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Sample records for blocks sperm maturation

  1. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis.

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    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm.

  2. Is lithium essential for epididymal sperm maturation?

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    Halder, Tanmoy; Datta, Uttam; Basu, Siddhartha; Mukherjee, Prasenjit

    2016-11-01

    A wider biological role of ultratrace element lithium in the mammalian reproduction has been reported, however, presence of lithium in the epididymal luminal fluid (ELF) and its influence on sperm during maturation events in the epididymal regions are still unknown. A pilot study was carried out in Jamunapari buck which revealed that levels of lithium in the ELF diminished gradually and significantly (Psperm were observed, except spermatozoan motility that was found absent in the caput epididymis. Therefore, we hypothesize that levels of lithium in the epididymal regions is one of the motility initiation and/or regulatory factor for epididymal sperm maturation essential for acquiring fertilizing competence of sperm cells, hence, lithium could also be considered as one of the biomarker of sperm maturation in any species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Posttesticular sperm maturation, infertility, and hypercholesterolemia

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    Marjorie Whitfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a key molecule in the mammalian physiology of especial particular importance for the reproductive system as it is the common precursor for steroid hormone synthesis. Cholesterol is also a recognized modulator of sperm functions, not only at the level of gametogenesis. Cholesterol homeostasis regulation is crucial for posttesticular sperm maturation, and imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect these posttesticular events. Metabolic lipid disorders (dyslipidemia affect male fertility but are most of the time studied from the angle of endocrine/testicular consequences. This review will focus on the deleterious effects of a particular dyslipidemia, i.e., hypercholesterolemia, on posttesticular maturation of mammalian spermatozoa.

  4. Hyaluronic acid binding ability of human sperm reflects cellular maturity and fertilizing potential: selection of sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

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    Huszar, Gabor; Ozkavukcu, Sinan; Jakab, Attila; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Sati, G Leyla; Cayli, Sevil

    2006-06-01

    The current concepts of sperm biochemical markers and the central role of the HspA2 chaperone protein, a measure of sperm cellular maturity and fertilizing potential, are reviewed. Because HspA2 is a component of the synaptonemal complex, low HspA2 levels and increased frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies are related in diminished maturity sperm. We also suggest a relationship between HspA2 expression in elongating spermatids and events of late spermiogenesis, such as cytoplasmic extrusion and plasma membrane remodeling that aid the formation of the zona pellucida binding and hyaluronic acid binding sites. The presence of hyaluronic acid receptor on the plasma membrane of mature sperm, coupled with hyaluronic acid coated glass or plastic surfaces, facilitates testing of sperm function and selection of single mature sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The frequencies of sperm with chromosomal disomy are reduced approximately fourfold to fivefold in hyaluronic acid selected sperm compared with semen sperm, comparable to the increase in such abnormalities in intracytoplasmic sperm injection offspring. Hyaluronic acid binding also excludes immature sperm with cytoplasmic extrusion, persistent histones, and DNA chain breaks. Hyaluronic acid mediated sperm selection is a novel technique that is comparable to sperm zona pellucida binding. Hyaluronic acid selected sperm will also alleviate the risks related to intracytoplasmic sperm injection fertilization with sperm of diminished maturity that currently cause worldwide concern.

  5. Role of WNT signaling in epididymal sperm maturation.

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    Cheng, Jin-Mei; Tang, Ji-Xin; Li, Jian; Wang, Yu-Qian; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Su-Ren; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2018-02-01

    Spermatozoa maturation, a process required for spermatozoa to acquire progressive motility and the ability to fertilize ova, primarily occurs in the caput and corpus of the epididymis. Despite considerable efforts, the factor(s) promoting epididymal sperm maturation remains unclear. Recently, WNT signaling has been implicated in epididymal sperm maturation. To further investigate WNT signaling function in epididymal sperm maturation, we generated Wntless conditional knockout mice (Wls cKO), Wls flox/flox ; Lcn5-Cre. In these mice, WNTLESS (WLS), a conserved membrane protein required for all WNT protein secretion, was specifically disrupted in the principal cells of the caput epididymidis. Immunoblot analysis showed that WLS was significantly reduced in the caput epididymidis of Wls cKO mice. In the caput epididymidis of Wls cKO mice, WNT 10A and WNT 2b, which are typically secreted by the principal cells of the caput epididymis, were not secreted. Interestingly, sperm motility analysis showed that the WLS deficiency in the caput epididymidis had no effect on sperm motility. Moreover, fertility tests showed that Wls cKO male mice had normal fertility. These results indicate that the disruption of WLS in principal cells of the caput epididymidis inhibits WNT protein secretion but has no effect on sperm motility and male fertility, suggesting that WNT signaling in the caput epididymidis may be dispensable for epididymal sperm maturation in mice.

  6. Identification and validation of mouse sperm proteins correlated with epididymal maturation

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    Ijiri, Takashi W.; Merdiushev, Tanya; Cao, Wenlei; Gerton, George L.

    2011-01-01

    Sperm need to mature in the epididymis to become capable of fertilization. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mouse sperm maturation, we conducted a proteomic analysis using saturation dye labeling to identify proteins of caput and cauda epididymal sperm that exhibited differences in amounts or positions on two-dimensional gels. Of eight caput epididymal sperm-differential proteins, three were molecular chaperones and three were structural proteins. Of nine cauda epididymal sperm-diffe...

  7. Protein deubiquitination during oocyte maturation influences sperm function during fertilisation, antipolyspermy defense and embryo development.

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    Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Song, Won-Hee; Sutovsky, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitination is a covalent post-translational modification of proteins by the chaperone protein ubiquitin. Upon docking to the 26S proteasome, ubiquitin is released from the substrate protein by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). We hypothesised that specific inhibitors of two closely related oocyte DUBs, namely inhibitors of the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCH) UCHL1 (L1 inhibitor) and UCHL3 (L3 inhibitor), would alter porcine oocyte maturation and influence sperm function and embryo development. Aberrant cortical granule (CG) migration and meiotic spindle defects were observed in oocytes matured with the L1 or L3 inhibitor. Embryo development was delayed or blocked in oocytes matured with the general DUB inhibitor PR-619. Aggresomes, the cellular stress-inducible aggregates of ubiquitinated proteins, formed in oocytes matured with L1 inhibitor or PR-619, a likely consequence of impaired protein turnover. Proteomic analysis identified the major vault protein (MVP) as the most prominent protein accumulated in oocytes matured with PR-619, suggesting that the inhibition of deubiquitination altered the turnover of MVP. The mitophagy/autophagy of sperm-contributed mitochondria inside the fertilised oocytes was hindered by DUB inhibitors. It is concluded that DUB inhibitors alter porcine oocyte maturation, fertilisation and preimplantation embryo development. By regulating the turnover of oocyte proteins and mono-ubiquitin regeneration, the DUBs may promote the acquisition of developmental competence during oocyte maturation.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29, a protein related to sperm maturation is involved in sperm-oocyte fusion in mouse

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    Zhu Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sperm-oocyte fusion is a critical step in fertilization, which requires a series of proteins from both spermatozoa and oocyte to mediate membrane adhesion and subsequent fusion. A rat spermatozoa membrane protein is endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29, which significantly increases on the sperm surface as well as in the cytoplasm of epididymal epithelia from caput to cauda as the sperm undergo epididymal maturation. Moreover, ERp29 facilitates viral infection via mediating membrane penetration. We determined if in addition to promoting sperm maturation ERp29 may also play a role in facilitating gamete fusion during the fertilization process. Methods Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM and Western blot analysis were employed to probe for ERp29 protein in BALB/c mouse epididymal and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa. We prepared rabbit polyclonal antibodies against mouse recombinant ERp29 (rERp29 to characterize: 1 fertilization rate (FR; 2 fertilization index (FI; 3 sperm motility and 4 acrosome reaction (AR. Results Confocal microscopy indicated that ERp29 was partially localized at the sperm head of the epididymal caput as well as over the whole head and part of the principal piece of the tail region from the epididymal cauda. However, when the acrosome reacted, ERp29 remained in the equatorial and post-acrosomal regions of the sperm head, which is the initial site of sperm-oocyte membrane fusion. Such localization changes were confirmed based on the results of Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the antibodies against mouse rERp29 inhibited the spermatozoa from penetrating into the zona pellucida (ZP-free oocytes. The functional blocking antibodies reduced both mouse sperm-oocyte FR and FI at concentrations of 100 and 200 micro g/ml compared with pre-immunized rabbit IgG or with anti-mouse recombinant bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI, a sperm surface protein unrelated to sperm-oocyte fusion antibodies

  9. Sperm maturation in dogs: sperm profile and enzymatic antioxidant status in ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa.

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    Angrimani, D S R; Lucio, C F; Veiga, G A L; Silva, L C G; Regazzi, F M; Nichi, M; Vannucchi, C I

    2014-09-01

    Spermatozoa become more susceptible to the attack of reactive oxygen species during maturation. To avoid oxidative damage, the epididymis must provide the necessary antioxidant protection. The aim of this study was to compare the canine sperm profile and the enzymatic antioxidant status of the ejaculated fractions and samples collected from the different segments of the epididymis (caput, corpus and cauda). Five adult dogs were used, and after 1-3 weeks, subsequently to bilateral orchiectomy and epididymal storage, sperm samples were collected from the different segments of the epididymis. Samples were evaluated for conventional microscopy and computer-assisted motility analysis: sperm plasma membrane permeability and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Samples collected from the caput and corpus showed lower values for most of the motility variables evaluated, indicating different levels of immaturity. Catalase activity was observed only in ejaculated samples. Conversely, GPx activity was higher in the cauda epididymidis. Correlations were found between SOD and GPx and SOD and sperm motility in the epididymal cauda and corpus, highlighting the importance of the enzymes for the protection of spermatozoa during the transit along the epididymis. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Nonpathological extracellular amyloid is present during normal epididymal sperm maturation.

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    Sandra Whelly

    Full Text Available Amyloids are aggregated proteins characterized by a specific cross-β-sheet structure and are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, however, several nonpathological amyloids have been found in intracellular organelles of normal mammalian tissues suggesting that amyloid may also carry out biological functions. We previously have shown that the epididymal cystatin CRES (cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic, cst8, a reproductive-specific member of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors, forms amyloid in vitro suggesting that CRES amyloid may also form in vivo within the epididymal lumen. Here we show that amyloid structures containing CRES are a component of the normal mouse epididymal lumen without any apparent cytotoxic effects on spermatozoa and that these structures change along the length of the tubule. These studies suggest the presence of a functional amyloid structure that may carry out roles in sperm maturation or maintenance of the luminal milieu and which itself may undergo maturational changes along the epididymis. In contrast to previous examples of functional amyloid which were intracellular, our studies now show that nonpathological/functional amyloid can also be extracellular. The presence of an extracellular and nonpathological amyloid in the epididymis suggests that similar amyloid structures may be present in other organ systems and may carry out distinctive tissue-specific functions.

  11. Fatty acid content in epididymal fluid and spermatozoa during sperm maturation in dogs.

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    Ramos Angrimani, Daniel S; Nichi, Marcilio; Losano, João Diego A; Lucio, Cristina F; Lima Veiga, Gisele A; Franco, Márcia V M Junqueira; Vannucchi, Camila I

    2017-01-01

    During sperm maturation, there is a reorganization of fatty acids from plasmatic membrane of the spermatozoa, which allows higher membrane integrity and acquisition of sperm motility. However, the fatty acid profile during sperm maturation remains unclear in dogs. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the fatty acids from the epididymal spermatozoa and plasma during the sperm maturation, and observed changes in the motility and plasmatic membrane parameters. Twenty one adult dogs were used, subsequently to bilateral orchiectomy and epididymal storage, sperm samples were collected from the different segments of the epididymis. Samples were evaluated for conventional microscopy, computer-assisted motility analysis, sperm plasma membrane permeability and the fatty acid analysis (lipids were extracted, transmethylated and analyzed by chromatography). Caput and corpus sperm showed lower values for the motility variables evaluated and plasmatic membrane integrity, indicating different levels of the fatty acids organization. Saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were in higher concentrations in the spermatozoa from epididymis cauda. Highlighting the presence of caprylic, stearic and docosahexaenoic acids. These findings demonstrate the influence of the fatty acid profile during sperm maturation, assigning physical and chemical changes in sperm cells, essential for fertilization.

  12. Identification and validation of mouse sperm proteins correlated with epididymal maturation

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    Ijiri, Takashi W.; Merdiushev, Tanya; Cao, Wenlei; Gerton, George L.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm need to mature in the epididymis to become capable of fertilization. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mouse sperm maturation, we conducted a proteomic analysis using saturation dye labeling to identify proteins of caput and cauda epididymal sperm that exhibited differences in amounts or positions on two-dimensional gels. Of eight caput epididymal sperm-differential proteins, three were molecular chaperones and three were structural proteins. Of nine cauda epididymal sperm-differential proteins, six were enzymes of energy metabolism. To validate these proteins as markers of epididymal maturation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses were performed. During epididymal transit, heat shock protein 2 was eliminated with the cytoplasmic droplet and smooth muscle γ-actin exhibited reduced fluorescence from the anterior acrosome while the signal intensity of aldolase A increased, especially in the principal piece. Besides these changes, we observed protein spots, such as glutathione S-transferase mu 5 and the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, shifting to more basic isoelectric points, suggesting post-translational changes such dephosphorylation occur during epididymal maturation. We conclude that most caput epididymal sperm-differential proteins contribute to the functional modification of sperm structures and that many cauda epididymal sperm-differential proteins are involved in ATP production that promotes sperm functions such as motility. PMID:21805633

  13. The human epididymis: its function in sperm maturation.

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    Sullivan, Robert; Mieusset, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Spermatozoa acquire their fertilizing ability and forward motility properties during epididymal transit. Our knowledge of gamete physiology is based on studies conducted in laboratory and domestic species; our knowledge of these processes in humans is limited. Medical indications for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have progressed to include male infertility. Surgical procedures allow collection of spermatozoa from all along the human excurrent ducts, and the former have been used with some success in reproductive medicine. This has raised questions over the role of the epididymis in human sperm physiology. To reanalyze what we now know about epididymal physiology in humans and to assess the relevance of laboratory animal models for understanding human physiology and the pathophysiology of the epididymis. A systematic bibliographic search of PubMed for articles published in English before May 2015 was carried out using the search terms 'epididymis' and 'sperm maturation'. Literature on the consequences of vasectomy on the epididymis was also searched. Whereas the proximal epididymis is almost exclusively occupied by efferent ducts, the sperm reservoir capacity is poorly developed in humans. At the molecular level, the human transcriptome and proteome show some segment specificity; conflicting results persist with regard to secretome variation along the tubule. The number of genes regulated along the excurrent ducts in men is lower when compared to rodent species, but remains significant. It is challenging to reconcile biochemical and physiological studies with clinical data obtained from men undergoing reanastomosis of the vas deferens at different points along the excurrent duct. We propose that vasectomy/vasovasostomy is a model to understand the consequences of obstruction on epididymis function in humans. Despite the scarcity of biological material available, the interspecies variability of the male reproductive tract urges us to use modern molecular

  14. Localization of cathepsin D in mouse reproductive tissues and its acquisition onto sperm surface during epididymal sperm maturation.

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    Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Saewu, Arpornrad; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana

    2013-06-01

    Sperm maturation in the epididymis involves multiple complex events, that include the adsorption of epididymal secretory proteins, re-organization and removal of sperm surface ligands. In this study, we investigated the existence and distribution of cathepsin D (CAT-D) transcripts and proteins in mouse reproductive tissues and proposed a transfer mechanism of CAT-D to the sperm surface. CAT-D transcripts were highly expressed in cultured Sertoli cells, but not in germ cells. The transcriptional level was relatively higher in the caput epididymis (CP) than in the cauda epididymis (CD). At the translational level, CAT-D was detected in testicular somatic cells and in the principal and basal cells in the CP. The expression of CAT-D was fairly specific to the clear cells in the CD. All forms of CAT-D were detected in ultracentrifuged epididymosomes. In conjunction with the expression levels in epididymal epithelium and epididymosomes, CAT-D expression level on the sperm surface was relatively high in CP sperm, but gradually declined toward the CD. Overall, our results indicated that CAT-D was not inherent to sperm themselves, but rather of epididymal origin and was presumably transported to the sperm surface via epididymosomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Biogenesis and function of tRNA fragments during sperm maturation and fertilization in mammals.

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    Sharma, Upasna; Conine, Colin C; Shea, Jeremy M; Boskovic, Ana; Derr, Alan G; Bing, Xin Y; Belleannee, Clemence; Kucukural, Alper; Serra, Ryan W; Sun, Fengyun; Song, Lina; Carone, Benjamin R; Ricci, Emiliano P; Li, Xin Z; Fauquier, Lucas; Moore, Melissa J; Sullivan, Robert; Mello, Craig C; Garber, Manuel; Rando, Oliver J

    2016-01-22

    Several recent studies link parental environments to phenotypes in subsequent generations. In this work, we investigate the mechanism by which paternal diet affects offspring metabolism. Protein restriction in mice affects small RNA (sRNA) levels in mature sperm, with decreased let-7 levels and increased amounts of 5' fragments of glycine transfer RNAs (tRNAs). In testicular sperm, tRNA fragments are scarce but increase in abundance as sperm mature in the epididymis. Epididymosomes (vesicles that fuse with sperm during epididymal transit) carry RNA payloads matching those of mature sperm and can deliver RNAs to immature sperm in vitro. Functionally, tRNA-glycine-GCC fragments repress genes associated with the endogenous retroelement MERVL, in both embryonic stem cells and embryos. Our results shed light on sRNA biogenesis and its dietary regulation during posttesticular sperm maturation, and they also link tRNA fragments to regulation of endogenous retroelements active in the preimplantation embryo. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Comparative analysis of human reproductive proteomes identifies candidate proteins of sperm maturation.

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    Fu-Jun, Liu; Xiao-Fang, Shen

    2012-12-01

    Male reproductive proteomes provide basis for studying gene products and its involvement or regulation in sperm physiology. Here, a comparative study between these proteomes was performed to find potential proteins and functions associated with human sperm maturation. Seven reproductive proteomes associated with human sperm physiology were integrated. Gene ontology analysis were performed using DAVID and Panther tools to determine enriched functions. Total of 270 proteins overlapped between epididymal, prostatic milieu and sperm proteome were thought to be candidate proteins involved in sperm maturation, and they showed enriched functions of proteasomal protein catabolic process and protein folding. 34 epididymal milieu proteins and 274 prostatic milieu proteins were contributed to the composition of seminal fluids proteome. Literatures have confirmed the involvements in sperm maturation of many of these proteins The spatial expressions of 24 epididymal milieu proteins involved in chaperone and antioxidant activity were authenticated by real-time RT-PCR. These proteins may serve as candidate molecules for future studies of sperm maturation and male infertility.

  17. Molecular changes and signaling events occurring in sperm during epididymal maturation

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    Gervasi, Maria Gracia; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2017-01-01

    After leaving the testis, sperm have not yet acquired the ability to move progressively and are unable to fertilize oocytes. To become fertilization-competent they must go through an epididymal maturation process in the male, and capacitation in the female tract. Epididymal maturation can be defined as those changes occurring to sperm in the epididymis that render the sperm the ability to capacitate in the female tract. As part of this process, sperm cells undergo a series of biochemical and physiological changes that require incorporation of new molecules derived from the epididymal epithelium, as well as post-translational modifications of endogenous proteins synthesized during spermiogenesis in the testis. This review will focus on epididymal maturation events, with emphasis in recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of this process. PMID:28297559

  18. Prophase I Mouse Oocytes Are Deficient in the Ability to Respond to Fertilization by Decreasing Membrane Receptivity to Sperm and Establishing a Membrane Block to Polyspermy1

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    Kryzak, Cassie A.; Moraine, Maia M.; Kyle, Diane D.; Lee, Hyo J.; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes occurring as the prophase I oocyte matures to metaphase II are critical for the acquisition of competence for normal egg activation and early embryogenesis. A prophase I oocyte cannot respond to a fertilizing sperm as a metaphase II egg does, including the ability to prevent polyspermic fertilization. Studies here demonstrate that the competence for the membrane block to polyspermy is deficient in prophase I mouse oocytes. In vitro fertilization experiments using identical insemination conditions result in monospermy in 87% of zona pellucida (ZP)-free metaphase II eggs, while 92% of ZP-free prophase I oocytes have four or more fused sperm. The membrane block is associated with a postfertilization reduction in the capacity to support sperm binding, but this reduction in sperm-binding capacity is both less robust and slower to develop in fertilized prophase I oocytes. Fertilization of oocytes is dependent on the tetraspanin CD9, but little to no release of CD9 from the oocyte membrane is detected, suggesting that release of CD9-containing vesicles is not essential for fertilization. The deficiency in membrane block establishment in prophase I oocytes correlates with abnormalities in two postfertilization cytoskeletal changes: sperm-induced cortical remodeling that results in fertilization cone formation and a postfertilization increase in effective cortical tension. These data indicate that cortical maturation is a component of cytoplasmic maturation during the oocyte-to-egg transition and that the egg cortex has to be appropriately primed and tuned to be responsive to a fertilizing sperm. PMID:23863404

  19. Normozoospermic versus teratozoospermic domestic cats: differential testicular volume, sperm morphometry, and subpopulation structure during epididymal maturation.

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    Gutiérrez-Reinoso, Miguel Angel; García-Herreros, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Teratozoospermia (sperm morphometric traits, and potential differences regarding the sperm subpopulational structure during epididymal sperm maturation in teratozoospermic feline donors. Epididymal sperm samples were collected from the caput (R1), corpus (R2), and cauda (R3) epididymidis in two donor groups (N: normozoospermic; T: teratozoospermic). Aliquots were assessed for concentration, viability, motility, and acrosomal integrity. Sperm morphometric descriptors from CASA-Morph analysis were analyzed by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering analyses. Irrespective of the group analyzed, PCA revealed two Principal Components (PCs) for each epididymal region explaining more than the 93% of the variance. Surprisingly, the number of subpopulations remained constant in regions R1-R2-R3 irrespective of the donor group analyzed. However, the distribution of these subpopulations was found to be structurally different and strongly influenced by the epididymal region and the donor group. In conclusion, testicular morphometry and the sperm subpopulation structure were different in N and T donors. The alterations in subpopulations during epididymal maturation could be used as a potential clinical indicator of teratozoospermic individuals since an important influence of teratozoospermia on sperm subpopulation structure has been demonstrated.

