduardo G; Oliveira, Idili R; Serralheiro, Pedro C Da Silva; Cerqueira, Vinicius R

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a protocol of semen cryopreservation of the mutton snapper Lutjanus analis. The interaction between three extenders ( pH 6.1; 7.8 and 8.2) , two concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide ( DMSO, 5 and 10%) and three cooling rates ( -90; -60 and -30°C.min-1) on the sperm motility rate and motility time were analyzed by a factorial experiment. A sample of 30 fishes ( 1,261 ± 449 g) collected in the nature was kept in floating net cages. The semen was frozen by using cryogenic straws, in nitrogen vapour and transferred, later, to liquid nitrogen. Fertilization test was accomplished to evaluate the viability of the cryopreserved sperm. The highest sperm motility rate and motility time ( P snapper.

  6. BMI in relation to sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sermondade, N; Faure, C; Fezeu, L;

    2013-01-01

    with meta-analysis. METHODS A systematic review of available literature (with no language restriction) was performed to investigate the impact of BMI on sperm count. Relevant studies published until June 2012 were identified from a Pubmed and EMBASE search. We also included unpublished data (n = 717 men......BACKGROUND The global obesity epidemic has paralleled a decrease in semen quality. Yet, the association between obesity and sperm parameters remains controversial. The purpose of this report was to update the evidence on the association between BMI and sperm count through a systematic review......) obtained from the Infertility Center of Bondy, France. Abstracts of relevant articles were examined and studies that could be included in this review were retrieved. Authors of relevant studies for the meta-analysis were contacted by email and asked to provide standardized data. RESULTS A total of 21...

  7. Could using the zona pellucida bound sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI)enhance the outcome of ICSI?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Yi Liu

    2011-01-01

    @@ In the recent literature, several interesting articles have been published using the zona pellucdia(ZP)-bound sperm for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI)to enhance embryo quality, implantation and clinical pregnancy rates.1-3

  8. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy ( Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites.

  9. 21 CFR 173.275 - Hydrogenated sperm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogenated sperm oil. 173.275 Section 173.275... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.275 Hydrogenated sperm oil. The food additive hydrogenated sperm oil may be safely used in accordance with the following...

  10. Cryopreservation of sperm in farmed Australian greenlip abalone Haliotis laevigata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yibing; Xu, Tong; Robinson, Nicholas; Qin, Jianguang; Li, Xiaoxu

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated factors important to the development of the liquid nitrogen (LN) vapor sperm cryopreservation technique in farmed greenlip abalone Haliotis laevigata, including (1) cryoprotectant agent (CPA) toxicity; (2) cooling temperature (height above LN surface); (3) thawing temperature; (4) sperm to egg ratio; and (5) sugar supplementation, using sperm motility, fertilization rate or integrity/potential of sperm components and organelles as quality assessment indicators. Results suggested that among the single CPAs evaluated 6% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) would be the most suitable for sperm cryopreservation in this species. The highest post-thaw sperm motility was achieved with the sperm that had been exposed to LN vapor for 10min at 5.2cm above the LN surface, thawed and recovered in 60 and 18°C seawater bathes, respectively after at least 2h storage in LN. The highest fertilization rates were achieved at a sperm to egg ratio of 10,000:1 or 15,000:1. Addition of 1% glucose or 2% sucrose produced significantly higher post-thaw sperm motility than 6% Me2SO alone. Among the three cryoprotectant solutions further trialled, 6% Me2SO+1% glucose produced the highest fertilization rate of 83.6±3.7%. Evaluation of sperm has shown that the addition of glucose could significantly improve the sperm plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrated a positive role of glucose in the improvement of sperm cryopreservation in farmed greenlip abalone. PMID:24440870

  11. Sperm DNA fragmentation, recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is increasing that the integrity of sperm DNA may also be related to implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage (RM. To investigate this, the sperm DNA fragmentation in partners of 35 women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF following in vitro fertilization, 16 women diagnosed with RM and seven recent fathers (control were examined. Sperm were examined pre- and post-density centrifugation by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD test and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. There were no significant differences in the age of either partner or sperm concentration, motility or morphology between three groups. Moreover, there were no obvious differences in sperm DNA fragmentation measured by either test. However, whilst on average sperm DNA fragmentation in all groups was statistically lower in prepared sperm when measured by the SCD test, this was not seen with the results from the TUNEL assay. These results do not support the hypothesis that sperm DNA fragmentation is an important cause of RIF or RM, or that sperm DNA integrity testing has value in such patients. It also highlights significant differences between test methodologies and sperm preparation methods in interpreting the data from sperm DNA fragmentation tests.

  12. Purification and characterization of a sperm motility inhibiting factor from caprine epididymal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Das

    Full Text Available Several studies have been reported on the occurrence of sperm motility inhibiting factors in the male reproductive fluids of different mammalian species, but these proteins have not been adequately purified and characterized. A novel sperm motility inhibiting factor (MIF-II has been purified from caprine epididymal plasma (EP by Hydroxylapatite gel adsorption chromatography, DEAE-Cellulose ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The MIF-II has been purified to apparent homogeneity and the molecular weight estimated by Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration is 160 kDa. MIF-II is a dimeric protein, made up of two subunits each having a molecular mass of 80 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric point of MIF-II is 5.1 as determined by chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing. It is a heat labile protein and maximal active at the pH 6.9 to 7.5. The sperm motility inhibiting protein factor at 2 microg/ml (12.5 nM level showed maximal motility-inhibiting activity. The observation that the epididymal plasma factor lowered the intracellular cAMP level of spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent manner suggests that it may block the motility of caprine cauda spermatozoa by interfering the cAMP dependent motility function. The results revealed that the purified protein factor has the potential of sperm motility inhibition and may serve as a vaginal contraceptive. The antibody raised against the MIF-II has the potential for enhancement of forward motility of cauda-spermatozoa. This antibody may thus be useful for solving some of the problems of male infertility due to low sperm motility.

  13. Effect of testicle postmortem storage on goat frozen-thawed epididymal sperm quality as a tool to improve genebanking in local breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, F; Madeddu, M; Gliozzi, T M; Gandini, G; Pizzi, F

    2014-03-01

    The interest to develop assisted reproductive technologies and cryobanking for farm animal genetic resource conservation has recently increased. However, cryopreservation for ex-situ management of genetic diversity sometimes is not routinely feasible, owing to the lack of facilities (AI centres, laboratories) and expertise near the local breed farming area. In these cases, epididymal sperm obtained from slaughtered or castrated animals, associated with the possibility of managing rather long periods between animal death, sperm recovery and freezing, would increase the opportunities to create semen storages. This investigation addresses the pre-freeze/post-thaw quality of goat epididymal sperm as a function of testicle storage temperature (environment or +5°C) and time elapsed between animal's death and sperm recovery (0, 24, 48, 72 h) to establish the optimal protocols for the recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm in this species. Testicles of 50 mature bucks collected at the abattoir were divided in two groups: half of the testicles (n=50) were transported to the laboratory at environment temperature (E), whereas the remaining half (n=50) at a refrigeration temperature (R) of +5°C. In the two groups (E) and (R), one testicle from each pair was processed after slaughter forming the time 0 groups (0E and 0R). The contralateral testicle was processed after 24, 48 or 72 h of storage, at the corresponding temperature. Sperm motility and kinetic parameters, viability and morphology were assessed in pre-freeze and post-thaw samples. Until 48 h postmortem, both E and R temperatures are able to maintain good pre-freeze epididymal sperm quality. After 48 h postmortem, R temperature is fundamental to reduce epididymal sperm quality decay in pre-freeze samples. Moreover, testicle refrigeration also has a positive impact on post-thaw samples, allowing a lower decline through time considering total motility, kinetics parameters, sperm viability and sperm

  14. Predictive capacity of sperm quality parameters and sperm subpopulations on field fertility after artificial insemination in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, P; Vicente-Fiel, S; Palacín, I; Fantova, E; Blasco, M E; Silvestre, M A; Yániz, J L

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the relevance of several sperm quality parameters and sperm population structure on the reproductive performance after cervical artificial insemination (AI) in sheep. One hundred and thirty-nine ejaculates from 56 adult rams were collected using an artificial vagina, processed for sperm quality assessment and used to perform 1319 AI. Analyses of sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA), sperm nuclear morphometry by computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA), membrane integrity by acridine orange-propidium iodide combination and sperm DNA fragmentation using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD) were performed. Clustering procedures using the sperm kinematic and morphometric data resulted in the classification of spermatozoa into three kinematic and three morphometric sperm subpopulations. Logistic regression procedures were used, including fertility at AI as the dependent variable (measured by lambing, 0 or 1) and farm, year, month of AI, female parity, female lambing-treatment interval, ram, AI technician and sperm quality parameters (including sperm subpopulations) as independent factors. Sperm quality variables remaining in the logistic regression model were viability and VCL. Fertility increased for each one-unit increase in viability (by a factor of 1.01) and in VCL (by a factor of 1.02). Multiple linear regression analyses were also performed to analyze the factors possibly influencing ejaculate fertility (N=139). The analysis yielded a significant (P<0.05) relationship between sperm viability and ejaculate fertility. The discriminant ability of the different semen variables to predict field fertility was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Sperm viability and VCL showed significant, albeit limited, predictive capacity on field fertility (0.57 and 0.54 Area Under Curve, respectively). The distribution of spermatozoa in the different subpopulations was not

  15. Sperm Cryopreservation in Live-Bearing Xiphophorus Fishes: Offspring Production from Xiphophorus variatus and Strategies for Establishment of Sperm Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Huiping; Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Savage, Markita G.; Walter, Ronald B.; Terrence R. Tiersch

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation of sperm from Xiphophorus fishes has produced live young in three species: X. hellerii, X. couchianus, and X. maculatus. In this study, the goal was to establish protocols for sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination to produce live young in X. variatus, and to identify needs for repository development. The objectives were to: 1) collect basic biological characteristics of males; 2) cryopreserve sperm from X. variatus, 3) harvest live young from cryopreserved sperm,...

  16. Interaction of resident sperm with sperm-storage tubule (SST) epithelial cell microvilli in the turkey hen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlike most mammals, birds do not need to synchronize copulation with ovulation. Hens are endowed with tubular structures, the sperm-storage tubules (SST), in their oviducts which the sperm enter and survive for weeks after mating or artificial insemination. Sperm are slowly but continually releas...

  17. Relationship of Total Motile Sperm Count and Percentage Motile Sperm to Successful Pregnancy Rates Following Intrauterine Insemination

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualotto, Eleonora B.; Daitch, James A.; Hendin, Benjamin N.; Falcone, Tommaso; Thomas, Anthony J.; Nelson, David R; Agarwal, Ashok

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:This study sought (i) to investigate the relationship between postwash total motile sperm count and postwash percentage motile sperm in predicting successful intrauterine insemination and (ii) to determine the minimal postwash total motile sperm count required to achieve pregnancy with intrauterine insemination.

  18. Exogenous neurotensin modulates sperm function in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Kohei; Hiradate, Yuuki; Oikawa, Toshinori; Ishiguro, Hirotoshi; Numabe, Takashi; Hara, Kenshiro; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2016-08-25

    Recently, the conception rates after artificial insemination have been pointed out to decline continuously. To overcome this problem, the control of frozen and thawed sperm quality is required. However, the mechanism of bovine sperm functional regulation is still largely unknown. In mammals, the ejaculated sperm are capable of showing fertilizing ability during migration in the female reproductive organs. It is well known that these female organs secrete several factors contributing to sperm capacitation. We previously reported that neurotensin (NT) secreted from the oviduct and cumulus cells enhanced sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in mice. In this study, we confirmed the expression of the NT receptor (NTR1) in the bovine sperm neck region and the secretion of NT in the bovine uterus and oviduct. The similar expression patterns of NT and NTR1 suggests a conserved mechanism of sperm functional regulation between mouse and cattle. Thus, we examined the effects of exogenous NT on the bovine sperm functions. First, we showed that NT induced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT enhances sperm capacitation. Second, we showed that NT induced acrosome reactions of capacitated sperm in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT facilitates acrosome reaction. Finally, we used a computer-aided sperm analysis system to show that NT did not have a great effect on sperm motility. These results suggest that NT acts as a facilitator of sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in the female reproductive tracts in cattle, highlighting the importance of NT-mediated signaling to regulate sperm functions. PMID:27210588

  19. Study on Resistance of Human Sperm Chromatin to Heparin Decondensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚劲松; 李建国; 薛同一; 王一飞

    1995-01-01

    Resistance of human sperm chromatin to heparin deeondensatinn was investigated by image analysis. The level of DNA deeondensation was determined by measuring the α, [red fluorescence/(red + green) fluoreseence] of sperm. The optimal experimental conditions were incubating sperms with 1000 IU/ml of heparin at 37℃ for 13 minutes and analysing the sperms with excitation F488, red fluoreseenee F630, green fluoreseence F530. The result showed that 72.93±14.73 percent of 20 fertile human sperms resist heparin deeondensa tion.

  20. A Nonlinear Multi-Scale Interaction Model for Atmospheric Blocking: The Eddy-Blocking Matching Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dehai; Cha, Jing; Zhong, Linhao; Dai, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear multi-scale interaction (NMI) model is used to propose an eddy-blocking matching (EBM) mechanism to account for how synoptic eddies reinforce or suppress a blocking flow. It is shown that the spatial structure of the eddy vorticity forcing (EVF) arising from upstream synoptic eddies determines whether an incipient block can grow into a meandering blocking flow through its interaction with the transient synoptic eddies from the west. Under certain conditions, the EVF exhibits a low-frequency oscillation on timescales of 2-3 weeks. During the EVF phase with a negative-over- positive dipole structure, a blocking event can be resonantly excited through the transport of eddy energy into the incipient block by the EVF. As the EVF changes into an opposite phase, the blocking decays. The NMI model produces life cycles of blocking events that resemble observations. Moreover, it is shown that the eddy north-south straining is a response of the eddies to a dipole- or Ω-type block. In our model, as in observations, two synoptic anticyclones (cyclones) can attract and merge with one another as the blocking intensifies, but only when the feedback of the blocking on the eddies is included. Thus, we attribute the eddy straining and associated vortex interaction to the feedback of the intensified blocking on synoptic eddies. The results illustrate the concomitant nature of the eddy deformation, whose role as a PV source for the blocking flow becomes important only during the mature stage of a block. Our EBM mechanism suggests that an incipient block flow is amplified (or suppressed) under certain conditions by the EVF coming from the upstream of the blocking region.

  1. Ultrastructural evaluation of recurrent and in-vitro maturation resistant metaphase I arrested oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, M L; Coetzee, K; Kruger, T F; Marino, H; Kitshoff, M S; Sousa, M

    2001-11-01

    An infertile couple whose female partner showed recurrent retrieval of immature metaphase I (MI) oocytes that were resistant to in-vitro maturation, was studied. Four spermiograms revealed teratozoospermia. Consistent non-fertilization and negative pregnancy outcomes were obtained after intrauterine insemination, gamete intra-Fallopian transfer and IVF. Two intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were finally performed. All oocytes (n = 17) in both cycles were arrested at MI and failed to mature after 48 h culture. ICSI also resulted in total non-fertilization. In the last cycle, two oocytes were analysed by transmission electron microscopy and showed almost identical results. All organelles showed normal characteristics of an MI oocyte. The main abnormality found was related to the MI spindle, with absence of microtubules and dispersion of the female chromosomes. Minor abnormalities were observed (immature fibrous appearance of the zona pellucida; the presence of small vesicle aggregates which formed a foam-like body). The injected sperm nucleus was arrested in the middle of the chromatin decondensation process, with no visible nuclear envelope reformation. Normal disruption of sperm acrosomal and flagellar components were observed. Only a partial cortical reaction was observed. This represents the first documented case of developmental arrest due to complete absence of spindle formation in association with an otherwise mature ooplasm. PMID:11679527

  2. Effect of acute androgen withdrawal by GnRH antagonist on epididymal sperm motility and morphology in the cynomolgus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C H; Weinbauer, G F; Cooper, T G

    1999-01-01

    Hormonal male contraception requires an induction phase before azoospermia and contraceptive safety are achieved. The nature of spermatozoa that may be ejaculated during this induction phase was studied in a nonhuman primate. The GnRH antagonist Cetrorelix was administered daily to five cynomolgus monkeys to induce testicular regression, and the vehicle was given to five control animals. Within 16 days, the antagonist reduced androgens by 80% in the serum and by 50% in the epididymis. Sperm were obtained by mincing different epididymal regions and were examined for morphology (subjectively) and motility (objectively) after removal of the organs 16 and 25 days after continuous treatment. Spermatozoa entering the epididymis of monkeys undergoing regression differed from those of vehicle-treated controls in their greater susceptibility to disruption during preparation for morphological staining. The acquisition of motility by sperm in the epididymides attached to regressing testes occurred in the same epididymal region as controls but did not achieve the median velocities attained by sperm in controls during epididymal passage. Values for most sperm motion parameters developed as in the controls, and, during epididymal passage, sperm developed resistance to stresses encountered during preparation for morphological analysis. These observations suggest that spermatozoa ejaculated before spermatogenesis ceases may be potentially fertilizing because epididymal maturation continues in an androgen-deprived organ. From these preclinical studies, it can be concluded that in men, applying hormonal contraception precautions against pregnancy must be recommended before azoospermia is induced, since the epididymis can partially compensate for poor-quality sperm produced by a regressing testis even when levels of circulating androgens and tissue androgens are low. PMID:10100476

  3. Sperm whale assessment in the Western Ionian Sea using acoustic data from deep sea observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Francesco; Bellia, Giorgio; Beranzoli, Laura; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Marinaro, Giuditta; Papale, Elena; Pavan, Gianni; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Scandura, Danila; Sciacca, Virginia; Viola, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) operates two deep sea infrastructures: Capo Passero, Western Ionian Sea 3,600 meters of depth, and Catania Wester Ionian Sea 2,100 m depth. At the two sites, several research observatories have been run: OnDE, NEMO-SN1, SMO, KM3NeT-Italia most of them jointly operated between INFN and INGV. In all these observatories, passive acoustic sensors (hydrophones) have been installed. Passive Acoustics Monitoring (PAM) is nowadays the main tool of the bioacoustics to study marine mammals. In particular, receiving the sounds emitted by cetaceans from a multi-hydrophones array installed in a cabled seafloor observatory, a research about the ecological dynamics of the species may be performed. Data acquired with the hydrophones installed aboard the OnDE, SMO and KM3NeT-Italia observatories will be reported. Thanks to acquired data, the acoustic presence of the sperm whales was assessed and studied for several years (2005:2013). An "ad hoc" algorithm was also developed to allow the automatic identification of the "clicks" emitted by the sperm whales and measure the size of detected animals. According to the results obtained, the sperm whale population in the area is well-distributed in size, sex and sexual maturity. Although specimens more than 14 meters of length (old males) seem to be absent.

  4. Diagnostic tools in male infertility-the question of sperm dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher LR Barratt; Steven Mansell; Catherine Beaton; Steve Tardif; Senga K Oxenham

    2011-01-01

    Sperm dysfunction is the single most common cause of infertility,yet what is remarkable is that,there is no drug a man can take or add to his spermatozoa in vitroto improve fertility.One reason for the lack of progress in this area is that our understanding of the cellular and molecular workings of the mature spermatazoon is limited.However,over the last few years there has been considerable progress in our knowledge base and in addressing new methods to diagnose sperm dysfunction.We review the current state of the field and provide insights for further development.We conclude that:(i) there is little to be gained from more studies identifying/categorizing various populations of men using a basic semen assessment,where an effort is required in making sure the analysis is performed in an appropriate high quality way;(ii) technological development is likely to bring the reality of sperm function testing closer to implementation into the clinical pathways.In doing this,these assays must be robust,cheap (or more appropriately termed cost effective),easy to use and clinically useful;and (iii) clinical necessity,e.g.,the need to identify the highest quality spermatozoon for injection is driving basic research forward.This is an exciting time to be an andrologist and,likely,a fruitful one.

  5. By Hook or by Crook? Morphometry, Competition and Cooperation in Rodent Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Immler; Harry D M Moore; Breed, William G.; Tim R Birkhead

    2007-01-01

    Background Sperm design varies enormously across species and sperm competition is thought to be a major factor influencing this variation. However, the functional significance of many sperm traits is still poorly understood. The sperm of most murid rodents are characterised by an apical hook of the sperm head that varies markedly in extent across species. In the European woodmouse Apodemus sylvaticus (Muridae), the highly reflected apical hook of sperm is used to form sperm groups, or “tr...

  6. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. van den Berg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI Stations is limited.

  7. Prudent sperm use by leaf-cutter ant queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Baer, Boris; Dreier, Stéphanie Agnès Jeanine;

    2009-01-01

    In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps), reprodu......In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps......), reproduction is usually monopolized by one or relatively few queens, who mate only during a brief period early in life and store sperm for later use. The queens of some ants are particularly long-lived and have the potential to produce millions of offspring during their life. To do so, queens store many sperm...... cells, and this sperm must remain viable throughout the years of storage. Queens should also be under strong selection to use stored sperm prudently when fertilizing eggs. We used the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica to investigate the dynamics of sperm use during egg fertilization. We show that queens...

  8. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa. PMID:27085371

  9. Comparative study on efficacy of three sperm-separation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanXU; Ren-KangLU; LingCHEN; Yan-LuanZHENG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of real-time sperm separation technique (Wang's tube method) and other two conventional methods in isolating high-quality sperm preparation, and to compare the spouse pregnancy rate in intrauterine insemination (IUI) with sperm preparations isolated by these methods. Methods: The effectiveness of the real-time sperm separation technique, the conventional swim-up and the Percoll discontinuous density gradient methods in isolating sperm preparations from 60 infertile patients (20 with apparently normal semen and 40, abnormal semen contaminated with microorganisms and other impurities) was evaluated and compared. The microorganisms to bere moved included bacteria, virus, Chlamydia trachomaticum, Ureaplsama urealyticum, etc. The spouse pregnancy rates in IUI with sperm preparations isolated by these three techniques from 80 oligoasthenoteratospermic patients werealso compared. Results: The quality (including the percentages of normal form, normal-chromatin and motilesperm, and the grade of motility) of sperm obtained by the real-time sperm separation technique was much higher ( P<0.01 ) as compared with those by the other two methods. The Wang's tube method was also more effective in removing microorganisms and other impurities. The method provided a higher IUI pregnancy rate than the other two sperm separation techniques ( P < 0.05). Conclusion: The real-time sperm separation technique is the most effective method so far available in isolating high-quality sperm samples to be used in assisted reproduction.

  10. Life after Death. Sperm, Property, and Hope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte; Willum Adrian, Stine

    A tragic workplace accident led in 2010 to the death of Mark Edwards. Subsequently, his wife Joycelyn Edwards requested for the New South Wales Superior Court´s permission to extract sperm posthumous from her husband. She got the permission and one year later, the Court decided to grant her acces...

  11. Expression and Purification of Sperm Whale Myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen; Indivero, Virginia; Burkhard, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiweek laboratory exercise that exposes students to the fundamental techniques of bacterial expression and protein purification through the preparation of sperm whale myoglobin. Myoglobin, a robust oxygen-binding protein, contains a single heme that gives the protein a reddish color, making it an ideal subject for the teaching…

  12. Exposures that may affect sperm DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsen, L B; Spano, M; Bonde, J P;

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal lifestyle exposures are linked to alterations in conventional semen characteristics. Sperm DNA integrity is another marker of semen quality shown to be altered in mice prenatally exposed to chemicals. From a Danish pregnancy cohort established in 1984-1987, sons were selected for a follo...

  13. Cryopreservation of mutton snapper ( Lutjanus analis sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO G. SANCHES

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a protocol of semen cryopreservation of the mutton snapper Lutjanus analis. The interaction between three extenders ( pH 6.1; 7.8 and 8.2 , two concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide ( DMSO, 5 and 10% and three cooling rates ( -90; -60 and -30°C.min−1 on the sperm motility rate and motility time were analyzed by a factorial experiment. A sample of 30 fishes ( 1,261 ± 449 g collected in the nature was kept in floating net cages. The semen was frozen by using cryogenic straws, in nitrogen vapour and transferred, later, to liquid nitrogen. Fertilization test was accomplished to evaluate the viability of the cryopreserved sperm. The highest sperm motility rate and motility time ( P < 0.05 was achieved by combining extender C ( pH 8.2 with DMSO ( 10% and cooling rate of -60°C.min−1 ( P < 0.05 . The use of cryopreserved sperm presented fertilization rates higher than 59% validating the present protocol for mutton snapper.

  14. Effect of astaxanthin on human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Gabriella; Kožuh, Ivana; Brunati, Anna Maria; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-06-01

    In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR). Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC). Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam) and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC). Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells. PMID:23736766

  15. Effect of Astaxanthin on Human Sperm Capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bordin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR. Astaxanthin (Asta, a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC. Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC. Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells.

  16. Sperm retrieval techniques for assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Different surgical methods such as PESA, MESA, TESA, TESE and micro-TESE have been developed to retrieve spermatozoa from either the epididymis or the testis according to the type of azoospermia, i.e., obstructive or non-obstructive. Laboratory techniques are used to remove contaminants, cellular debris, and red blood cells following collection of the epididymal fluid or testicular tissue. Surgically-retrieved spermatozoa may be used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and/or cryopreservation. In this article, we review the surgical procedures for retrieving spermatozoa from both the epididymis and the testicle and provide technical details of the commonly used methods. A critical analysis of the advantages and limitations of the current surgical methods to retrieve sperm from males with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia is presented along with an overview of the laboratory techniques routinely used to process surgically-retrieved sperm. Lastly, we summarize the results from the current literature of sperm retrieval, as well as the clinical outcome of ICSI in the clinical scenario of obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia.

  17. Could sperm aneuploidy rate determination be used as a predictive test before intracytoplasmic sperm injection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, François M; Frydman, Nelly; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Le Du, Anne; Aboura, Azzedine; Fanchin, Renato; Frydman, Rene; Tachdjian, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in embryos are a major cause of implantation and development failures. Some couples with normal karyotypes have repeated implantation failures after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In order to value patients at risk for genetic ICSI failures and the validity of sperm aneuploidy analysis, we have studied cytogenetic abnormalities in sperm from ICSI patients. Twenty-nine patients with normal karyotypes were included. Ten patients had at least 4 ICSI treatments without pregnancy (group A). Nine patients had a pregnancy after 1 to 3 ICSI treatments (group B). Ten fertile men with normal semen parameters were studied as controls (group C). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for sperm nucleus cytogenetic analysis using chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 18, 21, X, and Y specific probes. Aneuploidy for each chromosome and diploidy rates were significantly higher in group A than in group B and in group B than in group C (P < .05). Considering each patient in groups A and B, aneuploidy rate for each chromosome was too variable to be considered as a significant test. We proposed analysis of the total sperm aneuploidy. Chromosomal sperm nuclei profile could be used as a predictive biological test before ICSI in order to improve genetic counseling for oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients.

  18. Ram seminal plasma proteins contribute to sperm capacitation and modulate sperm-zona pellucida interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, C; Colás, C; Casao, A; Serrano, E; Domingo, J; Pérez-Pé, R; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Muiño-Blanco, T

    2015-03-01

    Incubation of ram spermatozoa in capacitating conditions with cAMP-elevating agents promotes a progressive time-dependent increase in the capacitated sperm subpopulation. In this study, the fertilizing capacity of ram spermatozoa (ability to bind to the zona pellucida, ZBA rate) capacitated in these conditions was determined. The results showed an increase (P ram spermatozoa. Likewise, the presence of two seminal plasma (SP) proteins able to protect sperm against cold shock (RSVP14 and RSVP20) was evidenced in both SP and the ram sperm surface, and their influence in the fertilizing ability of spermatozoa capacitated in basal medium or with cAMP-elevating agents was determined. The results verified that RSVP14 and RSVP20 act as decapacitating factors given that their addition to SP-free sperm samples previously to capacitation maintained high proportions of the noncapacitated sperm pattern with no increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the obtained ZBA rate in the high-cAMP-containing samples was increased in the presence of RSVP20 (P < 0.05). These findings would indicate that the stimulating effect exerted by this protein on the sperm-oocyte binding occurs downstream from the cAMP generation and that the mechanisms by which RSVP20 promotes the zona pellucida binding might be independent of protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  19. Pseudoephedrine induces sperm abnormalities, lower sperm counts and increased apoptosis in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa; Thanoi, Samur

    2012-08-01

    Pseudoephedrine, an over-the-counter drug, is commonly used for the treatments of asthma, nasal congestion, and obesity. Furthermore, it can be used as a psychostimulant drug if taken in large doses; however, there have been no reports on its effects on reproduction. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of pseudoephedrine administration on sperm morphology, sperm concentration and apoptotic activity in the rat testis. Rats were administered intraperitoneally (IP) with pseudoephedrine at 120 mg/kg for the acute group and 80 mg/kg, IP, once daily for 15 days for the chronic group, while a control group was treated with vehicle. The percentages of normal sperm morphology were significantly decreased in both acute and chronic groups when compared with controls while the total sperm count was significantly decreased in the acute group. Apoptotic activities were increased significantly in both pseudoephedrine-treated groups. The results indicate that pseudoephedrine can induce sperm abnormalities, decrease sperm numbers and increase apoptotic activity in the testis of rats if taken at high doses. The results of this study suggest that the users of pseudoephedrine in medical treatments need to be aware of its potential toxicity involving spermatogenesis.

  20. Audit Maturity Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya Uttam; Rahut Amit Kumar; De, Sujoy

    2014-01-01

    Today it is crucial for organizations to pay even greater attention on quality management as the importance of this function in achieving ultimate business objectives is increasingly becoming clearer. Importance of the Quality Management Function in achieving basic need by ensuring compliance with Capability Maturity Model Integrated or International Organization for Standardization is a basic demand from business nowadays. However, Quality Management Function and its processes need to be mad...

  1. Mechanisms of lipase maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Doolittle, Mark H.; Péterfy, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    Lipases are acyl hydrolases that represent a diverse group of enzymes present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. This article focuses on an evolutionarily related family of extracellular lipases that include lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase and endothelial lipase. As newly synthesized proteins, these lipases undergo a series of co- and post-translational maturation steps occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum, including glycosylation and glycan processing, and protein folding ...

  2. Sperm processing for advanced reproductive technologies: Where are we today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Kari L; Rodriguez, Harold F; Hakkarainen, Gloria C; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Asghar, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) utilize sperm sorting methods to select viable sperm from the semen samples. Conventional sperm sorting techniques in current use are density gradient centrifugation, direct swim-up, and conventional swim-up. These methods use multiple centrifugation steps, which have been shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that decrease DNA integrity and damage sperm. Newer technologies, such as microfluidics, electrophoresis, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), and birefringence eliminate the centrifugation steps and can improve the selection of sperm with higher DNA integrity, normal morphology, and motility as well as improved artificial insemination outcomes. In this review, we discuss some recent research in centrifugation and non-centrifugation based techniques and their effect on sperm quality and ART outcomes. PMID:26845061

  3. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  4. On the relative effect of spawning asynchrony, sperm quantity, and sperm quality on paternity under sperm competition in an external fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Egeland, Torvald B.; Rudolfsen, Geir; Nordeide, Jarle T.; Folstad, Ivar

    2015-01-01

    How much of a fitness benefit is obtained by dominant males of external fertilizers from releasing ejaculates in synchrony with female egg-release when engaging in sperm competition, and what is the most important sperm trait for paternity in these situations? The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is an external fertilizer experiencing intense male-male competition over reproductive opportunities including sperm competition. To compensate for their disadvantage the sneaker male...

  5. On the relative effect of spawning asynchrony, sperm quantity and sperm quality on paternity under sperm competition in an external fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Torvald Blikra Egeland; Geir eRudolfsen; Jarle Tryti Nordeide; Ivar eFolstad

    2015-01-01

    How much of a fitness benefit is obtained by dominant males of external fertilizers from releasing ejaculates in synchrony with female egg-release when engaging in sperm competition, and what is the most important sperm trait for paternity in these situations? The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is an external fertilizer experiencing intense male-male competition over reproductive opportunities including sperm competition. To compensate for their disadvantage the sneaker males, which often ...

  6. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mariana Andrade; Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell'Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant'Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor; de Andrade, André Furugen Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  7. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  8. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Fertilization Rate Does Not-Depend on the Proportion of Round-headed Sperm, Small acrosomal Sperm, or Morphologically Normal Sperm in Patients with Partial Globozoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Ying Jiang; Ling-Yun Yang; Xiao-Mei Tong; Hai-Yan Zhu; Ya-Mei Xue; Wen-Zhi Xu; Yang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Generally,intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be the preferable method to treat partial globozoospermia,but whether there exist some correlations between ICSI fertilization rate and the proportion of round-headed sperm or morphologically normal sperm remains open.This study was to explore the correlation between ICSI fertilization rate and the sperm morphology in patients with partial globozoospermia.Methods:Thirty-four patients diagnosed with partial globozoospermia accepted the following assisted fertilization treatments-2 cases accepted in-vitro fertilization (IvF) alone,26 cases accepted ICSI alone,and 6 accepted split IVF/ICSI.Detailed morphological characteristics were described using Diff-Quik rapid staining.Sixty cases accepting IVF or ICSI treatment in our reproductive center were considered as the control group after being matched by relevant criteria.Fertilization rate,embryo quality,embryo implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate were calculated.Results:Besides very high proportion of round-headed sperm,partial globozoospermia also showed very high proportion of small-acrosomal sperm and very low proportion of morphologically normal sperm.Fertilization rate of IVF (IVF alone plus split IVF) was very low in partial globozoospermia (25.4% ± 17.4%),but ICSI (ICSI alone plus split ICSI) achieved satisfying fertilization rate compared with the control group (66.2% ± 22.5% vs.68.8% ± 29.4%,P > 0.05).In patients with partial globozoospermia,there were no correlations between ICSI fertilization rate and the proportion of round-headed sperm,small-acrosomal sperm,or morphologically normal sperm.Conclusions:There was high proportion of small-acrosomal sperm in partial globozoospermia.For patients with partial globozoospermia,ICSI is more preferable than IVF.ICSI fertilization rate does not depend on the proportion of round-headed sperm,small-acrosomal sperm,or morphologically normal sperm.

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of sperm chromatin structure and DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenhof, H; Schütze, S; Wolkers, W F; Sieme, H

    2016-05-01

    Sperm chromatin structure and condensation determine accessibility for damage, and hence success of fertilization and development. The aim of this study was to reveal characteristic spectral features coinciding with abnormal sperm chromatin packing (i.e., DNA-protein interactions) and decreased fertility, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chromatin structure in spermatozoa obtained from different stallions was investigated. Furthermore, spermatozoa were exposed to oxidative stress, or treated with thiol-oxidizing and disulfide-reducing agents, to alter chromatin structure and packing. Spectroscopic studies were corroborated with flow cytometric analyses using the DNA-intercalating fluorescent dye acridine orange. Decreased fertility of individuals correlated with increased abnormal sperm morphology and decreased stability toward induced DNA damage. Treatment with the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol resulted in increased sperm chromatin decondensation and DNA accessibility, similar as found for less mature epididymal spermatozoa. In situ infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that characteristic bands arising from the DNA backbone (ν1230, ν1086, ν1051 cm(-1) ) changed in response to induced oxidative damage, water removal, and decondensation. This coincided with changes in the amide-I region (intensity at ν1620 vs. ν1640 cm(-1) ) denoting concomitant changes in protein secondary structure. Reduction in protein disulfide bonds resulted in a decreased value of the asymmetric to symmetric phosphate band intensity (ν1230/ν1086 cm(-1) ), suggesting that this band ratio is sensitive for the degree of chromatin condensation. Moreover, when analyzing spermatozoa from different individuals, it was found that the asymmetric/symmetric phosphate band ratio negatively correlated with the percentage of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa. PMID:26916383

  10. Maturity effects in energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos (Calgary Univ., AB (CA). Dept. of Economics)

    1992-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of maturity on future price volatility and trading volume for 129 energy futures contracts recently traded in the NYMEX. The results provide support for the maturity effect hypothesis, that is, energy futures prices to become more volatile and trading volume increases as futures contracts approach maturity. (author).

  11. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  12. Effect of various concentrations of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene on freezing capacity of Turkman stallion sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi-Jamadi, Afshin; Kohram, Hamid; Zareh-Shahne, Ahmad; Dehghanizadeh, Parvaneh; Ahmad, Ejaz

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of different concentrations of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on post-thaw stallion sperm quality. The ejaculates collected from four healthy mature Turkmen stallions were pooled and divided into eight aliquots. The samples were diluted with extenders containing different concentrations (0.5, 1 or 2mM/mL) of BHA or BHT. The positive control (PC) samples were diluted with extender containing 0.5% ethanol (v/v) whereas; the negative control (NC) samples were diluted with basic extender only. Semen samples were frozen according to a standard protocol. After thawing of samples, sperm motility, viability, membrane integrity, total abnormality and lipid peroxidation were assessed. The greatest (P<0.05) values for total sperm motility, viability and plasma membrane functionality and least values for malonedialdehyde (MDA) concentration were observed in samples supplemented either with 1mM BHT or 2mM BHA. However, the progressive motility was greater (P<0.05) only in samples treated with 2mM BHA. In conclusion, the use of 1mM BHT or 2mM BHA in extender improves the freezing capacity of stallion sperm by reducing oxidative stress during freeze-thaw process. PMID:27112036

  13. Fertilization rate and its determinants in intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Shireen; Rehman, Rehana; Ali, Mohammad Ashfaq; Abdullah, Umme Hani; Gul, Hina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of fertilization rate in patients of unexplained infertility after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Methods: Retrospective analysis of females (282) enrolled in quasi experimental design for ICSI at “Islamabad Clinic Serving Infertile Couples” was carried out from July 2013 till June 2014. Females with unexplained infertility were included, whereas well defined male and female causes of infertility were excluded. Fertilization rate (FR) was calculated as percentage transformation of micro injected oocytes into two pronuclei. Categorical variable of FR defined on the basis of 50% FR grouped females; Group I with FR ≤50% and Group II with FR >50%. The groups were compared in terms of demographic variables, base line hormones and oocyte parameters. Univariate logistic regression was executed to obtain odds ratio with 95% confidence interval to quantify the association of predictors like age, duration of infertility, oocytes parameters, hormones; Estradiol, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, prolactin and cytokines interleukin-Iβ (IL-Iβ) with the FR. Results: In our study out of 282 females, 19 (6.73%) were in group I and 263 (93.26%) comprised of Group II. Females with high FR(group II) had low Progesterone and FSH (p=0.04, p=0.02) respectively. Mature oocytes (OR: 0.35; 95% CI 1 – 2.56) and IL-Iβ in follicular phase (OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.000- 1.20) were significant positive predictors of FR while peak progesterone and FSH had significant negative effect on it Conclusion: Fertilization of oocytes in females of unexplained infertility depended on maturity of oocytes and optimal amounts of ILI- β released by developing follicles in the follicular phase of stimulation cycles of ICSI. PMID:27022334

  14. Different sperm sources and parameters can influence intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes before embryo implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-hong LU; Hui-juan GAO; Bai-jia LI; Ying-ming ZHENG; Ying-hui YE; Yu-li QIAN; Chen-ming XU; He-feng HUANG; Fan JIN

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of sperm with different parameters and sources on the outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI),1972 ICSI cycles were analyzed retrospectively.Groups 1 to 5 were composed of cycles using ejaculated sperm and were grouped according to sperm quantity,quality,and morphology into normal (288 cycles),or mild (329 cycles),moderate (522 cycles),severe (332 cycles),and extremely severe (171 cycles)oligozoospermia and/or asthenozoospermia and/or teratozoospermia (OAT) groups.Group 6 was composed of 250 cycles using testicular or epididymal sperm,and Group 7 consisted of 80 cycles using frozen-thawed sperm.We found that fertilization rates were gradually reduced from Groups 1 to 6,and reached statistical difference in Groups 5 and 6 (P<0.05).The high-quality embryo rate was higher in Group 1 than in Groups 2,3,5,6,and 7 (P<0.05).No statistical differences were observed in the rates of embryo cleavage,clinical pregnancy,miscarriage,live-birth,premature birth,low birth weight,weeks of premature birth,average birth weight,or sex ratio for all seven groups (P>0.05).A total of nine cases of malformation were observed,with a malformation rate of 1.25% (9/719).In conclusion,different sperm sources and parameters can affect ICSI outcomes before embryo implantation.A full assessment of offspring malformation will require further study using a larger sample size.

  15. Seminal plasma proteins interacting with sperm surface revert capacitation indicators in frozen-thawed ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Alba; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Cano, Adriana; Hozbor, Federico; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Cesari, Andreína

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of interacting seminal plasma proteins (iSPP) obtained by AV or EE on frozen-thawed ram sperm in order to test the hypothesis whether this fraction could be sufficient to emulate the effect of complete seminal plasma (SP). Additionally, we evaluated whether these proteins have a differential effect between spermatozoa from high and low fertility rams and between breeding and non-breeding seasons. We assessed sperm motility, quality parameters (intracellular reactive oxygen species, membrane fluidity, plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial activity) and capacitation status. The main findings from this work were: i) iSPP had no effect on sperm motility, whereas SP (AV or EE) addition produced the highest values of total motility (74.13±2.99 and 72.27±2.99 for AV and EE, respectively) and progressive motility (64.97±2.64 and 63.73±2.64 for AV and EE, respectively); ii) iSPP had no effect on sperm quality parameters (p>0.05), but whole SP improved all parameters evaluated. Moreover, SP collected by AV yielded significantly higher viability (44.60±2.87) and sperm with stable plasma membrane (44.56±2.49) comparing with the addition of SP collected by EE (35.80±2.47 and 36.67±1.71, respectively); iii) iSPP and SP collected by EE, but not by AV, reverted molecular signals of capacitation as protein tyrosine phosphorylation caused by freezing temperatures; iv) there were no effects of fertility or season in sperm quality parameters evaluated. This study demonstrated that, although the iSPP have a clear decapacitating effect, including the ability to revert cryo-capacitation indicators, they are not sufficient to emulate the effects of complete SP regarding sperm functional parameters. PMID:27570190

  16. Seminal plasma proteins interacting with sperm surface revert capacitation indicators in frozen-thawed ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Alba; Fernández-Alegre, Estela; Cano, Adriana; Hozbor, Federico; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Cesari, Andreína

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of interacting seminal plasma proteins (iSPP) obtained by AV or EE on frozen-thawed ram sperm in order to test the hypothesis whether this fraction could be sufficient to emulate the effect of complete seminal plasma (SP). Additionally, we evaluated whether these proteins have a differential effect between spermatozoa from high and low fertility rams and between breeding and non-breeding seasons. We assessed sperm motility, quality parameters (intracellular reactive oxygen species, membrane fluidity, plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial activity) and capacitation status. The main findings from this work were: i) iSPP had no effect on sperm motility, whereas SP (AV or EE) addition produced the highest values of total motility (74.13±2.99 and 72.27±2.99 for AV and EE, respectively) and progressive motility (64.97±2.64 and 63.73±2.64 for AV and EE, respectively); ii) iSPP had no effect on sperm quality parameters (p>0.05), but whole SP improved all parameters evaluated. Moreover, SP collected by AV yielded significantly higher viability (44.60±2.87) and sperm with stable plasma membrane (44.56±2.49) comparing with the addition of SP collected by EE (35.80±2.47 and 36.67±1.71, respectively); iii) iSPP and SP collected by EE, but not by AV, reverted molecular signals of capacitation as protein tyrosine phosphorylation caused by freezing temperatures; iv) there were no effects of fertility or season in sperm quality parameters evaluated. This study demonstrated that, although the iSPP have a clear decapacitating effect, including the ability to revert cryo-capacitation indicators, they are not sufficient to emulate the effects of complete SP regarding sperm functional parameters.

  17. Cellular ontogeny of RBMY during human spermatogenesis and its role in sperm motility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shadaan Abid; Vrushali Sagare-Patil; Jyotsna Gokral; Deepak Modi

    2013-03-01

    The Y-chromosome-encoded gene RBMY (RNA-binding motif on Y) is a male germline RNA-binding protein and is postulated to be a RNA-splicing regulator. In order to understand the roles of RBMY in different stages of male gamete maturation, the present study aimed at determining its cellular expression during spermatogenesis, spermeogenesis and in mature spermatozoa. In the spermatogonia (cKIT-positive cells), RBMY immunolocalized as two distinct foci, one in the nucleolus and the other in the subnuclear region; in the spermatocytes (cKIT-negative cells), the nucleus had punctuate staining with a subnuclear foci; in the pachytene cells, the protein was localized as a punctuate pattern in the nucleus spread along the elongating chromosomes. In the round and the elongating spermatids, the protein expression was polarized and restricted to the cytoplasm and in the developing mid-piece. In testicular and ejaculated sperm, RBMY was localized to the mid-piece region and weakly in the tail. Incubation of spermatozoa with the RBMY antibody reduced its motility. The spatial differences in expression of RBMY in the germ cells and the presences of this protein in post-meiotic cells and in transcriptionally inert spermatozoa suggest its involvement in multiple functions beyond RNA splicing. One such possible function of RBMY could be its involvement in sperm motility.

  18. Fine Structure of the Epididymal Sperm of the Snake Eryx jayakari (Squamata, Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Z. Al-Onazee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastucture of the snake Eryx jayakari (E. jayakari mature sperm has not been published. Therefore, the present study was conducted to elucidate the sperm ultrastructure of this species in comparison with that of other reptilian species. The present investigation has shown that mature spermatozoa of Eryx jayakari are filiform in shape averaging 45 m (mean of 10 in length with a curved head measuring 9 m. The acrosomal complex, which involves the acrosomal cap and subacrosomal material, measures 2.5 m. The nucleus is 6.5 m in length, the neck approximates 1 m and the tail (midpiece, principal piece and endpiece is maximally 35 m in length. The different tail pieces vary in diameter, being the largest at the midpiece (0.66 m, diminished at the principal piece (0.36 m and the least at the endpiece (0.25 m. The midpiece, the longest tail piece, is composed of mitochondrial and fibrous sheaths encircling the microtubular axoneme. The mitochondria are rod-shaped having linear cristae but no dense bodies interrupt their arrangement. The principal tail piece consists of the microtubular axoneme surrounded by the fibrous sheath. The endpiece involves only an axoneme enveloped within the plasmalemma of the spermatozoon. The present findings were discussed in relation to other relevant studies. It was concluded that the general ultrastucture of the E. jayakari spermatozoon conforms to that reported to be typical of squamates.