  20. Epididymal protein Rnase10 is required for post-testicular sperm maturation and male fertility

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    Krutskikh, Anton; Poliandri, Ariel; Cabrera-Sharp, Victoria; Dacheux, Jean Louis; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2012-01-01

    Eutherian spermatozoa are dependent on the environment of the proximal epididymis to complete their maturation; however, no specific epididymal factors that mediate this process have so far been identified. Here, we show that targeted disruption of the novel gene Rnase10 encoding a secreted proximal epididymal protein in the mouse results in a binding defect in spermatozoa and their inability to pass through the uterotubal junction in the female. The failure to gain the site of fertilization in the knockout spermatozoa is associated with a gradual loss of ADAM3 and ADAM6 proteins during epididymal transit. In the distal epididymis, these spermatozoa appear to lack calcium-dependent associations with the immobilizing glutinous extracellular material and are released as single, vigorously motile cells that display no tendency for head-to-head agglutination and lack affinity to the oviductal epithelium. In sperm-egg binding assay, they are unable to establish a tenacious association with the zona pellucida, yet they are capable of fertilization. Furthermore, these sperm show accelerated capacitation resulting in an overall in vitro fertilizing ability superior to that of wild-type sperm. We conclude that the physiological role of sperm adhesiveness is in the mechanism of restricted sperm entry into the oviduct rather than in sperm-egg interaction.—Krutskikh, A., Poliandri, A., Cabrera-Sharp, V., Dacheux, J. L., Poutanen, M., Huhtaniemi, I. Epididymal protein Rnase10 is required for post-testicular sperm maturation and male fertility. PMID:22750516

  1. Post Testicular Sperm Maturational Changes in the Bull: Important Role of the Epididymosomes and Prostasomes

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    Julieta Caballero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After spermatogenesis, testicular spermatozoa are not able to fertilize an oocyte, they must undergo sequential maturational processes. Part of these essential processes occurs during the transit of the spermatozoa through the male reproductive tract. Since the sperm become silent in terms of translation and transcription at the testicular level, all the maturational changes that take place on them are dependent on the interaction of spermatozoa with epididymal and accessory gland fluids. During the last decades, reproductive biotechnologies applied to bovine species have advanced significantly. The knowledge of the bull reproductive physiology is really important for the improvement of these techniques and the development of new ones. This paper focuses on the importance of the sperm interaction with the male reproductive fluids to acquire the fertilizing ability, with special attention to the role of the membranous vesicles present in those fluids and the recent mechanisms of protein acquisition during sperm maturation.

  2. Effect of dilution in sperm maturation media and time of storage on sperm motility and fertilizing capacity of cryopreserved semen of sex-reversed female rainbow trout.

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    Judycka, Sylwia; Ciereszko, Andrzej; Dobosz, Stefan; Zalewski, Tomasz; Dietrich, Grzegorz J

    2017-05-01

    Masculinized females, also called neomales or sex-reversed females have a male phenotype but retain the female genotype (XX). Therefore, all spermatozoa produced in their functional testes carry an X chromosome, which is desired for the production of all-female rainbow trout populations. Semen of sex-reversed female rainbow trout is of low quality and in vitro maturation is required, which includes dilution of sperm suspensions with specially formulated maturation solutions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dilution in different maturation media on sperm quality (sperm motility characteristics and fertilizing capacity) of frozen/thawed sperm of sex-reversed female rainbow trout. The effect of time of post-thaw storage (0, 15, 60 and 120min) on semen quality was also tested. Sperm motility parameters and fertilization rate at the eyed and hatching stages were assessed for post-thaw semen diluted in different media. The cryopreservation procedure resulted in high post-thaw sperm motility of about 57% and did not differ from fresh semen. Unexpectedly, maturation media decreased sperm activation capacity immediately after dilution; however, sperm motility increased over time. Fertilization rates of frozen/thawed semen were high (71-87%) and did not differ significantly between experimental variants at any of tested periods of storage. Our results demonstrated that the effect of the maturation media on frozen/thawed sperm is different from that of fresh sperm. The progressive increase in post-thaw sperm motility in maturation media can potentially be applied to routine hatchery practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human sperm head vacuoles are physiological structures formed during the sperm development and maturation process.

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    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Tanaka, Izumi; Kusunoki, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    To clarify whether human sperm vacuoles affected intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) success rates. Retrospective study. A private infertility clinic. Spermatozoa and spermatids were obtained from 11 normozoospermic, 10 oligozoospermic or asthenozoospermic, 4 obstructive azoospermic, and 3 nonobstructive azoospermic men. Differential interference contrast observation and intracytoplasmic injection of morphologically selected sperm. Incidence, size, and position of vacuoles of sperm cells were recorded. Ability of fertilization and blastocyst development were compared between cells with and without vacuoles. More than 97.4% of ejaculated, 87.5% of epididymal, 87.5% of testicular spermatozoa, and more than 90.0% of Sc-Sd2 spermatids had vacuoles of various sizes. The incidence of vacuoles on ejaculated cells was significantly higher than that on the other types of cells, but there was no difference between sperm from normozoospermic men and those from the other donors. Removal of plasma membrane and/or acrosome did not affect the incidence of vacuoles. Although more than 60% of spermatozoa had small vacuoles in the acrosomal regions, 52.6% of Sb1-2 spermatids had large vacuoles. After injection of a motile spermatozoon with large and small vacuoles, 60.9% and 85.7% of metaphase II oocytes could be normally fertilized, respectively, and almost half of the zygotes developed to the blastocyst stage. When using sperm without vacuoles, the fertilization rate was 80.0%, but only 25% of them developed to the blastocyst stage. Human sperm head vacuoles did not affect ICSI outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New insights into epididymal function in relation to sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Françoise

    2014-02-01

    Testicular spermatozoa acquire fertility only after 1 or 2 weeks of transit through the epididymis. At the end of this several meters long epididymal tubule, the male gamete is able to move, capacitate, migrate through the female tract, bind to the egg membrane and fuse to the oocyte to result in a viable embryo. All these sperm properties are acquired after sequential modifications occurring either at the level of the spermatozoon or in the epididymal surroundings. Over the last few decades, significant increases in the understanding of the composition of the male gamete and its surroundings have resulted from the use of new techniques such as genome sequencing, proteomics combined with high-sensitivity mass spectrometry, and gene-knockout approaches. This review reports and discusses the most relevant new results obtained in different species regarding the various cellular processes occurring at the sperm level, in particular, those related to the development of motility and egg binding during epididymal transit.

  5. Disturbances of Sperm Maturation and Minipuberty: Is There a Connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Živković

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive function in the general population raises an increased attention due to reports indicating declining sperm counts, increased occurrence of testicular cancer, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. It is also hypothesized that prolonged exposure of the developing male, during both fetal and postnatal life, to exogenous estrogens could reduce Sertoli cell number and thus reduce sperm output (and sperm counts in adult life. Fact is that infertility, which is defined as the inability to conceive after 1 year of unprotected intercourse, has a global prevalence of 9%. A male contributory factor is involved in approximately half of these cases, but most of the causes of reduced semen quality and other disturbances of male reproductive function are unknown. In the most affected men (azoospermic men 15–20% had a prior history of cryptorchidism. The association between the cryptorchidism and infertility is one of the most studied potential causes of infertility. There are numerous studies that accentuate the importance of minipuberty for future fertility. Is it possible that a normal minipuberty ensures normal fertility despite malpositioned testes? And to move away from cryptorchidism, could impaired minipuberty be responsible for fertility problems in men who were born with both testes in their scrotal sacs?

  6. Changes of murine sperm phospholipid composition during epididymal maturation determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyttel, S; Nimptsch, A; Böttger, J; Zschörnig, K; Jakop, U; Wegener, J; Müller, K; Paasch, U; Schiller, J

    2014-08-01

    After leaving the testis, spermatozoa undergo several important steps of biochemical maturation during the passage through the epididymis, increasing their motility and fertilizing ability. These changes comprise (among others) the modification of the phospholipid composition of the sperm membrane. This process is thought to be important for the achievement of motility and fertilizing capacity. The lipids of the sperm membrane are characterized by a significant content of unsaturated fatty acyl residues, resulting in a high sensitivity against oxidative stress. This is evidenced by the appearance of lysolipids, for example, lysophosphatidylcholine, which acts like a detergent and is normally present in only very small amounts in biological membranes. The epididymis represents a tubular system comprising three main parts (caput, corpus, and cauda), through which the spermatozoa are consecutively transported undergoing distinct maturation stages. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we established three striking differences in the lipid composition of murine spermatozoa from the different epididymal regions: in comparison to the caput sperm, sperm from the cauda are characterized by (1) a higher degree of unsaturation (PC 18:0/22:5 and 18:0/22:6 vs. 18:0/20:4 and 18:0/18:1), (2) an enhanced plasmalogen content, and (3) an enhanced content of lysolipids. These changes are likely to be of physiological relevance and potentially useful as diagnostic markers of sperm maturation and acquisition of motility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomic Analyses Reveal a Role of Cytoplasmic Droplets as an Energy Source during Epididymal Sperm Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuiqiao; Zheng, Huili; Zheng, Zhihong; Yan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A small portion of cytoplasm is generally retained as the cytoplasmic droplet (CD) on the flagellum of spermatozoa after spermiation in mice. CDs are believed to play a role in osmoadaptation by allowing water entrance or exit. However, many lines of evidence suggest that CDs may have roles beyond osmoregulation. To gain more insights, we purified CDs from murine epididymal spermatozoa and conducted proteomic analyses on proteins highly enriched in CDs. Among 105 proteins identified, 71 (68%) were enzymes involved in energy metabolism. We also found that sperm mitochondria underwent a reactivation process and glycolytic enzymes were further distributed and incorporated into different regions of the flagellum during epididymal sperm maturation. Both processes appeared to require CDs. Our data suggest that the CD represents a transient organelle that serves as an energy source essential for epididymal sperm maturation. PMID:24155961

  8. Analysis of epididymal sperm maturation by MALDI profiling and top-down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Valérie; Spina, Lucie; Belleannee, Clémence; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Gargaros, Audrey; Dacheux, Françoise; Dacheux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-15

    The fertilization ability of male gametes is achieved after their transit through the epididymis where important post-gonadal differentiation occurs in different cellular compartments. Most of these maturational modifications occur at the protein level. The epididymal sperm maturation process was investigated using the ICM-MS (Intact Cell MALDI-TOF MS) approach on boar spermatozoa isolated from four different epididymal regions (immature to mature stage). Differential and quantitative MALDI-TOF profiling for whole cells or sub-cellular fractions was combined with targeted top-down MS in order to identify endogenous biomolecules. Using this approach, 172m/z peaks ranging between 2 and 20kDa were found to be modified during maturation of sperm. Using top-down MS, 62m/z were identified corresponding to peptidoforms/proteoforms with post-translational modifications (MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001303). Many of the endogenous peptides were characterized as N-, C-terminal sequences or internal fragments of proteins presenting specific cleavages, suggesting the presence of sequential protease activities in the spermatozoa. This is the first time that such proteolytic activities could be evidenced for various sperm proteins through quantification of their proteolytic products. ICM-MS/top-down MS thus proved to be a valid approach for peptidome/degradome studies and provided new contributions to understanding of the maturation process of the male gamete involved in the development of male fertility. This peptidomic study (i) characterized the peptidome of epididymal spermatozoa from boar (Sus scrofa); (ii) established characteristic molecular phenotypes distinguishing degrees of maturation of spermatozoa during epididymal transit, and (iii) revealed that protease activities were at the origin of numerous peptides from known and unknown proteins involved in sperm maturation and/or fertility processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina-Guzman, Belem; Sanchez-Gutierrez, M.; Marchetti, Francesco; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Solis-Heredia, M.J .; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2009-05-03

    Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm. Oxidative damage has been involved in the genotoxic and reproductive effects of OP. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Me-Pa on spermatozoa function and ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. DNA damage was evaluated by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (percentDFI); lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production; sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR); mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 flurochrome; and, fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Results showed alterations in DNA integrity (percentDFI and NT-positive cells) at 7 and 28 dpt, in addition to decreased sperm quality and a decrease in induced-AR; reduced MMP and LPO was observed only at 7 dpt. We found negative correlations between LPO and all sperm alterations. Altered sperm functional parameters were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times, evaluated either in vitro or in vivo. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism ofthe detrimental effects of Me-Pa in male germ cells.

  10. Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Guzmán, B; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, M; Marchetti, F; Hernández-Ochoa, I; Solís-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B

    2009-07-15

    Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl-parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm, possibly via oxidative damage. This study investigated the stages of spermatogenesis susceptible to be targeted by Me-Pa exposure that impact on spermatozoa function and their ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. Spermatozoa were examined for DNA damage by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (%DFI), lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production, sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 fluorochrome, and fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Alterations on DNA integrity (%DFI and NT-positive cells) in spermatozoa collected at 7 and 28 dpt, and decreases in sperm quality and induced-AR were observed; reduced MMP and LPO were observed at 7 dpt only. Negative correlations between LPO and sperm alterations were found. Altered sperm functional parameters evaluated either in vitro or in vivo were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism of the detrimental effects of Me-Pa exposure in male germ cells.

  11. Sperm parameters and epididymis function in transgenic rats overexpressing the Ca2+-binding protein regucalcin: a hidden role for Ca2+ in sperm maturation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S; Oliveira, P F; Guerreiro, P M; Lopes, G; Alves, M G; Canário, A V M; Cavaco, J E; Socorro, Sílvia

    2013-09-01

    Sperm undergo maturation acquiring progressive motility and the ability to fertilize oocytes through exposure to the components of the epididymal fluid (EF). Although the establishment of a calcium (Ca(2+)) gradient along the epididymis has been described, its direct effects on epididymal function remain poorly explored. Regucalcin (RGN) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulating the activity of Ca(2+)-channels and Ca(2+)-ATPase, for which a role in male reproductive function has been suggested. This study aimed at comparing the morphology, assessed by histological analysis, and function of epididymis, by analysis of sperm parameters, antioxidant potential and Ca(2+) fluxes, between transgenic rats overexpressing RGN (Tg-RGN) and their wild-type littermates. Tg-RGN animals displayed an altered morphology of epididymis and lower sperm counts and motility. Tissue incubation with (45)Ca(2+) showed also that epididymis of Tg-RGN displayed a diminished rate of Ca(2+)-influx, indicating unbalanced Ca(2+) concentrations in the epididymal lumen. Sperm viability and the frequency of normal sperm, determined by the one-step eosin-nigrosin staining technique and the Diff-Quik staining method, respectively, were higher in Tg-RGN. Moreover, sperm of Tg-RGN rats showed a diminished incidence of tail defects. Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of RGN in EF as well as its higher expression in the corpus region. The results presented herein demonstrated the importance of maintaining Ca(2+)-levels in the epididymal lumen and suggest a role for RGN in sperm maturation. Overall, a new insight into the molecular mechanisms driving epididymal sperm maturation was obtained, which could be relevant to development of better approaches in male infertility treatment and contraception.

  12. Post-testicular sperm maturation and identification of an epididymal protein in the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Ewen, Katherine A; Krivanek, Klara M; Clulow, John; Kidd, Grahame; Ecroyd, Heath; Jones, Russell C

    2014-03-01

    The role of the avian epididymis in post-testicular development and capacitation was examined to assess whether avian spermatozoa undergo any processes similar to those characteristic of mammalian sperm development. We found no evidence of a need for quail sperm to undergo capacitation and 90% of testicular sperm could bind to a perivitelline membrane and acrosome react. However, computer-assisted sperm analysis showed that 20% of testicular sperm from the quail were capable of movement and only about 12% of the motile sperm would have a curvilinear velocity greater than the mean for sperm from the distal epididymis. Nevertheless, epididymal transit was associated with increases in mean sperm velocity and the proportion of motile sperm. Together, these findings explain why earlier workers have achieved some fertilizations following inseminations of testicular spermatozoa and also demonstrate the need for some epididymal maturation of avian spermatozoa. Analysis of the electrophoretic profile of quail epididymal luminal proteins revealed that only one major protein (∼16 kDa) is secreted by the epididymis and it was virtually the only protein secreted by the ipsilateral epididymis following unilateral orchidectomy. Mass spectrometry showed that this protein is hemoglobin; this finding was confirmed using anti-hemoglobin antibodies. It is suggested that hemoglobin may support sperm metabolism in the quail epididymis, aid in motility, and/or serve as an antioxidant.

  13. Epididymosomes: a heterogeneous population of microvesicles with multiple functions in sperm maturation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular microvesicles present in the epididymal fluid have been named epididymosomes. Many epididymosome-associated proteins are transferred to spermatozoa during their maturation in the excurrent duct. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous, with their size varying between 50 and 250 nm. Two distinct population of epididymosomes characterized by different protein compositions and diameters have been isolated from the bovine epididymal fluid using different centrifugation protocols. One subpopulation of epididymosomes was characterized by CD9 and other tetraspanin partners. Transfer of proteins from these epididymosomes to maturing spermatozoa in co-incubation experiments was inhibited by antibodies against tetraspanin proteins. This suggests that this subpopulation of epididymosomes is involved in the acquisition of proteins involved in maturation by spermatozoa in the epididymis. The other population of epididymosomes was characterized by ELSPBP1 (epididymal sperm binding protein 1, known for its affinity for the phospholipid choline group. Flow cytometric analyses showed that ELSPBP1-positive epididymosomes only interacted with dying or dead epididymal spermatozoa in a Zn 2 + -dependent manner. BLVRA (biliverdin reductase was identified as a partner of ELSPBP1. This enzyme reduces biliverdin to bilirubin: two molecules with powerful anti-oxidant properties. We hypothesize that BLVRA is involved in an ROS-scavenging mechanism protecting live epididymal spermatozoa against detrimental molecules (ROS released by dying cells. Therefore, it appears that there are at least two epididymosome population with distinct functions: targeting specific proteins to transiting spermatozoa by tetraspanin-mediated membrane fusion, and protection of epididymal spermatozoa against ROS released from dying cells. Further work is needed to understand functions of epididymosomes in epididymal physiology and sperm maturation and storage.

  14. Proteome profiling of the sperm maturation milieu in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Shao-Hua; Liu, Xue-Xia; Wang, Wen-Juan; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian spermatozoon acquires its fertilising potential during transit through the epididymis, where it interacts with epididymal luminal fluid proteins (the sperm maturation milieu). In order to highlight the epididymal-specific function of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) in sperm maturation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of epididymal luminal fluid proteins was followed by identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) or MALDI-TOF/TOF and revealed over five hundred spots, comprising 198 non-redundant proteins. Some mass spectrometric data were confirmed by western blotting identification. Some common epididymal fluid proteins were identified, such as clusterin, α-1-antitrypsin, malate dehydrogenase, L-lactate dehydrogenase B, α-1-acid glycoprotein 1 and α-mannosidase. More than 7% of all proteins were anti-oxidative, which might control oxidative stress within the male tract. When compared with bull and human epididymal luminal fluid proteins, those in the rhesus monkey had more overlap with the human, which provides evidence of a close evolutionary relationship between the rhesus monkey and man. This study provides new proteomic information on possible rhesus monkey epididymal functions and novel potential biomarkers for the noninvasive assessment of male fertility.

  15. Testicular Characteristics and the Block to Spermatogenesis in Mature Hinny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Han

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most hinnies (female donkey×male horse and mules (female horse×male donkey are sterile with few reports of equine fertile hybrids. The main cause of this sterility is thought to be a meiotic block to spermatogenesis and oogenesis. This study compared the developmental features of the testes and a histological analyses of spermatogenesis in a male hinny with those of a normal, fertile stallion and Jack donkey. Hinny testes showed a thicker tunica albuginea, fewer blood vessels and more connective tissue in the testis parenchyma than those of the stallion and Jack donkey. Although the mean number of seminiferous tubules was significantly higher in stallion and hinny than Jack donkey (p<0.01, the mean proportion of seminiferous tubules was lower in the hinny (p<0.01 which resulted in a smaller diameter of seminiferous tubules. The mean number of spermatogonia and spermatocytes per unit area were significantly lower in hinny testis (p<0.01 and no spermatids or mature spermatozoa cells were found during immunofluorescent analyses. These results indicated that defects in seminiferous tubule development and structure occur in the testis of hinnies. Furthermore, most spermatogonia and spermatocytes cease development in synapsis during mid-meiosis of spermatocytes, which results in a block to spermatogenesis that prevents the formation of spermatids and matured spermatozoa during meiosis in male hinnies.

  16. Characterization of the injection funnel during intracytoplasmic sperm injection reflects cytoplasmic maturity of the oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Iris; Pohler, Uwe; Grosse, Stefan; Shebl, Omar; Petek, Erwin; Chandra, Arvind; Ebner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    To quantify cytoplasmic maturity on the basis of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) injection funnel manifestation and to evaluate influence factors of the latter. Prospective study. Private fertility center. A total of 31 patients with good ovarian response. Mature and immature oocytes were injected intracytoplasmatically. Formation and persistence of an injection funnel was documented and measured. ICSI funnel size, persistence of injection funnel, rates of degeneration and fertilization, embryo quality. Funnel volume in germinal vesicle stage oocytes (prophase I [PI]) was significantly smaller than that of metaphase I (MI) and MII oocytes. Immature eggs (PI, MI) almost never showed a persistent funnel 2-4 minutes after ICSI, whereas in MII eggs the funnel was still observable in 35% (117/334) of the cases. Uni- and multivariate analysis revealed that pipette type and stimulation protocol significantly influenced appearance of injection funnel. Funnel volume in oocytes that fertilized regularly was significantly higher compared with three-polar body and degenerated oocytes. Oocyte maturation within the follicle is closely associated with a remarkable change in cytoplasm viscosity from an aqueous to a more viscous subtype. Precise evaluation of the injection funnel may help to explain deviations from expected ICSI outcome and could also assist in optimizing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate disrupts pituitary and testicular hormonal functions to reduce sperm quality in mature goldfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golshan, M.; Hatef, A.; Socha, M.

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) interferes with male reproductive endocrine system in mammals, however its effects on fish reproduction are largely unknown. We evaluated sperm quality and investigated reproductive endocrine system in mature goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to nominal 1, 10...

  18. Characteristics of the Epididymal Luminal Environment Responsible for Sperm Maturation and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The testicular spermatozoa of all mammalian species are considered functionally immature owing to their inability to swim in a progressive manner and engage in productive interactions with the cumulus–oocyte complex. The ability to express these key functional attributes develops progressively during the cells’ descent through the epididymis, a highly specialized ductal system that forms an integral part of the male reproductive tract. The functional maturation of the spermatozoon is achieved via continuous interactions with the epididymal luminal microenvironment and remarkably, occurs in the complete absence of de novo gene transcription or protein translation. Compositional analysis of the luminal fluids collected from the epididymis of a variety of species has revealed the complexity of this milieu, with a diversity of inorganic ions, proteins, and small non-coding RNA transcripts having been identified to date. Notably, both the quantitative and qualitative profile of each of these different luminal elements display substantial segment-to-segment variation, which in turn contribute to the regionalized functionality of this long tubule. Thus, spermatozoa acquire functional maturity in the proximal segments before being stored in a quiescent state in the distal segment in preparation for ejaculation. Such marked division of labor is achieved via the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the epithelial cells lining each segment. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that exert influence over the unique intraluminal environment of the epididymis, with a particular focus on vesicle-dependent mechanisms that facilitate intercellular communication between the epididymal soma and maturing sperm cell population.