  19. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and mature spermatozoa in the flatworm Prosthiostomum siphunculus (Polycladida, Cotylea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoudi, Mehrez; Salvenmoser, Willi; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Tekaya, Saïda; Egger, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study investigating spermatogenesis and spermatozoan ultrastructure in the polyclad flatworm Prosthiostomum siphunculus. The testes are numerous and scattered as follicles ventrally between the digestive ramifications. Each follicle contains the different stages of sperm differentiation. Spermatocytes and spermatids derive from a spermatogonium and the spermatids remain connected by intercellular bridges. Chromatoid bodies are present in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia up to spermatids. During early spermiogenesis, a differentiation zone appears in the distal part of spermatids. A ring of microtubules extends along the entire sperm shaft just beneath the cell membrane. An intercentriolar body is present and gives rise to two axonemes, each with a 9 + "1" micro-tubular pattern. Development of the spermatid leads to cell elongation and formation of a filiform, mature spermatozoon with two free flagella and with cortical microtubules along the sperm shaft. The flagella exit the sperm shaft at different levels, a finding common for acotyleans, but so far unique for cotylean polyclads. The Golgi complex produces numerous electron-dense bodies of two types and of different sizes. These bodies are located around a perinuclear row of mitochondria. The elongated nucleus extends almost along the entire sperm body. The nucleus is wide in the proximal part and becomes narrow going towards the distal end. Thread-like chromatin mixed with electron-dense intranuclear spindle-shaped bodies are present throughout nucleus. The general sperm ultrastructure, the presence of intranuclear bodies and a second type of cytoplasmic electron-dense bodies may provide characters useful for phylogenetic analysis. PMID:26534881

  20. Impact of peak/mid luteal estradiol on pregnancy outcome after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare peak to mid estradiol ratio with the probability of successful conception after intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. Method: The quasi-experimental study was conducted in an infertility clinic at Islamabad from June 2010 till August 2011, and comprised couples subjected to intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. Down-regulation of ovaries was followed by calculated stimulation, ovulation induction, oocytes retrieval, intra cytoplasmic sperm injection, in vitro maturation of embryos and finally blastocysts transfer. Serum estradiol was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on ovulation induction day and the day of embryo transfer. Failure of procedure was detected by beta human chorionic gonadotropin 5-25mIU/ml (Group I; non-pregnant). Females with beta human chorionic gonadotropin>25mIU/ml and no cardiac activity after 4 weeks of transfer were placed in Group II (pre-clinical abortion), and confirmation of foetal heart in the latter comprised Group III (clinical pregnancy). Data was analysed using SPSS 15. Results: Of the 323 couples initially enrolled, embryo transfer was carried out in 282(87.3%) females. Clinical pregnancy was achieved in 101(36%) of the cases, while 61(21.63%) had pre-clinical abortion, and 120(42%) remained non-pregnant. The peak/mid-luteal estradiolratio was low (2.3) in patients who had high oocyte maturity (p=0.001) and fertilisation rate (p=0.003) compared to non-pregnant patients with high peak/mid-luteal estradiolratio (2.56). Conclusion: High peak estradiol with maintenance of optimal levels in mid-luteal phase is required for implantation of fertilised ovum and accomplishment of clinical pregnancy. (author)

  1. Dynamics of sperm transfer in the ant Leptothorax gredleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Angelika; Heinze, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Mating tactics differ remarkably between and within species of social Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, ants) concerning, e.g., mating frequencies, sperm competition, and the degree of male sperm limitation. Although social Hymenoptera might, therefore, potentially be ideal model systems for testing sexual selection theory, the dynamics of mating and sperm transfer have rarely been studied in species other than social bees, and basic information needed to draw conclusions about possible sperm competition and female choice is lacking. We investigated sperm transfer in the ant Leptothorax gredleri, a species in which female sexuals attract males by “female calling.” The analysis of 38 female sexuals fixed immediately or up to 7 days after copulation with a single male each revealed that the sperm is transferred into the female bursa copulatrix embedded in a gelatinous mass, presumably a spermatophore. Sperm cells rapidly start to migrate from the tip of the spermatophore towards the spermatheca, but transfer is drastically slowed down by an extreme constriction of the spermathecal duct, through which sperm cells have to pass virtually one by one. This results in the spermatheca being filled only between one and several hours after mating. During this time, the posterior part of the spermatophore seals the junction between bursa copulatrix and spermathecal duct and prevents sperm loss. The prolonged duration of sperm transfer might allow female sexuals to chose between ejaculates and explain previously reported patterns of single paternity of the offspring of multiply mated queens.

  2. Polyspermy in birds: sperm numbers and embryo survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, N; Birkhead, T R

    2015-11-01

    Polyspermy is a major puzzle in reproductive biology. In some taxa, multiple sperm enter the ovum as part of the normal fertilization process, whereas in others, penetration of the ovum by more than one sperm is lethal. In birds, several sperm typically enter the germinal disc, yet only one fuses with the female pronucleus. It is unclear whether supernumerary sperm play an essential role in the avian fertilization process and, if they do, how females regulate the progression of sperm through the oviduct to ensure an appropriate number reach the ovum. Here, we show that when very few sperm penetrate the avian ovum, embryos are unlikely to survive beyond the earliest stages of development. We also show that when the number of inseminated sperm is limited, a greater proportion than expected reach and penetrate the ovum, indicating that females compensate for low sperm numbers in the oviduct. Our results suggest a functional role for supernumerary sperm in the processes of fertilization and early embryogenesis, providing an exciting expansion of our understanding of sperm function in birds. PMID:26511048

  3. Mature Cystic Renal Teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, Alpaslan; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Bahar AKKAYA

    2014-01-01

    Teratomas are rare germline tumors that originate from one or more embryonic germ cell layers. Teratoma of the kidney is extremely rare, and less than 30 cases of primary intrarenal teratomas have been published to date. We report the main radiologic features of an unusual case of mature cystic teratoma arising from the left kidney in a two-year-old boy. A left-sided abdominal mass was detected on physical examination and B-Mod Ultrasound (US) examination revealed a heterogeneous mass with ce...

  4. Factors affecting sperm quality before and after mating of calopterygid damselflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available Damselflies (Odonata: Zygoptera have a more complex sperm transfer system than other internally ejaculating insects. Males translocate sperm from the internal reproductive organs to the specific sperm vesicles, a small cavity on the body surface, and then transfer them into the female. To examine how the additional steps of sperm transfer contribute to decreases in sperm quality, we assessed sperm viability (the proportion of live sperm at each stage of mating and after different storage times in male and female reproductive organs in two damselfly species, Mnais pruinosa and Calopteryx cornelia. Viability of stored sperm in females was lower than that of male stores even just after copulation. Male sperm vesicles were not equipped to maintain sperm quality for longer periods than the internal reproductive organs. However, the sperm vesicles were only used for short-term storage; therefore, this process appeared unlikely to reduce sperm viability when transferred to the female. Males remove rival sperm prior to transfer of their own ejaculate using a peculiar-shaped aedeagus, but sperm removal by males is not always complete. Thus, dilution occurs between newly received sperm and aged sperm already stored in the female, causing lower viability of sperm inside the female than that of sperm transferred by males. If females do not remate, sperm viability gradually decreases with the duration of storage. Frequent mating of females may therefore contribute to the maintenance of high sperm quality.

  5. Sperm use economy of honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Boris; Collins, Jason; Maalaps, Kristiina; den Boer, Susanne P A

    2016-05-01

    The queens of eusocial ants, bees, and wasps only mate during a very brief period early in life to acquire and store a lifetime supply of sperm. As sperm cannot be replenished, queens have to be highly economic when using stored sperm to fertilize eggs, especially in species with large and long-lived colonies. However, queen fertility has not been studied in detail, so that we have little understanding of how economic sperm use is in different species, and whether queens are able to influence their sperm use. This is surprising given that sperm use is a key factor of eusocial life, as it determines the fecundity and longevity of queens and therefore colony fitness. We quantified the number of sperm that honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens use to fertilize eggs. We examined sperm use in naturally mated queens of different ages and in queens artificially inseminated with different volumes of semen. We found that queens are remarkably efficient and only use a median of 2 sperm per egg fertilization, with decreasing sperm use in older queens. The number of sperm in storage was always a significant predictor for the number of sperm used per fertilization, indicating that queens use a constant ratio of spermathecal fluid relative to total spermathecal volume of 2.364 × 10(-6) to fertilize eggs. This allowed us to calculate a lifetime fecundity for honeybee queens of around 1,500,000 fertilized eggs. Our data provide the first empirical evidence that honeybee queens do not manipulate sperm use, and fertilization failures in worker-destined eggs are therefore honest signals that workers can use to time queen replacement, which is crucial for colony performance and fitness. PMID:27217944

  6. Effects of hepatitis B virus infection on human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Huang; Tian-Hua Huang; Huan-Ying Qiu; Xiao-Wu Fang; Tian-Gang Zhuang; Hong-Xi Liu; Yong-Hua Wang; Li-Zhi Deng; Jie-Wen Qiu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the level of sperm chromosome aberrations in male patients with hepatitis B, and to directly detect whether there are HBV DNA integrations in sperm chromosomes of hepatitis B patients.METHODS: Sperm chromosomes of 14 tested subjects (5healthy controls, 9 patients with HBV infection, including 1with acute hepatitis B, 2 with chronic active hepatitis B, 4with chronic persistent hepatitis B, 2 chronic HBsAg carriers with no clinical symptoms) were prepared using interspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free golden hamster ova and human spermatozoa, and the frequencies of aberration spermatozoa were compared between subjects of HBV infection and controls. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBV DNA probe to detect the specific HBV DNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.RESULTS: The total frequency of sperm chromosome aberrations in HBV infection group (14.8%, 33/223) was significantly higher than that in the control group (4.3%,5/116). Moreover, the sperm chromosomes in HBV infection patients commonly presented stickiness, clumping, failure to staining, etc, which would affect the analysis of sperm chromosomes. Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBV DNA were seen in sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitis. In 9 (9/42) sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots, one presented 5 obvious FISH spots, others presented 2 to 4signals. There was significant difference of fluorescence intensity among the signal spots. The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes was random.CONCLUSION: HBV infection can bring about mutagenic effects on sperm chromosomes. Integrations of viral DNA into sperm chromosomes which are multisites and nonspecific, can further increase the instability of sperm chromosomes. This study suggested that HBV infection can create extensively hereditary effects by alteration genetic constituent and

  7. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    Full Text Available As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR, hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+/K(+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+/K(+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  8. Insulin and leptin enhance human sperm motility, acrosome reaction and nitric oxide production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fanuel Lampiao; Stefan S. du Plessis

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro effects of insulin and leptin on human sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and nitric oxide (NO) production. Methods: Washed human spermatozoa from normozoospermic donors were treated with insulin (10 μIU) and leptin (10 nmol). Insulin and leptin effects were blocked by inhibition of their intracellular effector, phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), by wortmannin (10 μmol) 30 min prior to insulin and leptin being given. Computer-assisted semen analysis was used to assess motility after 1, 2 and 3 h of incubation. Viability was assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using propidium iodide as a fluorescent probe. Acrosome-reacted cells were observed under a fluorescent microscope using fluorescein-isothiocyanate-Pisum sativum agglutinin as a probe. NO was measured after treating the sperm with 4,5-diaminofluorescein-2/diacetate (DAF-2/DA) and analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results: Insulin and leptin significantly increased total motility, progressive motility and acrosome reaction, as well as NO production. Conclusion: This study showed the in vitro beneficial effects of insulin and leptin on human sperm function. These hormones could play a role in enhancing the fertilization capacity of human spermatozoa.

  9. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  10. Pretreating porcine sperm with lipase enhances developmental competence of embryos produced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yinghui; Fan, Junhua; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhiguo; Li, Kui

    2016-08-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been widely applied in humans, mice, and some domestic animals to cure human infertility, or produce genetically superior or genetically engineered animals. However, the production efficiency of ICSI in pigs remains quite low. In this study, we developed a new sperm pretreatment method to improve production efficiency of ICSI in pigs. Experiment 1 revealed that pretreating porcine sperm with 2.5 mg/ml lipase before ICSI operation, not only can reduce the adhesion between sperm and the injection pipette without adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the operating medium, but also significantly improve male pronuclei (MPN) formation rate (55.56% vs. 40.00% (0 mg/ml), 42.59% (5.0 mg/ml), 40.00% (10.0 mg/ml), P competence of ICSI embryos (26.03% vs. 10.87% (0 mg/ml), 10.00% (5.0 mg/ml), 10.13% (10.0 mg/ml), P formation rate (50.47% vs. 30.78%, P < 0.05) and blastocyst rate (18.81% vs. 7.41%, P < 0.05) than the PVP method, and was better than the Triton X-100 treatment method (50.47% vs. 46.23%, 18.81% vs. 12.75%). Therefore, pretreating porcine sperm with 2.5 mg/ml lipase before ICSI operation is highly recommended, instead of adding PVP in the operating medium. PMID:26443110

  11. Oligospermia due to partial maturation arrest responds to low dose estrogen—testosterone combination therapy resulting in live—birth:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SahP

    2002-01-01

    A man having severe oligospermia,due to partial maturation arrest at spermatid stage,was given low dose estrogen-testosterone conbination therapy for three months.His sperm count increased enormously,following which his wife conceived and delivered a healthy baby at term.

  12. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  13. Sperm storage induces an immunity cost in ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Armitage, Sophie A O; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    what selective forces determine the upper limit to sperm storage. Here we show that sperm storage carries a significant cost of reduced immunity during colony founding. Newly mated queens of the leaf-cutting ant Atta colombica upregulate their immune response shortly after completing their nest burrow......Ant queens are among the most long-lived insects known. They mate early in adult life and maintain millions of viable sperm in their sperm storage organ until they die many years later. Because they never re-mate, the reproductive success of queens is ultimately sperm-limited, but it is not known......-term reproductive success. The immune response was lower when more males contributed to the stored sperm, indicating that there might be an additional cost of mating or storing genetically different ejaculates....

  14. Magnetic propulsion of robotic sperms at low-Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Fatih Tabak, Ahmet; Klingner, Anke; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the microswimming behaviour of robotic sperms in viscous fluids. These robotic sperms are fabricated from polystyrene dissolved in dimethyl formamide and iron-oxide nanoparticles. This composition allows the nanoparticles to be concentrated within the bead of the robotic sperm and provide magnetic dipole, whereas the flexibility of the ultra-thin tail enables flagellated locomotion using magnetic fields in millitesla range. We show that these robotic sperms have similar morphology and swimming behaviour to those of sperm cells. Moreover, we show experimentally that our robotic sperms swim controllably at an average speed of approximately one body length per second (around 125 μm s-1), and they are relatively faster than the microswimmers that depend on planar wave propulsion in low-Reynolds number fluids.

  15. Microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration: indications,techniques and outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M Bernie; Ranjith Ramasamy; Doron S Stember; Peter J Stahl

    2013-01-01

    Microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration (MESA) refers to retrieval of sperm-containing fluid from optimal areas of the epididymis that are selected and sampled using high-power optical magnification provided by an operating microscope.Retrieved sperm are subsequently used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to induce fertilization and pregnancy.MESA is considered by many experts to be the gold standard technique for sperm retrieval in men with obstructive azoospermia given its high yield of quality sperm,excellent reported fertilization and pregnancy rates,and low risk of complications.However,MESA must be performed in an operating room,requires microsurgical skills and is only useful for reproduction using ICSI.Herein we present an overview of the evaluation of candidate patients for MESA,the technical performance of the procedure and the outcomes that have been reported.

  16. Effect of short abstinence time on sperm motility parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, Hiva; Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Van Der Horst, Gerhard;

    2015-01-01

    differences in the details of the sperm movement (kinematics) of human sperm provided by computerized sperm analysis systems. This study was designed to assess the effect of two different media pH levels on kinematic parameters of the human sperm. Samples were prepared using the 40%/80% Pureception (Sage, USA...... of this study illustrated a general insignificant decrease in the ratio of progressively motile and hyperactive sperm after 6 and 24 hours. However a significant difference between the test groups was observed in the curvilinear, straight line and Mean path velocity and Straightness after 6 and 24 hours....... Linearity and Wobble showed significant difference after 24 hours. This study demonstrated a difference in the sperm motion pattern and velocity in different environmental pH levels. Based on these findings, further investigations are required to elucidate knowledge about possible effect of marginal p...

  17. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  18. Some Reflections on Intracytoplasmic Morphologically Selected Sperm Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ebner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI allows proper fertilization in most cases of male sub fertility, it is one of the most unphysiological techniques in assisted reproductive technologies (ART. Thus, over the last decade, researchers have tried to improve sperm observation with higher-resolution microscopy techniques such as the intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI technique. In order to identify literatures for this review, the PubMed database was searched from 2000 onwards using the terms IMSI, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME and sperm vacuole. Approximately 10 years after the introduction of the MSOME and IMSI procedures, several questions related to the prevalence, origin, location, and clinical consequences of sperm vacuoles have not yet been clarified. It seems that IMSI as a routine application is not state of the art and the only confirmed indications for IMSI are recurrent implantation failure following ICSI and severe male factor.

  19. Inverse turbulent cascade in swarming sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa; Plouraboue, Franck; Inra, Cnrs, Umr, F-37380 Nouzilly, France Team; Université de Toulouse, Inpt, Ups, Imft, Umr 5502, France Team

    2014-11-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small scale turbulence arising where viscosity effects are dominant. We report the first observation of an universal inverse enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of velocity field power-spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in two-dimensional turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures the size of which provides turbulence's integral scale. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-two-dimensional turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interaction and alignment, a state of active matter that we call ``swarming liquid crystal.'' We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation. The implication of multi-scale collective dynamics of sperm's collective motility for fertility assessment is discussed. This work has been supported by the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (ANR) in the frame of the Contract MOTIMO (ANR-11-MONU-009-01). We thank Pierre Degond, Eric Climent, Laurent Lacaze and Frédéric Moulin for interesting discussions.

  20. Surgical recovery of sperm in non-obstructive azoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Tomomoto

    2011-01-01

    The development of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) opened a new era in the field of assisted reproduction and revolutionized the assisted reproductive technology protocols for couples with male factor infertility. Fertilisation and pregnancies can be achieved with spermatozoa recovered not only from the ejaculate but also from the seminiferous tubules. The most common methods for retrieving testicular sperm in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) are testicular sperm aspiration (TESA: ne...

  1. Human Sperm Chromosome Analysis—Study on Human Sperm Chromosome Mutagenesis Induced by Carbon Disulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEJUN-YI; FUXIAO-MIN

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect CS2 of on human sperm chromosomal aberration.The human sperm/hamster egg fusion techniquse was used to analyze 203 human sperm chromosome complement form 9 healthy volunteers.The incidence of numerical aberration was 1.0%,and that of structural chromosome aberration was 5.9% and total abnormalities was 6.9%.Structural aberrations consisted of breaks,deletions, centric rings,fragments,and chromatid exchange.The results from high concentration group(10μmol·L-1 CS2)showed that the incidence of chromosomal aberration rate was significantly higher than that of the control group.The results indicate that high concentration of CS2 might directly cause mutatenesis f the germ cell.

  2. A sterile sperm caste protects brother fertile sperm from female-mediated death in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Snook, Rhonda R

    2008-01-01

    antispermicidal mechanisms have been definitively identified. One such adaptation may be the enigmatic infertile sperm morphs or "parasperm" produced by many species, which have been hypothesized to protect their fertile brother "eusperm" from spermicide [2, 3]. Here, we show that female Drosophila pseudoobscura...... reproductive tracts are spermicidal and that the survival of eusperm after exposure to the female tract is highest when males produce many parasperm. This study clarifies the adaptive significance of infertile sperm castes, which has remained elusive in Drosophila and other taxa despite much recent interest [2......Spermicide (i.e., female-mediated sperm death) is an understudied but potentially widespread phenomenon that has important ramifications for the study of sexual conflict, postcopulatory sexual selection, and fertility [1, 2]. Males are predicted to evolve adaptations against spermicide, but few...

  3. Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis (CASA) of sperm motility and hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, David; Mortimer, Sharon T

    2013-01-01

    Progressive motility is a vital functional characteristic of ejaculated human spermatozoa that governs their ability to penetrate into, and migrate through, both cervical mucus and the oocyte vestments, and ultimately fertilize the oocyte. A detailed protocol, based on the most common computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) system with phase contrast microscope optics, is provided for performing reliable assessments of sperm movement pattern characteristics ("kinematics") in semen. The protocol can also be used with washed sperm suspensions where, in addition, the percentages of motile and progressively motile spermatozoa can also be derived. Using CASA technology it is also possible to identify biologically, and hence clinically, important subpopulations of spermatozoa (e.g., those in semen with good mucus-penetrating characteristics, or those showing hyperactivation when incubated under capacitating conditions) by applying multi-parametric definitions on a cell-by-cell basis.

  4. Zeta Sperm Selection Improves Pregnancy Rate and Alters Sex Ratio in Male Factor Infertility Patients: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Sekhavati, Mohammad Hadi; Gourabi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Selection of sperm for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is usually considered as the ultimate technique to alleviate male-factor infertility. In routine ICSI, selection is based on morphology and viability which does not necessarily preclude the chance injection of DNA-damaged or apoptotic sperm into the oocyte. Sperm with high negative surface electrical charge, named “Zeta potential”, are mature and more likely to have intact chromatin. In addition, X-bearing spermatozoa carry more negative charge. Therefore, we aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of Zeta procedure with routine sperm selection in infertile men candidate for ICSI. Materials and Methods From a total of 203 ICSI cycles studied, 101 cycles were allocated to density gradient centrifugation (DGC)/Zeta group and the remaining 102 were included in the DGC group in this prospective study. Clinical outcomes were com- pared between the two groups. The ratios of Xand Y bearing sperm were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods in 17 independent semen samples. Results In the present double-blind randomized clinical trial, a significant increase in top quality embryos and pregnancy rate were observed in DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group. Moreover, sex ratio (XY/XX) at birth significantly was lower in the DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group despite similar ratio of X/Y bearings sper- matozoa following Zeta selection. Conclusion Zeta method not only improves the percentage of top embryo quality and pregnancy outcome but also alters the sex ratio compared to the conventional DGC method, despite no significant change in the ratio of Xand Ybearing sperm population (Registration number: IRCT201108047223N1).

  5. Dietary Vitamin E Is More Effective than Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acid for Improving The Kinematic Characteristics of Rat Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, AliReza; Taleb, Zeinab; Ebrahimi, Bita; Esmaeili, Vahid; Shaverdi, Abdolhossein; Nasr, Javad; Kheimeh, Abolfazl; Yazdi, Reza Salman

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although key roles for dietary vitamin E (VITE) and fatty acid (FA) in fertility have been confirmed, limited data are available on the effects of VITE alone, or a constant level of VITE supplemented by dietary omega-6 and omega-3 FAs in combination on male reproduction. Consequently in this paper, the effects of VITE, sunflower oil, fish oil and their combination on rat sperm were investigated. Materials and Methods We divided 50 mature male Wistar rats into 5 groups (n=10) in a experimental completely randomized design for eight weeks: i. Control (CTR): standard diet; ii. Vitamin E diet (VITE): 2 times greater than recommendations; iii. Sunflower oil group (n-6) [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat sunflower oil+VITE diet]; iv. Fish oil group (n-3): [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat fish oil+VITE diet] and v. n-3+n-6 group [gavaged with 0.3 ml fish oil/day/rat+0.2 ml sunflower oil/day/rat+VITE diet]. The sperm parameters were measured by computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). All data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results Feed intake decreased in groups which were administered sunflower oil compared with the other groups (P<0.05). The groups which received only VITE or fish oil+VITE had a significantly higher concentration of sperm compared with the n-6+n-3 and CTR group (P<0.05). VITE and n-3 showed significant improved progressive motility compared to the CTR group, whereas the n-6 and n-6+n-3 groups were in the middle (P<0.05). The highest sperm kinematic parameters were observed in the VITE only group. There was no strong correlation between sperm parameters and blood lipid profiles. Conclusion Dietary VITE and fish oil+VITE can improve sperm quality. Our findings can be a focus for improvements in sperm quantity and motility in fertile animals using only dietary VITE.

  6. On the relative effect of spawning asynchrony, sperm quantity and sperm quality on paternity under sperm competition in an external fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvald Blikra Egeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available How much of a fitness benefit is obtained by dominant males of external fertilizers from releasing ejaculates in synchrony with female egg-release when engaging in sperm competition, and what is the most important sperm trait for paternity in these situations? The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus is an external fertilizer experiencing intense male-male competition over reproductive opportunities including sperm competition. To compensate for their disadvantage the sneaker males, which often spawn out of synchrony with the female, produce more and faster sperm than the guarding males. We used controlled in vitro fertilization trials with experimentally produced dominant and subordinate, sneaker males to test what effect relative synchrony in gamete release, sperm quality (i.e., motility and velocity and sperm quantity have on a male’s fertilization success in pair-wise sperm competitions. When the sneaker males released ejaculates after the guarding male there was no overall difference in fertilization success. The quality (i.e., motility and velocity of a male’s sperm relative to that of the competing male was the best predictor of male fertilization success regardless of their mating tactic and spawning synchrony. The relative number of sperm cells also had an effect on fertilization success, but mainly when the dominant and sneaker male ejaculated synchronously. Our close imitation of natural sperm competition in charr shows that the sneaker males of external fertilizing species may fully compensate for their disadvantaged mating role by producing ejaculates of higher quality - an adjustment strangely not met by dominants.

  7. Sperm density required for inducing gynogenetic haploidy in scallop Chlamys nobilis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.

    Experiments conducted for standardizing sperm density for artificial insemination and inducing gynogenesis by ultra-violet rays irradiated sperms in Chlamys nobilis showed that 10:1 ratio of sperms to eggs, gave maximum rate of fertilization...

  8. Kinetic analysis of decreased sperm fertilizing ability by fluorides and fluoroaluminates: a tool for analyzing the effect of environmental substances on biological events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosakova, Zuzana; Tockstein, Antonin; Adamusova, Hana; Coufal, Pavel; Sebkova, Natasa; Dvorakova-Hortova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Fluorides and fluoroaluminates decrease mouse sperm fertilizing potential by modifying the process of sperm preparation for fertilization, so-called capacitation, followed by acrosome reaction (AR). Capacitation was monitored by protein tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr), and AR was induced consequently. The aim of this study was to apply kinetic analysis to the previously obtained dependences of pTyr and AR at capacitation times, and propose a mathematical theory for a mechanism when sperm maturation ability is amended by external stimuli. The experimental input data, previously obtained, are consistent with the proposed theory and the results of kinetic analysis show that sperm capacitation runs as two subsequent first-order steps. Firstly, an unstable intermediate is formed and then gradually decomposes. The time corresponding to the maximal production of the unstable intermediate is probably most suitable for sperm obtaining the ability to fertilize the egg. The presented calculations indicate that the application of kinetic analysis can serve as a tool to predict or confirm a course of biological events that are modified by external factors, and therefore the proposed theory shall be of interest to a broad scientific audience.

  9. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate......-2. Based on the presented data we suggest that affinity maturation of the model antibody proceeds through multiple incremental steps of subtle improvements. We moreover conclude that the best affinity improved candidates are likely to be obtained through optimization of both the antigen...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  10. Accountings of Selecting Sperm on the (ethical) border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past years, Denmark has become a destination for fertility travellers, in need for donated sperm. Today, treatment is possible no matter of marital status or sexuality. Furthermore, users of sperm donation can choose between anonymous and non-anonymous sperm, with either basic...... will analyze how women and their partners crossing the Danish border accounts for their donor choice, and their practices of choosing. I will be exploring the question: How are women and their partners accounting for choosing a sperm donor, crossing the (ethical) border to Denmark? The use of the term...

  11. Effect of Neem Oil on Sperm Mitochondrial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Patil; Gaikwad RD; Sawane MV; Waghmare VS

    2010-01-01

    It is a known fact that neem oil has some effect on motility of sperm. Motility of sperm depends on mitochondrial activity present in mid-piece of sperm. In the present study, the mitochondrial activity of sperm was evaluated after treating semen with the different quantities of neem oil. The mitochondrial activity was also evaluated after subjecting the semen samples for different incubation periods keeping the quantity of semen as well as that of neem oil same. Tests were done on thirty nor...

  12. MILT DILUTION EFFECTIVENESS ON PIKEPERCH (SANDER LUCIOPERCA SPERM DNA INACTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KORBULY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Percid fishes, including pikeperch (Sander lucioperca have recently become the subject of intense research. In order to obtain gynogenetic all female pikeperch populations, normal pikeperch eggs are fertilized with inactivated sperm. Because pikeperch semen has a high viscosity, milt has to be diluted in an immobilizing solution before DNA inactivation. The aim of this study was to assess milt diluting solutions effectiveness in order to inactivate sperm DNA with UV irradiation, to produce meiotic gynogenetic pikeperch (Sander lucioperca. We assessed sperm motility after dilution in 5 different immobilizing solutions. Best results were obtained using Ringer’s solution as pikeperch sperm diluent.

  13. Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Spyridis, Panagiotis; Mehari Abraha, Hyab; Carrier, David R; Pataky, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Herman Melville's novel Moby Dick was inspired by historical instances in which large sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L.) sank 19th century whaling ships by ramming them with their foreheads. The immense forehead of sperm whales is possibly the largest, and one of the strangest, anatomical structures in the animal kingdom. It contains two large oil-filled compartments, known as the "spermaceti organ" and "junk," that constitute up to one-quarter of body mass and extend one-third of the total length of the whale. Recognized as playing an important role in echolocation, previous studies have also attributed the complex structural configuration of the spermaceti organ and junk to acoustic sexual selection, acoustic prey debilitation, buoyancy control, and aggressive ramming. Of these additional suggested functions, ramming remains the most controversial, and the potential mechanical roles of the structural components of the spermaceti organ and junk in ramming remain untested. Here we explore the aggressive ramming hypothesis using a novel combination of structural engineering principles and probabilistic simulation to determine if the unique structure of the junk significantly reduces stress in the skull during quasi-static impact. Our analyses indicate that the connective tissue partitions in the junk reduce von Mises stresses across the skull and that the load-redistribution functionality of the former is insensitive to moderate variation in tissue material parameters, the thickness of the partitions, and variations in the location and angle of the applied load. Absence of the connective tissue partitions increases skull stresses, particularly in the rostral aspect of the upper jaw, further hinting of the important role the architecture of the junk may play in ramming events. Our study also found that impact loads on the spermaceti organ generate lower skull stresses than an impact on the junk. Nevertheless, whilst an impact on the spermaceti organ would

  14. Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridis, Panagiotis; Mehari Abraha, Hyab; Carrier, David R.; Pataky, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick was inspired by historical instances in which large sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L.) sank 19th century whaling ships by ramming them with their foreheads. The immense forehead of sperm whales is possibly the largest, and one of the strangest, anatomical structures in the animal kingdom. It contains two large oil-filled compartments, known as the “spermaceti organ” and “junk,” that constitute up to one-quarter of body mass and extend one-third of the total length of the whale. Recognized as playing an important role in echolocation, previous studies have also attributed the complex structural configuration of the spermaceti organ and junk to acoustic sexual selection, acoustic prey debilitation, buoyancy control, and aggressive ramming. Of these additional suggested functions, ramming remains the most controversial, and the potential mechanical roles of the structural components of the spermaceti organ and junk in ramming remain untested. Here we explore the aggressive ramming hypothesis using a novel combination of structural engineering principles and probabilistic simulation to determine if the unique structure of the junk significantly reduces stress in the skull during quasi-static impact. Our analyses indicate that the connective tissue partitions in the junk reduce von Mises stresses across the skull and that the load-redistribution functionality of the former is insensitive to moderate variation in tissue material parameters, the thickness of the partitions, and variations in the location and angle of the applied load. Absence of the connective tissue partitions increases skull stresses, particularly in the rostral aspect of the upper jaw, further hinting of the important role the architecture of the junk may play in ramming events. Our study also found that impact loads on the spermaceti organ generate lower skull stresses than an impact on the junk. Nevertheless, whilst an impact on the spermaceti organ

  15. Double Fertilization in Arabidopsis thaliana Involves a Polyspermy Block on the Egg but Not the Central Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rod J.Scott; Susan J.Armstrong; James Doughty; Melissa Spielman

    2008-01-01

    In animal reproduction,thousands of sperm may compete to fertilize a single egg,but polyspermy blocks prevent multiple fertilization that would otherwise lead to death of the embryo.In flowering plants,successfuI seed development requires that only two sperm are delivered to the embryo sac,where each must fertilize a female gamete(egg or central cell)to produce the embryo and endosperm.Therefore,polyspermy must be avoided,not only to prevent abnormalities in offspring,but to ensure double fertilization.It is not understood how each sperm fertilizes only one female gamete,nor has the existence of polyspermy barriers been directly tested in vivo.Here,we sought evidence for poly-spermy blocks in angiosperms using the polyspermic tetraspore(tes)mutant of Arabidopsis,which allows in-vivo challenge of egg and central cell with multiple male gametes.We show that tes mutant pollen tubes can transmit more than one sperm pair to an embryo sac,and that sperm from more than one pair can participate in fertilization.We detected endosperms but not embryos with ploidies that could only result from multiple fertilization.Our results therefore dem-onstrate an in-vivo polyspermy block on the egg,but not the central cell of a flowering plant.

  16. Competition drives cooperation among closely-related sperm of deer mice

    OpenAIRE

    FISHER, HEIDI S.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the extraordinary adaptations driven by sperm competition is the cooperative behaviour of spermatozoa1. By forming cooperative groups, sperm can increase their swimming velocity and thereby gain an advantage in intermale sperm competition1,2. Accordingly, selection should favour cooperation of the most closely related sperm to maximize fitness3. Here we show that sperm of deer mice (genus Peromyscus) form motile aggregations, then we use this system test predictions of sperm cooperation...

  17. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Uosaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM differentiation. However, control of the CM maturation that is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs, which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent-stem-cell-derived CMs mature early in culture but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation.

  18. Steroid receptors in human ejaculated sperm as molecular markers of the detrimental effects related to the pathophysiology of testicular varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Ida; Aquila, Saveria

    2016-08-01

    The exact physiopathologic effect of testicular varicocele on male fertility is not defined yet. The detrimental role of the varicocele in fertility is supported by the presence of a higher frequency of affected men among the infertile population. However, the mechanism/s by which a varicocele impairs sperm production, structure and function, is not known. In spite of active interest, our understanding of the human male gamete ultrastructural molecular organisation is still incomplete and therefore our knowledge of the sperm molecular anatomy is very limited. The presence of steroid binding sites on human spermatozoa has been evidenced since the 1970s, and afterwards, spermatozoa physiology was linked to the action of different steroids. The presence of steroid/steroid receptor systems was demonstrated in mature spermatozoa as membrane but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroids, through sperm receptors, may influence male fertility. From new data, it emerges that varicocele may induce damage in the male gamete at molecular level, opening a new chapter in the already multifactorial pathophysiology of the varicocele, complicating this issue. In sperm from varicocele, a decreased expression of steroid receptors and a consequent reduced responsiveness to steroids may represent a mechanism involved in the physiopathology of varicocele. Therefore, the modulation of these nuclear receptors pave the way for novel therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of the male pathologies related to human reproduction. The purpose of this review is to gain new insight into the physiopathology of varicocele and to study its impact on human sperm molecular anatomy. PMID:27031584

  19. Porcine embryos produced after intracytoplasmic sperm injection using xenogeneic pig sperm from neonatal testis tissue grafted in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Honaramooz, Ali; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Dobrinski, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Embryo development after homologous intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with sperm from testis tissue xenografts from pigs or any other farm animal species has not been evaluated critically. Here, we report development of porcine embryos in vitro following ICSI with sperm retrieved from xenografted neonatal pig testis. Small pieces of testis tissue from newborn piglets were grafted under the back skin of castrated immunodeficient mice (n = 4) and the xenografts were collected 8 months aft...

  20. Electroejaculated Baboon (Papio anubis) Sperm Requires a Higher Dosage of Pentoxifylline to Enhance Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Cseh, Sandor; Chan, Philip J.; Corselli, Johannah; Bailey, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Sperm collected by electroejaculation often showpoor motility. The objective was to determine whether theaddition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pentoxifylline,would stimulate electroejaculated baboon sperm motility.

  1. EFFECT OF BULL AND SPERM PREPARATION METHOD ON IN VITRO FERTILIZATION OF BUFFALO OOCYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. JAMIL, H. A. SAMAD, Z. I. QURESHI, N. REHMAN AND L. A. LODHI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to compare fertilization rates following oocyte exposure to spermatozoa from different buffalo bulls, using three sperm preparation methods i.e. percoll density gradient, swim-up (modified Ca2 free Tyrode’s medium and TALP medium and sodium citrate washing prior to co-incubation with oocytes. Buffalo oocytes were aspirated from ovarian follicles within 1.5 to 2 hours after slaughter. They were matured in TCM-199 supplemented with 20% oestrus buffalo serum drops under mineral oil in CO2 incubator at 39C for 24 hours. Matured oocytes were transferred to the fertilization droplets and inseminated with 1x106 capacitated sperms prepared by different experimental methods. Data collected on recovered sperm motility immediately after treatment and 24 hours after incubation (at 37C and cleavage rate of co-incubated oocytes were subjected to statistical analysis. The percentage of motile spermatozoa was significantly higher (P<0.05 in semen samples prepared by swim-up method in Ca2 free Tyrode’s medium compared to other experimental techniques. Bull wise comparison showed significantly higher (P<0.05 motility in bull B1 (50.50 ± 5.92%, followed by bull B2 (46.46 ± 5.99% and B3 (45.96 ± 5.79%. Fertilization rate was also significantly (P<0.05 higher for spermatozoa prepared by Swim-up method in Ca2 free Tyrode’s medium (63.75 ± 2.81%, followed by sodium citrate (26.70 ± 5.08%, swim-up TALP (29.14 ± 3.74% and Percoll gradient density (23.89 ± 3.88%. Fertilization rate was significantly higher (P<0.05 in oocytes inseminated with semen from bull B1 (43.43 ± 8.59%, followed by B2 (33.38 ± 9.95% and B3 (30.80 ± 9.56%. The results of present study indicate that bulls and sperm preparation methods differ in their contribution to in vitro fertilization rate. Further studies are suggested to ascertain the factors responsible for such specific effects.

  2. Dietary Vitamin E Is More Effective than Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acid for Improving The Kinematic Characteristics of Rat Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    AliReza Alizadeh; Zeinab Taleb; Bita Ebrahimi; Vahid Esmaeili; Abdolhossein Shaverdi; Javad Nasr; Abolfazl Kheimeh; Reza Salman Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although key roles for dietary vitamin E (VITE) and fatty acid (FA) in fertility have been confirmed, limited data are available on the effects of VITE alone, or a constant level of VITE supplemented by dietary omega-6 and omega-3 FAs in combination on male reproduction. Consequently in this paper, the effects of VITE, sunflower oil, fish oil and their combination on rat sperm were investigated. Materials and Methods We divided 50 mature male Wistar rats into 5 groups (n...

  3. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  4. The role of phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating serotonin-induced oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing; ZHANG Tao

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been found to stimulate meiotic maturation of oocytes in many molluscs. During maturation, several signaling pathways are involved, especially the phosphatidylinositol and cAMP pathways. In order to examine the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria, the effects of the activator/inhibitor of phospholipase (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) on serotonin-induced maturation were studied. Results show that high-concentrations of neomycin (inhibitor of PLC) blocked oocyte maturation, while 9, 10-dimethyl- 1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA, activator of PLC) promoted oocyte maturation in the presence of serotonin. It was also found that in the presence of serotonin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA,activator of PKC) inhibited oocyte maturation, while sphingosine (inhibitor of PKC) stimulated oocyte maturation. These results indicate that serotonin-induced oocyte maturation requires the activation of the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Decrease of PLC inhibited serotonin-induced oocyte maturation, whereas a decrease of PKC stimulated the maturation. Thus, our study indicates that serotonin promotes maturation of M. mercenaria oocytes through PLC stimulated increase in calcium ion concentration via inositol-1,4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) but not PKC.

  5. Effects of Crocin Supplementation during In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Oocytes on Glutathione Synthesis and Cytoplasmic Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Mokhber Maleki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crocin is an active ingredient of saffron (Crocus sativus L. and its antioxidant properties have been previously investigated. This carotenoid scavenges free radicals and stimulates glutathione (GSH synthesis; consequently, it may protect cells against oxidative stress. The aim of this research is to protect oocytes from oxidative stress by the addition of a natural source antioxidant. Materials and Methods: In the present in vitro experimental study, we collected cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs from mouse ovaries of euthanized, 6-8 week-old female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI mice. Oocytes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM in the presence of either crocin (5 or 10 μg/ml, 5 mM buthionine-[S-R]- sulfoximine (BSO, or the combination of crocin plus BSO. Oocytes that matured in vitro in a medium without crocin or BSO supplements were considered as controls. Following 16-18 hours of IVM, matured oocytes (n=631 were fertilized by capacitated sperm from NMRI male mice, and cultured in vitro for up to 96 hours to assess preimplantation embryonic development. The levels of GSH in metaphase II (MII oocytes after IVM (n=240 were also assessed by the 5, 5-dithio-bis (2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB-GSH reductase recycling assay. Results: Supplementation of IVM media with 10 μg/ml crocin significantly (P<0.05 increased nuclear maturation, preimplantation development and GSH concentrations compared with the control group. Maturation of oocytes in IVM medium supplemented with BSO alone or the combination of 5 μg/ml crocin and BSO drastically decreased GSH concentrations and subsequently resulted in low rates of maturation, fertilization and blastocyst development. However, the combination of 10 μg/ml crocin with 5 mM BSO increased the level of nuclear maturation which was comparable to the control group. Conclusion: Supplementation of IVM media with crocin can improve nuclear maturation rates and subsequent developmental potential

  6. Effects of Crocin Supplementation during In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Oocytes on Glutathione Synthesis and Cytoplasmic Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhber Maleki, Elham; Eimani, Hussein; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza; Golkar Narenji, Afsane; Abedi, Reyhane

    2016-01-01

    Background Crocin is an active ingredient of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its antioxidant properties have been previously investigated. This carotenoid scavenges free radicals and stimulates glutathione (GSH) synthesis; consequently, it may protect cells against oxidative stress. The aim of this research is to protect oocytes from oxidative stress by the addition of a natural source antioxidant. Materials and Methods In the present in vitro experimental study, we collected cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) from mouse ovaries of euthanized, 6-8 week-old female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice. Oocytes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM) in the presence of either crocin (5 or 10 μg/ml), 5 mM buthionine-[S-R]- sulfoximine (BSO), or the combination of crocin plus BSO. Oocytes that matured in vitro in a medium without crocin or BSO supplements were considered as controls. Following 16-18 hours of IVM, matured oocytes (n=631) were fertilized by capacitated sperm from NMRI male mice, and cultured in vitro for up to 96 hours to assess preimplantation embryonic development. The levels of GSH in metaphase II (MII) oocytes after IVM (n=240) were also assessed by the 5, 5-dithio-bis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB)-GSH reductase recycling assay. Results Supplementation of IVM media with 10 µg/ml crocin significantly (P<0.05) increased nuclear maturation, preimplantation development and GSH concentrations compared with the control group. Maturation of oocytes in IVM medium supplemented with BSO alone or the combination of 5 µg/ml crocin and BSO drastically decreased GSH concentrations and subsequently resulted in low rates of maturation, fertilization and blastocyst development. However, the combination of 10 µg/ml crocin with 5 mM BSO increased the level of nuclear maturation which was comparable to the control group. Conclusion Supplementation of IVM media with crocin can improve nuclear maturation rates and subsequent developmental potential of mouse

  7. Adverse testicular effects of Botox® in mature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breikaa, Randa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Mosli, Hisham A. [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Nagy, Ayman A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim.pharma@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-01

    Botox® injections are taking a consistently increasing place in urology. Intracremasteric injections, particularly, have been applied for cryptorchidism and painful testicular spasms. Studies outlining their safety for this use are, however, scanty. Thus, the present study aimed at evaluating possible testicular toxicity of Botox® injections and their effect on male fertility. Mature rats were given intracremasteric Botox® injections (10, 20 and 40 U/kg) three times in a two-week interval. Changes in body and testes weights were examined and gonadosomatic index compared to control group. Semen quality, sperm parameters, fructose, protein, cholesterol and triglycerides contents were assessed. Effects on normal testicular function were investigated by measuring testosterone levels and changes in enzyme activities (lactate dehydrogenase-X and acid phosphatase). To draw a complete picture, changes in oxidative and inflammatory states were examined, in addition to the extent of connective tissue deposition between seminiferous tubules. In an attempt to have more accurate information about possible spermatotoxic effects of Botox®, flowcytometric analysis and histopathological examination were carried out. Botox®-injected rats showed altered testicular physiology and function. Seminiferous tubules were separated by dense fibers, especially with the highest dose. Flowcytometric analysis showed a decrease in mature sperms and histopathology confirmed the findings. The oxidative state was, however, comparable to control group. This study is the first to show that intracremasteric injections of Botox® induce adverse testicular effects evidenced by inhibited spermatogenesis and initiation of histopathological changes. In conclusion, decreased fertility may be a serious problem Botox® injections could cause. - Highlights: • Botox® injections are the trend nowadays, for both medical and non-medical uses. • They were recently suggested for cryptorchidism and

  8. Towards microfluidic sperm refinement : impedance-based analysis and sorting of sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, de B.; Dekker, S.; Boer, de H.L.; Bomer, J.G.; Olthuis, W.; Berg, van den A.; Segerink, L.I.

    2016-01-01

    The use of high quality semen for artificial insemination in the livestock industry is essential for successful outcome. Insemination using semen with a high number of sperm cells containing morphological defects has a negative impact on fertilization outcome. Therefore, semen with a high number of

  9. Blocking and associability change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed. PMID:23668185

  10. Blocking and associability change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed.

  11. Transmembrane Signal Transduction in Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization: Focusing on Xenopus laevis as a Model Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a cell biological phenomenon of crucial importance for the birth of new life in a variety of multicellular and sexual reproduction species such as algae, animal and plants. Fertilization involves a sequence of events, in which the female gamete “egg” and the male gamete “spermatozoon (sperm” develop, acquire their functions, meet and fuse with each other, to initiate embryonic and zygotic development. Here, it will be briefly reviewed how oocyte cytoplasmic components are orchestrated to undergo hormone-induced oocyte maturation and sperm-induced activation of development. I then review how sperm-egg membrane interaction/fusion and activation of development in the fertilized egg are accomplished and regulated through egg coat- or egg plasma membrane-associated components, highlighting recent findings and future directions in the studies using Xenopus laevis as a model experimental animal.

  12. Comparison of semen variables, sperm DNA damage and sperm membrane proteins in two male layer breeder lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Shanmugam; T R, Kannaki; A, Vinoth

    2016-09-01

    Semen variables are affected by the breed and strain of chicken. The present study was undertaken to compare the semen quality in two lines of adult chickens with particular reference to sperm chromatin condensation, sperm DNA damage and sperm membrane proteins. Semen from a PD3 and White Leghorn control line was collected at 46 and 47 weeks and 55 weeks of age. The semen was evaluated for gross variables and sperm chromatin condensation by aniline blue staining. Sperm DNA damage was assessed by using the comet assay at 47 weeks of age and sperm membrane proteins were assessed at 55 weeks of age. The duration of fertility was studied by inseminating 100 million sperm once into the hens of the same line as well as another line. The eggs were collected after insemination for 15days and incubated. The eggs were candled on 18th day of incubation for observing embryonic development. The White Leghorn control line had a greater sperm concentration and lesser percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm at the different ages where assessments occurred. There was no difference in sperm chromatin condensation, DNA damage and membrane proteins between the lines. Only low molecular weight protein bands of less than 95kDa were observed in samples of both lines. The line from which semen was used had no effect on the duration over which fertility was sustained after insemination either when used in the same line or another line. Thus, from the results of the present study it may be concluded that there was a difference in gross semen variables between the lines that were studied, however, the sperm chromatin condensation, DNA damage, membrane proteins and duration over which fertility was sustained after insemination did not differ between the lines. PMID:27470200

  13. Career Maturity of Welfare Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Carol M.

    To investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients, this thesis examines six independent variables: (1) race; (2) sex; (3) age; (4) level of formal education; (5) general intelligence; and (6) locus of control. Scales taken from the Career Maturity Inventory served as the dependent variables. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who…

  14. Sperm use economy of honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Collins, Jason; Maalaps, Kristiina;

    2016-01-01

    the fecundity and longevity of queens and therefore colony fitness. We quantified the number of sperm that honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens use to fertilize eggs. We examined sperm use in naturally mated queens of different ages and in queens artificially inseminated with different volumes of semen. We found...