  19. Characteristics of the Epididymal Luminal Environment Responsible for Sperm Maturation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; De Iuliis, Geoffry N; Dun, Matthew D; Nixon, Brett

    2018-01-01

    The testicular spermatozoa of all mammalian species are considered functionally immature owing to their inability to swim in a progressive manner and engage in productive interactions with the cumulus-oocyte complex. The ability to express these key functional attributes develops progressively during the cells' descent through the epididymis, a highly specialized ductal system that forms an integral part of the male reproductive tract. The functional maturation of the spermatozoon is achieved via continuous interactions with the epididymal luminal microenvironment and remarkably, occurs in the complete absence of de novo gene transcription or protein translation. Compositional analysis of the luminal fluids collected from the epididymis of a variety of species has revealed the complexity of this milieu, with a diversity of inorganic ions, proteins, and small non-coding RNA transcripts having been identified to date. Notably, both the quantitative and qualitative profile of each of these different luminal elements display substantial segment-to-segment variation, which in turn contribute to the regionalized functionality of this long tubule. Thus, spermatozoa acquire functional maturity in the proximal segments before being stored in a quiescent state in the distal segment in preparation for ejaculation. Such marked division of labor is achieved via the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the epithelial cells lining each segment. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that exert influence over the unique intraluminal environment of the epididymis, with a particular focus on vesicle-dependent mechanisms that facilitate intercellular communication between the epididymal soma and maturing sperm cell population.

  20. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  1. Junctional adhesion molecule A: expression in the murine epididymal tract and accessory organs and acquisition by maturing sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kathie Z; Li, Kun; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2017-02-10

    Is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), a sperm protein essential for normal motility, expressed in the murine post-testicular pathway and involved in sperm maturation? JAM-A is present in the prostate and seminal vesicles and in all three regions of the epididymis where it is secreted in epididymosomes in the luminal fluid and can be delivered to sperm in vitro. JAM-A shares with the plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase 4 (PMCA4, the major Ca2+ efflux pump in murine sperm) a common interacting partner, CASK (Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase). JAM-A, like PMCA4, plays a role in Ca2+ regulation, since deletion of Jam-A results in significantly elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels and reduced sperm motility. Recently, PMCA4 was reported to be expressed in the epididymis and along with CASK was shown to be in a complex on epididymosomes where it was transferred to sperm. Because of the association of JAM-A with CASK in sperm and because of the presence of PMCA4 and CASK in the epididymis, the present study was performed to determine whether JAM-A is expressed in the epididymis and delivered to sperm during their maturation. The epididymides, prostate and seminal vesicles were collected from sexually mature C57BL/6J and Institute for Cancer Research mice and antibodies specific for JAM-A and Ser285 -phosphorylated JAM-A (pJAM-A) were used for the analysis. Tissues, sperm and epididymal luminal fluid (ELF) were studied. Epididymosomes were also isolated for study. Caput and caudal sperm were co-incubated with ELF individually to determine their abilities to acquire JAM-A in vitro. Sections of all three regions of the epididymis were subjected to indirect immunofluorescence analysis. Epididymal tissues, fluid, sperm, prostate and seminal vesicle tissues were analyzed for JAM-A and/or pJAM-A via western blotting analysis. The relative amounts of JAM-A and pJAM-A among epididymal tissues, ELF and sperm were detected by western blot via quantification of band intensities

  2. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S.L.S. Reis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion, scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by electroejaculation, were evaluated soon after collection for motility, vigor and wave motion under an optical microscope. Sperm membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial activity were evaluated under a fluorescent microscope using probe association (FITC-PSA, PI, JC-1, H342. The sperm were classified into eight integrity categories depending on whether they exhibited intact or damaged membranes, an intact or damaged acrosomal membrane, and high or low mitochondrial potential. The results show that bulls have a low amount of sperm with intact membranes at puberty, and the sperm show low motility, vigor, and wave motion; however, in bulls at early sexual maturity, the integrity of the sperm membrane increased significantly. The rate of sperm membrane damage was negatively correlated with motility, vigor, wave motion, and testosterone in the bulls, and a positive correlation existed between sperm plasma membrane integrity and scrotal circumference. The integrity of the acrosomal membrane was not influenced by puberty. During puberty and into early sexual maturity, bulls show low sperm mitochondrial potential, but when bulls reached sexual maturity, high membrane integrity with high mitochondrial potential was evident.

  3. Effect of active immunization against GnRH on testosterone concentration, libido and sperm quality in mature AI boars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of the Improvac on testosterone concentration in blood serum, sexual behavior and sperm quality in matured AI boars. A total of nine Danish Landrace AI boars were included in the analysis. Methods The trial period lasted for 15 weeks and was divided into four periods: Control period: three weeks before vaccination; Period I – four weeks after first vaccination; Period II – four weeks after second vaccination, Period III – four weeks after third vaccination. Blood and sperm samples were collected at weekly intervals. Freshly collected sperm samples were analyzed. Results Testosterone concentration correlated with libido (r = 0.531; p < 0.001), volume of ejaculate (r = 0.324; p < 0.001) and the percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa (r = 0.207; p < 0.05). Testosterone concentration rised significantly (p < 0.05) in 5–6 week of trial, e. i. after the first dose of Improvac and after this peak the level of testosterone further progressively decreased (p < 0.05). Conclusions Results from this study indicate that active immunization of sexually matured boars against GnRH has negative impact on testosterone concentration, sexual behavior, volume of ejaculate and total number of normal spermatozoa in ejaculate. PMID:22640725

  4. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function.

  5. Expression characterization and functional implication of the collagen-modifying Leprecan proteins in mouse gonadal tissue and mature sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Zimmerman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Leprecan protein family which includes the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzymes (P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3, the closely related cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP, and SC65 (Synaptonemal complex 65, aka P3H4, LEPREL4, is involved in the post-translational modification of fibrillar collagens. Mutations in CRTAP, P3H1 and P3H2 cause human genetic diseases. We recently showed that SC65 forms a stable complex in the endoplasmic reticulum with P3H3 and lysyl hydroxylase 1 and that loss of this complex leads to defective collagen lysyl hydroxylation and causes low bone mass and skin fragility. Interestingly, SC65 was initially described as a synaptonemal complex-associated protein, suggesting a potential additional role in germline cells. In the present study, we describe the expression of SC65, CRTAP and other Leprecan proteins in postnatal mouse reproductive organs. We detect SC65 expression in peritubular cells of testis up to 4 weeks of age but not in cells within seminiferous tubules, while its expression is maintained in ovarian follicles until adulthood. Similar to bone and skin, SC65 and P3H3 are also tightly co-expressed in testis and ovary. Moreover, we show that CRTAP, a protein normally involved in collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation, is highly expressed in follicles and stroma of the ovary and in testes interstitial cells at 4 weeks of age, germline cells and mature sperm. Importantly, CrtapKO mice have a mild but significant increase in morphologically abnormal mature sperm (17% increase compared to WT. These data suggest a role for the Leprecans in the post-translational modification of collagens expressed in the stroma of the reproductive organs. While we could not confirm that SC65 is part of the synaptonemal complex, the expression of CRTAP in the seminiferous tubules and in mature sperm suggest a role in the testis germ cell lineage and sperm morphogenesis.

  6. Neomultitestis aspidogastriformis Bray and Cribb, 2003 (Digenea, Lepocreadiidae): mature spermatozoon and sperm morphologies in the Lepocreadioidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J S; Quilichini, Yann; Justine, Jean-Lou; Bray, Rodney A; Bâ, Cheikh T; Marchand, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Spermatological characteristics are described for the first time in the genus Neomultitestis Machida, 1982, belonging to the family Lepocreadiidae Odhner, 1905. Adult Neomultitestis aspidogastriformis were collected from the digestive tract of Platax teira, caught off New Caledonia. The mature spermatozoon of N. aspidogastriformis is described by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It includes two axonemes with 9 + "1" pattern of Trepaxonemata, an antero-lateral electron-dense material, attachment zones, two mitochondria, a nucleus, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies, and granules of glycogen. Certain ultrastructural characteristics of the spermatozoon, especially the antero-lateral electron-dense material, are shared by N. aspidogastriformis and all species of the superfamily Lepocreadioidea studied so far. The antero-lateral electron-dense material, present in different families of lepocreadioids, supports the monophyletic status of the superfamily. We also list several ultrastructural characteristics which characterize the mature spermatozoon of the Lepocreadioidea. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  7. Sperm competition, sperm numbers and sperm quality in muroid rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gómez Montoto

    and developmental pathways underlying processes of sperm formation, maturation, transport in the female reproductive tract, and preparation for fertilization must all evolve in concert.

  8. AP-1/KIF13A Blocking Peptides Impair Melanosome Maturation and Melanin Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Cécile; Ripoll, Léa; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Raposo, Graça; Delevoye, Cédric

    2018-02-14

    Melanocytes are specialized cells that generate unique organelles called melanosomes in which melanin is synthesized and stored. Melanosome biogenesis and melanocyte pigmentation require the transport and delivery of melanin synthesizing enzymes, such as tyrosinase and related proteins (e.g., TYRP1), from endosomes to maturing melanosomes. Among the proteins controlling endosome-melanosome transport, AP-1 together with KIF13A coordinates the endosomal sorting and trafficking of TYRP1 to melanosomes. We identify here β1-adaptin AP-1 subunit-derived peptides of 5 amino acids that block the interaction of KIF13A with AP-1 in cells. Incubating these peptides with human MNT-1 cells or 3D-reconstructed pigmented epidermis decreases pigmentation by impacting the maturation of melanosomes in fully pigmented organelles. This study highlights that peptides targeting the intracellular trafficking of melanocytes are candidate molecules to tune pigmentation in health and disease.

  9. AP-1/KIF13A Blocking Peptides Impair Melanosome Maturation and Melanin Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Campagne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Melanocytes are specialized cells that generate unique organelles called melanosomes in which melanin is synthesized and stored. Melanosome biogenesis and melanocyte pigmentation require the transport and delivery of melanin synthesizing enzymes, such as tyrosinase and related proteins (e.g., TYRP1, from endosomes to maturing melanosomes. Among the proteins controlling endosome-melanosome transport, AP-1 together with KIF13A coordinates the endosomal sorting and trafficking of TYRP1 to melanosomes. We identify here β1-adaptin AP-1 subunit-derived peptides of 5 amino acids that block the interaction of KIF13A with AP-1 in cells. Incubating these peptides with human MNT-1 cells or 3D-reconstructed pigmented epidermis decreases pigmentation by impacting the maturation of melanosomes in fully pigmented organelles. This study highlights that peptides targeting the intracellular trafficking of melanocytes are candidate molecules to tune pigmentation in health and disease.

  10. Elucidation of the involvement of p14, a sperm protein during maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of caprine spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinki Nandi

    Full Text Available Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilization. Although progress is being made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little has been yet explored about the potential role(s of individual sperm cell protein during this process. Therefore elucidation of the role of different sperm proteins in the process of capacitation might be of great importance to understand the process of fertilization. The present work describes the partial characterization of a 14-kDa protein (p14 detected in goat spermatozoa using an antibody directed against the purified protein. Confocal microscopic analysis reveals that the protein is present in both the intracellular and extracellular regions of the acrosomal and postacrosomal portion of caudal sperm head. Though subcellular localization shows that p14 is mainly cytosolic, however it is also seen to be present in peripheral plasma membrane and soluble part of acrosome. Immuno-localization experiment shows change in the distribution pattern of this protein upon induction of capacitation in sperm cells. Increased immunolabeling in the anterior head region of live spermatozoa is also observed when these cells are incubated under capacitating conditions, whereas most sperm cells challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187 to acrosome react, lose their labeling almost completely. Intracellular distribution of p14 also changes significantly during acrosome reaction. Interestingly, on the other hand the antibody raised against this 14-kDa sperm protein enhances the forward motility of caprine sperm cells. Rose-Bengal staining method shows that this anti-p14 antibody also decreases the number of acrosome reacted cells if incubated with capacitated sperm cells before induction of acrosome reaction. All these results taken together clearly indicate that p14 is intimately involved and plays a critical role in the acrosomal membrane fusion event.

  11. Identification of New Epididymal Luminal Fluid Proteins Involved in Sperm Maturation in Infertile Rats Treated by Dutasteride Using iTRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wu Xie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spermatozoa become mature and acquire fertilizing capacity during their passage through the epididymal lumen. In this study, we identified new epididymal luminal fluid proteins involved in sperm maturation in infertile rats by dutasteride, a dual 5α-reductase inhibitor, in order to provide potential epididymal targets for new contraceptives and infertility treatment. Methods: Male rats were treated with dutasteride for 28 consecutive days. We observed the protein expression profiles in the epididymal luminal fluids in infertile and normal rats using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ technique. The confidence of proteome data was validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: 1045 proteins were tested, and 23 of them presented different expression profiling in the infertile and normal rats. The seven proteins were down-regulated, and 16 proteins were up-regulated. Among the seven proteins which were significantly down-regulated by dutasteride in the epididymal luminal fluids, there were three β-defensins (Defb2, Defb18 and Defb39, which maybe the key proteins involved in epididymal sperm maturation and male fertility. Conclusions: We report for the first time that dutasteride influences the protein expression profiling in the epididymal luminal fluids of rats, and this result provides some new epididymal targets for male contraception and infertility therapy.

  12. Methylation changes in mature sperm deoxyribonucleic acid from oligozoospermic men: assessment of genetic variants and assisted reproductive technology outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montjean, Debbie; Ravel, Célia; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Cohen-Bacrie, Paul; Berthaut, Isabelle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    To characterize a potential genetic cause for methylation errors described in oligozoospermia. Analysis of PEG1/MEST-DMR and H19-DMR methylation level in sperm, in parallel with the study of several genes on the Y chromosome, DNMT3A, and DNMT3L. Clinical outcome was also looked at regarding PEG1/MEST-DMR and H19-DMR methylation level in sperm. Research and diagnostic laboratories. One hundred nineteen normospermic and 175 oligozoospermic men consulting for couple infertility. We studied PEG1/MEST-DMR and H19-DMR methylation profiles in 294 men. We searched for Y chromosome gene aberrations and for mutations in both DNMT3A and DNMT3L genes in men showing epimutations. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes were also investigated. Sperm samples were collected from 294 volunteers for genomic DNA isolation that was used to study methylation profiles in imprinted loci and Y chromosome SMCY, DNMT3A, and DNMT3L genes. Pregnancy rate was also studied after ART treatment using sperm showing epimutations. Epimutations in H19-DMR and PEG1/MEST-DMR were found in 20% and 3% of oligozoospermic men, respectively. We identified an amino acid change in DNMT3A in one case and in DNMT3L in eight men with altered methylation profiles. No mutations were detected in SMCY or in selected Y chromsome genes. No correlation between ART outcome and epimutations was found. We observed epimethylations in spermatozoa of oligozoospermic individuals, but no association was found with genetic variants or in the ART outcome. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Total glucosides of paeony attenuated functional maturation of dendritic cells via blocking TLR4/5 signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Lin, Jinpiao; Huo, Rongfen; Huang, Wenkang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Li; Sun, Yue; Shen, Baihua; Li, Ningli

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the initiation and development of an immune response. Inhibitory effect on DC maturation alters immune-mediated inflammatory reaction in vivo. Total glucosides of paeony (TGP) are active compounds extracted from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora and have been widely used to ameliorate inflammation in therapy for autoimmune diseases. However, whether TGP act on DC maturation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of TGP on DC maturation in ovalbumin (OVA) immunized mice. Ear inflammation was inhibited by TGP (150 mgkg(-1), i.p.×11 days) obviously. The antigen presenting capacity of DC derived from TGP-treated mice was arrested. Meanwhile, OVA specific T cell proliferation was inhibited. In addition, we found that maturation of DCs was decreased by TGP treatment. Furthermore, OVA specific T cell proliferation was rescued by the adoptive transfer of mature DCs (mDCs) into TGP treated OVA-challenged mice. The research on the mechanism showed that TGP significantly inhibited activation of TLR4/5 singling. All these results demonstrated that TGP inhibited DC maturation and function by selectively blocking TLR4/5 activation in vivo, which in turn leads to reduce immune-mediated inflammation in vivo, adding a novel mechanism and therapeutic target of TGP for inflammatory and autoimmune disease treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Protein disulfide isomerase-P5, down-regulated in the final stage of boar epididymal sperm maturation, catalyzes disulfide formation to inhibit protein function in oxidative refolding of reduced denatured lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akama, Kuniko; Horikoshi, Tomoe; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Nakahata, Satoko; Akitsu, Aoi; Niwa, Nobuyoshi; Intoh, Atsushi; Kakui, Yasutaka; Sugaya, Michiko; Takei, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Noriaki; Sato, Takaya; Matsumoto, Rena; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Kashiwabara, Shin-ichi; Baba, Tadashi; Nakamura, Megumi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2010-06-01

    In mammalian spermiogenesis, sperm mature during epididymal transit to get fertility. The pig sharing many physiological similarities with humans is considered a promising animal model in medicine. We examined the expression profiles of proteins from boar epididymal caput, corpus, and cauda sperm by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Our results indicated that protein disulfide isomerase-P5 (PDI-P5) human homolog was down-regulated from the epididymal corpus to cauda sperm, in contrast to the constant expression of protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) human homolog. To examine the functions of PDIA3 and PDI-P5, we cloned and sequenced cDNAs of pig PDIA3 and PDI-P5 protein precursors. Each recombinant pig mature PDIA3 and PDI-P5 expressed in Escherichia coli showed thiol-dependent disulfide reductase activities in insulin turbidity assay. Although PDIA3 showed chaperone activity to promote oxidative refolding of reduced denatured lysozyme, PDI-P5 exhibited anti-chaperone activity to inhibit oxidative refolding of lysozyme at an equimolar ratio. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis suggested that disulfide cross-linked and non-productively folded lysozyme was responsible for the anti-chaperone activity of PDI-P5. These results provide a molecular basis and insights into the physiological roles of PDIA3 and PDI-P5 in sperm maturation and fertilization. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Low Sperm Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem such as an inherited chromosomal abnormality, a hormonal imbalance, dilated testicular veins or a condition that blocks ... Elevated temperatures impair sperm production and function. Although studies are limited and are inconclusive, frequent use of ...

  16. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  17. Insect radiosensitivity: dose curves and dose-fractionation studies of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm of 4 insect species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaChance, L.E.; Graham, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Males of 4 species of insects: Musca domestica L. (housefly) (Diptera), Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (milkweed bug) (Hemiptera), Anagasta kuhniella (Zeller) (mealmoth) (Lepidoptera) and Heliothis virescens (Fab.) (tobacco budworm) (Lepidoptera) were irradiated as adults. Dose-response curves for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm were constructed. The curves were analyzed mathematically and compared with theoretical computer simulated curves requiring 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 'hits' for the induction of a dominant lethal mutation. The 4 species belonging to 3 different orders of insects showed a wide range in radiation sensitivity and vastly different dose-response curves. When the data were analyzed by several mathematical models the authors found that a logistic response curve gave reasonably good fit with vastly different parameters for the 4 species. Dose-fractionation experiments showed no reduction in the frequency of lethal mutations induced in any species when an acute dose was fractionated into 2 equal exposures separated by an 8-h period. (Auth.)

  18. Conditioned blocking is re-established by neurotransplantation in mature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morón, I.; Ballesteros, M. A.; Valoušková, Věra; Gallo, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2001), s. 2297-2301 ISSN 0959-4965 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : aging * conditioned blocking * neurotransplantation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.374, year: 2001

  19. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly.

  20. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Gantt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nelfinavir (NFV is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs. Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  1. A Recurrent Deletion of DPY19L2 Causes Infertility in Man by Blocking Sperm Head Elongation and Acrosome Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbuz, Radu; Zouari, Raoudha; Pierre, Virginie; Ben Khelifa, Mariem; Kharouf, Mahmoud; Coutton, Charles; Merdassi, Ghaya; Abada, Farid; Escoffier, Jessica; Nikas, Yorgos; Vialard, François; Koscinski, Isabelle; Triki, Chema; Sermondade, Nathalie; Schweitzer, Thérèse; Zhioua, Amel; Zhioua, Fethi; Latrous, Habib; Halouani, Lazhar; Ouafi, Marrakchi; Makni, Mounir; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Sèle, Bernard; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Satre, Véronique; Viville, Stéphane; Arnoult, Christophe; Lunardi, Joël; Ray, Pierre F.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of couples require medical assistance to achieve a pregnancy, and more than 2% of the births in Western countries now result from assisted reproductive technologies. To identify genetic variants responsible for male infertility, we performed a whole-genome SNP scan on patients presenting with total globozoospermia, a primary infertility phenotype characterized by the presence of 100% round acrosomeless spermatozoa in the ejaculate. This strategy allowed us to identify in most patients (15/20) a 200 kb homozygous deletion encompassing only DPY19L2, which is highly expressed in the testis. Although there was no known function for DPY19L2 in humans, previous work indicated that its ortholog in C. elegans is involved in cell polarity. In man, the DPY19L2 region has been described as a copy-number variant (CNV) found to be duplicated and heterozygously deleted in healthy individuals. We show here that the breakpoints of the deletions are located on a highly homologous 28 kb low copy repeat (LCR) sequence present on each side of DPY19L2, indicating that the identified deletions were probably produced by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between these two regions. We demonstrate that patients with globozoospermia have a homozygous deletion of DPY19L2, thus indicating that DPY19L2 is necessary in men for sperm head elongation and acrosome formation. A molecular diagnosis can now be proposed to affected men; the presence of the deletion confirms the diagnosis of globozoospermia and assigns a poor prognosis for the success of in vitro fertilization. PMID:21397064

  2. Tripeptidyl peptidase II regulates sperm function by modulating intracellular Ca(2+ stores via the ryanodine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified Ca(2+ stores in sperm cells; however, it is not clear whether these Ca(2+ stores are functional and how they are mobilized. Here, in vitro and in vivo, we determined that tripeptidyl peptidase II antagonists strongly activated the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that drives sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated that in the absence of Ca(2+, TPIII antagonists elevated the intracellular Ca(2+ levels in sperm, resulting in a marked improvement in sperm movement, capacitation, acrosome reaction, and the in vitro fertilizing ability. This antagonist-induced release of intracellular Ca(2+ could be blocked by the inhibitors of ryanodine receptors (RyRs which are the main intracellular Ca(2+ channels responsible for releasing stored Ca(2+. Consistent with these results, indirect immunofluorescence assay using anti-RyR antibodies further validated the presence of RyR3 in the acrosomal region of mature sperm. Thus, TPPII can regulate sperm maturation by modulating intracellular Ca(2+ stores via the type 3 RyR.

  3. None of the integrins known to be present on the mouse egg or to be ADAM receptors are essential for sperm-egg binding and fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zhi-Yong; Brakebusch, Cord; Fässler, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    Antibody inhibition and alpha6beta1 ligand binding experiments indicate that the egg integrin alpha6beta1 functions as a receptor for sperm during gamete fusion; yet, eggs null for the alpha6 integrin exhibit normal fertilization. Alternative integrins may be involved in sperm-egg binding...... was not essential for sperm-egg binding and fusion. Oocyte-specific, beta1 integrin conditional knockout mice allowed us to obtain mature eggs lacking all beta1 integrins. We found that the beta1 integrin null eggs were fully functional in fertilization both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, neither anti......-mouse beta3 integrin function-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) nor alphav integrin function-blocking mAb inhibited sperm binding to or fusion with beta1 integrin null eggs. Thus, function of beta3 or alphav integrins does not seem to be involved in compensating for the absence of beta1 integrins...

  4. Cephalometric evaluation of the effects of the Twin Block appliance in subjects with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion amongst different cervical vertebral maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Aisha; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the cephalometric changes in skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue variables induced by Clark's Twin Block (CTB) in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and to compare these changes in different cervical vertebral maturation stages. Pre- and post-treatment/observation lateral cephalograms of 53 Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and 60 controls were compared to evaluate skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue changes. Skeletal maturity was assessed according to cervical vertebral maturation stages. Pre- and post-treatment/observation mean changes and differences (T2-T1) were compared by means of Wilcoxon sign rank and Mann-Whitney U-tests, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between different cervical stages were performed by means of Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test (p ≤ 0.05) . When compared with controls, there was a significant reduction in ANB angle (p cervical stages (p cervical stages (p cervical stages, significant differences were found for SNA, SNB and UI-SN angles and overjet. . The Twin-Block along with the normal craniofacial growth improves facial esthetics in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion by changes in underlying skeletal and dentoalveolar structures. The favorable mandibular growth occurs during any of the cervical vertebral maturation stages, with more pronounced effect during CS-3 stage.

  5. Impacts on transfer of the sperm of helicoverpa Armigera by irradiation (L. noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohui; Li Yongjun; Wang Huasong; Song Jiaxiang

    2001-01-01

    Gamma irradiation did not influence the quantity of the eupyrene sperm bundles in duplex and that of the eupyrene sperm in spermatophore, but affected the maturing of eupyrene sperm bundles. When males were given sterilizing dose of 400 Gy, the quantity and the activity of the eupyrene sperm in the spermatheca were reduced significantly (P < 0.05)

  6. Different gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist doses for the final oocyte maturation in high-responder patients undergoing in vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Goksan Pabuccu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Efficacy of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRH-a for ovulation in high-responders. Aims: The aim of the current study is to compare the impact of different GnRH-a doses for the final oocyte maturation on cycle outcomes and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS rates in high-responder patients undergoing ovarian stimulation. Settings And Designs: Electronic medical records of a private in vitro fertilization center, a retrospective analysis. Subjects and Methods: A total of 77 high-responder cases were detected receiving GnRH-a. Group I consisted of 38 patients who received 1 mg of agonist and Group II consisted of 39 patients who received 2 mg of agonist. Statistical Analysis: In order to compare groups, Student′s t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Pearson′s Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test were used where appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Number of retrieved oocytes (17.5 vs. 15.0, P = 0.510, implantation rates (46% vs. 55.1%, P = 0.419 and clinical pregnancy rates (42.1% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.744 were similar among groups. There were no mild or severe OHSS cases detected in Group I. Only 1 mild OHSS case was detected in Group II. Conclusion: A volume of 1 or 2 mg leuprolide acetate yields similar outcomes when used for the final oocyte maturation in high-responder patients.

  7. Sperm Production Rate, Gonadal and Extragonadal Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five healthy West African Dwarf (WAD) rams, 1.5 to 2.5 years of age and weighing between 15 kg to 20 kg were used to determine daily sperm production, gonadal and exragonadal sperm reserves. Gonadal and extragonadal sperm reserves were estimated by the haemocytometric method, while the daily sperm production ...

  8. Cephalometric evaluation of the effects of the Twin Block appliance in subjects with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion amongst different cervical vertebral maturation stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Khoja

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the cephalometric changes in skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue variables induced by Clark's Twin Block (CTB in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and to compare these changes in different cervical vertebral maturation stages. Methods: Pre- and post-treatment/observation lateral cephalograms of 53 Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and 60 controls were compared to evaluate skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue changes. Skeletal maturity was assessed according to cervical vertebral maturation stages. Pre- and post-treatment/observation mean changes and differences (T2-T1 were compared by means of Wilcoxon sign rank and Mann-Whitney U-tests, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between different cervical stages were performed by means of Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test (p ≤ 0.05 . Results: When compared with controls, there was a significant reduction in ANB angle (p < 0.001, which was due to a change in SNB angle in CS-2 and CS-3 (p < 0.001, and in SNA (p < 0.001 and SNB (p = 0.016 angles in the CS-4 group. There was significant increase in the GoGn-SN angle in CS-2 (p = 0.007 and CS-4 (p = 0.024, and increase in Co-Gn and Go-Gn amongst all cervical stages (p < 0.05. There was significant decrease in U1-SN and increase in IMPA amongst all cervical stages (p < 0.05. There was significant retraction of the upper lip in CS-3 (p = 0.001, protrusion of the lower lip in CS-2 (p = 0.005, increase in nasolabial angle in CS-4 (p = 0.006 and Z-angle in CS-3 (p = 0.016, reduction in H-angle in CS-2 (p = 0.013 and CS-3 (p = 0.002 groups. When pre- and post-treatment mean differences were compared between different cervical stages, significant differences were found for SNA, SNB and UI-SN angles and overjet. . Conclusions: The Twin-Block along with the normal craniofacial growth improves facial esthetics in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion by changes in underlying skeletal and

  9. Sperm length evolution in the fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, B.; Dijkstra, M. B.; Mueller, U. G.

    2009-01-01

    Eusocial insects offer special opportunities for the comparative study of sperm traits because sperm competition is absent (in species with obligatory monandry) or constrained (in lineages where queens mate multiply but never remate later in life). We measured sperm length in 19 species of fungus......-growing ants, representing 9 of the 12 recognized genera, and mapped these onto the ant phylogeny. We show that average sperm length across species is highly variable and decreases with mature colony size in basal genera with singly mated queens, suggesting that sperm production or storage constraints affect...... the evolution of sperm length. Sperm length does not decrease further in multiply mating leaf-cutting ants, despite substantial further increases in colony size. In a combined analysis, sexual dimorphism explained 63.1% of the variance in sperm length between species. As colony size was not a significant...

  10. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen

  11. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadi, H.A.S.; Riemsdijk, van E.L.C.; Dance, A.L.; Rajamanickam, G.D.; Kastelic, J.P.; Thundathil, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n = 3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in

  12. Visualisation of plastid degradation in sperm cells of wheat pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavesi, Lucia F; Wu, Huixia; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil; Jones, Huw D

    2017-01-01

    Like most angiosperms, wheat (Triticum aestivum) shows maternal inheritance of plastids. It is thought that this takes place by cytoplasmic stripping at fertilisation rather than the absence of plastids in sperm cells. To determine the fate of plastids during sperm cell development, plastid-targeted green fluorescent protein was used to visualise these organelles in nuclear transgenic wheat lines. Fewer than thirty small 1-2-μm plastids were visible in early uninucleate pollen cells. These dramatically increased to several hundred larger (4 μm) plastids during pollen maturation and went through distinct morphological changes. Only small plastids were visible in generative cells (n = 25) and young sperm cells (n = 9). In mature sperm cells, these green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged plastids were absent. This is consistent with maternal inheritance of plastids resulting from their degradation in mature sperm cells in wheat.

  13. Left-handed sperm removal by male Calopteryx damselflies (Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kaori; Hayashi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Male genitalia in several insect species are asymmetry in right and left shape. However, the function of such asymmetric male genitalia is still unclear. We found that the male genitalia of the damselfly Calopteryx cornelia (Odonata: Calopterygidae) are morphologically symmetric just after emergence but asymmetric after reproductive maturation. Males remove rival sperm stored in the female bursa copulatrix (single spherical sac) and the following spermatheca (Y-shaped tubular sac) prior to their own ejaculation to prevent sperm competition. Males possess the aedeagus with a recurved head to remove bursal sperm and a pair of spiny lateral processes to remove spermathecal sperm. The right lateral process is less developed than the left, and sperm stored in the right spermathecal tube are rarely removed. Experiments involving surgical cutting of each lateral process demonstrated that only the left process functions in spermathecal sperm removal. Thus, males of C. cornelia are left-handed in their sperm removal behaviour at copulation.

  14. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  15. The relationship between acridine orange fluorescence of sperm nuclei and the fertilizing ability of human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, K; Katayose, H; Yanagida, K; Kimura, Y; Sato, A

    1996-10-01

    To determine whether the outcome of IVF can be predicted by acridine orange (AO) nuclear fluorescence of sperm. Based on the fact that AO nuclear fluorescence color after acid treatment reflects maturity (green fluorescence) or immaturity (yellow to red fluorescence) of spermatozoa, the relationships between sperm maturity and the outcome of IVF, subzonal insemination, or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were investigated. The IVF program at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fukushima Medical College. Sixty-eight patients undergoing 68 IVF treatment cycles. Acridine orange fluorescence of sperm nuclei and successful oocyte fertilization. conventional semen parameters (sperm concentration and percentages of motile or morphologically normal spermatozoa in semen) did not correlate with the incidence of spermatozoa with green AO fluorescent (mature) nuclei. When > or = 50% of spermatozoa in semen samples exhibited green AO nuclear fluorescence, IVF was always successful. When green AO nuclear fluorescence was green AO fluorescent spermatozoa were able to bind efficiently human zona pellucida. When the incidence of green AO fluorescent spermatozoa was fertilized by ICSI. The spermatozoa which fertilized oocytes in vivo and in IVF were limited to those whose nuclei exhibited green AO fluorescence. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection may be the method of choice when the incidence of green AO nuclear fluorescence is low regardless of the results of semen analysis.

  16. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accurate sperm morphology assessment predicts sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hassan Abu, D; Franken, D R; Hoffman, B; Henkel, R

    2012-05-01

    Sperm morphology has been associated with in vitro as well as in vivo fertilisation. The study aimed to evaluate the possible relation between the percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology and the following sperm functional assays: (i) zona-induced acrosome reaction (ZIAR); (ii) DNA integrity; (iii) chromatin condensation; (iv) sperm apoptosis; and (v) fertilisation rates. Regression analysis was employed to calculate the association between morphology and different functional tests. Normal sperm morphology correlated significantly with the percentages of live acrosome-reacted spermatozoa in the ZIAR (r = 0.518; P sperm apoptosis (r = -0.395; P = 0.0206; n = 34) and necrosis (r = -0.545; P = 0.0009; n = 34). Negative correlations existed between for the acrosome reaction, and DNA integrity, while negative associations were recorded with the percentages of CMA(3) -positive spermatozoa, apoptotic and necrotic spermatozoa. Sperm morphology is related to sperm dysfunction such as poor chromatin condensation, acrosome reaction and DNA integrity. Negative and significant correlations existed between normal sperm morphology and chromatin condensation, the percentage of spermatozoa with abnormal DNA and spermatozoa with apoptotic activity. The authors do not regard sperm morphology as the only test for the diagnosis of male fertility, but sperm morphology can serve as a valuable indicator of underlying dysfunction. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Matrine Inhibits Mouse Sperm Function by Reducing Sperm [Ca2+]i and Phospho-ERK1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrine is a bioactive alkaloid that has a variety of pharmacological effects and is widely used in Chinese medicine. However, its effects on male reproduction are not well known. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vitro toxicity of matrine on mature mouse sperm. Methods: Mouse cauda epididymal sperm were exposed to matrine (10-200 µM in vitro. The viability, motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and fertilization ability of the mouse sperm were examined. Furthermore, the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i, calcium (Catsper and potassium (Ksper currents, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (p-ERK1/2 of the sperm were analyzed. Results: After exposure to 100 µM or more of matrine, mouse cauda epididymal sperm exhibited a significant reduction in total motility, progressive motility, linear velocity and acrosome reaction rate induced by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. As a result, the fertilization ability of mouse sperm was remarkably decreased by matrine. Our data further demonstrated that matrine significantly reduced sperm [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]i-related p-ERK1/2; however, both the CatSper and KSper currents, which are thought to interactively regulate Ca2+ influx in sperm, were not affected by matrine. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that matrine inhibits mouse sperm function by reducing sperm [Ca2+]i and suppressing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2.

  19. Sperm Surface Proteomics 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewis, I.A.; Gadella, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115389873

    2017-01-01

    This contribution will focus exclusively on the total (global) protein composition (the proteome) of the sperm surface. Immune responses directed towards sperm surface proteins may cause infertility since functionally intact sperm are under immune attack. The immune attack can be achieved directly

  20. Advanced sperm selection techniques for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Simon; Kroon, Ben; Ford, Emily; Hook, Ysanne; Glujovsky, Demián; Yazdani, Anusch

    2014-10-28

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) bring together gametes outside of the body to enhance the probability of fertilisation and pregnancy. Advanced sperm selection techniques are increasingly being employed in ART, most commonly in cycles utilising ICSI. Advanced sperm selection techniques are thought to improve the chance that structurally intact and mature sperm with high DNA integrity are selected for fertilisation. Advanced sperm selection strategies include selection according to surface charge; sperm apoptosis; sperm birefringence; ability to bind to hyaluronic acid; and sperm morphology under ultra-high magnification. These techniques theoretically improve ART outcomes. To evaluate the impact of advanced sperm selection techniques on ART outcomes. Systematic search of electronic databases (Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information Database (LILACS)), trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform), conference abstracts (Web of Knowledge) and grey literature (OpenGrey) for relevant randomised controlled trials. We handsearched the reference lists of included studies and similar reviews. The search was conducted in May 2014. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing an advanced sperm selection technique versus standard IVF or ICSI or versus another advanced sperm selection technique. We excluded studies of sperm selection using ultra-high magnification (intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection, or IMSI), as they are the subject of a separate Cochrane review. Quasi-randomised and pseudo-randomised trials were

  1. Identification of peroxiredoxin-5 in bovine cauda epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagdas, Subir K; Buchanan, Teresa; Raychoudhury, Samir

    2014-02-01

    Developing spermatozoa require a series of posttesticular modifications within the luminal environment of the epididymis to achieve maturation; this involves several surface modifications including changes in plasma membrane lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and alterations in the outer acrosomal membrane. Epididymal maturation can therefore allow sperm to gain forward motility and fertilization capabilities. The objective of this study was to identify maturation-dependent protein(s) and to investigate their role with the production of functionally competent spermatozoa. Lectin blot analyses of caput and cauda sperm plasma membrane fractions identified a 17.5 kDa wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-binding polypeptide present in the cauda sperm plasma membrane not in the caput sperm plasma membrane. Among the several WGA-stained bands, the presence of a 17.5 kDa WGA-binding polypeptide band was detected only in cauda epididymal fluid not in caput epididymal fluid suggesting that the 17.5 kDa WGA-binding polypeptide is secreted from the cauda epididymis and binds to the cauda sperm plasma membrane during epididymal transit. Proteomic identification of the 17.5 kDa polypeptide yielded 13 peptides that matched the sequence of peroxiredoxin-5 (PRDX5) protein (Bos Taurus). We propose that bovine cauda sperm PRDX5 acts as an antioxidant enzyme in the epididymal environment, which is crucial in protecting the viable sperm population against the damage caused by endogeneous or exogeneous peroxide.

  2. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes ...

  3. Daily sperm production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyjovska, Zdenka Orabi; Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Jackson, Petra

    2013-01-01

    instillation with Printex90. Body and testicle weight, sperm content per g testicular parenchyma and daily sperm production (DSP) were assessed. The protocol for assessment of DSP was optimized for application in mice (C57BL/6J) and the influence of different parameters was studied. Maternal particulate...... exposure did not affect DSP statistically significantly in the F1 generation, although TiO2 tended to reduce sperm counts. Overall, time-to-first F2 litter increased with decreasing sperm production. There was no effect on sperm production in the F2 generation originating after TiO2 exposure. F2 offspring......, whose fathers were prenatally exposed to Printex90, showed lowered sperm production. Furthermore, we report statistically significant differences in sperm production between mouse strains....

  4. Characterization of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity involvement in sterlet spermatozoon maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzyuba, V.; Słowińska, M.; Cosson, J.; Ciereszko, A.; Boryshpolets, S.; Štěrba, Ján; Rodina, M.; Linhart, O.; Dzyuba, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2016), s. 1755-1766 ISSN 0920-1742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : amidase activity * anti-proteolytic activity * casein and gelatin zymography * siberian sturgeon sperm * sperm atozoon maturation * sterlet sperm Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.647, year: 2016

  5. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A Urra

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT, serotonin (SERT and norepinephrine (NET transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylaminostyryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+, as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909 and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  6. Parallel Evolution of Sperm Hyper-Activation Ca2+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jacob C; Phadnis, Nitin

    2017-07-01

    Sperm hyper-activation is a dramatic change in sperm behavior where mature sperm burst into a final sprint in the race to the egg. The mechanism of sperm hyper-activation in many metazoans, including humans, consists of a jolt of Ca2+ into the sperm flagellum via CatSper ion channels. Surprisingly, all nine CatSper genes have been independently lost in several animal lineages. In Drosophila, sperm hyper-activation is performed through the cooption of the polycystic kidney disease 2 (pkd2) Ca2+ channel. The parallels between CatSpers in primates and pkd2 in Drosophila provide a unique opportunity to examine the molecular evolution of the sperm hyper-activation machinery in two independent, nonhomologous calcium channels separated by > 500 million years of divergence. Here, we use a comprehensive phylogenomic approach to investigate the selective pressures on these sperm hyper-activation channels. First, we find that the entire CatSper complex evolves rapidly under recurrent positive selection in primates. Second, we find that pkd2 has parallel patterns of adaptive evolution in Drosophila. Third, we show that this adaptive evolution of pkd2 is driven by its role in sperm hyper-activation. These patterns of selection suggest that the evolution of the sperm hyper-activation machinery is driven by sexual conflict with antagonistic ligands that modulate channel activity. Together, our results add sperm hyper-activation channels to the class of fast evolving reproductive proteins and provide insights into the mechanisms used by the sexes to manipulate sperm behavior. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen cryopreservation; evaluation of semen in the andrology laboratory; genetic aspects of male reproduction; emerging techniques and future development of semen evaluation and handling and applied androlo...

  8. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn W Zimmerman

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL, a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and

  9. Flow Cytometry Analysis Reveals That Only a Subpopulation of Mouse Sperm Undergoes Hyperpolarization During Capacitation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffier, Jessica; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Doug; Santi, Celia M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2015-01-01

    To gain fertilizing capacity, mammalian sperm should reside in the female tract for a period of time. The physiological changes that render the sperm able to fertilize are known as capacitation. Capacitation is associated with an increase in intracellular pH, an increase in intracellular calcium, and phosphorylation of different proteins. This process is also accompanied by the hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane potential (Em). In the present work, we used flow cytometry to analyze changes in sperm Em during capacitation in individual cells. Our results indicate that a subpopulation of hyperpolarized mouse sperm can be clearly distinguished by sperm flow cytometry analysis. Using sperm bearing green fluorescent protein in their acrosomes, we found that this hyperpolarized subpopulation is composed of sperm with intact acrosomes. In addition, we show that the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization is blocked by high extracellular K+, by PKA inhibitors, and by SLO3 inhibitors in CD1 mouse sperm, and undetectable in Slo3 knockout mouse sperm. On the other hand, in sperm incubated in conditions that do not support capacitation, sperm membrane hyperpolarization can be induced by amiloride, high extracellular NaHCO3, and cAMP agonists. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model in which sperm Em hyperpolarization is downstream of a cAMP-dependent pathway and is mediated by the activation of SLO3 K+ channels. PMID:25855261

  10. Flow cytometry analysis reveals that only a subpopulation of mouse sperm undergoes hyperpolarization during capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffier, Jessica; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Doug; Santi, Celia M; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E

    2015-05-01

    To gain fertilizing capacity, mammalian sperm should reside in the female tract for a period of time. The physiological changes that render the sperm able to fertilize are known as capacitation. Capacitation is associated with an increase in intracellular pH, an increase in intracellular calcium, and phosphorylation of different proteins. This process is also accompanied by the hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane potential (Em). In the present work, we used flow cytometry to analyze changes in sperm Em during capacitation in individual cells. Our results indicate that a subpopulation of hyperpolarized mouse sperm can be clearly distinguished by sperm flow cytometry analysis. Using sperm bearing green fluorescent protein in their acrosomes, we found that this hyperpolarized subpopulation is composed of sperm with intact acrosomes. In addition, we show that the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization is blocked by high extracellular K(+), by PKA inhibitors, and by SLO3 inhibitors in CD1 mouse sperm, and undetectable in Slo3 knockout mouse sperm. On the other hand, in sperm incubated in conditions that do not support capacitation, sperm membrane hyperpolarization can be induced by amiloride, high extracellular NaHCO3, and cAMP agonists. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model in which sperm Em hyperpolarization is downstream of a cAMP-dependent pathway and is mediated by the activation of SLO3 K(+) channels. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  11. Formation and development of sperms in angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tatintseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermiogelnesis has been studied in a large number of Angiosperm species characterizing different levels of phylogenetic system. The formation and development of male gamets can be described as formation of sperm cells that undergo ontogenesis which stimulates changes up to full maturity of the pollen grain. The process of ontogenesis is aimed at creating a suitable delivery system by the pollen tube to a female gamete.

  12. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Devadasa Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1 st , 2 nd , 4 th , 5 th , 7 th , and 10 th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment.

  13. cSrc is necessary for epididymal development and is incorporated into sperm during epididymal transit

    OpenAIRE

    Krapf, Dario; Ruan, Ye Chun; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Battistone, Maria A.; Pawlak, John B.; Sanjay, Archana; Pilder, Stephen H.; Cuasnicu, Patricia; Breton, Sylvie; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2012-01-01

    Changes that occur to mammalian sperm upon epididymal transit and maturation render these cells capable of moving progressively and capacitating. Signaling events leading to mammalian sperm capacitation depend on the modulation of proteins by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades. Recent experiments have demonstrated that the Src family of kinases plays an important role in the regulation of these events. However, sperm from cSrc null mice display normal tyrosine phosphorylation asso...

  14. Sperm storage potential and daily sperm production of brown male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm storage potential and daily sperm production of brown male Japanese quails for three different physiological age groups. ... positively correlated (r=0.91 P<0.01). This study revealed that the brown male Japanese quail has its peak reproduction potential at puberty. Keywords: Quail sperm storage, sperm production ...

  15. Sperm form and function in the absence of sperm competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Gerhard; Maree, Liana

    2014-03-01

    Sperm competition is a post-copulatory, sexual selection force that, together with phylogeny and fertilization mode, has been regarded as one of the main factors explaining the diversity in sperm size across species. This universal sperm selection mechanism favors traits that enhance a male's fertilizing ability and paternity success. Surprisingly, however, sperm characteristics and semen quality in monogamous species, with low risk of sperm competition, have barely received any attention. In this review, we consider sperm competition and monogamy as two ends of the selective spectrum, and discuss its effect on sperm structure and function. We address the issue of a lack of sperm competition by comparing sperm traits of essentially monogamous species--their largely degenerative sperm features and high degree of polymorphisms could be norms for monogamous species. Further, the level of sperm competition in humans is discussed by comparing its mating strategy, relative testis size, and sperm traits to other primate species. In terms of sperm concentration, sperm swimming speed, and sperm morphology, humans seem to be closer aligned to the low-risk sperm competition situation in gorillas than to promiscuous chimpanzees. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The fine structure of the sperm and spermatid differentiation in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fine structure of the sperm and spermatid differentiation in the brown mussel Perna perna. RIF. Bernard and A.N. Hodgson. Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown. The mature sperm of Perna perna is 50-55 Ilm long and comprises three regions: a head, a mid-piece and a tail. The.