  15. Egg Activation at Fertilization by a Soluble Sperm Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most fundamental unresolved issue of fertilization is to define how the sperm activates the egg to begin embryo development. Egg activation at fertilization in all species thus far examined is caused by some form of transient increase in the cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration. What has not been clear, however, is precisely how the sperm triggers the large changes in Ca(2+) observed within the egg cytoplasm. Here, we review the studies indicating that the fertilizing sperm stimulates a cytosolic Ca(2+) increase in the egg specifically by delivering a soluble factor that diffuses into the cytosolic space of the egg upon gamete membrane fusion. Evidence is primarily considered in species of eggs where the sperm has been shown to elicit a cytosolic Ca(2+) increase by initiating Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. We suggest that our best understanding of these signaling events is in mammals, where the sperm triggers a prolonged series of intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The strongest empirical studies to date suggest that mammalian sperm-triggered Ca(2+) oscillations are caused by the introduction of a sperm-specific protein, called phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ) that generates inositol trisphosphate within the egg. We will discuss the role and mechanism of action of PLCζ in detail at a molecular and cellular level. We will also consider some of the evidence that a soluble sperm protein might be involved in egg activation in nonmammalian species.

  16. Sequential male mate choice under sperm competition risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Steven A; Stockley, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Male eagerness to mate is a central paradigm of sexual selection theory. However, limited sperm supplies mean that male sexual restraint might sometimes be favored under promiscuous mating. Here, we demonstrate dynamic plasticity in male mating effort when females are encountered sequentially under varying sperm competition risk. Rather than showing consistent eagerness to mate, male house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) instead tailor their mating effort according to likely reproductive payoffs. They are significantly less likely to mate when sperm competition is certain and potential reproductive payoffs low, but dramatically increase investment if they do choose to mate under such circumstances. By contrast, male mice are significantly more likely to mate in situations simulating extra-territorial copulations, where future risk of competition is high but so too are potential reproductive rewards. Differential mating propensity appears to be the primary mechanism by which male house mice allocate sperm adaptively under sperm competition risk because we find no evidence for facultative adjustment of sperm numbers per ejaculate or ejaculation frequency in response to female-related cues. We conclude that sequential male mate choice under sperm competition risk could be a widespread but often unappreciated mechanism of strategic sperm allocation.

  17. Bending the law and crossing borders choosing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    have to apply to the law, it is even possible to choose between anonymous and non-anonymous donors. In this presentation, I focus on how the fertility travellers seeking sperm donation in Denmark, and the employees at Danish fertility clinics and sperm banks, negotiate the ethical implications of using...

  18. Sperm banking for male cancer patients: social and semen profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana C.S. Bonetti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Report the characteristics of cryopreserved semen from a cohort of male cancer patients, attitudes towards cryopreservation and outcomes of semen samples based on a 12-year cryopreservation program. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 98 male cancer patients whose sperm samples were banked were evaluated. Demographic parameters, semen characteristics, destination of sperm banked samples and questionnaires answered by the patients regarding cryopreservation time were evaluated. RESULTS: The cancer diagnoses were testicle (56.1%, prostate (15.3%, Hodgkin’s lymphomas (9.2%, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (7.1%, leukemia (3.1% and other malignancies (9.2%. The patients with testicular cancer presented lower sperm concentration (p < 0.001; however, there were no differences with the percentage of normozoospermic patients among cancer type groups (p = 0.185. A shorter time between cancer diagnosis and sperm banking was observed for testicular and prostate cancer patients (p < 0.001. Most of the patients (89.5% favored sperm banking as a fertility preservation method. CONCLUSIONS: Although less than 20% of banked sperm samples were disposed of, the majority of patients related sperm banking with safe for fertility preservation. Our results show that all male cancer patients of reproductive age facing cancer treatment could be offered sperm banking.

  19. Reproduction and sperm structure in Galeommatidae (Bivalvia, Galeommatoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Åse; Lützen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Reproduction and/or sperm structure was studied in 18 species belonging to five genera of Galeommatidae from Phuket Island, Andaman Sea, Thailand, and Hong Kong. Incubation of the ova occurs in the inner and outer demibranchs of both gills, and sperm is most probably transferred to the ctenidial ...

  20. [Eosin Y-water test for sperm function examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Shu-wei; Lü, Nian-qing; Xu, Hao-qin

    2015-06-01

    Based on the principles of the in vitro staining technique, hypotonic swelling test, and water test, the Eosin Y-water test method was developed to simultaneously detect the integrity of the sperm head and tail and sperm membrane structure and function. As a widely used method in clinical laboratories in China, the Eosin Y-water test is methodologically characterized by three advantages. Firstly, both the sperm head and tail can be detected at the same time, which allows easy and comprehensive assessment of membrane damage in different parts of sperm. Secondly, distilled water is used instead of the usual formula solution to simplify and standardize the test by eliminating any potential effects on the water molecules through the sperm membrane due to different osmotic pressure or different sugar proportions and electrolyte solutions. Thirdly, the test takes less time and thus can be repeated before and after treatment. This article focuses on the fundamental principles and modification of the Eosin Y-water test and its application in sperm function examination and routine semen analysis for male infertility, assessment of the quality of sperm retrieved by testicular fine needle aspiration, semen cryopreservation program development, and evaluation of sperm membrane integrity after microwave radiation.

  1. Mating duration and sperm precedence in the spider Linyphia triangularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Ditte L.; Toft, Søren; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2011-01-01

    , especially the males, are able to influence the outcome of mating for their own benefit. We studied the linyphiid spider Linyphia triangularis in which mating follows a strict sequence during which the male inducts two droplets of sperm and transfers them to the female. We performed sperm competition...

  2. Heritability of sperm length in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; de Jong, Gerdien; Schmid-Hempel, Regula;

    2006-01-01

    Sperm length is highly variable, both between and within species, but the evolutionary significance of this variation is poorly understood. Sexual selection on sperm length requires a significant additive genetic variance, but few studies have actually measured this. Here we present the first est...

  3. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  4. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  5. Our experience in sperm morphology assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Irene Ariagno; Susana Mercedes Curi; Patricia Chenlo; Herberto Ernesto Hector Repetto; Mercedes Norma Pugliese; Luis Alberto Palaoro; Melba Sardi; Gabriela Ruth Mendeluk

    2011-01-01

    @@ We read with great interest the article recently published by Menkeveld et al.1 as we have a double interest in sperm morphology assess-ment.The first one as a Clinical Andrology Laboratory(Laboratory of Male Fertility,Department of Clinical Biochemistry,Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina)attempting to give aluable diagnosis to our patients, and the second one as Sponsors of the External Quality Control for the Study of Human Semen in Argentina(Programa de Evaluación Externa de la Calidad(PEEC)de la Fundación Bioquimica Argentina2).

  6. XGef Mediates Early CPEB Phosphorylation during Xenopus Oocyte Meiotic Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Susana E.; Yuan, Lei; Lacza, Charlemagne; Ransom, Heather; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Whitehead, Ian P.; Hake, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyadenylation-induced translation is an important regulatory mechanism during metazoan development. During Xenopus oocyte meiotic progression, polyadenylation-induced translation is regulated by CPEB, which is activated by phosphorylation. XGef, a guanine exchange factor, is a CPEB-interacting protein involved in the early steps of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. We find that XGef influences early oocyte maturation by directly influencing CPEB function. XGef and CPEB interact during oogenesis and oocyte maturation and are present in a c-mos messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Both proteins also interact directly in vitro. XGef overexpression increases the level of CPEB phosphorylated early during oocyte maturation, and this directly correlates with increased Mos protein accumulation and acceleration of meiotic resumption. To exert this effect, XGef must retain guanine exchange activity and the interaction with CPEB. Overexpression of a guanine exchange deficient version of XGef, which interacts with CPEB, does not enhance early CPEB phosphorylation. Overexpression of a version of XGef that has significantly reduced interaction with CPEB, but retains guanine exchange activity, decreases early CPEB phosphorylation and delays oocyte maturation. Injection of XGef antibodies into oocytes blocks progesterone-induced oocyte maturation and early CPEB phosphorylation. These findings indicate that XGef is involved in early CPEB activation and implicate GTPase signaling in this process. PMID:15635100

  7. Distribution and viability of spermatozoa in the canine female genital tract during post-ovulatory oocyte maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karre Inga

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unlike other domestic mammals, in which metaphase-II oocytes are ovulated, canine ovulation is characterized by the release of primary oocytes, which may take 12 to up to 36 hours. Further 60 hours are needed for maturation to secondary oocytes which then remain fertile for about 48 hours. Oestrus takes 7 to 10 days on average and may start as early as a week before ovulation. This together with the prolonged process of post-ovulatory oocyte maturation requires an according longevity of spermatozoa in the female genital tract in order to provide a population of fertile sperm when oocytes have matured to fertilizability. Therefore the distribution and viability of spermatozoa in the bitch genital tract was examined during post-ovulatory oocyte maturation. Methods Thirteen beagle bitches were inseminated on the day of sonographically verified ovulation with pooled semen of two beagle dogs containing one billion progressively motile spermatozoa. Ovariohysterectomy was performed two days later (group 1, n = 6 and four days later (group 2, n = 7. The oviduct and uterine horn of one side were flushed separately and the flushing’s were checked for the presence of gametes. The oviducts including the utero-tubal junction and the uterine horns, both the flushed and unflushed, were histologically examined for sperm distribution. Results The total number of spermatozoa recovered by flushing was low and evaluation of viability was limited. Prophase-I oocytes were collected from oviduct flushing in group 1, whereas unfertilized metaphase-II oocytes were detected in group 2. From day 2 to day 4 after ovulation a significant decrease in the percentage of glands containing sperm (P Conclusions Oocyte maturation to metaphase-II stage is accompanied by a continuous sperm detachment and elimination in the uterine horns. Entrance of spermatozoa into the caudal oviduct seems to be steadily controlled by the utero-tubal junction thus

  8. Sperm penetration assay and its correlation with semen analysis parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Kant Pandey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of current study was to determine whether the Sperm Penetration Assay (SPA can be used as a test to discriminate the infertile male from fertile one. We have also correlated the SPA with semen analysis. Methods: Sperm characteristics namely Semen analysis and the sperm penetration assay were tested in 44 infertile and 10 fertile men. Sperm penetration assay was determined by using zona free hamster eggs. Results: With decreasing spermatozoa concentration in the semen there was significant decrease in percentage penetration of zona free Hamster eggs (p0.05. Conclusions: The Sperm penetration assay could discriminate the infertile group from fertile group significantly (p<0.001. The test appeared to be highly reproducible and probably identifies a truly infertile male. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3197-3201

  9. Association between chronic pain and the sperm motion characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Nielsen, Hans Ingolf;

    2015-01-01

    stimulation, it can be speculated that the observed difference in sperm kinematic parameters could be related to the alterations in serum sex hormone levels emanating from the chronic pain. Further studies are required to explain the possible mechanism of action of chronic pain on male fertility.......Sex hormones play an important role in pain in many chronic pain conditions. Relationship between chronic pain and sperm quality has not been investigated thoroughly and may provide an insight to better understanding, management and treatment of cases where chronic pain and male sub-fertility co......-exist. Neat (fresh semen) and processed sperm from 15 males with orthopedic chronic pain (CP) were assessed and compared with 15 healthy age matched controls. Sperm analysis was performed using the SCA computer-aided sperm analyzer. There was no significant difference in any parameters of the neat semen...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF POLYMORPHISM OF FSH BETA-SUBUNIT GENE AS SPERM QUALITY MARKER IN BALI CATTLE USING PCR-RFLP

    OpenAIRE

    A. B. L. Ishak; C. Sumantri; R.R. Noor; I. Arifiantini

    2011-01-01

    The aim of study was to identify the association of FSH beta-subunit gene polymorphisms with sperm quality traits. A total of 470 samples of normal mature bull from several breeds were used for population study and 127 bulls from National and Regional AI centre of Indonesia for association study. To amplify, a PCR-RFLP method was used and digested with Pst1 restriction enzyme. The allele frequency of the A and B in Bali cattle were (0.000) and (1.000), respectively. The absence of other allel...

  11. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  12. TRPM8, a Versatile Channel in Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Ana Y.; Serrano, Carmen J.; Castellano, Laura E.; Hernández-González, Enrique O.; Chirinos, Mayel; Larrea, Fernando; Beltrán, Carmen; Treviño, Claudia L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The transient receptor potential channel (TRP) family includes more than 30 proteins; they participate in various Ca2+ dependent processes. TRPs are functionally diverse involving thermal, chemical and mechanical transducers which modulate the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Ca2+ triggers and/or regulates principal sperm functions during fertilization such as motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Nevertheless, the presence of the TRPM subfamily in sperm has not been explored. Principal Findings Here we document with RT-PCR, western blot and immunocitochemistry analysis the presence of TRPM8 in human sperm. We also examined the participation of this channel in sperm function using specific agonists (menthol and temperature) and antagonists (BCTC and capsazepine). Computer-aided sperm analysis revealed that menthol did not significantly alter human sperm motility. In contrast, menthol induced the acrosome reaction in human sperm. This induction was inhibited about 70% by capsazepine (20 µM) and 80% by BCTC (1.6 µM). Activation of TRPM8 either by temperature or menthol induced [Ca2+]i increases in human sperm measured by fluorescence in populations or individual sperm cells, effect that was also inhibited by capsazepine (20 µM) and BCTC (1.6 µM). However, the progesterone and ZP3-induced acrosome reaction was not inhibited by capsazepine or BCTC, suggesting that TRPM8 activation triggers this process by a different signaling pathway. Conclusions This is the first report dealing with the presence of a thermo sensitive channel (TRPM8) in human sperm. This channel could be involved in cell signaling events such as thermotaxis or chemotaxis. PMID:19582168

  13. Ketamine inhibits human sperm function by Ca(2+)-related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanqiao; Zou, Qianxing; Li, Bingda; Chen, Houyang; Du, Xiaohong; Weng, Shiqi; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Xuhui

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, which was widely used in human and animal medicine, has become a popular recreational drug, as it can induce hallucinatory effects. Ketamine abuse can cause serious damage to many aspects of the organism, mainly reflected in the nervous system and urinary system. It has also been reported that ketamine can impair the male genital system. However, the detailed effect of ketamine on human spermatozoa remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vitro effects of ketamine on human sperm functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were treated in vitro with different concentrations of ketamine (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 g/L). The results showed that 0.25-1 g/L ketamine inhibited sperm total motility, progressive motility and linear velocity, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the sperm's ability to penetrate viscous medium and the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were significantly inhibited by ketamine. Ketamine did not affect sperm viability, capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is a central factor in the regulation of human sperm function, was decreased by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the currents of the sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel, CatSper, which modulates Ca(2+) influx in sperm, were inhibited by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ketamine induces its toxic effects on human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca(2+)]i through inhibition of CatSper channel. PMID:27143628

  14. Effects of ketamine or medetomidine administration on quality of electroejaculated sperm and on sperm flow in the domestic cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, D; Cunto, M; Prati, F; Merlo, B

    2007-09-15

    The effects of two commonly used drugs for anaesthesia in the domestic cat, ketamine and medetomidine, on features of electroejaculated semen and on sperm flow in this species were evaluated performing three experiments. This is the first study about these topics in the domestic cat. In Experiment 1, ketamine or medetomidine effects on cat sperm quality after collection by electroejaculation (E.E.) have been assessed in nine animals. Results showed that mean sperm concentration was significantly higher (pketamine administration. In Experiment 2, ketamine or medetomidine effects on sperm flow in 12 electroejaculated cats were studied. Mean sperm concentration and mean total number of spermatozoa resulted significantly higher (pketamine treated animals. The number of spermatozoa displaced in urethra was significantly higher (pketamine or medetomidine effects on urethral sperm flow, without any stimulation for sperm collection, were evaluated. Data obtained showed a significantly higher (pketamine injection. In conclusion, E.E. in the cat after medetomidine administration determined a higher number of spermatozoa per ejaculate than after ketamine administration, with a good pharmacological restriction and without increasing sperm retrograde flow. PMID:17662381

  15. First production of larvae using cryopreserved sperm: Effects of preservation temperature and cryopreservation on European eel sperm fertilization capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asturiano, J.F.; Sørensen, Sune Riis; Perez, L.;

    2016-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation is a useful tool in captive fish reproduction management, that is to synchronize gamete production, especially in the case of species as the European eel, where the time of female spawning readiness is unpredictable. Several protocols to cryopreserve sperm of this species h...

  16. Sperm Proteases that May Be Involved in the Initiation of Sperm Motility in the Newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misato Yokoe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A protease of sperm in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster that is released after the acrosome reaction (AR is proposed to lyse the sheet structure on the outer surface of egg jelly and release sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS. Here, we found that protease activity in the sperm head was potent to widely digest substrates beneath the sperm. The protease activity measured by fluorescein thiocarbamoyl-casein digestion was detected in the supernatant of the sperm after the AR and the activity was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF, an inhibitor for serine or cysteine protease, suggesting the release of serine and/or cysteine proteases by AR. In an in silico analysis of the testes, acrosins and 20S proteasome were identified as possible candidates of the acrosomal proteases. We also detected another AEBSF-sensitive protease activity on the sperm surface. Fluorescence staining with AlexaFluor 488-labeled AEBSF revealed a cysteine protease in the principal piece; it is localized in the joint region between the axial rod and undulating membrane, which includes an axoneme and produces powerful undulation of the membrane for forward sperm motility. These results indicate that AEBSF-sensitive proteases in the acrosome and principal piece may participate in the initiation of sperm motility on the surface of egg jelly.

  17. Preliminary study of sperm chromatin characteristics of the brachyuran crab Maja brachydactyla. Histones and nucleosome-like structures in decapod crustacean sperm nuclei previously described without SNBPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, K; Ausió, J; Chiva, M

    2009-10-01

    An interesting characteristic of decapod crustacean sperm nuclei is that they do not contain highly packaged chromatin. In the present study we re-examine the presence of DNA-interacting proteins in sperm nuclei of the brachyuran Maja brachydactyla. Although previous reports have indicated that, unlike the majority of sperm cells, DNA of decapod sperm is not organized by basic proteins, in this work we show that: (1) histones are present in sperm of M. brachydactyla; (2) histones are associated with sperm DNA; (3) histone H3 appears in lower proportions than the other core histones, while histone H2B appears in higher proportions; and (4) histone H3 in sperm nuclei is acetylated. This work complements a previous study of sperm histones of Cancer pagurus and supports the suggestion that decapod crustacean sperm chromatin deserves further attention. PMID:19324386

  18. Surrogate production of eggs and sperm by intrapapillary transplantation of germ cells in cytoablated adult fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullip Kumar Majhi

    Full Text Available Germ cell transplantation (GCT is a promising assisted reproductive technology for the conservation and propagation of endangered and valuable genetic resources. In teleost fish, GCT in adult gonads has been achieved only in male recipients, limiting greatly the usefulness of this technique in situations where both sexes need equal and timely attention for conservation and/or propagation. Here we describe a simplified GCT approach that ultimately leads to production of donor-derived eggs and sperm in considerably short time. Donor germ cells isolated from young pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis (Atherinopsidae were transplanted non-surgically through the genital papilla into the sexually mature gonads of Patagonian pejerrey O. hatcheri recipients whose gonads have been depleted of endogenous GCs by heat (26°C and chemical treatment (four doses of Busulfan at 30 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg for females and males, respectively. Transplanted spermatogonial and oogonial cells were able to recolonize the recipients' gonads and produce functional donor origin eggs and sperm within 7 months from the GCT. We confirmed the presence of donor-derived gametes by PCR in 17% and 5% of the surrogate O. hatcheri fathers and mothers, respectively. The crosses between surrogate fathers and O. bonariensis mothers yielded 12.6-39.7% pure O. bonariensis and that between a surrogate mother and an O. bonariensis father yielded 52.2% pure O. bonariensis offspring. Our findings confirm that transplantation of germ cells into sexually competent adult fish by non-surgical methods allows the production of functional donor-derived eggs and sperm in a considerably short time. The methods described here could play a vital role in conservation and rapid propagation of endangered fish genetic resources.

  19. Production of ROS and its effects on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, human spermatozoa, and sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardi Darmawan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades many researchers studying the causes of male infertility have recently focused on the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS – highly reactive oxidizing agents belonging to the class of free radicals. If ROS levels rise, oxidative stress (OS occurs, which results in oxygen and oxygen derived oxidants, and in turn increases the rates of cellular damage. In human, ROS are produced by a variety of semen components, and antioxidants in the seminal fluid keep their level balance. Small amounts of ROS help spermatozoa acquire their necessary fertilizing capabilities. Many researches showed that ROS attack DNA integrity in the sperm nucleus by causing base modification, DNA strand breaks, and chromatin cross linking. The DNA damage induced excessive levels of ROS and might accelerate the process of germ cell apoptosis leading to a decline in sperm counts associated with male infertility. This paper will review the molecular (cellular origins of ROS in human semen, how ROS damage sperm nuclear DNA, and how such DNA damage contributes to male infertility. Increased ROS production by spermatozoa is associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is an important indicator of functional integrity of the spermatozoa. Germ cell apoptosis is essential for normal spermatogenesis and its dysregulation may lead to male infertility. Thus, understanding the causes and mechanisms of germ cell apoptosis is of major importance in preventing male reproductive problems. Levels of apoptosis in mature spermatozoa that were significantly correlated with levels of seminal ROS determined by chemiluminescence assay indicate the linkage between ROS and male fertility problems. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:127-33 Keywords: Apoptosis, infertility, free radicals

  20. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  1. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  2. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  3. Multivitamin and micronutrient treatment improves semen parameters of azoospermic patients with maturation arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Tiwari, Anil K; Singh, Pratap B; Dwivedi, Udai S; Trivedi, Sameer; Singh, Surya K; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of multivitamin and micronutrient supplementation in azoospermic patients with maturation arrest. A total of 35 azoospermic patients showing maturation arrest on testicular biopsy were recruited in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Untreated group (n=11) without any treatment and treated group (n=24) who received multivitamins, micronutrients and co-enzyme Q10. The sperm concentration, motility and morphology were evaluated at monthly interval. The results showed reduction in liquefaction time and relative viscosity of the semen in the treated group. Further, in treated group there was appearance of spermatozoa (4.0 million/ml) exhibiting progressive motility (7%) and normal morphology (6%), even in the first follow up visit. The sperm count, motility and normal morphology increased significantly on subsequent visits. Within 3 months (3 visits) 2 pregnancies were reported. These observations indicate that multivitamin and micronutrient supplementation improve the qualitative and quantitative parameters of seminogram in patients with azoospermia of maturation arrest. PMID:21090533

  4. The fertilization—induced Ca2+ oscillation in mouse oocytes is cytoplasmic maturation dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGMANQI; FANGZHENSUN

    1996-01-01

    Mature eggs (at metaphase II stage) produce a series of Ca2+ oscillation at fertilization.To define whether the fertilization-induced Ca2+ oscillation is restrict to the metaphase II eggs and cell cycle dependent,mouse oocytes at prophase I (arrested at germinal vesicle stage),metaphase I,metaphase II,as well as the pronuclear embryos at interphase of the first mitotic division derived from fertilization of parthenogenetic activation were inseminated after removal of zona pellucida,The results show that the fertilization-induced Ca2+ oscillation is not specific to metaphase II eggs.This is supported by the fact that immature oocytes generated the Ca2+ oscillations at fertilization regardless of their nuclear progression from prophase I to metaphase I (in vitro matured) stage.More interestingly,it was first found that pronuclear embryos at interphase derived from parthenogenetic activation showed Ca2+ oscillations in response to fertilization while the zygotes at interphase did not after reinsemination or intracytoplasmic injection of sperm extracts which induce Ca2+ oscillations in MII eggs.This suggests that the ability of oocytes to generate Ca2+ oscillation in response to sperm penetration is not regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner but dependent on the cytoplasmic maturation.