  17. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Compromises Human Sperm Function by Reducing Intracellular cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Dahu; He, Yuanqiao; Ding, Zhiyong; Mao, Fei; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    A worldwide decline in the quality of human semen is currently occurring. In mammals, sperm are produced from diploid stem-cell spermatogonia by spermatogenesis in testes and become mature in epididymis. Nevertheless, these biological processes can be affected by Gram-negative bacterial infection mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major endotoxin of Gram-negative bacteria. It is well known that LPS can disturb spermatogenesis and affect sperm maturation and quality in vivo. However, the effect of LPS on the ejaculated mature sperm in vitro remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the in vitro toxicity of LPS on human sperm function and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were incubated with LPS (0.1-100 μg/ml) for 1-12 h in vitro and, subsequently, sperm viability, motility and capacitation, and the acrosome reaction were examined. LPS dose-dependently inhibited total and progressive motility and the ability to move through a viscous medium of the sperm but did not affect sperm viability, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. To explore the underlying mechanism of LPS's actions, we examined the effects of LPS on the intracellular concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm, which are key regulators of human sperm function. LPS decreased intracellular cAMP dose-dependently but had no effect on [Ca(2+)]i and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm. These findings suggest that LPS inhibits human sperm motility by decreasing intracellular cAMP.

  19. Signaling in sperm: toward a molecular understanding of the acquisition of sperm motility in the mouse epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Aghajanian, Haig K; Lin, Angel; Gerton, George L

    2013-11-01

    Sperm motility encompasses a wide range of events involving epididymal maturation and activation of biochemical pathways, most notably cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Following the discovery of guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (RAPGEFs), also known as exchange proteins activated by cAMP, we investigated the separate roles of PKA and RAPGEFs in sperm motility. RT-PCR showed the presence of Rapgef3, Rapgef4, and Rapgef5, as well as several known RAPGEF partner mRNAs, in spermatogenic cells. However, Rapgef3 and Rapgef4 appeared to be less abundant in condensing spermatids versus pachytene spermatocytes. Similarly, many of these proteins were detected by immunoblotting. RAPGEF5 was detected in germ cells and murine epididymal sperm. Indirect immunofluorescence localized SGK1, SGK3, AKT1 pT(308), and RAPGEF5 to the acrosome, while PDPK1 was found in the postacrosomal region. SGK3 was present throughout the tail, while PDPK1 and AKT1 pT(308) were in the midpiece. When motility was assessed in demembranated cauda epididymal sperm, addition of ATP and the selective ligand for RAPGEFs, 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, resulted in motility, but the sperm were unable to undergo hyperactivated-like motility. In contrast, when demembranated cauda epididymal sperm were incubated with ATP plus dibutyryl cAMP, sperm became motile and progressed to hyperactivated-like motility. However, no significant difference was observed when intact sperm were examined. GSK3 phosphorylation was altered in the presence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Significantly, intact caput epididymal sperm became motile when incubated in the presence of extracellular ATP. These results provide evidence for a new pathway involved in endowing sperm with the capacity to swim.

  20. Signaling in Sperm: Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Acquisition of Sperm Motility in the Mouse Epididymis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Lin, Angel; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sperm motility encompasses a wide range of events involving epididymal maturation and activation of biochemical pathways, most notably cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Following the discovery of guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (RAPGEFs), also known as exchange proteins activated by cAMP, we investigated the separate roles of PKA and RAPGEFs in sperm motility. RT-PCR showed the presence of Rapgef3, Rapgef4, and Rapgef5, as well as several known RAPGEF partner mRNAs, in spermatogenic cells. However, Rapgef3 and Rapgef4 appeared to be less abundant in condensing spermatids versus pachytene spermatocytes. Similarly, many of these proteins were detected by immunoblotting. RAPGEF5 was detected in germ cells and murine epididymal sperm. Indirect immunofluorescence localized SGK1, SGK3, AKT1 pT308, and RAPGEF5 to the acrosome, while PDPK1 was found in the postacrosomal region. SGK3 was present throughout the tail, while PDPK1 and AKT1 pT308 were in the midpiece. When motility was assessed in demembranated cauda epididymal sperm, addition of ATP and the selective ligand for RAPGEFs, 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP, resulted in motility, but the sperm were unable to undergo hyperactivated-like motility. In contrast, when demembranated cauda epididymal sperm were incubated with ATP plus dibutyryl cAMP, sperm became motile and progressed to hyperactivated-like motility. However, no significant difference was observed when intact sperm were examined. GSK3 phosphorylation was altered in the presence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Significantly, intact caput epididymal sperm became motile when incubated in the presence of extracellular ATP. These results provide evidence for a new pathway involved in endowing sperm with the capacity to swim. PMID:24006282

  1. Sperm and Spermatids Contain Different Proteins and Bind Distinct Egg Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Teperek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation. Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1 several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2 numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  2. Endothelial galectin-1 binds to specific glycans on nipah virus fusion protein and inhibits maturation, mobility, and function to block syncytia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omai B Garner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus targets human endothelial cells via NiV-F and NiV-G envelope glycoproteins, resulting in endothelial syncytia formation and vascular compromise. Endothelial cells respond to viral infection by releasing innate immune effectors, including galectins, which are secreted proteins that bind to specific glycan ligands on cell surface glycoproteins. We demonstrate that galectin-1 reduces NiV-F mediated fusion of endothelial cells, and that endogenous galectin-1 in endothelial cells is sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation. Galectin-1 regulates NiV-F mediated cell fusion at three distinct points, including retarding maturation of nascent NiV-F, reducing NiV-F lateral mobility on the plasma membrane, and directly inhibiting the conformational change in NiV-F required for triggering fusion. Characterization of the NiV-F N-glycome showed that the critical site for galectin-1 inhibition is rich in glycan structures known to bind galectin-1. These studies identify a unique set of mechanisms for regulating pathophysiology of NiV infection at the level of the target cell.

  3. Mating system does not predict permanent sperm depletion in black widow spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modanu, Maria; Michalik, Peter; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2013-05-01

    Variation in sperm production is strongly influenced by mating system across taxa. Recent work in spiders suggests that males of some species show termination of spermatogenesis before their adult molt and thus an inability to produce sperm after maturation. This permanent sperm depletion (PSD) has been hypothesized to co-occur with monogyny, genital mutilation, or sexual cannibalism because the maintenance of continual sperm supplies is not necessary for species where males can expect only one mating opportunity. Here we test this hypothesis in two congeners exhibiting genital mutilation: the sexually cannibalistic, monogynous Australian redback spider Latrodectus hasselti and the polygynous Western black widow Latrodectus hesperus. We report that PSD does not occur in adult males of either species, and show that males transfer sperm into their copulatory organs multiple times as adults. These data suggest evolutionary links between mating system and investment in sperm production may be more complex than currently appreciated. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P 60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Sperm length, sperm storage and mating system characteristics in bumblebees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    Multiple insemination induces sperm competition and may select for longer, faster moving sperm in species where sperm is short-lived and egg fertilization takes place almost immediately after ejaculation. Here we report the first detailed analysis of sperm length in social insects with long......-term storage of sperm, using three bumblebee species with different mating systems as models. We show that individual males produce only one size-class of sperm, but that sperm length is highly variable among brothers, among unrelated conspecific males, and among males of different species. Males of Bombus...... hypnorum, a species with multiple-mating queens, have longer sperm than males of B. terrestris and B. lucorum whose queens are single mated. Although the sample size on the species level was too small to perform a phylogenetic analysis, this finding supports the hypothesis that, all other things being...

  6. Characterization of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity involvement in sterlet spermatozoon maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, Viktoriya; Słowińska, Mariola; Cosson, Jacky; Ciereszko, Andrzej; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Štĕrba, Ján; Rodina, Marek; Linhart, Otomar; Dzyuba, Borys

    2016-12-01

    In sturgeon, the acquisition of the potential for motility activation called spermatozoon maturation takes place outside testes. This process can be accomplished in vitro by pre-incubation of immature testicular spermatozoa in seminal fluid collected from fully mature Wolffian duct sperm. Addition of trypsin inhibitor to the pre-incubation medium disrupts spermatozoon maturation. There are no available data for the role of proteolysis regulators in fish spermatozoon maturation, while their role is recognized in mammalian sperm maturation. The present study evaluated the involvement of seminal fluid proteases and anti-proteolytic activity in the sterlet spermatozoon maturation process. Casein and gelatin zymography and quantification of amidase and anti-proteolytic activity were conducted in sturgeon seminal fluid from Wolffian duct sperm and seminal fluid from testicular sperm, along with spermatozoon extracts from Wolffian duct spermatozoa, testicular spermatozoa, and testicular spermatozoa after in vitro maturation. We did not find significant differences in proteolytic profiles of seminal fluids from Wolffian duct sperm and ones from testicular sperm. Zymography revealed differences in spermatozoon extracts: Wolffian duct spermatozoon extracts were characterized by the presence of a broad proteolytic band ranging from 48 to 41 kDa, while testicular spermatozoon extracts did not show such activity until after in vitro maturation. The differences in amidase activity coincided with these results. It may not be the levels of proteolytic and anti-proteolytic activity per se, but the alterations in their interactions triggering a cascade of signaling events, that is crucial to the maturation process.

  7. Sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, L F C; Sertich, P L; Stull, G B; Rives, W; Knobbe, M

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe sperm ultrastructure, morphometry, and abnormal morphology in American black bears. Electroejaculation was successful in 53.8% (7/13) of the attempts, but urine contamination was common. Epididymal sperm samples were also obtained from five bears. Sperm had a paddle-like head shape and the ultrastructure was similar to that of most other mammals. The most striking particularity of black bear sperm ultrastructure was a tightening of the nucleus in the equatorial region. Although the differences were not significant in all bears, the overall decrease in sperm nucleus dimensions during transport from the caput epididymis to the cauda suggested increasing compaction of the nucleus during maturation. For ejaculated sperm, nucleus length, width, and base width were 4.9, 3.7, and 1.8 μm, respectively, whereas sperm head length, width, and base width were 6.6, 4.8, and 2.3 μm, and midpiece, tail (including midpiece), and total sperm lengths were 9.8, 68.8, and 75.3 μm. Evaluation of sperm cytoplasmic droplets in the epididymis revealed that proximal droplets start migrating toward a distal position in the caput epididymis and that the process was mostly completed by the time sperm reached the cauda epididymis. The proportion of morphologically normal sperm in the ejaculate was 35.6%; the most prevalent sperm defects were distal cytoplasmic droplets and bent/coiled tails. The morphology of abnormal sperm and the underlying ultrastructural defects were similar to that in other large domestic animals thus suggesting similar underlying pathogenesis of specific sperm defects and similar effects on fertility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past two decades, Denmark has developed in to an important destination for fertility travellers in need of donor sperm. Furthermore, two of the largest sperm banks in Europe have been established in Denmark, exporting sperm globally. This development has taken place at the same time...

  9. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Getting pregnant Healthy sperm aren't always a given. Understand how lifestyle factors can affect your ... of retrieving and storing sperm before treatment. Adopting healthy lifestyle practices to promote your fertility — and avoiding things ...

  10. Sperm whale clicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    . A sound generator weighing upward of 10 tons and with a cross-section of 1 m is expected to generate high-intensity, directional sounds. This prediction from the Norris and Harvey theory is not supported by published data for sperm whale clicks ~source levels of 180 dB re 1 mPa and little, if any....... This implicates sonar as a possible function of the clicks. Thus, previously published properties of sperm whale clicks underestimate the capabilities of the sound generator and therefore cannot falsify the Norris and Harvey theory.......In sperm whales ~Physeter catodon L. 1758! the nose is vastly hypertrophied, accounting for about one-third of the length or weight of an adult male. Norris and Harvey @in Animal Orientation and Navigation, NASA SP-262 ~1972!, pp. 397–417# ascribed a sound-generating function to this organ complex...

  11. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  12. Coupling sperm mediated gene transfer and sperm sorting techniques: a new perspective for swine transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, Marco; Spinaci, Marcella; Zannoni, Augusta; Bernardini, Chiara; Seren, Eraldo; Forni, Monica; Bacci, Maria Laura

    2010-09-15

    Flow cytometric separation of X and Y chromosome-bearing spermatozoa has been demonstrated to be effective in pigs, allowing the use of boar sexed semen in in vitro trials. Sperm Mediated Gene Transfer (SMGT) is a widely used and efficient technique for the creation of transgenic animals. The present research intended to prove that it is possible to associate sperm sexing with the SMGT technique in order to speed up the assessment of homozygous lines of transgenic pigs. In the first experiment, the sorting protocol was modified in order to obtain the highest DNA uptake by sorted spermatozoa. In the second experiment, spermatozoa that had undergone only sperm sorting, only SMGT, or both procedures (Sorted-SMGT) were used for in in vitro fertilization of in vitro matured oocytes. In the third experiment, transformed blastocysts of the desired gender (male) were obtained with Sorted-SMGT in an in vitro fertilization trial. The method we developed here allowed us to produce transgenic swine blastocysts of pre-determined gender, giving a positive answer at the aim to couple SMGT and sperm sorting in swine, obtaining fertile spermatozoa able to produce transgenic embryos of pre-determined gender. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past two decades, Denmark has developed in to an important destination for fertility travellers in need of donor sperm. Furthermore, two of the largest sperm banks in Europe have been established in Denmark, exporting sperm globally. This development has taken place at the same time...... as the use of donated sperm continuously has been debated as an ethical issue, and increasingly been regulated. In this presentation I will discuss how Denmark became a destination for fertility travelling (sperm donation) as a result of various subversive strategies of family making. The article inquires...... into how the bending of boundaries by “inappropriate parents”, fertility travellers, private sperm banks and fertility clinics have been part in negotiating the changes of the legislation in practice, and thus been part of developing a Danish industry of sperm banking. The presentation is based on a multi...

  14. Dietary fatty acids influence sperm quality and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, A; Moscatelli, N; Di Giacomo, M; Zara, V

    2017-05-01

    Recently, obesity has been linked to male infertility. In animal models the administration of a high-fat diet caused a reduction in sperm quality, by impairing gamete energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible effect of dietary fatty acids supplementation in the modulation of sperm energy metabolism and, in turn, in the improvement of sperm quality in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed for 4 weeks a standard diet (control group), a high-fat diet (enriched in 35% of fat and 15% sucrose), a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% olive oil (a source of monounsaturated fatty acids) or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids). Liver and adipose tissue weight, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations were determined. Activities of enzymes involved in sperm energetic metabolism were evaluated by spectrophotometric assays. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was also assayed. The obtained results suggest that olive oil partially counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on sperm quality, by increasing gamete motility, by reducing oxidative stress and slightly improving mitochondrial respiration efficiency. On the other hand, krill oil determines an increase in sperm concentration and motility, an increase in the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, Krebs cycle enzymes and respiratory chain complexes; a parallel increase in the cellular levels of ATP and a reduction in oxidative damage were also observed. These results suggest that dietary fatty acids are able to positively influence sperm quality and function. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. Cryopreservation of boar sperm induces differential microRNAs expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Dai, Dinghui; Chang, Yu; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Guangbin; Peng, Zhanghua; Zeng, Changjun

    2017-06-01

    Lower conception rates and litter sizes limit the wide use of artificial insemination with frozen-thawed boar sperm, due to a lack of understanding of the mechanisms that cause cryodamage and cryoinjury to sperm during cryopreservation. CryoMiRs, a family of freeze-related microRNAs (miRNAs), are associated with freeze tolerance, and regulate metabolism in mammalian hibernators and insects. Thus, we speculate that miRNAs maybe involved in the regulation of the freeze-thaw process and may affect boar sperm function. In this study, we studied the differential expression of 46 miRNAs that have roles in spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and sperm quality in response to cryopreservation (with or without 3% glycerol). The results indicated that, in response to cryopreservation with 3% glycerol, 14 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated, but only two miRNAs (miR-22 and miR-450b-5p) were significantly down-regulated, relative to fresh sperm. Preservation with 3% glycerol caused up-regulation of 17 miRNAs, but only caused down-regulation of one miRNA (miR-24), relative to sperm cryopreserved without glycerol. Functional annotations of these differentially expressed miRNAs indicated that these miRNAs and their targets are mainly associated with metabolic and cellular processes. Therefore, our findings show that cryopreservation results in changes in miRNA expression, and suggest that the anti-freeze mechanisms of boar sperm need to be studied further. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Maturity Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    effects, unicausal reduction, and case specificity. Based on the developments in set theoretical thinking in social sciences and employing methods like Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), Necessary Condition Analysis (NCA), and set visualization techniques, in this position paper, we propose...... and demonstrate a new approach to maturity models in the domain of Information Systems. This position paper describes the set-theoretical approach to maturity models, presents current results and outlines future research work....

  17. Sperm head's birefringence: a new criterion for sperm selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianaroli, Luca; Magli, M Cristina; Collodel, Giulia; Moretti, Elena; Ferraretti, Anna P; Baccetti, Baccio

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of birefringence in human sperm heads and apply polarization microscopy for sperm selection at intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Prospective randomized study. Reproductive Medicine Unit, Società Italiana Studi Medicina della Riproduzione, Bologna, Italy. A total of 112 male patients had birefringent sperm selected for ICSI (study group). The clinical outcome was compared with that obtained in 119 couples who underwent a conventional ICSI cycle (control group). The proportion of birefringent spermatozoa was evaluated before and after treatment in relation to the sperm sample quality. Embryo development and clinical outcome in the study group were compared with those in the controls. Proportion of birefringent sperm heads, rates of fertilization, cleavage, pregnancy, implantation, and ongoing implantation. The proportion of birefringent spermatozoa was significantly higher in normospermic samples when compared with oligoasthenoteratospermic samples with no progressive motility and testicular sperm extraction samples. Although fertilization and cleavage rates did not differ between the study and control groups, in the most severe male factor condition (oligoasthenoteratospermic with no progressive motility and testicular sperm extraction), the rates of clinical pregnancy, ongoing pregnancy, and implantation were significantly higher in the study group versus the controls. The analysis of birefringence in the sperm head could represent both a diagnostic tool and a novel method for sperm selection.

  18. Sperm-surface ATP in boar spermatozoa is required for fertilization: relevance to sperm proteasomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Joo; Park, Chang-Sik; Kim, Eui-Sook; Song, Eun-Sook; Jeong, Ji-Hyeon; Sutovsky, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular ATP has been implicated in a number of cellular events, including mammalian sperm function. The complement of ATP-dependent sperm proteins includes six subunits of the 26S proteasome, a multi-subunit protease specific to ubiquitinated substrate-proteins. Proteolysis of ubiquitinated proteins by the 26S proteasome is necessary for the success of mammalian fertilization, including but not limited to acrosomal exocytosis (AE) and sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) penetration. The 26S proteasome is uniquely present on the sperm acrosomal surface during mammalian, ascidian, and invertebrate fertilization. The proteasome is a multi-subunit protease complex of approximately 2 MDa composed of the 19S regulatory complex and a 20S proteolytic core. Integrity of the 19S complex is maintained by six 19S ATPase subunits (PSMC1 through PSMC6). Consequently, we hypothesized that fertilization will be blocked by the depletion of sperm-surface associated ATP (ssATP). Depletion of ssATP by the Solanum tuberosum apyrase, a 49 kDa, non-cell permeant enzyme, significantly reduced the ATP content measured by an adapted luminescence-ATP assay from which all permeabilizing agents were excluded. Addition of active apyrase to porcine in vitro fertilization (IVF) medium caused a concentration dependent reduction in the overall fertilization rate. No such outcomes were observed in control groups using heat-inactivated apyrase. Apyrase treatment altered the band pattern of 19S ATPase subunits PSMC1 (Rpt2) and PSMC4 (Rpt3) in Western blotting, suggesting that it had an effect on the integrity of the sperm proteasomal 19S complex. Apyrase only altered the proteasomal core activities slightly, since these activities are not directly dependent on external ATP. In contrast, sperm treatment with MG132, a specific inhibitor of the proteasomal core chymotrypsin-like activity, inhibited the target proteolytic activity, but also induced a compensatory elevation in proteasomal peptidyl

  19. Interspecific androgenetic restoration of rosy barb using cadaveric sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirankumar, S; Pandian, T J

    2004-02-01

    Interspecific androgenetic rosy barb (Puntius conchonius) was generated using its cadaveric (-20 degrees C) or fresh sperm to activate nuclear genome inactivated oocytes of gray tiger barb (Puntius tetrazona). UV irradiation was used to inactivate nuclear genome of tiger barb oocytes. Thermal shock restored diploidy of rosy barb in the oocytes of tiger barb. Survival of androgenotes was 14% or 7% when fresh or cadaveric sperm was used. The diploid or haploid nuclear genome of rosy barb, individually or jointly with that of tiger barb, regulated the time sequence of embryonic development in an alien cytoplasm of tiger barb oocytes. Androgenetic males (Y2Y2) attained sexual maturity earlier and had significantly higher gonadosomatic index and sperm concentration, albeit suffering a slight decrease in fertilizing ability. Conversely, androgenetic females (X2X2) suffered extended interspawning period, reduced fecundity, and poor hatchability of their progenies. These results are discussed with respect to their significance for conservation biology.

  20. TRY-5 is a sperm-activating protease in Caenorhabditis elegans seminal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Seminal fluid proteins have been shown to play important roles in male reproductive success, but the mechanisms for this regulation remain largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm differentiate from immature spermatids into mature, motile spermatozoa during a process termed sperm activation. For C. elegans males, sperm activation occurs during insemination of the hermaphrodite and is thought to be mediated by seminal fluid, but the molecular nature of this activity has not been previously identified. Here we show that TRY-5 is a seminal fluid protease that is required in C. elegans for male-mediated sperm activation. We observed that TRY-5::GFP is expressed in the male somatic gonad and is transferred along with sperm to hermaphrodites during mating. In the absence of TRY-5, male seminal fluid loses its potency to transactivate hermaphrodite sperm. However, TRY-5 is not required for either hermaphrodite or male fertility, suggesting that hermaphrodite sperm are normally activated by a distinct hermaphrodite-specific activator to which male sperm are also competent to respond. Within males, TRY-5::GFP localization within the seminal vesicle is antagonized by the protease inhibitor SWM-1. Together, these data suggest that TRY-5 functions as an extracellular activator of C. elegans sperm. The presence of TRY-5 within the seminal fluid couples the timing of sperm activation to that of transfer of sperm into the hermaphrodite uterus, where motility must be rapidly acquired. Our results provide insight into how C. elegans has adopted sex-specific regulation of sperm motility to accommodate its male-hermaphrodite mode of reproduction.

  1. Ontogeny of the complex sperm in the macrostomid flatworm Macrostomum lignano (Macrostomorpha, Rhabditophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Maxime; Leroux, Frederic; Claeys, Myriam; Boone, Mieke; Mouton, Stijn; Artois, Tom; Borgonie, Gaëtan

    2009-02-01

    Spermiogenesis in Macrostomum lignano (Macrostomorpha, Rhabditophora) is described using light- and electron microscopy of the successive stages in sperm development. Ovoid spermatids develop to highly complex, elongated sperm possessing an undulating distal (anterior) process (or "feeler"), bristles, and a proximal (posterior) brush. In particular, we present a detailed account of the morphology and ontogeny of the bristles, describing for the first time the formation of a highly specialized bristle complex consisting of several parts. This complex is ultimately reduced when sperm are mature. The implications of the development of this bristle complex on both sperm maturation and the evolution and function of the bristles are discussed. The assumed homology between bristles and flagellae questioned. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Comparative evidence for the evolution of sperm swimming speed by sperm competition and female sperm storage duration in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Fossøy, Frode; Laskemoen, Terje; Robertson, Raleigh J; Rudolfsen, Geir; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2009-09-01

    Sperm swimming speed is an important determinant of male fertility and sperm competitiveness. Despite its fundamental biological importance, the underlying evolutionary processes affecting this male reproductive trait are poorly understood. Using a comparative approach in a phylogenetic framework, we tested the predictions that sperm swim faster with (1) increased risk of sperm competition, (2) shorter duration of female sperm storage, and (3) increased sperm length. We recorded sperm swimming speed in 42 North American and European free-living passerine bird species, representing 35 genera and 16 families. We found that sperm swimming speed was positively related to the frequency of extrapair paternity (a proxy for the risk of sperm competition) and negatively associated with clutch size (a proxy for the duration of female sperm storage). Sperm swimming speed was unrelated to sperm length, although sperm length also increased with the frequency of extrapair paternity. These results suggest that sperm swimming speed and sperm length are not closely associated traits and evolve independently in response to sperm competition in passerine birds. Our findings emphasize the significance of both sperm competition and female sperm storage duration as evolutionary forces driving sperm swimming speed.