  5. Intrauterine insemination versus fallopian tube sperm perfusion for non-tubal infertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantineau, Astrid E. P.; Cohlen, Ben J.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Marjoribanks, Jane; Farquhar, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is a common treatment for couples with subfertility that does not involve the fallopian tubes. It is used to bring the sperm close to the released oocyte. Another method of introducing sperm is fallopian tube sperm perfusion (FSP). Fallopian tube sperm perf

  6. Processive pulses of retinoic acid propel asynchronous and continuous murine sperm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel; Kent, Travis; Mitchell, Debra; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    The asynchronous cyclic nature of spermatogenesis is essential for continual sperm production and is one of the hallmarks of mammalian male fertility. While various mRNA and protein localization studies have indirectly implicated changing retinoid levels along testis tubules, no quantitative evidence for these changes across the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium currently exists. This study utilized a unique mouse model of induced synchronous spermatogenesis, localization of the retinoid-signaling marker STRA8, and sensitive quantification of retinoic acid concentrations to determine whether there are fluctuations in retinoid levels at each of the individual stages of germ cell differentiation and maturation to sperm. These data show that processive pulses of retinoic acid are generated during spermatogonial differentiation and are the likely trigger for cyclic spermatogenesis and allow us, for the first time, to understand how the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium is generated and maintained. In addition, this study represents the first direct quantification of a retinoid gradient controlling cellular differentiation in a postnatal tissue.

  7. The testicular and epididymal expression profile of PLCζ in mouse and human does not support its role as a sperm-borne oocyte activating factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Aarabi

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte activating factor (SOAF which has recently received attention as a potential biomarker of human male infertility. However, important SOAF attributes of PLCζ, including its developmental expression in mammalian spermiogenesis, its compartmentalization in sperm head perinuclear theca (PT and its release into the ooplasm during fertilization have not been established and are addressed in this investigation. Different detergent extractions of sperm and head/tail fractions were compared for the presence of PLCζ by immunoblotting. In both human and mouse, the active isoform of PLCζ was detected in sperm fractions other than PT, where SOAF is expected to reside. Developmentally, PLCζ was incorporated as part of the acrosome during the Golgi phase of human and mouse spermiogenesis while diminishing gradually in the acrosome of elongated spermatids. Immunofluorescence localized PLCζ over the surface of the postacrosomal region of mouse and bull and head region of human spermatozoa leading us to examine its secretion in the epididymis. While previously thought to have strictly a testicular expression, PLCζ was found to be expressed and secreted by the epididymal epithelial cells explaining its presence on the sperm head surface. In vitro fertilization (IVF revealed that PLCζ is no longer detectable after the acrosome reaction occurs on the surface of the zona pellucida and thus is not incorporated into the oocyte cytoplasm for activation. In summary, we show for the first time that PLCζ is compartmentalized as part of the acrosome early in human and mouse spermiogenesis and is secreted during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Most importantly, no evidence was found that PLCζ is incorporated into the detergent-resistant perinuclear theca fraction where SOAF resides.

  8. Rab3D is critical for secretory granule maturation in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kögel

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide- and hormone-containing secretory granules (SGs are synthesized at the trans-Golgi network (TGN as immature secretory granules (ISGs and complete their maturation in the F-actin-rich cell cortex. This maturation process is characterized by acidification-dependent processing of cargo proteins, condensation of the SG matrix and removal of membrane and proteins not destined to mature secretory granules (MSGs. Here we addressed a potential role of Rab3 isoforms in these maturation steps by expressing their nucleotide-binding deficient mutants in PC12 cells. Our data show that the presence of Rab3D(N135I decreases the restriction of maturing SGs to the F-actin-rich cell cortex, blocks the removal of the endoprotease furin from SGs and impedes the processing of the luminal SG protein secretogranin II. This strongly suggests that Rab3D is implicated in the subcellular localization and maturation of ISGs.

  9. The Deadbeat Paternal Effect of Uncapped Sperm Telomeres on Cell Cycle Progression and Chromosome Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Takuo; Yasuda, Glenn K; Wakimoto, Barbara T

    2016-06-01

    Telomere-capping complexes (TCCs) protect the ends of linear chromosomes from illegitimate repair and end-to-end fusions and are required for genome stability. The identity and assembly of TCC components have been extensively studied, but whether TCCs require active maintenance in nondividing cells remains an open question. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster requires Deadbeat (Ddbt), a sperm nuclear basic protein (SNBP) that is recruited to the telomere by the TCC and is required for TCC maintenance during genome-wide chromatin remodeling, which transforms spermatids to mature sperm. Ddbt-deficient males produce sperm lacking TCCs. Their offspring delay the initiation of anaphase as early as cycle 1 but progress through the first two cycles. Persistence of uncapped paternal chromosomes induces arrest at or around cycle 3. This early arrest can be rescued by selective elimination of paternal chromosomes and production of gynogenetic haploid or haploid mosaics. Progression past cycle 3 can also occur if embryos have reduced levels of the maternally provided checkpoint kinase Chk2. The findings provide insights into how telomere integrity affects the regulation of the earliest embryonic cell cycles. They also suggest that other SNBPs, including those in humans, may have analogous roles and manifest as paternal effects on embryo quality. PMID:27029731

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF POLYMORPHISM OF FSH BETA-SUBUNIT GENE AS SPERM QUALITY MARKER IN BALI CATTLE USING PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B.L. Ishak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to identify the association of FSH beta-subunit gene polymorphisms with sperm quality traits. A total of 470 samples of normal mature bull from several breeds were used for population study and 127 bulls from National and Regional AI centre of Indonesia for association study. To amplify, a PCR-RFLP method was used and digested with Pst1 restriction enzyme. The allele frequency of the A and B in Bali cattle were (0.000 and (1.000, respectively. The absence of other allele A suggested that the Bali cattle was monomorphic, while Brahman, FH, Simmental and Limousine were polymorphic. The highest observed heterozygosity were found in Limousine (0.318 and the highest expected heterozygosity were in Simmental (0.420. The higher incident of percentage of sperm abnormalities were found in Simmental, Limousin, Brahman compared to Bali and FH. Among all types of sperm abnormalities, the abaxial and microcephalus were found in highest number.

  11. Lesson Thirteen Trifascicular Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2005-01-01

    @@ A complete trifascicular block would result in complete AV block. The idio ventricular rhythm has a slower rate and a wide QRS complex because the pacemaker is located at the peripheral part of the conduction system distal to the sites of the block1. Such a rhythm may be difficult to differentiate from bifascicular or bundle branch block combined with complete block at a higher level such as the AV node or His bundle2. Besides a slower ventricular rate, a change in the morphology of the QRS complex from a previous known bifascicular pattern would be strongly suggestive of a trifascicular origin of the complete AV block3. A His bundle recording is required for a definitive diagnosis, however.

  12. The Role of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies on the Outcome of Assisted Reproductive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Razavi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm DNA is known to contribute one half of the genomic material to the offspring. The integrity of sperm DNA is important in fertilization, embryonic and fetal development, and postnatal child well being. The nature has created multiple barriers that allow only the fittest sperm to reach and fertilize an oocyte. However, assisted reproductive techniques (ART, like IVF and ICSI, may allow sperms with abnormal genomic material to enter the oocyte with minimal effort. This article describes structure of sperm DNA and different mechanism involved in sperm chromatin anomalies and DNA damage. Furthermore, this study elaborates possible sperm selection methods that may improve the outcome of ART.

  13. Block Advertisement Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Nemirovsky, Danil

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, a decentralized cryptocurrency, has attracted a lot of attention from academia, financial service industry and enthusiasts. The trade-off between transaction confirmation throughput and centralization of hash power do not allow Bitcoin to perform at the same level as modern payment systems. Block Advertisement Protocol is proposed as a step to resolve this issue. The protocol allows block mining and block relaying to happen in parallel. The protocol dictates a miner to advertise the ...

  14. Block Cipher Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miolane, Charlotte Vikkelsø

    ensurethat no attack violatesthe securitybounds specifiedbygeneric attack namely exhaustivekey search and table lookup attacks. This thesis contains a general introduction to cryptography with focus on block ciphers and important block cipher designs, in particular the Advanced Encryption Standard...... on small scale variants of AES. In the final part of the thesis we present a new block cipher proposal Present and examine its security against algebraic and differential cryptanalysis in particular....

  15. Ultrastructure of sperm cells in the female gonoduct of Xiphinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Velde, M C; Coomans, A; Van Ranst, L; De W Kruger, J C; Claeys, M

    1991-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the sperm cells in the female gonoduct of the nematodes Xiphinema theresiae and X. pinoides is described. The nucleus of the sperm cells is composed of several electron-dense clumps of chromatin that is not surrounded by a nuclear envelope. A layer of mitochondria, in which the mitochondrial cristae are only rarely visible, lies around the nuclear material. In the surrounding cytoplasm packets of electron-dense fibres are abundant. The sperm in the uterus have the following surface differentiations: highly intertwined protrusions between adjacent sperm cells, protrusions coinciding with the plication of the inner uterine wall and a slightly undulated surface towards the uterine lumen. It is argued that in the uterus, the sperm cells actively move in proximal direction by a mechanism resembling pseudopodial movement, in which the packets of fibres are involved. In the oviduct, the sperm cells loose their surface protrusions and the packets of fibres gradually become less abundant. Since the oviduct has no pre-formed lumen, the sperm cells appear to wedge their way along by forcing oviduct cells apart.

  16. Sperm cryopreservation of lane snapper Lutjanus synagris (Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, E G; Oliveira, I R; Serralheiro, P C S; Cerqueira, V R

    2015-08-01

    This study aims developing and evaluate a protocol of semen cryopreservation of the lane snapper Lutjanus synagris. Firstly, sperm motility rate, motility time, density and spermatocrit were appraised to characterize the sperm quality of the lane snapper. The effect of three extenders with distinct ionic compositions and pH values combined with seven concentrations of cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide (0; 2.5; 5.0; 7.5; 10.0; 12.5 e 15.0%), five cooling rates (110, 90, 60, 45 e 30°C -min), nine equilibration time (1; 2,5; 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; 30 e 60 minutes) e five dilutions ratio (1:1; 1:3; 1:6; 1:10 e 1:20) on the sperm motility rate and motility time were analyzed. Fertilization test was accomplished to evaluate the viability of the cryopreserved sperm. The higher sperm motility rate and motility time (P60% validating the present protocol for lane snapper. The cryoconserved sperm of lane snapper is a viable alternative, being possible to maintain appropriate sperm viability.

  17. Effect of antioxidants supplementation on human sperm parameters after freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghasemi Hamidabadi,

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Antioxidant reduces oxidative stress during cryo-preservation. The aim of this study was to find out the effects of vitamin E and C on sperm parameters after cryo-preservation.Materials and Methods: Human semen samples were obtained from Vali-e-asr Hospital. The samples were divided in two groups (normal and oligospermia groups. Semen was pooled in liquid nitrogen after thawing, samples were centrifuged, then vitamin E and C were added to medium and the aliquots were incubated for 45 minutes in incubator Co2. In control group, no antioxidant was added to medium. Sperm parameters were analyzed according to WHO criteria. Data was analyzed by ANNOVA test.Results: There was a significant increase in the progressive motility and viability of sperm which was supplemented by vitamin E, with 1, 2 Mm (p<0.05 in the normal groups (the increase in the oligospermia group, after addition of vitamin E with 1, 2, Mm was not significant. Vitamin C did not have a significant effect on sperm parameters with 1, 2 Mm concentration.Conclusion: Supplementation of media with alpha-tocopherol is beneficial for sperm motility and viability rates after cryopreservation and it may be of clinical value in assisted conception procedures.Key words: Alpha-tocopherol, Ascorbic acid, Sperm motility, Sperm morphologyJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2008; 18(63: 20-27 (Persian

  18. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers. PMID:24673547

  19. The effect of selected staining techniques on bull sperm morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszewska, Dorota; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Czubaszek, Magdalena; Biesiada-Drzazga, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphometry has some value as an indicator of reproductive capacity in males. In laboratory practice a variety of slide-staining methods are used during morphological evaluation of semen to predict male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of staining of semen using four different techniques on the morphometry of the bull sperm cell. The material for the study consisted of semen collected from test bulls of the Black-and-White variety of Holstein-Friesians. The results obtained in the study indicate differences in the dimensions of bull sperm heads when different slide staining techniques were used. The most similar results for sperm head dimensions were obtained in the case of SpermBlue(®) and eosin+gentian violet complex, although statistically significant differences were found between all the staining techniques. Extreme values were noted for the other staining techniques - lowest for the Papanicolaou and highest for silver nitrate, which may indicate more interference in the cell by the reagents used in the staining process. However, silver nitrate staining was best at identifying the structures of the sperm cell. Hence it is difficult to determine which of the staining methods most faithfully reveals the dimensions and shape of the bull sperm.

  20. Age associated variations in human neutrophil and sperm functioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaveri Purandhar; Sriram Seshadri

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the functional and biochemical variations in sperm and the neutrophil with the progression of age. Methods: Ninety healthy male subjects were selected in the age group 26-40 for the collection of semen and blood samples were collected. Basic semen analysis, hematogram, differential count serum analysis, seminal plasma and serum biochemistry was performed. Mitochondrial isolation from sperm and neutrophil was done to ascertain mitochondrial markers. Results: Our data shows a significant age-dependent reduction in the levels of mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) in sperm and the neutrophil. The functional attributes of sperm and neutrophil did not show any specific trend.Conclusion:The decreasing trend of the mitochondrial antioxidants enzymes in the sperm and the neutrophil is an indicative of the reduction in the functioning of sperm and the neutrophil. The antioxidants enzymes of sperm and neutrophil shows similar declining trend with the progression of age suggesting its possible role as a prognostic marker for age related deformities and even in male fertility.

  1. Analysis of the Epididymal Sperm Parameters in Fertile Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文任乾; 李世勤; 王春湘; 王庆辉; 李庆琨; 冯焕民; 姜彦嘉; 张信烈

    1994-01-01

    The left and right epididymial fluids from 73 normal fertile men were respectively eollected by eannulating the yes deferens during the operation of vasectomy. The parameters of epididymal spermatozoa were analysed. The results indicated that the sperm motility( % ), normal sperm morphology(%), sperm viability(%) and hypoosmotie swelling test (HOST) ( % ) were within the normal range as compared with those in the ejaculated spermatozoa. However, the sperm concentration in epididymis (6220.6± 5300.8 million per ml) was higher than that in semen. It is of interest that the sperm concentration in the right epidymis was significantly higher than that in the left.It was also demonstrated that the percentage of abnormal Kremer's test in the left epididymal spermatozoa was significantly higher than that in the right. The above phenomenon was discussed. There was no anti-sperm antibody on the surface of spermatozoa from epididymis as determined by the sperm cervical mucus contact test (SCMC) and lmmunobead test (IBT). These data will be usefull for the research of male reproductive physiology3,, male contracecetive and vasectomy.

  2. Sperm morphology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration and swimming velocity: unexpected relationships in a passerine bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennison, Clair; Hemmings, Nicola; Brookes, Lola; Slate, Jon; Birkhead, Tim

    2016-08-31

    The relationship between sperm energetics and sperm function is poorly known, but is central to our understanding of the evolution of sperm traits. The aim of this study was to examine how sperm morphology and ATP content affect sperm swimming velocity in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata We exploited the high inter-male variation in this species and created extra experimental power by increasing the number of individuals with very long or short sperm through artificial selection. We found a pronounced quadratic relationship between total sperm length and swimming velocity, with velocity increasing with length up to a point, but declining in the very longest sperm. We also found an unexpected negative association between midpiece length and ATP content: sperm with a short midpiece generally contained the highest concentration of ATP. Low intracellular ATP is therefore unlikely to explain reduced swimming velocity among the very longest sperm (which tend to have a shorter midpiece). PMID:27559067

  3. The Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA(®)) and other sperm DNA fragmentation tests for evaluation of sperm nuclear DNA integrity as related to fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-five years ago the pioneering paper in Science (240:1131) on the relationship between sperm DNA integrity and pregnancy outcome was featured as the cover issue showing a fluorescence photomicrograph of red and green stained sperm. The flow cytometry data showed a very significant difference in sperm DNA integrity between fertile and subfertile bulls and men. This study utilized heat (100°C, 5min) to denature DNA at sites of DNA strand breaks followed by staining with acridine orange (AO) and measurements of 5000 individual sperm of green double strand (ds) DNA and red single strand (ss) DNA fluorescence. Later, the heat protocol was changed to a low pH protocol to denature the DNA at sites of strand breaks; the heat and acid procedures produced the same results. SCSA data are very advantageously dual parameter with 1024 channels (degrees) of both red and green fluorescence. Hundreds of publications on the use of the SCSA test in animals and humans have validated the SCSA as a highly useful test for determining male breeding soundness. The SCSA test is a rapid, non-biased flow cytometer machine measurement providing robust statistical data with exceptional precision and repeatability. Many genotoxic experiments showed excellent dose response data with very low coefficient of variation that further validated the SCSA as being a highly powerful assay for sperm DNA integrity. Twelve years following the introduction of the SCSA test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) test (1993) for sperm was introduced as the only other flow cytometric assay for sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the TUNEL test can also be done by light microscopy with much less statistical robustness. The COMET (1998) and Sperm Chromatin Dispersion (SCD; HALO) (2003) tests were introduced as light microscope tests that don't require a flow cytometer. Since these tests measure only 50-200 sperm per sample, they suffer from the lack of

  4. Nanoparticle incorporation of melittin reduces sperm and vaginal epithelium cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Jallouk

    Full Text Available Melittin is a cytolytic peptide component of bee venom which rapidly integrates into lipid bilayers and forms pores resulting in osmotic lysis. While the therapeutic utility of free melittin is limited by its cytotoxicity, incorporation of melittin into the lipid shell of a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle has been shown to reduce its toxicity in vivo. Our group has previously demonstrated that perfluorocarbon nanoparticles containing melittin at concentrations <10 µM inhibit HIV infectivity in vitro. In the current study, we assessed the impact of blank and melittin-containing perfluorocarbon nanoparticles on sperm motility and the viability of both sperm and vaginal epithelial cells. We found that free melittin was toxic to sperm and vaginal epithelium at concentrations greater than 2 µM (p<0.001. However, melittin nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to sperm (p = 0.42 or vaginal epithelium (p = 0.48 at an equivalent melittin concentration of 10 µM. Thus, nanoparticle formulation of melittin reduced melittin cytotoxicity fivefold and prevented melittin toxicity at concentrations previously shown to inhibit HIV infectivity. Melittin nanoparticles were toxic to vaginal epithelium at equivalent melittin concentrations ≥20 µM (p<0.001 and were toxic to sperm at equivalent melittin concentrations ≥40 µM (p<0.001. Sperm cytotoxicity was enhanced by targeting of the nanoparticles to the sperm surface antigen sperm adhesion molecule 1. While further testing is needed to determine the extent of cytotoxicity in a more physiologically relevant model system, these results suggest that melittin-containing nanoparticles could form the basis of a virucide that is not toxic to sperm and vaginal epithelium. This virucide would be beneficial for HIV serodiscordant couples seeking to achieve natural pregnancy.

  5. Enhancement of mouse sperm motility by trophinin-binding peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophinin is an intrinsic membrane protein that forms a complex in the cytoplasm with bystin and tastin, linking it microtubule-associated motor dynein (ATPase in some cell types. Previously, we found that human sperm tails contain trophinin, bystin and tastin proteins, and that trophinin-binding GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide enhanced motility of human sperm. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine trophinin protein in mouse spermatozoa from wild type mouse, by using spermatozoa from trophinin null mutant mice as a negative control. Multivalent 8-branched GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide or GWRQ-MAPS, was chemically synthesized, purified by HPLC and its structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Effect of GWRQ-MAPS on mouse spermatozoa from wild type and trophinin null mutant was assessed by a computer-assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Results Anti-trophinin antibody stained the principal (central piece of the tail of wild type mouse sperm, whereas the antibody showed no staining on trophinin null sperm. Phage particles displaying GWRQ bound to the principal piece of sperm tail from wild type but not trophinin null mice. GWRQ-MAPS enhanced motility of spermatozoa from wild type but not trophinin null mice. CASA showed that GWRQ-MAPS enhanced both progressive motility and rapid motility in wild type mouse sperm. Conclusions Present study established the expression of trophinin in the mouse sperm tail and trophinin-dependent effect of GWRQ-MAPS on sperm motility. GWRQ causes a significant increase in sperm motility.

  6. Intra- and interboar variability in flow cytometric sperm sex sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Diego V; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Tarantini, Tatiana; Parlapan, Laura; Del Olmo, David; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    To improve the efficiency of porcine sperm sex sorting using flow cytometry, the aims of the present study were to determine the relevance of inter- and intraboar variability in sperm sortability and to evaluate the significance of ejaculate semen characteristics in such variability. In addition, the variability among boars in the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to survive liquid storage at 15 °C to 17 °C was also evaluated. In total, 132 ejaculates collected from 67 boars of different breeds that were housed at an artificial insemination center were used in three experiments. X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm were simultaneously separated according to the Beltsville sperm-sorting technology using a high-speed flow cytometer. In the first experiment, interboar variability in the ability of the ejaculated spermatozoa to undergo the flow-based sex-sorting procedure was observed; the ejaculates of nearly 15% of the boars (n = 67) did not exhibit well-defined X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa peaks in the histogram, and the ejaculate sperm concentration demonstrated good predictive value for explaining this variation, as indicated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (0.88, P boars that showed poor sperm sortability (measured according to the presence or not a well-defined split together with sperm sortability parameters) in the first ejaculate (n = 3). In contrast, boars classified as having good sperm sortability in the first ejaculate (n = 5) maintained this condition in five ejaculates collected over the subsequent 5 months. In the third experiment, sex-sorted spermatozoa from boars with good sperm sortability (n = 5) remained viable and motile (above 70% in all boars) after 48 hours of storage at 15 °C to 17 °C, which may facilitate the commercial application of sex-sorted spermatozoa in swine artificial insemination programs. PMID:24930604

  7. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Effect of sesame on sperm quality of infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Khani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High level of semen reactive oxygen species is considered as an important factor in male infertility. Sesame has antioxidant properties, which could be effective on improvement of semen parameters. This study was designed to determine the effects of sesame on sperm quality. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five infertile men entered this clinical trial. They were treated with a 3-months course of taking 0.5 mg/kg sesame. The pre intervention sperm analysis (sperm count, motile sperm percentage and normal morphology sperm percentage was compared with post treatment sperm analysis. Based on the post intervention seamen analysis, patients were advised to undergo either IVF or ICSI to assess their fertility status. Results: There was significant improvement in the sperm count (10.56 ± 5.25 vs. 22.71 ± 30.14 million per ml and motility (15.32 ± 13.58 vs. 23.32 ± 20.61 percent after treatment with sesame (P value: 0.04 and <0.0001 respectively, but there was no significant improvement in sperm morphology after the treatment (10.72 ± 6.66 vs. 13.20 ± 11.14 percent, P value: 0.10. Three patients (12% underwent IUI, which resulted in 1 successful pregnancy. Two patients (8% underwent ICSI, which was not successful; however 2 (8% patients had spontaneous pregnancy. Fortunately, all pregnancies led to live birth. Except 1 case of diarrhea, no other major side effect was reported. Conclusion: Sesame improved sperm count and motility, and can be prescribed as an effective and safe method for male factor infertility.

  9. Some Aspects of School Maturity

    OpenAIRE

    SATRAPOVÁ, Jana

    2008-01-01

    This bachelor{\\crq}s thesis is focused on the maturity of pre-school children for school work. Particularly it researches the level of children{\\crq}s knowledge in the period just before and immediately after entering school. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with pre-school characteristics, various aspects of school maturity and readiness for elementary school regarding the fact that in the period just before entering school and immediately after the beginning of school attendance cer...

  10. Surgical sperm recovery for intracytoplasmic sperm injection: which method is to be preferred?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaye, H

    1999-09-01

    Different methods for recovering epididymal or testicular spermatozoa have been described and each has its drawbacks and advantages. Percutaneous aspiration of the testis may be the method of choice in cases of irreparable obstructive azoospermia. Using a 21-gauge needle, spermatozoa may be recovered in 96 % of patients. More patients undergoing fine-needle aspiration experienced less pain than expected as compared with those undergoing open biopsy. Microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration (MESA) is the preferred method in patients with an incomplete work-up because, if indicated, a vasoepididymostomy can be performed concomitantly with a full scrotal exploration. In azoospermic patients with testicular failure, the sperm recovery rate, i.e. the chance of finding at least one spermatozoon, is around 50% after multiple open biopsies. However, the fertilization rates after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are significantly lower than in men with normal spermatogenesis, and complete fertilization failure may occur more frequently. Although the combination of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and ICSI may be the sole treatment available for infertility because of non-obstructive azoospermia, the overall success rate is limited and ongoing pregnancies are obtained in fine-needle aspiration are not useful in these patients. Of 14 patients with primary testicular failure as proven by histopathology, only in one case (7.1%) were spermatozoa recovered by multiple aspirations, while in nine cases (64.3%) spermatozoa were recovered by open biopsy. Although the pregnancy rates reported after ICSI with frozen-thawed testicular spermatozoa from patients with primary testicular failure are relatively low, the recovery of testicular spermatozoa by open biopsy followed by cryopreservation may be the method of choice by which to prevent repeat surgery and pointless ovarian stimulation in the female partner. PMID:10573025

  11. Epididymosomes are involved in the acquisition of new sperm proteins during epididymal transit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Sullivan; Gilles Frenette; Julie Girouard

    2007-01-01

    During epididymal transit, spermatozoa acquire new proteins. Some of these newly acquired proteins behave as integral membrane proteins, including glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. This suggests that the secreted epididymal proteins are transferred to spermatozoa by an unusual mechanism. Within the epididymal lumen,spermatozoa interact with small membranous vesicles named epididymosomes. Many proteins are associated with epididymosomes and the protein composition of these vesicles varies along the excurrent duct and differs from soluble intraluminal proteins. Some epididymosome-associated proteins have been identified and their functions in sperm maturation hypothesized. These include P25b, a zona pellucida binding protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, enzymes of the polyol pathway, HE5/CD52, type 5 glutathione peroxidase, and SPAM1 or PH-20. The electrophoretic patterns of proteins associated to epididymosomes are complex and some of these proteins are transferred to defined surface domains of epididymal spermatozoa. Epididymosomes collected from different epididymal segments interact differently with spermatozoa. This protein transfer from epididymosomes to spermatozoa is timedependent, temperature-dependent and pH-dependent, and is more efficient in the presence of zinc. Some proteins are segregated to lipid raft domains of epididymosomes and are selectively transferred to raft domains of the sperm plasma membrane. Some evidence is presented showing that epididymosomes are secreted in an apocrine manner by the epididymal epithelial cells. In conclusion, epididymosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted in an apocrine manner in the intraluminal compartment of the epididymis and play a major role in the acquisition of new proteins by the maturing spermatozoa.

  12. Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid can protect the sperm of other males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    #  1. Many internally-fertilizing animals produce seminal fluid which is transferred along with sperm during mating. Seminal fluid typically contains a diverse range of chemicals that coordinate sperm storage, moderate sperm motility, provide advantages in sexual selection and influence female....... These findings suggest that residual seminal fluid inside females could benefit the sperm of subsequent mates, affecting the outcome of sperm competition and influencing the evolution of ejaculates and mating systems....

  13. Interaction of milk proteins and Binder of Sperm (BSP) proteins from boar, stallion and ram semen

    OpenAIRE

    Plante, Geneviève; Lusignan, Marie-France; Lafleur, Michel; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammalian semen contains a family of closely related proteins known as Binder of SPerm (BSP proteins) that are added to sperm at ejaculation. BSP proteins extract lipids from the sperm membrane thereby extensively modifying its composition. These changes can ultimately be detrimental to sperm storage. We have demonstrated that bovine BSP proteins interact with major milk proteins and proposed that this interaction could be the basis of sperm protection by milk extenders. In the pre...

  14. Effect of combined density gradient centrifugation on X- and Y- sperm separation and chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Esmaeilpour; Leila Elyasi; Soghra Bahmanpour; Alireza Ghannadi; Ahmad Monabbati; Farzaneh Dehghani; Marjaneh Kazerooni

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been claimed that by using different washing methods, the sperms can be separated according to size, motility, density, chromosomal content and surface markings and charge. These methods also reduce sperm chromatin deficiencies and screen the sperms before applying in assisted reproduction techniques. Objective: This study compared simple density gradient methods and a combined method with albumin density gradient and PureSperm separation (alb/PureSperm) for sex preselectio...

  15. Lactate and Adenosine Triphosphate in the Extender Enhance the Cryosurvival of Rat Epididymal Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Toyomizu, Masaaki; Kikusato, Motoi; Toyama, Natsuki; Sugimura, Satoshi; Hoshino, Yumi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Moisyadi, Stefan; Sato, Eimei

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the cryosurvival of rat epididymal sperm preserved in raffinose–modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate–egg yolk extender supplemented with various energy-yielding substrates (glucose, pyruvate, lactate, and ATP) and assessed the effect on sperm oxygen consumption. The incubation of sperm at 37 °C for 10 min in lactate-free extender decreased sperm motility and oxygen consumption before and after thawing compared with those of sperm in glucose- and pyruvate-free mediums. We then focuse...

  16. The Relationship between Some Ions and Acrosome Reactionof Human Sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春年; 谢文英; 徐胜; 王一飞

    1994-01-01

    The acrosome reaction of sperm was induced by calcium ionophore A 23187. The relationship between some ions and acrosome reaction by removing Na+ from the medium,or by adding antagonist of K+, TEA chloride, or antagonist of Ca++, verapamiI, or antagonist of Na+-h+-ATPase, acetyl strophanthidin is studied The results show that Na+,K+, Ca++ and Na+ pump are necessary for acrosome reaction of human sperm. The Ca++ might not enter the sperms through the channel of Ca++.

  17. Application of new phenolic antioxidants for cryopreservation of sturgeon sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipova, V P; Berberova, N T; Gazzaeva, R A; Kudryavtsev, K V

    2016-04-01

    Heterocyclic derivatives of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were studied as cryoprotectants of the basic media for cryopreservation of the Russian sturgeon sperm. Rates of lipid peroxidation of sturgeon sperm before and after cryopreservation were reduced in the presence of the studied compounds, exceeding the effects of BHT and water-soluble analogue of vitamin E, trolox. The most efficient antioxidant has the effective concentration of 0.1 mM. Novel antioxidant agents as cryomedium supplements not only reduced the level of lipid peroxidation, but also enhanced the translational motility of the sperm of the Russian sturgeon after defrosting. PMID:26929990

  18. Role of Abnormal Sperm Morphology in Predicting Pregnancy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtaie, Samuel A; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A; Kohn, Taylor P; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of strict morphology for predicting successful pregnancy has been controversial, nevertheless remains an essential component of semen analysis. Patients with teratozoospermia (abnormal strict morphology) have traditionally been counseled to undergo assisted reproduction. However, recent studies suggest that patients with abnormal sperm morphology alone should not be precluded from attempting natural conception before undergoing assisted reproduction. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the evaluation of sperm morphology for prognosis in assisted reproductive techniques such as intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Additionally, we propose a logical approach to the evaluation of a patient with teratozoospermia seeking fertility treatment. PMID:27469478

  19. Standardisation of a novel sperm banking kit - NextGen(®) - to preserve sperm parameters during shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Singh, A; Gupta, S; Sharma, R

    2016-08-01

    Many male patients diagnosed with cancer are within their reproductive years. These men are advised to freeze their spermatozoa prior to the start of cancer treatment. Very often, sperm banking facilities may not be readily available and patients may be required to travel to distant sperm bank centres. Our objective was to design and standardise a remote home shipping sperm kit that allows patients to collect a semen sample at home and ship it overnight to a sperm bank. A total of 21 semen samples and two transport media (refrigeration media and human tubal fluid) and five different combinations of ice packs were tested for maintaining desired shipping temperature. Ten semen samples were assessed for pre- and post-shipment changes in sperm motility, membrane integrity, total motile spermatozoa and recovery of motile spermatozoa. Even though motility, membrane integrity and total motile spermatozoa declined both in samples examined under simulated shipped conditions and in overnight-shipped samples, the observed motility and total motile spermatozoa were adequate for use with assisted reproductive techniques. Using refrigeration media, cooling sleeve and ice packs, adequate sperm motility can be maintained utilising NextGen(®) kit and these spermatozoa can be used for procreation utilising ART techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26564753

  20. Standardisation of a novel sperm banking kit - NextGen(®) - to preserve sperm parameters during shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Singh, A; Gupta, S; Sharma, R

    2016-08-01

    Many male patients diagnosed with cancer are within their reproductive years. These men are advised to freeze their spermatozoa prior to the start of cancer treatment. Very often, sperm banking facilities may not be readily available and patients may be required to travel to distant sperm bank centres. Our objective was to design and standardise a remote home shipping sperm kit that allows patients to collect a semen sample at home and ship it overnight to a sperm bank. A total of 21 semen samples and two transport media (refrigeration media and human tubal fluid) and five different combinations of ice packs were tested for maintaining desired shipping temperature. Ten semen samples were assessed for pre- and post-shipment changes in sperm motility, membrane integrity, total motile spermatozoa and recovery of motile spermatozoa. Even though motility, membrane integrity and total motile spermatozoa declined both in samples examined under simulated shipped conditions and in overnight-shipped samples, the observed motility and total motile spermatozoa were adequate for use with assisted reproductive techniques. Using refrigeration media, cooling sleeve and ice packs, adequate sperm motility can be maintained utilising NextGen(®) kit and these spermatozoa can be used for procreation utilising ART techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  1. Seminal plasma arising from the whole boar sperm-rich fraction increases the stability of sperm membrane after thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M A; Ravagnani, G M; Leal, D F; Martins, S M M K; Muro, B B D; Meirelles, F V; Papa, F O; Dell'aqua, J A; Alvarenga, M A; Moretti, A S; De Andrade, A F C

    2016-05-01

    Boar spermatozoa arising from the sperm-rich ejaculate fraction are reported to have a more stable plasma membrane and are more resistant to cold shock and premature acrosome reaction than spermatozoa from the whole ejaculate. Furthermore, seminal plasma (SP) can increase the cryotolerance of boar spermatozoa, and in other domestic species, it has the ability to reverse cryopreservation damage. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of boar SP arising from the whole sperm-rich ejaculate fraction (SP-SRF) on the integrity, stability, and peroxidation of sperm membranes after thawing. Each ejaculate ( = 24) was divided among 4 treatments: control (CT), centrifuged and suspended in autologous SP-SRF (CS), centrifuged with withdrawn SP-SRF (CW), and post-thawed SP arising from the whole sperm-rich fraction addition to CW (CWSP). After thawing, all treatments were incubated for 5, 60, and 120 min and were analyzed for membrane integrity, fluidity, and peroxidation by flow cytometer. The absence of SP-SRF increased the lipid disorder ( 0.05) or membrane integrity ( > 0.05). However, the increase in lipid disorder by withdrawal of SP-SRF was reversed by SP-SRF addition ( 0.05) and lipid peroxidation ( > 0.05) were unchanged. In conclusion, despite the centrifugation effects, the addition of SP arising from the whole sperm-rich fraction to post-thawed boar semen decreased sperm lipid disorder without an influence of the sperm membrane integrity and peroxidation. PMID:27285688

  2. Maturity Model of Software Product with Educational Maturity Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Manjula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Software product line engineering is an inter-disciplinary concept. It spans the dimensions of business, architecture, process,and the organization. Similarly, Education System engineering is also an inter-disciplinary concept, which spans the dimensions of academic, infrastructure, facilities, administration etc. Some of the potential benefits of this approach includecontinuous improvements in System quality and adhering to global standards. The increasing competency in IT and Educational Sectors necessitates a process maturity evaluation methodology. Accordingly, this paper presents an organizational maturity model for Education system for evaluating the maturity of multi- dimension factors and attributes of an Education System. Assessment questionnaires and a rating methodology comprise the framework of this Educational maturity model. The objective and design of the questionnaires are to collect information about the Education system engineering process from the multi perspectives of academic, infrastructure, administration, facilities etc. Furthermore, we conducted one case study and reported the assessment results using the organizational maturity model presented in this paper.

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  4. Andrology laboratory review: Evaluation of sperm concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Althouse, Gary C; Aurich, Christine; Chenoweth, Peter J; Eilts, Bruce E; Love, Charles C; Luvoni, Gaia C; Mitchell, Jere R; Peter, Augustine T; Pugh, David G; Waberski, Dagmar

    2016-06-01

    This article is the result of the work of the andrology task-force of the Association of Applied Animal Andrology, American College of Theriogenologists, European College of Animal Reproduction, Society for Theriogenology, and National Association of Animal Breeders. It is intended to serve as a comprehensive reference on methods to evaluate sperm concentration and to contribute to the adoption of best practices in veterinary andrology laboratories. The information covered in the article includes sample preparation and the use of manual counts, spectrophotometers, computer-assisted semen analysis, NucleoCounter, and flow cytometry. Emphasis is given to the principles of the methods and equipment, performing the evaluation, and common mistakes and/or pitfalls. In addition, the precision and accuracy of the different methods are also discussed. PMID:27045626

  5. Reproductive-tactic-specific variation in sperm swimming speeds in a shell-brooding cichlid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J L; Desjardins, J K; Milligan, N; Montgomerie, R; Balshine, S

    2007-08-01

    Theory predicts that males experiencing elevated levels of sperm competition will invest more in gonads and produce faster-swimming sperm. Although there is ample evidence in support of the first prediction, few studies have examined sperm swimming speed in relation to sperm competition. In this study, we tested these predictions from sperm competition theory by examining sperm characteristics in Telmatochromis vittatus, a small shell-brooding cichlid fish endemic to Lake Tanganyika. Males exhibit four different reproductive tactics: pirate, territorial, satellite, and sneaker. Pirate males temporarily displace all other competing males from a shell nest, whereas sneaker males always release sperm in the presence of territorial and satellite males. Due to the fact that sneakers spawn in the presence of another male, sneakers face the highest levels of sperm competition and pirates the lowest, whereas satellites and territorials experience intermediate levels. In accordance with predictions, sperm from sneakers swam faster than sperm from males adopting the other reproductive tactics, whereas sperm from pirates was slowest. Interestingly, we were unable to detect any variation in sperm tail length among these reproductive tactics. Thus, sperm competition appears to have influenced sperm energetics in this species without having any influence on sperm size. PMID:17460159

  6. Cryorecovery of Mouse Sperm by Different IVF Methods Using MBCD and GSH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Wen; Glass, Olivia C; Zarrabi, Jasmin; Baker, Lisa N.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent

    2016-01-01

    Different protocols incorporating methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) have been reported to improve IVF recovery of cryopreserved mouse sperm on a C57BL/6 (J and N) genetic background. However, it is not clear which IVF protocol is most appropriate when using the various methods to cryorecover sperm with different sperm quality and sample volumes. Therefore, in the present study we correlated sperm motility with fertilization rate and compared the efficiency of different IVF methods using various sperm samples so as to establish general guidelines for mouse sperm cryorecovery by IVF. High linear correlation between sperm fertilization rate and progressive motility was found, R2 was 0.9623 and 0.9993 for pre-freezing and post-thaw progressive motility, respectively. High amounts of cryoprotective agent (CPA) were observed to impair both sperm capacitation and fertilization. Moreover, the presence of a large number of immotile sperm in the sperm-oocyte co-incubation drop was found to reduce IVF success which could be partially reversed by supplementation using monothioglycerol (MTG) during centrifugation. It was concluded that the efficiency of IVF using cryorecovered mouse sperm in media containing MBCD and GSH can be predicted from sperm progressive motility. High concentrations of CPA and immotile sperm should be mitigated prior to IVF. The optimum IVF method should be selected based on sperm sample volume and sperm parameters. PMID:27413624

  7. Evaluation on the Morphology and Membrane Integrity of Immotile Human Sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the membrane integrity in the head and tail regions of individual spermatozoon, and observe sperm morphology for samples with totally immotile sperm.Methods Ten infertile men with immotile sperm were enrolled into this study (group A).The membrane integrity in the head and tail regions of individual spermatozoon of immotile sperm was examined by using the combined hypo-osmotic swelling-eosin Y exclusion test (HOS-EY test). Sperm morphology was observed by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ten semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control (group B).Results The percentage of sperm with intact both head and tail membranes in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.01), whereas the value of sperm with defective head membrane but intact tail membrane in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (P<0.01) Abnormal sperm morphology in group A had a high incidence, and immotile sperm with viability and normal morphology could be observed in some cases. Most sperm had multiple ultrastructural defects.Conclussion Some immotile sperm had intact tail membrane but defective head membrane. Immotile sperm with viability and normal morphology could exist in some cases though abnormal sperm were in a great proportion. Carefully evaluating immotile sperm membrane integrity and morphology should benefit the treatment of patients with immotile sperm.

  8. Sperm cryopreservation in live-bearing Xiphophorus fishes: offspring production from Xiphophorus variatus and strategies for establishment of sperm repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiping; Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Savage, Markita G; Walter, Ronald B; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2012-09-01

    Cryopreservation of sperm from Xiphophorus fishes has produced live young in three species: X. hellerii, X. couchianus, and X. maculatus. In this study, the goal was to establish protocols for sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination to produce live young in X. variatus, and to identify needs for repository development. The objectives were to: 1) collect basic biological characteristics of males; 2) cryopreserve sperm from X. variatus, 3) harvest live young from cryopreserved sperm, and 4) discuss the requirements for establishment of sperm repositories. The 35 males used in this study had a body weight of 0.298±0.096 g (mean±SD), body length of 2.5±0.2 cm, and testis weight of 6.4±3.4 mg. The sperm production per gram of testis was 2.33±1.32×10(9) cells. After freezing, the post-thaw motility decreased significantly to 37%±17% (ranging from 5% to 70%) (p=0.000) from 57%±14% (40%-80%) of fresh sperm (N=20). Artificial insemination of post-thaw sperm produced confirmed offspring from females of X. hellerii and X. variatus. This research, taken together with previous studies, provides a foundation for development of strategies for sperm repositories of Xiphophorus fishes. This includes: 1) the need for breeding strategies for regeneration of target populations, 2) identification of minimum fertilization capacity of frozen samples, 3) identification of fish numbers necessary for sampling and their genetic relationships, 4) selection of packaging containers for labeling and biosecurity, 5) assurance of quality control and standardization of procedures, 6) information systems that can manage the data associated with cryopreserved samples, including the genetic data, 7) biological data of sampled fish, 8) inventory data associated with frozen samples, and 9) data linking germplasm samples with other related materials such as body tissues or cells saved for DNA and RNA analyses. PMID:22924335

  9. Kinetics of human sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, C M; Pavarotti, M A; Zanetti, M N; Zoppino, F C M; De Blas, G A; Mayorga, L S

    2015-03-01

    The acrosome reaction is a unique event in the lifespan of sperm characterized by the exocytosis of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal membrane and the plasma membrane. This unique regulated exocytosis is mediated by essentially the same membrane fusion machinery present in neuroendocrine cells. However, whereas secretion in neuroendocrine cells occurs in less than a second, the acrosome reaction is normally assessed after several minutes of incubation with inducers. In this report, we measured the kinetics of human sperm exocytosis triggered by two stimuli (calcium ionophore and progesterone) by using electron microscopy and three different approaches based on the incorporation of fluorescent Pisum sativum agglutinin into the acrosome upon opening of fusion pores connecting the extracellular medium with the acrosomal lumen. The results with the different methods are consistent with a slow kinetics (t½ = 14 min). We also manipulated the system to measure different steps of the process. We observed that cytosolic calcium increased with a relatively fast kinetics (t½ = 0.1 min). In contrast, the swelling of the acrosomal granule that precedes exocytosis was a slow process (t½ = 13 min). When swelling was completed, the fusion pore opening was fast (t½ = 0.2 min). The results indicate that acrosomal swelling is the slowest step and it determines the kinetics of the acrosome reaction. After the swelling is completed, the efflux of calcium from intracellular stores triggers fusion pores opening and the release of hybrid vesicles in seconds.