  3. Targeting post-ejaculation sperm for value-added contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gopal; Jangir, Santosh; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2014-01-01

    The spermatogenesis is a precisely-timed cellular proliferation that takes place in the seminiferous tubules of testes and is meticulously regulated by gonadotrophins, androgens and temperature. Hormonal, nonhormonal and thermal methods of male contraception have been researched with success; though a clinically viable method is yet to evolve. Testicular sperm lack motility and fertilizing ability, which they gain during their transit through the long epididymal conduit whose distal end serves as a store house of mature sperm in a quiescent state, ready for ejaculation during coitus. Epididymal maturation has been a target for male contraceptive research to avert interruptions of fundamental testicular functions like spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. However, several experimental successes have not yet yielded a practicable method of fertility regulation. Coitus culminates in the propulsion of epididymal sperm within seconds through the vas deferens into the female vagina and marks the initiation of sperm motility, a vigorous physical activity that is crucial for fertilization. Highly motile spermatozoa have a brief stay in the vagina before starting their ascent in the female reproductive tract. Vaginal spermatozoa have been targeted for contraception since ages. Spermicides and sperm immobilizers inactivate sperm immediately on deposition in the vagina, while they are placed in a rather 'ex-vivo' condition outside the body. Their need based usage, minimal systemic involvement; easy application, self-controlled reversibility and potential capability to obliterate sexually transmitted infections add significant value to contraception. We have reviewed here our recent endeavors in this important area of chemical contraception by using designed chemical synthesis approach to inhibit spermatozoa and infection.

  4. Sperm cell proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Rafael; de Mateo, Sara; Estanyol, Josep Maria

    2009-02-01

    The spermatozoon is an accessible cell which can be easily purified and therefore it is particularly well suited for proteomic analysis. It is also an extremely differentiated cell with very marked genetic, cellular, functional and chromatin changes as compared to other cells, and has profound implications for fertility, embryo development and heredity. The recent developments in MS have boosted the potential for identification and study of the sperm proteins. Catalogues of hundreds to thousands of spermatozoan proteins in human and in model species are becoming available setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and the development of specific treatments. The present article reviews the available scientific publications dealing with the composition and function of the sperm cell using an MS proteomic approach.

  5. Cryopreservation of Fish Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokura, Hisashi

    Present status of research activities in cryopreservation of fish gamete in aquaculture field was introduced. More than 59 fish species have been reported in the research histories and nearly half of them were studied during recent 10 years. This means that the research activities are increasing, though commercial profit have not obtained yet. Fish species of which sperm can successfully cryopreserved is still limited comparing to numerous species in telost. One of the major obstacle for improvement of the technique is existence of wide specie specific variance in the freezing tolerance of fish sperm. The varianc can possibly be explaind thorugh the informations obtained by the studies in comparative spermatology, which is recently activated field in fish biology.

  6. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  7. cSrc is necessary for epididymal development and is incorporated into sperm during epididymal transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Dario; Ruan, Ye Chun; Wertheimer, Eva V; Battistone, Maria A; Pawlak, John B; Sanjay, Archana; Pilder, Stephen H; Cuasnicu, Patricia; Breton, Sylvie; Visconti, Pablo E

    2012-09-01

    Changes that occur to mammalian sperm upon epididymal transit and maturation render these cells capable of moving progressively and capacitating. Signaling events leading to mammalian sperm capacitation depend on the modulation of proteins by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades. Recent experiments have demonstrated that the Src family of kinases plays an important role in the regulation of these events. However, sperm from cSrc null mice display normal tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation. We report here that, despite normal phosphorylation, sperm from cSrc null mice display a severe reduction in forward motility, and are unable to fertilize in vitro. Histological analysis of seminiferous tubules in the testes, caput and corpus epididymis do not reveal obvious defects. However, the cauda epididymis is significantly smaller, and expression of key transport proteins in the epithelial cells lining this region is reduced in cSrc null mice compared to wild type littermates. Although previously, we and others have shown the presence of cSrc in mature sperm from cauda epididymis, a closer evaluation indicates that this tyrosine kinase is not present in sperm from the caput epididymis, suggesting that this protein is acquired by sperm later during epididymal maturation. Consistent with this observation, cSrc is enriched in vesicles released by the epididymal epithelium known as epididymosomes. Altogether, these observations indicate that cSrc is essential for cauda epididymal development and suggest an essential role of this kinase in epididymal sperm maturation involving cSrc extracellular trafficking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imbalanced lipid homeostasis in the conditional Dicer1 knockout mouse epididymis causes instability of the sperm membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkgren, Ida; Gylling, Helena; Turunen, Heikki; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Strauss, Leena; Poutanen, Matti; Sipilä, Petra

    2015-02-01

    During epididymal sperm maturation, the lipid content of the sperm membrane is modified, which facilitates sperm motility and fertility. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating the maturation process. By generating a conditional knockout (cKO) of Dicer1 in the proximal part of the mouse epididymis, we studied the role of RNA interference in epididymal functions. The Dicer1 cKO epididymis displayed an altered lipid homeostasis associated with a 0.6-fold reduction in the expression of the gene elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 2, an enzyme needed for production of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Furthermore, the expression of several factors involved in cholesterol synthesis was up-regulated. Accordingly, the Dicer1 cKO sperm membrane showed a 0.7-fold decrease in long-chain PUFAs, whereas the amount of cholesterol in acrosome-reacted sperm displayed a 1.7-fold increase. The increased cholesterol:PUFA ratio of the sperm membrane caused breakage of the neck and acrosome region and immotility of sperm. Dicer1 cKO mice sperm also displayed reduced ability to bind to and fertilize the oocyte in vitro. This study thus shows that Dicer1 is critical for lipid synthesis in the epididymis, which directly affects sperm membrane integrity and male fertility. © FASEB.

  9. Relative testis size and sperm morphometry across mammals: no evidence for an association between sperm competition and sperm length.

    OpenAIRE

    Gage, Matthew J G; Freckleton, Robert P

    2003-01-01

    Understanding why there is extensive variation in sperm form and function across taxa has been a challenge because sperm are specialized cells operating at a microscopic level in a complex environment. This comparative study collates published data to determine whether the evolution of sperm morphometry (sperm total length and separate component dimensions) is associated with sperm competition (when different males' sperm mix and compete for a female's ova) across 83 mammalian species. We use...

  10. Sperm function test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation. They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation. Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count, structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology. Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test, should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test. They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test. Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test to the oocyte during fertilization.

  11. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples

  12. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  13. Cryopreservation of microencapsulated canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shambhu; Otsuki, Tsubasa; Fujimura, Chika; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Higaki, Shogo; Hishinuma, Mitsugu

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to develop a method for cryopreserving microencapsulated canine sperm. Pooled ejaculates from three beagle dogs were extended in egg yolk tris extender and encapsulated using alginate and poly-L-lysine at room temperature. The microcapsules were cooled at 4 °C, immersed in pre-cooled extender (equivalent in volume to the microcapsules) to reach final concentration of 7% (v/v) glycerol and 0.75% (v/v) Equex STM paste, and equilibrated for 5, 30 and 60 min at 4 °C. Thereafter, microcapsules were loaded into 0.5 mL plastic straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 1, characteristics of microencapsulated canine sperm were evaluated after glycerol addition at 4 °C. Glycerol exposure for 5, 30 and 60 min did not significantly affect progressive motility, viability, or acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm compared with pre-cooled unencapsulated sperm (control). In Experiment 2, characteristics of frozen-thawed canine microencapsulated sperm were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 h of culture at 38.5 °C. Pre-freeze glycerol exposure for 5, 30, and 60 min at 4 °C did not influence post-thaw quality in unencapsulated sperm. Post-thaw motility and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm decreased more than those of unencapsulated sperm (P < 0.05) following glycerol exposure for 5 min. However, motility, viability and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm after 30 and 60 min glycerol exposure were higher than unencapsulated sperm cultured for 6 or 9 h (P < 0.05). In conclusion, since microencapsulated canine sperm were successfully cryopreserved, this could be a viable alternative to convention sperm cryopreservation in this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and Proteomic Characterization of the Mouse Sperm Acrosomal Matrix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, Benoit; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; SanFrancisco, Susan; Cornwall, Gail A.

    2012-01-01

    A critical step during fertilization is the sperm acrosome reaction in which the acrosome releases its contents allowing the spermatozoa to penetrate the egg investments. The sperm acrosomal contents are composed of both soluble material and an insoluble material called the acrosomal matrix (AM). The AM is thought to provide a stable structure from which associated proteins are differentially released during fertilization. Because of its important role during fertilization, efforts have been put toward isolating the AM for biochemical study and to date AM have been isolated from hamster, guinea pig, and bull spermatozoa. However, attempts to isolate AM from mouse spermatozoa, the species in which fertilization is well-studied, have been unsuccessful possibly because of the small size of the mouse sperm acrosome and/or its fusiform shape. Herein we describe a procedure for the isolation of the AM from caput and cauda mouse epididymal spermatozoa. We further carried out a proteomic analysis of the isolated AM from both sperm populations and identified 501 new proteins previously not detected by proteomics in mouse spermatozoa. A comparison of the AM proteome from caput and cauda spermatozoa showed that the AM undergoes maturational changes during epididymal transit similar to other sperm domains. Together, our studies suggest the AM to be a dynamic and functional structure carrying out a variety of biological processes as implied by the presence of a diverse group of proteins including proteases, chaperones, hydrolases, transporters, enzyme modulators, transferases, cytoskeletal proteins, and others. PMID:22707618

  15. Cryopreservation of epididymal stallion sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui, M; Gil, L; Montón, A; Luño, V; Jerez, R A; Martí, J I

    2014-02-01

    Any event that makes semen collection or mating impossible, such as death, castration, or injury, may terminate a stallion's breeding career. Fortunately, stallion sperm which are capable of fertilization can be harvested from the epididymis, and frozen for future use. However, the fertility of frozen-thawed epididymal sperm has been found to be lower than that of ejaculated sperm. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the fertility of frozen epididymal stallion sperm by investigating the effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing protocols on sperm quality. Dimethylformamide was tested alone or combination with pasteurized egg yolk as substitute of fresh egg yolk. In addition, the effect of the pre-freeze stabilization on sperm quality was analyzed. Heterospermic samples obtained from stallion epididymis were collected and cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying content of cryoprotectant and content of egg yolk, stabilized and no-stabilized. Sperm motility, viability, hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) and acrosome integrity were evaluated post-thawing. No improvement was observed on the replacement of fresh yolk by pasteurized egg yolk, whereas the results suggest that dimethylformamide is a cryoprotectant suitable for cryopreservation of equine epididymal semen, even better than glycerol. In addition, we found that the stabilization before freezing on epididymal stallion sperm, can improve sperm quality parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Domestic Cat Embryo Produced by Preserved Sperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARTINI ERIANI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to mature and fertilize oocytes of endangered species may allow us to sustain genetic and global biodiversity. Epididymis sperms may be the last chance to ensure preservation of genetic materials after injury or death of a valuable animal. Studies have been conducted to determine wether both epididymis sperms and oocytes can be used to produce viable embryos and offspring. The purpose of this study was to determine how long cats sperms contained in epididymis were remain motile and had intact membranes when preserved at 4 ° C, and to determine whether such those preserved sperms are able to fertilize oocytes. Epididymis was preserved immediately in phosphate buffer saline at 4 ° C for 1, 3, and 6 days. The observation of sperm quality and viability after preservation was performed by vital staining acrosom and Hoechst-Propidium Iodine. Biological functions of sperms were evaluated by in vitro culture technique for fertilization, micro fertilization and embryonic development rate in CR1aa medium. The results showed that average motility of sperms collected from ductus deferens, cauda and corpus epididymis decreased not significantly (P > 0.05 from 0, 1, 3, and 6 days of preservation times (from 83.0%, 80.2%, 79.0%; 80.9%, 75.0%, 75.5%; 52.0%, 63.2%, 55.0% to 34.6%, 34.6%, 33.3%, respectively. The general results showed that sperms from epididymis preserved for 1, 3, and 6 days can be used for IVF. The rate of embryonal cleavage produced by IVF technique using sperms collected from epididymis preserved for 1-, 3- and 6-days were 33.3, 26.7, and 20.0%, respectively and significantly different (p < 0.05 from that of controll (50.0%. In conclusion, sperms contained in epididyimis preserved at 4 ° C in PBS (Phospate Buffer Saline for 1-6 days can be used to IVF and in vitro production of cat embryos.

  17. Heat shock protein 90 has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-responsive sperm function in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Xue, Yamei; Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function.

  18. Daily Sperm Production, Gonadal and Extra-Gonadal Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SH

    significantly (P<0.05) higher in rabbits fed prebiotic and symbiotic diets than those fed diet 3 and the control. The daily sperm production and sperm ... The amount of good quality live spermatozoa produced by the testis and the ... production and reproductive performance of rabbits. Effects of nutrition on reproduction.

  19. Unraveling the Sperm Bauplan: Relationships Between Sperm Head Morphology and Sperm Function in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varea-Sánchez, María; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Bastir, Markus; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2016-07-01

    Rodents have spermatozoa with features not seen in other species. Sperm heads in many rodent species bear one or more apical extensions known as "hooks." The process by which hooks have evolved, together with their adaptive significance, are still controversial issues. In order to improve our understanding of the biological meaning of these sperm head adaptations, we analyzed hook curvature angles, hook length, and overall hook shape in muroid rodents by using geometric morphometrics. We also searched for relationships between hook design and measurements of intermale competition to assess whether postcopulatory sexual selection was an important selective force driving changes in this sperm structure. Finally, we sought possible links between aspects of sperm hook design and sperm velocity as a measure of sperm performance. Results showed that one hook curvature angle is under strong selective pressure. Similarly, hook length appears to be strongly selected by sexual selection, with this selective force also exhibiting a stabilizing role reducing intermale variation in this trait. The adaptive significance of changes in hook structure was supported by the finding that there are strong and significant covariations between hook dimensions and shape and between hook design and sperm swimming velocity. Overall, this study strongly suggests that postcopulatory sexual selection has an important effect on the design of the sperm head that, in turn, is important for enhancing sperm velocity, a function crucial to reaching the vicinity of the female gamete and winning fertilizations under competitive situations. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Factors influencing boar sperm cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Hernández, M; Carvajal, G; Vázquez, J M; Martínez, E A

    2006-10-01

    Optimal sperm cryopreservation is a prerequisite for the sustainable commercial application of frozen-thawed boar semen for AI. Three experiments were performed to identify factors influencing variability of postthaw sperm survival among 464 boar ejaculates. Sperm-rich ejaculate fractions were cryopre-served using a standard freezing-thawing procedure for 0.5-mL plastic straws and computer-controlled freezing equipment. Postthaw sperm motility (assessed with a computer-assisted semen analysis system) and viability (simultaneously probed by flow cytometry analysis after triple-fluorescent stain), evaluated 30 and 150 min postthaw, were used to estimate the success of cryopreservation. In the first experiment, 168 unselected ejaculates (1 ejaculate/boar), from boars of 6 breeds with a wide age range (8 to 48 mo), were cryopreserved over a 12-mo period to evaluate the predictive value of boar (breed and age), semen collection, transport variables (season of ejaculate collection, interval between collections, and ejaculate temperature exposure), initial semen traits, and sperm quality before freezing on sperm survival after freezing-thawing. In Exp. 2, 4 ejaculates from each of 29 boars, preselected according to their initial semen traits and sperm quality before freezing, were collected and frozen over a 6-mo period to evaluate the influence of interboar and intraboar ejaculate variability in the survival of sperm after cryopreservation. In Exp. 3, 12 ejaculates preselected as for Exp. 2, from each of 15 boars with known good sperm cryosurvival, were collected and frozen over a 12-mo period to estimate the sustainability of sperm cryosurvival between ejaculates over time. Boar and semen collection and transport variables were not predictive of sperm cryosurvival among ejaculates. Initial semen traits and sperm quality variables observed before freezing explained 23.2 and 10.9%, respectively, of the variation in postthaw sperm motility and viability. However, more that

  1. Effect of supplemented diet with maturation plant extract on reproductive performance of Etroplus suratansis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Albin Dhas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to understand the effect of herbal maturation diet on reproductive successes in Etroplus suratensis. Three herbal maturation diets (EXD1, EXD2, EXD3 and one control diet (EXD0 were prepared with different combinations of herbal ingredients and normal diet ingredients. The experimental animal were observed for the success in reproductive performance like Gonado Somatic Index (GSI, fecundity, striping response, percentage of fertilization, percentage of hatching, percentage of deformed and formed larvae, volume of milt, number of sperm cell, percentage of sperm motility, sperm survival time, percentage of active sperm. The EXD3 diet combination increased the GSI (3.14, fecundity (1325, striping responds (87.23, percentage of fertilization (96.45 percentage of hatching (91.89, percentage of formed larvae (87.53, volume of milt (287 μl, number of sperm cell per μl (1912 percentage of sperm motility (94.18, time of sperm survival (72′15″ and percentage of active sperm cells (92.27 and reduced deformed larva percentage (4.36. From this observation it is more evident that the combination of EXD3 was the best combination and it could be utilized for the formulation of maturation diets for E. suratensis.

  2. Evaluation of cholesterol- treated dromedary camel sperm function by heterologous IVF and AI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Elizabeth G; Malo, Clara; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S; Nagy, Peter; Skidmore, Julian A

    2016-11-01

    Cholesterol (cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins: CLC) treatment of dromedary camel sperm prior to freezing enhances cryosurvival. The present study first validated the efficacy of a heterologous zona-free goat oocyte assay (n=115 oocytes) to evaluate camel sperm function in vitro (Experiment 1: n=6 bulls), then examined the effects of CLC treatment (1.5mg/mL CLC; CLC+) versus no treatment (0 CLC) of fresh (Experiment 2: n=4 bulls) and frozen-thawed (Experiment 3: n=5 bulls) camel sperm to penetrate, de-condense and form pro-nuclei in in vitro-matured goat oocytes. Finally, the ability of fresh 0 CLC and CLC+ sperm to fertilize in vivo was studied by artificially inseminating super-ovulated females (n=7-9 per treatment) and examining embryo production (Experiment 4: n=4-5 bulls/treatment). Camel spermatozoa penetrated (60%) and formed pro-nuclei (33%) in goat oocytes demonstrating the utility of this heterologous system for assessing sperm function in vitro. For fresh spermatozoa, 0 CLC-treated sperm performed better than their CLC+ counterparts for all parameters measured (Psperm-oocyte interaction in 0 CLC aliquots but remained unaltered in CLC+ aliquots demonstrating a protective effect of cholesterol treatment. There was no difference between treatments in the in vitro fertilizing ability of frozen-thawed sperm or in the numbers of embryos retrieved following AI with fresh 0 CLC or CLC+ sperm. We conclude that although CLC treatment of dromedary camel sperm improves sperm motility it fails to confer an advantage to them in terms of improved in vitro sperm-oocyte interaction or in vivo fertilization under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemosensory and hyperoxia circuits in C. elegans males influence sperm navigational capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu D Hoang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The sperm's crucial function is to locate and fuse with a mature oocyte. Under laboratory conditions, Caenorhabditis elegans sperm are very efficient at navigating the hermaphrodite reproductive tract and locating oocytes. Here, we identify chemosensory and oxygen-sensing circuits that affect the sperm's navigational capacity. Multiple Serpentine Receptor B (SRB chemosensory receptors regulate Gα pathways in gustatory sensory neurons that extend cilia through the male nose. SRB signaling is necessary and sufficient in these sensory neurons to influence sperm motility parameters. The neuropeptide Y pathway acts together with SRB-13 to antagonize negative effects of the GCY-35 hyperoxia sensor on spermatogenesis. SRB chemoreceptors are not essential for sperm navigation under low oxygen conditions that C. elegans prefers. In ambient oxygen environments, SRB-13 signaling impacts gene expression during spermatogenesis and the sperm's mitochondria, thereby increasing migration velocity and inhibiting reversals within the hermaphrodite uterus. The SRB-13 transcriptome is highly enriched in genes implicated in pathogen defense, many of which are expressed in diverse tissues. We show that the critical time period for SRB-13 signaling is prior to spermatocyte differentiation. Our results support the model that young C. elegans males sense external environment and oxygen tension, triggering long-lasting downstream signaling events with effects on the sperm's mitochondria and navigational capacity. Environmental exposures early in male life may alter sperm function and fertility.

  4. Sperm conjugation in mammal reproductive function: Different names for the same phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclus, Maria Angeles; Fornes, Miguel Walter

    2016-10-01

    In many mammalian and non-mammalian species, mature sperm interact within the female reproductive tract or inside the epididymal lumen using cohesive forces. This phenomenon, known as "sperm conjugation," is sometimes confused with sperm agglutination, which is the result of the interaction of epididymal or ejaculate spermatozoa upon release into culture medium. In addition to "agglutination," the terms "association," "rouleaux," or "rosettes" are employed interchangeably to describe the conjugation phenomenon, which inevitably causes confusion due to the non-unifying nomenclature. This variety of descriptions is likely due to a poor understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in such conspicuous cell-cell interaction as well as the different morphologies that result from such interactions among species. Here, we summarize the published data regarding mammalian sperm conjugation, considering the organisms in which sperm interaction was observed; the particular terminology employed; findings regarding the components that enable sperm to adhere; sperm behavior when deposited in the female reproductive tract; and hypotheses formulated to clarify the biological function and, when known, the mechanisms for sperm interaction. We also propose a new classification system for this phenomenon that might clearly unify the criteria used to describe this behavior. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 884-896, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Methods of sperm vitality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Librach, Clifford L

    2013-01-01

    Sperm vitality is a reflection of the proportion of live, membrane-intact spermatozoa determined by either dye exclusion or osmoregulatory capacity under hypo-osmotic conditions. In this chapter we address the two most common methods of sperm vitality assessment: eosin-nigrosin staining and the hypo-osmotic swelling test, both utilized in clinical Andrology laboratories.

  6. Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British...