  10. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of major sperm protein (MSP) in spermatogenic cells of the nematode Acrobeles complexus (Nematoda, Rhabditida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushin, Vladimir V; Claeys, Myriam; Bert, Wim

    2016-10-01

    The nematode spermatozoa represent a highly modified (aberrant) type of male gametes that lack a flagellum but for which the process of spermatogenesis culminates in the production of a crawling spermatozoon on the basis of the cytoskeletal component known as "major sperm protein", or MSP. MSP is also known as an important hormone triggering oocyte maturation and ovulation in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where this protein was first identified. However, direct evidence of MSP localization and of its fate in nematode spermatogenic cells is rare. In this study, the spermatogenesis and sperm structure in the rhabditid nematode Acrobeles complexus (Rhabditida: Tylenchina: Cephalobomorpha: Cephaloboidea: Cephalobidae) has been examined with electron microscopy. Morphological observations were followed by high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation which allows post-embedding immunogold localization of MSP in all stages of sperm development using antibodies raised for MSP of C. elegans. In spermatocytes, synthetic activity results in the development of specific cellular components, fibrous bodies (FB) and membranous organelles (MO), which appear as FB-MO complexes where the filamentous matter of FB has been MSP-labeled. The spermatids subdivide into a residual body with superfluous cytoplasm, and a main cell body which contains nucleus, mitochondria and FB-MO complexes. These complexes dissociate into individual components, MO and FB, with the MSP being localized in FB. Immature spermatozoa from testes are opaque cells where a centrally located nucleus is surrounded by mitochondria, MO and FB clustered together, the MSP still being localized only in FB. Cytoplasm of mature spermatozoa from spermatheca is segregated into external pseudopods lacking organelles and a central cluster of mitochondria with intact MO surrounding the central nucleus. The FB ultimately disappear, and the MSP labeling becomes concentrated in the filamentous content of

  11. Identification, cloning and functional characterization of novel sperm associated antigen 11 (SPAG11 isoforms in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrusz Peter

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sperm binding proteins and their C-terminal peptides of the Sperm Associated Antigen 11 (SPAG11 family were found to play an important role in epididymal innate immunity in addition to their role in sperm maturation. However, the expression of Spag11 transcripts in rodents is not well documented. Methods Computational analysis was employed to identify novel Spag11 isoforms in the rat. RT-PCR analyses were carried out on RNAs isolated from the male reproductive tract tissues of rat using gene specific primers for Spag11c and Spag11t. The identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. Tissue distribution, developmental expression and androgen regulation of Spag11t and Spag11c were studied using RT-PCR. The antimicrobial activities of recombinant Spag11t and Spag11c were tested against E coli in a colony forming unit assay. Results In this study, we identified two novel Spag11 transcripts, namely, Spag11t and Spag11c derived from the long arm of chromosome 16 in the rat (Rattus norvegicus, using both in silico and molecular biology approaches. Spag11c is expressed in all three regions of the epididymis, in testis and in ovary but is absent from the seminal vesicle. Spag11t expression is confined to the caput and it is not expressed in the testis, seminal vesicle or ovary. Age dependent expression of Spag11t and Spag11c was observed in the epididymides of rats (10–60 day old. Their expression was found to be most abundant in the adult rat (60 day suggesting roles in mature reproductive function. Further, both Spag11t and Spag11c expression was down regulated in castrated rat epididymides and the expression was maintained in the testosterone replaced castrated rats. SPAG11C is a potent antibacterial agent. SPAG11T also displayed bactericidal capacity although weaker than SPAG11C and SPAG11E. Conclusion The abundant expression of Spag11t and Spag11c in the male reproductive tract suggests an important role in male

  12. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of major sperm protein (MSP) in spermatogenic cells of the nematode Acrobeles complexus (Nematoda, Rhabditida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushin, Vladimir V; Claeys, Myriam; Bert, Wim

    2016-10-01

    The nematode spermatozoa represent a highly modified (aberrant) type of male gametes that lack a flagellum but for which the process of spermatogenesis culminates in the production of a crawling spermatozoon on the basis of the cytoskeletal component known as "major sperm protein", or MSP. MSP is also known as an important hormone triggering oocyte maturation and ovulation in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where this protein was first identified. However, direct evidence of MSP localization and of its fate in nematode spermatogenic cells is rare. In this study, the spermatogenesis and sperm structure in the rhabditid nematode Acrobeles complexus (Rhabditida: Tylenchina: Cephalobomorpha: Cephaloboidea: Cephalobidae) has been examined with electron microscopy. Morphological observations were followed by high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation which allows post-embedding immunogold localization of MSP in all stages of sperm development using antibodies raised for MSP of C. elegans. In spermatocytes, synthetic activity results in the development of specific cellular components, fibrous bodies (FB) and membranous organelles (MO), which appear as FB-MO complexes where the filamentous matter of FB has been MSP-labeled. The spermatids subdivide into a residual body with superfluous cytoplasm, and a main cell body which contains nucleus, mitochondria and FB-MO complexes. These complexes dissociate into individual components, MO and FB, with the MSP being localized in FB. Immature spermatozoa from testes are opaque cells where a centrally located nucleus is surrounded by mitochondria, MO and FB clustered together, the MSP still being localized only in FB. Cytoplasm of mature spermatozoa from spermatheca is segregated into external pseudopods lacking organelles and a central cluster of mitochondria with intact MO surrounding the central nucleus. The FB ultimately disappear, and the MSP labeling becomes concentrated in the filamentous content of

  13. Block Scheduling Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, J. Allen

    2000-01-01

    Successful block scheduling depends on provision of initial and ongoing instructional training. Teaching strategies should vary and include cooperative learning, the case method, the socratic seminar, synectics, concept attainment, the inquiry method, and simulations. Recommendations for maximizing block scheduling are outlined. (Contains 52…

  14. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  15. Interpreting sperm DNA damage in a diverse range of mammalian sperm by means of the two-tailed comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; López-Fernández, Carmen; Fernández, José Luis; DÁVILA-RODRÍGUEZ, MARTHA I.; Johnston, Stephen D; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Key Concepts The two-dimensional Two-Tailed Comet assay (TT-comet) protocol is a valuable technique to differentiate between single-stranded (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on the same sperm cell. Protein lysis inherent with the TT-comet protocol accounts for differences in sperm protamine composition at a species-specific level to produce reliable visualization of sperm DNA damage. Alkaline treatment may break the sugar–phosphate backbone in abasic sites or at sites wi...

  16. Inhibition of in vitro fertilizing capacity of cryopreserved mouse sperm by factors released by damaged sperm, and stimulation by glutathione.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Bath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro fertilization (IVF of eggs by frozen and thawed C57BL/6J mouse sperm is inhibited by dead sperm and enhanced by preincubation of the sperm in calcium-free medium. In other species, the presence of sperm killed by freezing and thawing has been associated with the generation of hydrogen peroxide. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportion of eggs fertilized by cryopreserved C57BL/6J mouse sperm was increased significantly by increasing the volume of fertilization medium in which sperm and eggs were coincubated. Enhanced fertilization occurred even though the concentration of potentially fertile sperm was decreased fivefold. This suggested that if a putative soluble factor was inhibiting fertilization, dilution of that factor, but not the sperm, should increase the fertilization rate. This was achieved by coincubation of the gametes in cell culture inserts (Transwells that during incubation were transferred progressively to wells containing fresh fertilization medium. Fertilization rates using inserts were high (66.6+/-2.4% versus 27.3%+/-2.8% in wells alone. On the assumption that the soluble factor could be H(2O(2, reduced glutathione was added to the fertilization medium. This enhanced fertilization rate significantly (76.6%+/-2.0% versus 21.2%+/-1.9%, while addition of oxidized glutathione did not (82.7%+/-6.5% with reduced glutathione; 44.5+/-8.8% with oxidized glutathione; 47.8%+/-12.1% with no glutathione. Positive effects of reduced glutathione on IVF were also seen with frozen 129S1, FVB, and C3H sperm, and sperm from two lines of genetically modified C57BL/6J mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IVF in cell culture inserts and addition of glutathione to fertilization medium significantly increased the proportion of eggs fertilized by cryopreserved mouse sperm from four inbred strains, suggesting that reactive oxygen species generated during fertilization inhibit fertilization. The modified IVF techniques developed here

  17. From Crescent to Mature Virion: Vaccinia Virus Assembly and Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV has achieved unprecedented success as a live viral vaccine for smallpox which mitigated eradication of the disease. Vaccinia virus has a complex virion morphology and recent advances have been made to answer some of the key outstanding questions, in particular, the origin and biogenesis of the virion membrane, the transformation from immature virion (IV to mature virus (MV, and the role of several novel genes, which were previously uncharacterized, but have now been shown to be essential for VACV virion formation. This new knowledge will undoubtedly contribute to the rational design of safe, immunogenic vaccine candidates, or effective antivirals in the future. This review endeavors to provide an update on our current knowledge of the VACV maturation processes with a specific focus on the initiation of VACV replication through to the formation of mature virions.

  18. Parthenogenic blastocysts derived from cumulus-free in vitro matured human oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohyun L McElroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of oocytes are classified as immature and discarded following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. These oocytes are obtained from gonadotropin-stimulated patients, and are routinely removed from the cumulus cells which normally would mature the oocytes. Given the ready access to these human oocytes, they represent a potential resource for both clinical and basic science application. However culture conditions for the maturation of cumulus-free oocytes have not been optimized. We aimed to improve maturation conditions for cumulus-free oocytes via culture with ovarian paracrine/autocrine factors identified by single cell analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Immature human oocytes were matured in vitro via supplementation with ovarian paracrine/autocrine factors that were selected based on expression of ligands in the cumulus cells and their corresponding receptors in oocytes. Matured oocytes were artificially activated to assess developmental competence. Gene expression profiles of parthenotes were compared to IVF/ICSI embryos at morula and blastocyst stages. Following incubation in medium supplemented with ovarian factors (BDNF, IGF-I, estradiol, GDNF, FGF2 and leptin, a greater percentage of oocytes demonstrated nuclear maturation and subsequently, underwent parthenogenesis relative to control. Similarly, cytoplasmic maturation was also improved as indicated by development to blastocyst stage. Parthenogenic blastocysts exhibited mRNA expression profiles similar to those of blastocysts obtained after IVF/ICSI with the exception for MKLP2 and PEG1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Human cumulus-free oocytes from hormone-stimulated cycles are capable of developing to blastocysts when cultured with ovarian factor supplementation. Our improved IVM culture conditions may be used for obtaining mature oocytes for clinical purposes and/or for derivation of embryonic stem cells following parthenogenesis or nuclear

  19. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters. PMID:26506651

  20. AWARE Sonar and Sperm Whale Tagging (DE9906, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AWARE sonar and sperm whale tagging cruise primarily focuses on whales in the continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  1. EVALUATION OF QUANTITATIVE BACTERIOLOGICAL CULTURE BEFORE AND AFTER SPERM WASHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANGGuang-Lun; ZHANGXi-Wei; WUGuo-Hua

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether sperm washing can remove microorganisms from human semen. 20 ejaculates were cultured for detecting the existenoe of any possible aerobic and anaerobic becteria. Samples collected were divided into two groups: spocial

  2. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters.

  3. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in process data apparently are available. PMID:24274405

  4. Impact of sperm DNA chromatin in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Miller, David; Griffin, Darren K; Tempest, Helen G

    2016-02-01

    The paternal contribution to fertilization and embryogenesis is frequently overlooked as the spermatozoon is often considered to be a silent vessel whose only function is to safely deliver the paternal genome to the maternal oocyte. In this article, we hope to demonstrate that this perception is far from the truth. Typically, infertile men have been unable to conceive naturally (or through regular IVF), and therefore, a perturbation of the genetic integrity of sperm heads in infertile males has been under-considered. The advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) however has led to very successful treatment of male factor infertility and subsequent widespread use in IVF clinics worldwide. Until recently, little concern has been raised about the genetic quality of sperm in ICSI patients or the impact genetic aberrations could have on fertility and embryogenesis. This review highlights the importance of chromatin packaging in the sperm nucleus as essential for the establishment and maintenance of a viable pregnancy. PMID:26678492

  5. Digital holographic microscopy for the evaluation of human sperm structure

    CERN Document Server

    Coppola, Gianluca; Wilding, Martin; Ferraro, Pietro; Esposito, Giusy; Di Matteo, Loredana; Dale, Roberta; Coppola, Giuseppe; Dale, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the sperm head has often been correlated with the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF), and has been shown to be the sole parameter in semen of value in predicting the success of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). In this paper, we have studied whether Digital Holographic (DH) microscopy may be useful to obtain quantitative data on human sperm head structure and compared this technique to high power digitally enhanced Nomarski microscope. The main advantage of DH is that a high resolution 3-D quantitative sample imaging may be obtained thorugh numerical refocusing at different object planes without any mechanical scanning. We show that DH can furnish useful information on the dimensions and structure of human spermatozoo, that cannot be revealed by conventional phase contrast microscopy. In fact, in this paper DH has been used to evaluate volume and indicate precise location of vacuoles, thus suggesting its use as ...

  6. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-10

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm.

  7. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm

  8. Effects of Seminal Plasma Relaxin on Human Sperm Motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于宁妮; 陆欣; 徐胜; 冯京生; 吴明章

    1999-01-01

    To clarify the role of endogenous relaxin on sperm motility, relaxin in semen was neutraliged by anti-relaxin antibody in vitro.22 semen samples were collected from infertility clinic and tested with Hamilton-Thorn 2000 Motility Analyzer to detect spermmotility(%),progressive motility(%),path velocity (micro/sec) and velocity(0-4 grade) at the time of 0,15,30 and 60 min respectively.The results showed that sperm motility declined significantly after being incubated with anti-relaxin serum.Sperm progressive motility declined more obviously.This experiment revealed that endogenous relaxin could play an important role in the physiological process of maintaining sperm motility,especially progressive motility.

  9. Sperm quality in mice acutely treated with parathion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CristianSobarzo; EduardoBustos-Obregón

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the toxic effect of a single injection of the organopbospborous agropesticide, parathion, on spermatogenesis in immature male mice. Methods: Seven-day old mice received a single injection of parathion intraperitoneally at a dose of 1/3 LD50. The epididymal sperm count, sperm morphology and chromatin thermal stability were analyzed 28 and 50 days after injection. Results: Sperm counts were decreased and teratozoospermia and thermal denaturation of DNA increased after parathion injection. Sperm parameters were changed to a greater extent in younger animals, denoting a nigher lability of spermatogenic process at its beginning. The damages could recover a long time after parathion administration. Conclusion: Organopbospborous agropesticides are testicular toxicants, eliciting reversible cytotoxic and cytogenetic alterations in germ cells.

  10. AWARE Sonar and Sperm Whale Tagging (DE0007, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AWARE sonar and sperm whale tagging cruise primarily focuses on whales in the continental shelf areas, with the following objectives: 1) Develop a better...

  11. Prostaglandin modulation of mouse and human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M B; Viggiano, J M; Boquet, M; Gimeno, M A

    1997-09-01

    To determine whether prostaglandins produce a capacitation and/or acrosome reaction, the effect of prostaglandins on capacitated mouse spermatozoa and the effect of prostaglandin pre-incubation on human and mouse spermatozoa were studied. Prostaglandins did not induce an acrosome reaction in capacitated mouse sperm. PGE1 pre-incubation in a protein-free medium enhanced acrosome loss of mouse sperm challenged with A-23187 or solubilized mouse zona pellucida. Human sperm were pre-incubated in media containing prostaglandins, and an acrosome reaction was induced with calcium ionophore or human follicular fluid. PGE1 pre-incubation enhanced acrosome loss by human sperm when the action was induced with calcium ionophore, but had no effect on follicular fluid induction. We conclude that PGE1 acts as a capacitating factor in vitro for mouse spermatozoa, and enhances acrosome-reaction induction with calcium ionophore in human spermatozoa.

  12. Determination of sperm creatine kinase and its isozyme in infertile patients%不育症患者精子肌酸激酶活性及其同工酶测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗比; 陈建; 漆著

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a biochemical marker of cytoplasm, the increased activity of creatine kinase (CK) in human spermatozoa is correlated with both the residual cytoplasma and the ratio of sperm with abnormal func tion. It is a marker of mature sperm and associated with the potential of in semination. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the differences of CK activity in sperm and the relative contents of sperm CK-MM and CK-BB isoenzymes between normal fertile males and infertile males, and evaluate its significance in clinical diagnosis of male infertility. DESIGN: Case-control observation. SETTING: Laboratory of Biochemistry, Family Planning Research Insti tute of Sichuan Province. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-four male infertile patients between January 1999 and October 2000 were selected from the Department of Family Planning Sciences of Sichuan Province, who had no aspermatism with their wives proved to be fertile. The average age of subjects were 31 years. Eighty subjects with the sperm count > 2×1010 L-1 were taken as normal sperm group and 14 subjects with the sperm counts < 2×1010 L-1 were considered as oligospermia group. Semen obtained from 27 healthy males who were normal in routine examinations and with children was taken as the healthy control group.METHODS: Semen sample collected by masturbation after abstinence of 3 to 5 days was incubated at 37 ℃ for liquefication and routinely analyzed.Total activity of CK in sperm was determined by using a kinetic spectrophotometry and the relative contents of CK isozyme was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis followed by density scanning of CK isozyme.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sperm counts, percentages of viability and motility of sperm, total CK activity and the relative contents of CK-MM and CK-BB isozyme in spermatozoa.RESULTS: A total of 94 enrolled patients and 27 normal controls were involved in the analysis of results. ①Sperm counts, percentage of viability and motility in oligospermia group ( Ⅱ + Ⅲ, WHO method

  13. Characterisation of mouse epididymosomes reveals a complex profile of microRNAs and a potential mechanism for modification of the sperm epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jackson N; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Stanger, Simone J; Anderson, Amanda L; Hutcheon, Kate; Church, Kiralee; Mihalas, Bettina P; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E; Eamens, Andrew L; Nixon, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that the sperm epigenome is vulnerable to dynamic modifications arising from a variety of paternal environment exposures and that this legacy can serve as an important determinant of intergenerational inheritance. It has been postulated that such exchange is communicated to maturing spermatozoa via the transfer of small non-protein-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in a mechanism mediated by epididymosomes; small membrane bound vesicles released by the soma of the male reproductive tract (epididymis). Here we confirm that mouse epididymosomes encapsulate an impressive cargo of >350 microRNAs (miRNAs), a developmentally important sRNA class, the majority (~60%) of which are also represented by the miRNA signature of spermatozoa. This includes >50 miRNAs that were found exclusively in epididymal sperm and epididymosomes, but not in the surrounding soma. We also documented substantial changes in the epididymosome miRNA cargo, including significant fold changes in almost half of the miRNAs along the length of the epididymis. Finally, we provide the first direct evidence for the transfer of several prominent miRNA species between mouse epididymosomes and spermatozoa to afford novel insight into a mechanism of intercellular communication by which the sRNA payload of sperm can be selectively modified during their post-testicular maturation. PMID:27549865

  14. Effect of homeopathic treatment used in commercial boar semen diluent on sperm viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Assunpção

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been speculated that the homeopathic treatment of sperm cells in order to improve semen quality could be promising. However, few data is available and its use in spermatozoa requires investigation. It is well established that mitochondrial membrane potential is an important viability parameter of spermatozoa and it is intimately related to reproductive efficiency. In this manner, new technologies in order to improve the activity of sperm cells and, finally, the fecundity of swine herds are of extremely importance. Due to the lack of knowledge of homeopathic treatment effect on spermatozoa, the aim of the present study was to verify the effect of three different homeopathic treatments on viability of boar sperm cells. Methods: semen samples were obtained from two sexually mature boars (18 mo of age. The boars were cross bred, with similar genetics of Pietrain versus Duroc, BP 450 progeny from a supplier company of similar reproductive performance animals. The animals were maintained in individual stalls, study conducted in Sao Paulo - Brazil. Three homeopathic treatments: Pulsatilla 6CH, Avena 6 CH or both, compared to placebo treatment (sucrose, the homeopathic medicaments or the control were administrated as globules manipulated according Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacology. Each globule weighted 30 mg and contained sucrose as vehicle. One dose of two globules was added per 100 mL of diluted boar semen, which were chilled for 24 or 48 hours. All samples were labeled in codes in order to allow all laboratory analysis and evaluations being performed as a blind test. Data were tested for normality of residues and homogeneity of variances using the Guided Data Analysis software. Variables and interactions were analyzed by the PROC MIXED of the SAS package (SAS Institute Ins. Cary, NC. Adjusted least squares means (LSMEANS of treatments were compared using the Tukey Test. Results: The different treatments contributed to

  15. Sexual behavior and seminal characteristics of fertile mature New Zealand White male rabbits of different body weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-De Lara, R; Fallas-López, M; García-Muñiz, J G; Martínez-Hernández, P A; Rangel-Santos, R; Maldonado-Siman, E; Cadena-Meneses, J A

    2015-01-01

    Body weight in different mammalian species influences reproductive potential. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship of body weight at the time of semen collection with libido, seminal characteristics and number of semen doses for artificial insemination (AI) in New Zealand White mature fertile male rabbits. Data came from 728 semen collections of 14 rabbits, 15-months of age that were sexually experienced with proven semen quality and fertility. Semen collection was performed twice a week with two ejaculates at each collection time and lasted 14 weeks. A second ejaculation was collected at 1-2h after the first. Data from each male from first and second ejaculates from 1 day of semen collection throughout the trial were averaged (n=324) and partial correlation coefficients and regression equations were estimated to describe the relationship of male body weight to ejaculation reaction time and 12 semen and sperm characteristics. As body weight increased there was a linear (Pincrease in reaction time, abnormal sperm with an intact membrane and abnormal sperm with a damaged membrane and a linear (Plibido, semen and sperm characteristics, with a general trend toward a lesser reproduction potential as body weight increases. PMID:25482591

  16. Penicillamine prevents ram sperm agglutination in media that support capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, T; Rickard, J P; Aitken, R J; de Graaf, S P

    2016-02-01

    Ram spermatozoa are difficult to capacitate in vitro. Here we describe a further complication, the unreported phenomenon of head-to-head agglutination of ram spermatozoa following dilution in the capacitation medium Tyrodes plus albumin, lactate and pyruvate (TALP). Sperm agglutination is immediate, specific and persistent and is not associated with a loss of motility. Agglutination impedes in vitro sperm handling and analysis. So the objectives of this study were to investigate the cause of sperm agglutination and potential agents which may reduce agglutination. The percentage of non-agglutinated, motile spermatozoa increased when bicarbonate was omitted from complete TALP suggesting that bicarbonate ions stimulate the agglutination process. d-penicillamine (PEN), a nucleophilic thiol, was highly effective at reducing agglutination. The inclusion of 250 μM PEN in TALP reduced the incidence of motile, agglutinated spermatozoa from 76.7 ± 2.7% to 2.8 ± 1.4%. It was then assessed if PEN (1 mM) could be included in existing ram sperm capacitation protocols (TALP +1 mM dibutyryl cAMP, caffeine and theophylline) to produce spermatozoa that were simultaneously capacitated and non-agglutinated. This protocol resulted in a sperm population which displayed high levels of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and lipid disordered membranes (merocyanine-540) while remaining motile, viable, acrosome-intact and non-agglutinated. In summary, PEN (1 mM) can be included in ram sperm capacitation protocols to reduce sperm agglutination and allow for the in vitro assessment of ram sperm capacitation.

  17. Direct action of endocrine disrupting chemicals on human sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Schiffer, Christian; Müller, Astrid; Egeberg, Dorte L; Alvarez, Luis,; Brenker, Christoph; Rehfeld, Anders; Frederiksen, Hanne; Wäschle, Benjamin; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Balbach, Melanie; Wachten, Dagmar; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Almstrup, Kristian; Strünker, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), omnipresent in food, household, and personal care products, have been implicated in adverse trends in human reproduction, including infertility and increasing demand for assisted reproduction. Here, we study the action of 96 ubiquitous EDCs on human sperm. We show that structurally diverse EDCs activate the sperm-specific CatSper channel and, thereby, evoke an intracellular Ca2+ increase, a motility response, and acrosomal exocytosis. Moreover,...

  18. MILT DILUTION EFFECTIVENESS ON PIKEPERCH (SANDER LUCIOPERCA) SPERM DNA INACTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    B. KORBULY; A. GROZEA; ADA CEAN; I. BĂNĂŢEAN - DUNEA; N. PĂCALĂ; A. VĂLEAN

    2013-01-01

    Percid fishes, including pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) have recently become the subject of intense research. In order to obtain gynogenetic all female pikeperch populations, normal pikeperch eggs are fertilized with inactivated sperm. Because pikeperch semen has a high viscosity, milt has to be diluted in an immobilizing solution before DNA inactivation. The aim of this study was to assess milt diluting solutions effectiveness in order to inactivate sperm DNA with UV irradiation, to produce m...

  19. Mass sperm motility is associated with fertility in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    David, Ingrid; Kohnke, Philippa; Lagriffoul, Gilles; Praud, Olivier; Plouarboué, Franck; Degond, Pierre; Druart, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The study was to focus on the relationship between wave motion (mass sperm motility, measured by a mass sperm motility score, manually assessed by artificial insemination (AI) center operators) and fertility in male sheep. A dataset of 711,562 artificial inseminations performed in seven breeds by five French AI centers during the 2001–2005 time period was used for the analysis. Factors influencing the outcome of the insemination, which is a binary response observed at lambing of either succes...

  20. Surgical recovery of sperm in non-obstructive azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomomoto Ishikawa

    2012-01-01

    The development of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) opened a new era in the field of assisted reproduction and revolutionized the assisted reproductive technology protocols for couples with male factor infertility.Fertilisation and pregnancies can be achieved with spermatozoa recovered not only from the ejaculate but also from the seminiferous tubules.The most common methods for retrieving testicular sperm in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) are testicular sperm aspiration (TESA:needle/fine needle aspiration)and open testicular biopsy (testicular sperm extraction:TESE).The optimal technique for sperm extraction should be minimally invasive and avoid destruction of testicular function,without compromising the chance to retrieve adequate numbers of spermatozoa to perform ICSI.Microdissection TESE (micro-TESE),performed with an operative microscope,is widely considered to be the best method for sperm retrieval in NOA,as larger and opaque tubules,presumably with active spermatogenesis,can be directly identified,resulting in higher spermatozoa retrieval rates with minimal tissue loss and low postoperative complications.Micro-TESE,in combination with ICSI,is applicable in all cases of NOA,including Klinefelter syndrome (KS).The outcomes of surgical sperm retrieval,primarily in NOA patients with elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (NOA including KS patients),are reviewed along with the phenotypic features.The predictive factors for surgical sperm retrieval and outcomes of treatment were analysed.Finally,the shortand long-term complications in micro-TESE in both 46XY males with NOA and KS patients are considered.