  7. Sperm preparation for ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schill Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The onset of clinical assisted reproduction, a quarter of a century ago, required the isolation of motile spermatozoa. As the indication of assisted reproduction shifted from mere gynaecological indications to andrological indications during the years, this urged andrological research to understand the physiology of male germ cell better and develop more sophisticated techniques to separate functional spermatozoa from those that are immotile, have poor morphology or are not capable to fertilize oocytes. Initially, starting from simple washing of spermatozoa, separation techniques, based on different principles like migration, filtration or density gradient centrifugation evolved. The most simple and cheapest is the conventional swim-up procedure. A more sophisticated and most gentle migration method is migration-sedimentation. However, its yield is relatively small and the technique is therefore normally only limited to ejaculates with a high number of motile spermatozoa. Recently, however, the method was also successfully used to isolate spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Sperm separation methods that yield a higher number of motile spermatozoa are glass wool filtration or density gradient centrifugation with different media. Since Percoll® as a density medium was removed from the market in 1996 for clinical use in the human because of its risk of contamination with endotoxins, other media like IxaPrep®, Nycodenz, SilSelect®, PureSperm® or Isolate® were developed in order to replace Percoll®. Today, an array of different methods is available and the selection depends on the quality of the ejaculates, which also includes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by spermatozoa and leukocytes. Ejaculates with ROS production should not be separated by means of conventional swim-up, as this can severely damage the spermatozoa. In order to protect the male germ cells from the influence of ROS and to stimulate

  8. Sperm preparation through Sephadex™filtration improves in vitro fertilization rate of buffalo oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna, A U; Azam, A; Qadeer, S; Awan, M A; Nasreen, S; Shahzad, Q; Fouladi-Nashta, A; Khalid, M; Akhter, S

    2018-04-01

    Routinely, swim-up method is used to separate high-quality sperm; however, long processing time and close cell-to-cell contact during the centrifugation step are inevitable elements of oxidative stress to sperm. The objective was to evaluate Sephadex ™ and glass wool filtration to separate motile, intact and viable sperm for in vitro fertilization in buffalo. The cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from ovaries of slaughtered buffaloes by aspiration and matured for 24 hr in CO 2 incubator at 38.5°C and 5% CO 2 . Matured COCs were rinsed twice in fertilization TALP and placed in the pre-warmed fertilization medium without sperm. Cryopreserved buffalo semen was thawed at 37°C for 30 s and processed through Sephadex ™ , glass wool filtration and swim-up (control). Total and motile sperm recovery rates were assessed, resuspended in fertilization TALP and incubated for 15-20 min in CO 2 incubator. Samples prepared by each method were divided into two aliquots: one aliquot was studied for sperm quality (progressive motility, membrane integrity, viability, liveability), while the other was subjected to co-incubation with sets of 10-15 in vitro matured oocytes. Data on sperm quality were analysed by ANOVA, while in vitro fertilizing rates were compared by chi-squared test using SPSS-20. Least significant difference (LSD) test was used to compare treatment means. Glass wool filtration yielded higher total and motile sperm recovery rate, while Sephadex ™ filtration improved (p < .05) sperm quality (progressive motility, membrane integrity, viability, liveability). Sperm preparation through Sephadex filtration yielded higher in vitro fertilization rate in terms of cleavage rate compared to glass wool filtration and swim-up (control). In conclusion, cryopreserved Nili-Ravi buffalo sperm selected through Sephadex filtration showed improved quality and yielded better fertilization rates (cleavage rate) of in vitro matured/fertilized oocytes. Sephadex

  9. Relationship between sperm parameters and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Chaichian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: With the adventure of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI technique, great progresses have developed in the treatment of infertility. Concentration on the properties of male’s gamete has been encouraged by the increasing concerns about the causes of ICSI failure. We hence conducted this study to investigate the probable association of sperm parameters with ISCI outcome. Methods: A total of 523 couples referred to Isfahan Fertility and Sterility Center from January 2007 to June 2008 for ICSI. Semen analysis was performed before ICSI procedure according to the WHO criteria. Patients were assigned into successful ICSI (case and failed ICSI (control groups. Sperm parameters were then compared between the 2 groups. Results: One hundred and six patients (20% had successful ICSI results (case group compared with 417 couples (80% with undesirable ICSI outcomes (control group. Among evaluated factors, sperm agglutination (p = 0.007, sperm concentration (p = 0.043, leukocytospermia (p = 0.026 and head abnormality of sperm (p = 0.019 showed statistically significant differences between two groups with differing ICSI results. None of the other semen parameters revealed significant differences between these two groups. Conclusion: Our study showed that some sperm parameters are associated with desirable ICSI outcome. However, it is unclear whether these associations are causal.

  10. Egg CD9 protein tides correlated with sperm oscillations tune the gamete fusion ability in mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaux, Benjamin; Favier, Sophie; Perez, Eric; Gourier, Christine

    2018-01-23

    Mammalian fertilization involves membrane events -adhesion, fusion, sperm engulfment, membrane block to polyspermy- whose causes remain largely unknown. Recently, specific oscillations of the sperm in contact with the egg were shown to be necessary for fusion. Using a microfluidic chip to impose the venue for the encounter of two gametes allowed real-time observation of the membrane remodelling occurring at the sperm/egg interface. The spatiotemporal mapping of egg CD9 revealed that this protein concentrates at the egg/sperm interface as a result of sperm oscillations, until a CD9-rich platform is nucleated on which fusion immediately takes place. Within 2 to 5 minutes after fusion, most of the CD9 leaves the egg for the external aqueous medium. Then an egg membrane wave engulfs the sperm head in approximately 25 minutes. These results show that sperm oscillations initiate the CD9 recruitment that causes gamete fusion after which CD9 and associated proteins leave the membrane in a process likely to contribute to block polyspermy. They highlight that the gamete fusion story in mammals is an unexpected interplay between mechanical constraints and proteins. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Orientation of sea urchin sperms in static magnetic fields: Compared to human sperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of sea urchin and human sperms. The sea urchin and human sperms became oriented parallel to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). The human sperms were totally oriented with magnetic field at about 600 mT. However, the sea urchin sperms show different behavior due to morphological differences between them and the human sperms.

  12. Maturation arrest of human oocytes at germinal vesicle stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi Qin; Ming, Teng Xiao; Nielsen, Hans Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    Maturation arrest of human oocytes may occur at various stages of the cell cycle. A total failure of human oocytes to complete meiosis is rarely observed during assisted conception cycles. We describe here a case of infertile couples for whom all oocytes repeatedly failed to mature at germinal vesicle (GV) stage during in vitro fertilization/Intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). The patient underwent controlled ovarian stimulation followed by oocyte retrieval and IVF/ICSI. The oocytes were stripped off cumulus cells prior to the ICSI procedure and their maturity status was defined. The oocyte maturation was repeatedly arrested at the GV. Oocyte maturation arrest may be the cause of infertility in this couple. The recognition of oocyte maturation arrest as a specific medical condition may contribute to the characterization of the currently known as “oocyte factor.” The cellular and genetic mechanisms causing oocyte maturation arrest should be the subject for further investigation. PMID:21234179

  13. Harvesting Sperm and Artificial Insemination of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duselis, Amanda R.; Vrana, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    Rodents of the genus Peromyscus (deer mice) are the most prevalent native North American mammals. Peromyscus species are used in a wide range of research including toxicology, epidemiology, ecology, behavioral, and genetic studies. Here they provide a useful model for demonstrations of artificial insemination. Methods similar to those displayed here have previously been used in several deer mouse studies, yet no detailed protocol has been published. Here we demonstrate the basic method of artificial insemination. This method entails extracting the testes from the rodent, then isolating the sperm from the epididymis and vas deferens. The mature sperm, now in a milk mixture, are placed in the female’s reproductive tract at the time of ovulation. Fertilization is counted as day 0 for timing of embryo development. Embryos can then be retrieved at the desired time-point and manipulated. Artificial insemination can be used in a variety of rodent species where exact embryo timing is crucial or hard to obtain. This technique is vital for species or strains (including most Peromyscus) which may not mate immediately and/or where mating is hard to assess. In addition, artificial insemination provides exact timing for embryo development either in mapping developmental progress and/or transgenic work. Reduced numbers of animals can be used since fertilization is guaranteed. This method has been vital to furthering the Peromyscus system, and will hopefully benefit others as well. PMID:18978991

  14. Production of functional sperm by subcutaneous auto-grafting of immature testes in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Sakuma, Daika; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2018-02-01

    Sexually mature individuals are indispensable for breeding programs. Salmonids require a long period before reaching sexual maturity, so we aimed to shorten the period required to obtain functional sperm by grafting immature testicular fragments into mature recipients, which we predicted would allow the grafted testicular fragments to skip the long pre-pubertal period. First, we demonstrated successful subcutaneous auto-grafting of testicular fragments in rainbow trout. Unilateral testectomy was performed, and the isolated immature testicular fragment was auto-grafted into the subcutaneous space along the back of recipient fish. The grafted testicular fragments developed synchronously with the recipients' testis remaining in its body cavity, and both eventually produced functional sperm. Next, immature testicular fragments were auto-grafted into the subcutaneous space of sexually mature males. We achieved this, without immune rejection, by isolating and cryopreserving testes from immature fish, and rearing these unilaterally testectomized fish until sexual maturity. The cryopreserved testes were then auto-grafted into the original, now spermiating fish. The grated immature testicular fragments differentiated and produced functional sperm within 5 months after grafting. By combining this grafting method with a technique to avoid immune rejection, we expect to develop a practical method for producing sperm in a shorter period in salmonids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Understanding fertilization through intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Queenie V.; Lee, Bora; Rosenwaks, Zev; Machaca, Khaled; Palermo, Gianpiero D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since the establishment of in vitro fertilization, it became evident that almost half of the couples failed to achieve fertilization and this phenomenon was attributed to a male gamete dysfunction. The adoption of assisted fertilization techniques particularly ICSI has been able to alleviate male factor infertility by granting the consistent ability of a viable spermatozoon to activate an oocyte. Single sperm injection, by pinpointing the beginning of fertilization, has been an invaluable tool in clarifying the different aspects of early fertilization and syngamy. However, even with ICSI some couples fail to fertilize due to ooplasmic dysmaturity in relation to the achieved nuclear maturation marked by the extrusion of the first polar body. More uncommon are cases where the spermatozoa partially or completely lack the specific oocyte activating factor. In this work, we review the most relevant aspects of fertilization and its failure through assisted reproductive technologies. Attempts at diagnosing and treating clinical fertilization failure are described. PMID:24290744

  16. Sperm ubiquitination in epididymal feline semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Valentina; Morselli, Maria Giorgia; Varesi, Sara; Nonnis, Simona; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Luvoni, Gaia Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    Ubiquitin is a 8.5-kDa peptide that tags other proteins for proteasomal degradation. It has been proposed that ubiquitination might be responsible for the elimination of defective spermatozoa during transit through the epididymis in humans and cattle, but its exact biological function in seminal plasma has not yet been clarified. In the domestic cat (Felis catus), the percentage of immature, unviable, and abnormal spermatozoa decreases during the epididymal transit, indicating the existence of a mechanism that removes defective spermatozoa. Magnetic cell separation techniques, based on the use of magnetic beads coated with anti-ubiquitin antibodies, may allow the selective capture of ubiquitinated spermatozoa from semen, thus contributing to the identification of a potential correlation between semen quality and ubiquitination process. Moreover, the selective identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins in different epididymal regions could give a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in feline sperm maturation. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to verify the possibility of separating ubiquitinated spermatozoa with magnetic ubiquitin beads and identify the morphological and acrosomal differences between whole sample and unbound gametes, (2) to characterize all the ubiquitinated proteins in spermatozoa retrieved in the three epididymal regions by a proteomic approach. The data indicated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in cat epididymal semen. However, a correlation between abnormal and ubiquitinated spermatozoa has not been found, and ubiquitin cannot be considered as a biomarker of quality of epididymal feline spermatozoa. To the author's knowledge, this is the first identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins of cat spermatozoa collected from different epididymal regions. The proteomic pattern allows a further characterization of cat epididymal semen and represents a contribute to a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in

  17. THE EVOLUTION OF SPERM SIZE IN BIRDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskie, James V; Montgomerie, Robert; Birkhead, Tim R

    1997-06-01

    Sperm size varies enormously among species, but the reasons for this variation remain obscure. Since it has been suggested that swimming velocity increases with sperm length, earlier studies proposed longer (and therefore faster) sperm are advantageous under conditions of intense sperm competition. Nonetheless, previous work has been equivocal, perhaps because the intensity of sperm competition was measured indirectly. DNA profiling now provides a more direct measure of the number of offspring sired by extrapair males, and thus a more direct method of assessing the potential for sperm competition. Using a sample of 21 species of passerine birds for which DNA profiling data were available, we found a positive relation between sperm length and the degree of extrapair paternity. A path analysis, however, revealed that this relationship arises only indirectly through the positive relationship between the rate of extrapair paternity and length of sperm storage tubules (SSTs) in the female. As sperm length is correlated positively with SST length, an increase in the intensity of sperm competition leads to an increase in sperm length only through its effect on SST length. Why females vary SST length with the intensity of sperm competition is not clear, but one possibility is that it increases female control over how sperm are used in fertilization. Males, in turn, may respond on an evolutionary time scale to changes in SST size by increasing sperm length to prevent displacement from rival sperm. Previous theoretical analyses predicting that sperm size should decrease as sperm competition becomes more intense were not supported by our findings. We suggest that future models of sperm-size evolution consider not only the role of sperm competition, but also how female control and manipulation of ejaculates after insemination selects for different sperm morphologies. © 1997 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti (Dasiprocta aguti) using powdered coconut water (ACP-109c) and Tris extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M A; Peixoto, G C X; Santos, E A A; Castelo, T S; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to compare the use of powdered coconut water (ACP-109c; ACP Biotecnologia, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil) and Tris extenders for recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from agouti. The caudae epididymus and proximal ductus deferens from 10 sexually mature agoutis were subjected to retrograde washing using ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris. Epididymal sperm were evaluated for motility, vigor, sperm viability, membrane integrity, and morphology. Samples were centrifuged, and extended in the same diluents plus egg yolk (20%) and glycerol (6%), frozen in liquid nitrogen, and subsequently thawed at 37°C for 1 min, followed by re-evaluation of sperm characteristics. The two extenders were similarly efficient for epididymal recovery, with regard to the number and quality of sperm recovered. However, for both extenders, sperm quality decreased (P Biotecnologia) group, which was significantly better than 9.7 ± 2.6% motile sperm with 1.2 ± 0.3 vigor in Tris. In conclusion, agouti epididymal sperm were successfully recovered using either ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) or Tris extenders; however, ACP-109c (ACP Biotecnologia) was a significantly better extender for processing and cryopreserving these sperm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sperm structure and sperm transfer in Pseudopythina subsinuata (Bivalvia, Galeommatoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Åse

    2009-01-01

    to the elongate cells. Most females contain one to three "sperm trees", structures consisting of a short stem and numerous branches. They are firmly implanted in the abfrontal part of the gill filament and protrude into the posterior part of the suprabranchial (brooding) chamber. Implantation of the trees causes...... the receptacle and thereupon fuse. A similar process is known in the allied P. tsurumaru, but the resulting structure ("sperm-carrying body") is not attached to the gills....

  20. Myoinositol: does it improve sperm mitochondrial function and sperm motility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, Rosita A; La Vignera, Sandro; Bellanca, Salvatore; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate whether an improvement in mitochondrial membrane potential was associated with sperm motility amelioration and greater sperm recovery after the swim-up procedure. A second purpose was to evaluate the effects of myoinositol (MYO) on sperm apoptosis, quality of chromatin compaction, and DNA integrity. Spermatozoa from 20 normozoospermic men and 20 patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia were incubated in vitro with 2 mg/mL of MYO or phosphate-buffered saline as a control for 2 hours. After this incubation period, sperm motility was evaluated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation. We also evaluated the total number of motile spermatozoa recovered after swim-up after incubation with MYO or phosphate-buffered saline. MYO significantly increased the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility in both normozoospermic men and patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia. Motility improvement in the latter group was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential. MYO had no effects on mitochondrial function in spermatozoa from normozoospermic men. Sperm phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation were unaffected by MYO in both groups. After incubation with MYO, the total number of spermatozoa recovered after swim-up had improved significantly in both groups. These data show that MYO increases sperm motility and the number of spermatozoa retrieved after swim-up in both normozoospermic men and patients with abnormal sperm parameters. In patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia, the improvement in these parameters was associated with improved sperm mitochondrial function. These findings support the use of MYO in both in vivo- and in vitro-assisted reproductive techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Yolk protein is expressed in the insect testis and interacts with sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachimiak Ewa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male and female gametes follow diverse developmental pathways dictated by their distinct roles in fertilization. While oocytes of oviparous animals accumulate yolk in the cytoplasm, spermatozoa slough off most of their cytoplasm in the process of individualization. Mammalian spermatozoa released from the testis undergo extensive modifications in the seminal ducts involving a variety of glycoproteins. Ultrastructural studies suggest that glycoproteins are involved in sperm maturation in insects; however, their characterization at the molecular level is lacking. We reported previously that the circadian clock controls sperm release and maturation in several insect species. In the moth, Spodoptera littoralis, the secretion of glycoproteins into the seminal fluid occurs in a daily rhythmic pattern. The purpose of this study was to characterize seminal fluid glycoproteins in this species and elucidate their role in the process of sperm maturation. Results We collected seminal fluid proteins from males before and after daily sperm release. These samples were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and gels were treated with a glycoprotein-detecting probe. We observed a group of abundant glycoproteins in the sample collected after sperm release, which was absent in the sample collected before sperm release. Sequencing of these glycoproteins by mass spectroscopy revealed peptides bearing homology with components of yolk, which is known to accumulate in developing oocytes. This unexpected result was confirmed by Western blotting demonstrating that seminal fluid contains protein immunoreactive to antibody against yolk protein YP2 produced in the follicle cells surrounding developing oocytes. We cloned the fragment of yp2 cDNA from S. littoralis and determined that it is expressed in both ovaries and testes. yp2 mRNA and YP2 protein were detected in the somatic cyst cells enveloping sperm inside the testis. During the period of sperm

  2. Role of Membrane Lipid Fatty Acids in Sperm Cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajes Mandal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid is an important constituent of cell membrane. Membrane lipid composition of spermatozoa has been correlated to different function. Many researchers have related membrane lipid with survival success after cryopreservation or cold shock. Sperm maturation and acrosome reactions are natural phenomenon, but cryopreservation or cold shock is not. Therefore, sperm cells are not programmed for such change and undergo stress. So the change in membrane lipid composition due to cold shock or cryopreservation may be looked upon as response of spermatozoa to a certain stressed condition. A significant body of research worked on the relationship between membrane lipid and fatty acid composition and ability of cell to tolerate adverse change in temperature. However, as the approach of different research groups was different, it is very difficult to compare the changes. Studies have been done with different species, ejaculated/seminal or epididymal sperm. Lipid analyses have been done with whole cell membrane isolated by different methods. Fatty acids estimated were from whole cell, plasma membrane, head membrane, or phospholipids. The cryopreservation condition, media composition, and diluents/cryoprotectants were also different. At this onset a comprehensive review is needed to cover changes of sperm membrane lipid composition of different species under different cryopreservation conditions.

  3. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: 1 Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2 Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  4. Pronuclear formation by ICSI using chemically activated ovine oocytes and zona pellucida bound sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Hernández-Pichardo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve ICSI, appropiate sperm selection and oocyte activation is necessary. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficiency of fertilization using ICSI with chemically activated ovine oocytes and sperm selected by swim up (SU or swim up + zona pellucida (SU + ZP binding. Results Experiment 1, 4–20 replicates with total 821 in vitro matured oocytes were chemically activated with ethanol, calcium ionophore or ionomycin, to determine oocyte activation (precense of one PN. Treatments showed similar results (54, 47, 42 %, respectively but statistically differents (P  0.05. Conclusions Chemical activation induces higher ovine oocyte activation than mechanical activation. Ethanol slightly displays higher oocyte activation than calcium ionophore and ionomicine. Sperm selection with SU + ZP increased AR/A and AR/D rates in comparison with SU in fresh and frozen-thawed sperm. According to this, in terms of fertilization rates, chemical activation after ICSI increased oocyte PN formation compared to mechanical activation. Also, fresh sperm treated with SU and SU + ZP were significantly different than frozen-thawed sperm, but between sperm treatments no significant differences were obtained.

  5. Cauda Epididymis-Specific Beta-Defensin 126 Promotes Sperm Motility but Not Fertilizing Ability in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fuertes, Beatriz; Narciandi, Fernando; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Kelly, Alan K; Fair, Sean; Meade, Kieran G; Lonergan, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Bovine beta-defensin 126 (BBD126) exhibits preferential expression for the cauda epididymis of males, where it is absorbed onto the tail and postacrosomal region of the sperm. The aim of this study was to examine the role of BBD126 in bull sperm function. Fresh and frozen-thawed semen were incubated in the presence of different capacitating agents as well as with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. These treatments, which have been successful in releasing beta-defensin 126 from macaque sperm, proved to be ineffective in bull sperm. This finding suggests that the protein behaves in a different manner in the bovine. The lack of success in removing BBD126 led us to use corpus epididymis sperm, a model in which the protein is not present, to study its functional role. Corpus sperm were incubated with cauda epididymal fluid (CEF) in the absence or presence of BBD126 antibody or with recombinant BBD126 (rBBD126). Confocal microscopy revealed that rBBD126 binds to corpus sperm with the same pattern observed for BBD126 in cauda sperm, whereas an aberrant binding pattern is observed when sperm are subject to CEF incubation. Addition of CEF increased motility as well as the number of corpus sperm migrating through cervical mucus from estrus cows. However, it decreased the ability of sperm to fertilize in vitro matured oocytes. The presence of the antibody failed to abrogate these effects. Furthermore, when rBBD126 was added in the absence of other factors and proteins from the CEF, an increase in motility was also observed and no negative effects in fertility were seen. These results suggest that BBD126 plays a key role in the acquisition of sperm motility in the epididymis. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  6. Cauda Epididymis-Specific Beta-Defensin 126 Promotes Sperm Motility but Not Fertilizing Ability in Cattle1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fuertes, Beatriz; Narciandi, Fernando; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Kelly, Alan K.; Fair, Sean; Meade, Kieran G.; Lonergan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bovine beta-defensin 126 (BBD126) exhibits preferential expression for the cauda epididymis of males, where it is absorbed onto the tail and postacrosomal region of the sperm. The aim of this study was to examine the role of BBD126 in bull sperm function. Fresh and frozen-thawed semen were incubated in the presence of different capacitating agents as well as with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. These treatments, which have been successful in releasing beta-defensin 126 from macaque sperm, proved to be ineffective in bull sperm. This finding suggests that the protein behaves in a different manner in the bovine. The lack of success in removing BBD126 led us to use corpus epididymis sperm, a model in which the protein is not present, to study its functional role. Corpus sperm were incubated with cauda epididymal fluid (CEF) in the absence or presence of BBD126 antibody or with recombinant BBD126 (rBBD126). Confocal microscopy revealed that rBBD126 binds to corpus sperm with the same pattern observed for BBD126 in cauda sperm, whereas an aberrant binding pattern is observed when sperm are subject to CEF incubation. Addition of CEF increased motility as well as the number of corpus sperm migrating through cervical mucus from estrus cows. However, it decreased the ability of sperm to fertilize in vitro matured oocytes. The presence of the antibody failed to abrogate these effects. Furthermore, when rBBD126 was added in the absence of other factors and proteins from the CEF, an increase in motility was also observed and no negative effects in fertility were seen. These results suggest that BBD126 plays a key role in the acquisition of sperm motility in the epididymis. PMID:27707713

  7. A comparative analysis of the morphology and evolution of permanent sperm depletion in spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michalik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Once thought to be energetically cheap and easy to produce, empirical work has shown that sperm is a costly and limited resource for males. In some spider species, there is behavioral evidence that sperm are permanently depleted after a single mating. This extreme degree of mating investment appears to co-occur with other reproductive strategies common to spiders, e.g. genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. Here we corroborate that sperm depletion in the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes is permanent by uncovering its mechanistic basis using light and electron microscopy. In addition, we use a phylogeny-based statistical analysis to test the evolutionary relationships between permanent sperm depletion (PSD and other reproductive strategies in spiders. Male testes do not produce sperm during adulthood, which is unusual in spiders. Instead, spermatogenesis is nearly synchronous and ends before the maturation molt. Testis size decreases as males approach their maturation molt and reaches its lowest point after sperm is transferred into the male copulatory organs (pedipalps. As a consequence, the amount of sperm available to males for mating is limited to the sperm contained in the pedipalps, and once it is used, males lose their ability to fertilize eggs. Our data suggest that PSD has evolved independently at least three times within web-building spiders and is significantly correlated with the evolution of other mating strategies that limit males to monogamy, including genital mutilation and sexual cannibalism. We conclude that PSD may be an energy-saving adaptation in species where males are limited to monogamy. This could be particularly important in web-building spiders where extreme sexual size dimorphism results in large, sedentary females and small, searching males who rarely feed as adults and are vulnerable to starvation. Future work will explore possible energetic benefits and the evolutionary lability of PSD relative to other

  8. Impact of dietary fatty acids on muscle composition, liver lipids, milt composition and sperm performance in European eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Baeza, R.; Støttrup, Josianne

    2015-01-01

    of dietary regime on muscle composition, and liver lipids prior to induced maturation, and the resulting sperm composition and performance. To accomplish this fish were reared on three "enhanced" diets and one commercial diet, each with different levels of fatty acids, arachidonic acid (ARA......), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Neutral lipids from the muscle and liver incorporated the majority of the fatty acid profile, while phospholipids incorporated only certain fatty acids. Diet had an effect on the majority of sperm fatty acids, on the total volume of extractable milt...... induced medium milt volumes but had the highest sperm motility. EPA also seems important for sperm quality parameters since diets with higher EPA percentages had a higher volume of milt and higher sperm motility. In conclusion, dietary fatty acids had an influence on fatty acids in the tissues of male eel...

  9. Shallow food for deep divers: Dynamic foraging behavior of male sperm whales in a high latitude habitat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teloni, Valeria; Johnson, M.P.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Groups of female and immature sperm whales live at low latitudes and show a stereotypical diving and foraging behavior with dives lasting about 45 min to depths of between 400 and 1200 m. In comparison, physically mature male sperm whales migrate to high latitudes where little is known about...... epipelagic prey, is consistent with the hypothesis that male sperm whales may migrate to high latitudes to access a productive, multi-layered foraging habitat....... their foraging behavior and ecology. Here we use acoustic recording tags to study the diving and acoustic behavior of male sperm whales foraging off northern Norway. Sixty-five hours of tag data provide detailed information about the movements and sound repertoire of four male sperm whales performing 83 dives...

  10. Is the idea of a fast block to polyspermy based on artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Brian

    2014-08-01

    This purpose of this review is to look at the experimental evidence, both kinetic and electrophysiological, that led to the hypothesis of a fast electrical block to polyspermy in sea urchin eggs. The idea of a fast partial block, forwarded in the 1950's, that would reduce the receptivity of the egg surface by 1/20th following its interaction with the fertilizing spermatozoon, was based on experiments that treated fertilization as a first order chemical reaction. Here, I outline the criticisms of the Rothschild theory and demonstrate that the hypothesis of a fast partial block to polyspermy is unfounded. Notwithstanding, it was suggested in the 1970's that the membrane depolarization, induced by the fertilizing spermatozoon, prevented the interaction of supernumerary spermatozoa, the fast electrical block to polyspermy. While trans-membrane voltage recording has permitted a better understanding of the sequence of events occurring at fertilization, there is no evidence that depolarization prevents the interaction of supernumerary spermatozoa. Sperm entry is prevented at positive and negative potentials, in the voltage clamp configuration, however this is an artifact caused by the currents injected into the egg employed to hold the voltage constant in a non-physiological range. At permissive voltages, around -20 mV, where the current required to hold the voltage is minimal, only one spermatozoon normally enters the egg. Thus, irrespective of the egg voltage, the fertilizing spermatozoon is, in any case, attached to a privileged interaction site that permits entry and distinguishes it from supernumerary spermatozoa. Competence for monospermy is acquired during oocyte maturation and data on cortical organization in echinoderm eggs points to the actin filament system for regulating sperm entry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Oral Supplements Regimes of Vitamins C and E on Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emerging role of oxidants as a causal factor in disease conditions in general and poor fertility, particularly in the male, necessitated investigation of the effects of oral supplements of vitamins C and E on sperm count in Wistar rats. Methodology: Twenty (20) male fully matured Wistar rats aged twelve (12) weeks with ...

  12. Relationship of Follicular Size to the Development of Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection-derived Human Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Fang Lee

    2010-09-01

    Conclusion: Even though fewer oocytes completed maturation in the small follicle group than in the other two groups, the quality of the embryos in all three groups was the same on days 2 and 3. These findings suggest that follicles of all sizes should be aspirated during the intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle as follicles of every size were a good source of embryos.

  13. Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Lauvas, Anna Jacobsen; Christensen, Preben

    2018-01-01

    Background: Semen quality parameters are potentially affected by nanomaterials in several ways: Inhaled nanosized particles are potent inducers of pulmonary inflammation, leading to the release of inflammatory mediators. Small amounts of particles may translocate from the lungs into the lung...... inflammation is a potential modulator of endocrine function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials on sperm quality parameters in an experimental mouse model.Methods: Effects on sperm quality after pulmonary inflammation induced by carbonaceous...... nanomaterials were investigated by intratracheally instilling sexually mature male NMRI mice with four different carbonaceous nanomaterials dispersed in nanopure water: graphene oxide (18 mu g/mouse/i.t.), Flammruss 101, Printex 90 and SRM1650b (0.1 mg/mouse/i.t. each) weekly for seven consecutive weeks...

  14. Sperm cleanup and centrifugation processing for cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieme, Harald; Oldenhof, Harriëtte

    2015-01-01

    Fertility rates with artificial insemination are highest with good-quality sperm samples. Therefore, nonviable sperm, cellular debris, and seminal plasma are preferably removed from semen samples prior to use or for preservation. Such compounds are sources where reactive oxygen species are generated during storage or upon cryopreservation, impairing sperm function. In this chapter we describe methods to remove seminal plasma and cellular debris from sperm samples, and for selecting morphologically normal motile sperm. The methods that are described here include: ordinary centrifugation, sperm swim-up, glass wool and Sephadex filtration/adherence, and single-layer as well as discontinuous two-layer iodixanol density gradient centrifugation.

  15. Targeted inactivation of the mouse epididymal beta-defensin 41 alters sperm flagellar beat pattern and zona pellucida binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkgren, Ida; Alvarez, Luis; Blank, Nelli; Balbach, Melanie; Turunen, Heikki; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Toivanen, Jussi; Krutskikh, Anton; Wahlberg, Niklas; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti; Wachten, Dagmar; Sipilä, Petra

    2016-05-15

    During epididymal maturation, sperm acquire the ability to swim progressively by interacting with proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. Beta-defensin proteins, expressed in the epididymis, continue to regulate sperm motility during capacitation and hyperactivation in the female reproductive tract. We characterized the mouse beta-defensin 41 (DEFB41), by generating a mouse model with iCre recombinase inserted into the first exon of the gene. The homozygous Defb41(iCre/iCre) knock-in mice lacked Defb41 expression and displayed iCre recombinase activity in the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. Heterozygous Defb41(iCre/+) mice can be used to generate epididymis specific conditional knock-out mouse models. Homozygous Defb41(iCre/iCre) sperm displayed a defect in sperm motility with the flagella primarily bending in the pro-hook conformation while capacitated wild-type sperm more often displayed the anti-hook conformation. This led to a reduced straight line motility of Defb41(iCre/iCre) sperm and weaker binding to the oocyte. Thus, DEFB41 is required for proper sperm maturation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oocyte Activation and Fertilisation: Crucial Contributors from the Sperm and Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Coward, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This chapter intends to summarise the importance of sperm- and oocyte-derived factors in the processes of sperm-oocyte binding and oocyte activation. First, we describe the initial interaction between sperm and the zona pellucida, with particular regard to acrosome exocytosis. We then describe how sperm and oocyte membranes fuse, with special reference to the discovery of the sperm protein IZUMO1 and its interaction with the oocyte membrane receptor JUNO. We then focus specifically upon oocyte activation, the fundamental process by which the oocyte is alleviated from metaphase II arrest by a sperm-soluble factor. The identity of this sperm factor has been the source of much debate recently, although mounting evidence, from several different laboratories, provides strong support for phospholipase C ζ (PLCζ), a sperm-specific phospholipase. Herein, we discuss the evidence in support of PLCζ and evaluate the potential role of other candidate proteins, such as post-acrosomal WW-binding domain protein (PAWP/WBP2NL). Since the cascade of downstream events triggered by the sperm-borne oocyte activation factor heavily relies upon specialised cellular machinery within the oocyte, we also discuss the critical role of oocyte-borne factors, such as the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R), protein kinase C (PKC), store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), during the process of oocyte activation. In order to place the implications of these various factors and processes into a clinical context, we proceed to describe their potential association with oocyte activation failure and discuss how clinical techniques such as the in vitro maturation of oocytes may affect oocyte activation ability. Finally, we contemplate the role of artificial oocyte activating agents in the clinical rescue of oocyte activation deficiency and discuss options for more endogenous alternatives.

  17. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  18. Reduced Fertility and Altered Epididymal and Sperm Integrity in Mice Lacking ADAM7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejin; Han, Cecil; Jin, Sora; Kwon, Jun Tae; Kim, Jihye; Jeong, Juri; Kim, Jaehwan; Ham, Sera; Jeon, Suyeon; Yoo, Yung Joon; Cho, Chunghee

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian epididymis is a highly convoluted tubule that connects the testis to the vas deferens. Its proper functions in sperm transport, storage, and maturation are essential for male reproduction. One of the genes predominantly expressed in the epididymis is ADAM7 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 7). Previous studies have shown that ADAM7 synthesized in the epididymis is secreted into the epididymal lumen and is then transferred to sperm membranes, where it forms a chaperone complex that is potentially involved in sperm fertility. In this study, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted disruption in the Adam7 gene. We found that the fertility of male mice was modestly but significantly reduced by knockout of Adam7. Histological analyses revealed that the cell heights of the epithelium were dramatically decreased in the caput of the epididymis of Adam7-null mice, suggesting a requirement for ADAM7 in maintaining the integrity of the epididymal epithelium. We found that sperm from Adam7-null mice exhibit decreased motility, tail deformation, and altered tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that the absence of ADAM7 leads to abnormal sperm functions and morphology. Western blot analyses revealed reduced levels of integral membrane protein 2B (ITM2B) and ADAM2 in sperm from Adam7-null mice, suggesting a requirement for ADAM7 in normal expression of sperm membrane proteins involved in sperm functions. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that ADAM7 is required for normal fertility and is important for the maintenance of epididymal integrity and for sperm morphology, motility, and membrane proteins. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  19. Use of spin labels and electron spin resonance spectroscopy to characterize membranes of bovine sperm: effect of butylated hydroxytoluene and cold shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstedt, R.H.; Amann, R.P.; Rucinsky, T.; Morse, P.D. II; Lepock, J.; Snipes, W.; Keith, A.D.

    1976-05-01

    Spin label probes were used in conjunction with measurements of metabolic rate and electron microscopy to characterize bovine sperm membranes. Aqueous compartments, membrane hydrocarbon zones and lipid : water interfaces were studied separately using appropriate spin labels. For sperm suspended in aqueous medium, the cold shock associated with rapid cooling from room temperature to 0/sup 0/ increased membrane permeability. This membrane damage was readily detected using spin labels but was not detected using thin section electron microscopy. This change was prevented by the addition of butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT). BHT provided partial protection against further damage caused by freezing sperm on solid CO/sub 2/. ESR techniques provide a rapid means to quantify the changes in sperm membranes occurring during the epididymal maturation of sperm and subsequent events within the female tract leading to fertilization. The technique also could be used to assess damage to sperm, ova or embryos during preparation for storage in cryoprotective diluents.

  20. Reduced developmental competence of immature, in-vitro matured and postovulatory aged mouse oocytes following IVF and ICSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trounson Alan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study highlights basic physiological differences associated with oocyte maturation and ageing. The study explores the fertilizing capacity and resistance to injury of mouse oocytes at different stages of maturation and ageing following IVF and ICSI. Also, the study examines the developmental competence of embryos obtained from these oocytes. The outcome of the study supports views that the mouse can be a model for human IVF suggesting that utilizing in-vitro matured and failed fertilized oocytes to produce embryos mainly when limited number of oocytes is retrieved in a specific cycle, should be carefully considered. Methods Hybrid strain mouse oocytes were inseminated by in-vitro fertilization (IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Oocytes groups that were used were germinal vesicle (GV in-vitro matured metaphase II (IVM-MII, freshly ovulated MII (OV-MII, 13 hrs in-vitro aged MII (13 hrs-MII and 24 hrs in-vitro aged MII (24 hrs-MII. Fertilization and embryo development to the blastocyst stage were monitored up to 5 days in culture for IVF and ICSI zygotes. Sperm head decondensation and pronuclear formation were examined up to 9 hrs in oocytes following ICSI. Apoptotic events in blocked embryos were examined using the TUNNEL assay. Differences between females for the number and quality of GV and OV-MII oocytes were examined by ANOVA analyses. Differences in survival after ICSI, fertilization by IVF and ICSI and embryo development were analysed by Chi-square test with Yates correction. Results No differences in number and quality of oocytes were identified between females. The findings suggest that inability of GV oocytes to participate in fertilization and embryo development initiates primarily from their inability to support initial post fertilization events such as sperm decondensation and pronuclei formation. These events occur in all MII oocytes in similar rates (87–98% for IVF and ICSI. Following

  1. Sperm-associated antigen 11A is expressed exclusively in the principal cells of the mouse caput epididymis in an androgen-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Epididymal sperm maturation occurs via interactions between sperm and proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. Although this is an important process, the genes that encode the involved proteins remain largely uncharacterized. Previous studies have demonstrated that the genes involved in sperm maturation are regulated by androgen. Spag11a is an epididymal gene that is influenced by androgen. However, little is known about the putative role of this gene in the sperm maturation process. The objective of this study was to characterize Spag11a in the mouse epididymis. Methods In silico analyses were performed to predict signal peptides and functional domains. Spag11a expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Western blots and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine protein expression. Results SPAG11A is a member of the beta defensin protein family and constitutes a secretory protein. Spag11a was expressed exclusively in the epididymis. Moreover, it exhibited region-specific expression in the caput, which is typical for genes that are involved in creating a suitable microenvironment for sperm maturation. Mouse Spag11a was regulated by androgen. A significant decrease of Spag11a expression was observed at third day following a gonadectomy (P epididymal luminal fluid and spermatozoa. Conclusions Based on the characteristics of Spag11a, it is likely that this gene has a specific role in epididymal sperm maturation. Further studies using functional assays are necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:23815807

  2. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Blengini, Cecilia S; Sergio, Naretto; Gabriela, Cardozo; Giojalas, Laura C; Margarita, Chiaraviglio

    2014-01-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and v...

  3. Female sperm storage in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, David M; Hamlett, William C

    2002-02-01

    Internal fertilization and oviparity most likely are symplesiomorphies for modern reptiles, and viviparity has evolved independently numerous times in Sauria and Serpentes. Oviducal sperm storage is known in females of all taxa except Amphisbaenia. However, in Rhynchocephalia and Crocodilia, sperm storage is poorly studied, and specialized sperm storage tubules (Ssts) are unknown. We use the molecular phylogenetic hypothesis [(Chelonia+Archosauria) (Squamata)] to trace evolution of sperm storage characters. Ssts arose independently in Chelonia and Squamata. Turtles possess albumen-secreting glands in the anterior half of the oviduct (the tuba or isthmus), and the most distal of these glands also serve as Ssts; in addition, some turtles possess Ssts in the adjacent segment of the oviduct, the uterus. Squamates lack albumen-secreting glands, and the ancestral state is possession of Ssts in the posterior infundibulum (uterine tube). Secondarily, iguanids have evolved vaginal Ssts. In this paper, we present the first ultrastructural observations on vaginal Ssts in lizards, using Anolis sagrei (Polychrotidae). Proximally, the neck of these simple tubular glands continues the alternation of ciliated and secretory cells lining the lumen of the vagina. However, the epithelial cells of the distal sperm storage area are neither secretory nor ciliated. The Ssts of Anolis are more similar to those of birds more than to infundibular receptacles in snakes and lizards. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Localization and identification of sumoylated proteins in human sperm: excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigodner, Margarita; Shrivastava, Vibha; Gutstein, Leah Elisheva; Schneider, Jordana; Nieves, Edward; Goldstein, Marc; Feliciano, Miriam; Callaway, Myrasol

    2013-01-01

    Sumoylation is a type of post-translational modification that is implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular events. However, its role in the function of human sperm has not yet been characterized. In this study, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 were highly enriched in the neck area of human sperm that is associated with the redundant nuclear envelope and were also detectable in the flagella and some head regions. Similar localization patterns of SUMO were also observed in mouse and fly sperm. Nonmotile, two-tailed, curled tailed, misshapen, microcephalic (small head) and aciphalic (no head) sperm exhibited abnormally high levels of sumoylation in their neck and tail regions relative to normal sperm. Numerous sumoylated proteins, ranging from 20 to 260 kDa, were detected via western blotting and identified by mass spectrometry, and 55 SUMO targets that were present specifically in human sperm, and not in the control fraction, corresponded to flagella proteins, proteins involved in the maturation and differentiation of sperm, heat shock proteins and important glycolytic and mitochondrial enzymes. The targets that were identified included proteins with specific functions in germ cells and sperm, such as heat shock-related 70-kDa protein 2, outer dense fiber protein 3, A-kinase anchor proteins 3 and 4, L-lactate dehydrogenase C, sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome B/F, valosin-containing protein, seminogelins, histone H4 and ubiquitin. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the sumoylation of semenogelin and indicated that some sperm proteins are modified by sumoylation and ubiquitination simultaneously. Numerous proteins are modified by sumoylation in human sperm; excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

  5. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  6. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M. [=Marja; Mochtar, M. H.; de Melker, A. A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that

  7. Variation in sperm morphology among Afrotropical sunbirds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Omotoriogun, T. C.; Laskemoen, T.; Rowe, M.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bowie, R. C. K.; Sedláček, O.; Hořák, D.; Ottosson, U.; Lifjeld, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 1 (2016), s. 155-166 ISSN 0019-1019 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : comparative analysis * Nectariniidae * phylogenetic signal * sperm competition * sperm size Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.279, year: 2016

  8. Delayed sexual maturation through gonadotropin receptor vaccination in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambroni, Elisabeth; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa; Remy, Jean-Jacques; Le Gac, Florence

    2009-01-01

    In fish, gonadotropin hormones FSH-GTH1 and LH-GTH2 are less specific for their cognate receptors than in mammals. The respective reproductive functions of fish LH and FSH are thus difficult to establish. We aimed to study the effect of specific antagonists of the two gonadotropin receptors on trout sexual maturation in both sexes by targeting specific regions of LH and FSH receptors, Lhr and Fshr. Filamentous phages displaying Lhr specific or Fshr specific decapeptides from the extracellular hormone binding domain were engineered. Recombinant phages were used as receptor-specific antagonistic vaccines. Male and female trouts were immunized with anti-LHR, anti-FSHR, anti-FSHR+LHR or adjuvant alone, through multiple injections over 8-24 weeks, starting at different stages of sexual maturation. The consequences of immunization on gonadal development were evaluated by determining gonad growth, by histological analysis of testis and ovaries at the end of the vaccination period and by measuring blood plasma sex steroids using radioimmunoassay. We show for the first time in fish that the anti-receptor vaccinations could have specific antagonistic effects on the development of the reproductive functions; while the anti-FSHR affected the sexual maturation of prepubertal males and delayed sperm production, the anti-LHR blocked vitellogenesis in females. In maturing males, the combined anti-FSHR+LHR vaccine inhibited spermatogenesis and affected steroidogenesis. In that case, the effects of the vaccine on spermatogenesis were transient and reversible when immunization was stopped. Such an immunological strategy to specifically and transiently inhibit a receptor provides a promising approach for discovering their specific functions; it could also lead to a new technology for controlling the onset of puberty in aquaculture species.

  9. Boundaries of Ethics, Sperm on the Border –The Globalization of Danish Sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past two decades, Denmark has developed into an important destination for fertility travelers in need of donor sperm. A variety of different clinics providing sperm with different modes of clinical care have developed, and an increasing number of their customers come from abroad. One...... of the reasons why Danish fertility clinics have enabled women from Denmark and abroad to turn to sperm donation is, that two of the largest sperm banks in Europe are Danish. In contrast to many other countries where sperm is in demand, the Danish sperm banks are able to provide enough sperm for the national...... market as well as clinics worldwide. Furthermore, one of the sperm banks market sperm for self-insemination and deliver it to private customers by UPS. Although sperm donation is an old and low technology compared to other reproductive technologies, this development has taken place at the same time...

  10. Bioenergetics of mammalian sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    After ejaculation, the mammalian male gamete must undergo the capacitation process, which is a prerequisite for egg fertilization. The bioenergetics of sperm capacitation is poorly understood despite its fundamental role in sustaining the biochemical and molecular events occurring during gamete activation. Glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are the two major metabolic pathways producing ATP which is the primary source of energy for spermatozoa. Since recent data suggest that spermatozoa have the ability to use different metabolic substrates, the main aim of this work is to present a broad overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside sperm mitochondria during capacitation in different mammalian species. Metabolism of glucose and of other energetic substrates, such as pyruvate, lactate, and citrate, is critically analyzed. Such knowledge, besides its obvious importance for basic science, could eventually translate into the development of novel strategies for treatment of male infertility, artificial reproduction, and sperm selection methods.

  11. Effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter blocking on human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, A; Treulen, F; Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Felmer, R; Villegas, J V

    2015-08-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulates a number of essential processes in spermatozoa. Ca(2+) is taken up by mitochondria via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (mCU). Oxygen-bridged dinuclear ruthenium amine complex (Ru360) has been used to study mCU because it is a potent and specific inhibitor of this channel. In bovine spermatozoa, it has been demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium uptake inhibition adversely affects the capacitation process. It has been demonstrated in human spermatozoa that mCU blocking, through Ru360, prevents apoptosis; however, the contribution of the mCU to normal human sperm function has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mCU blocking on human sperm function. Spermatozoa obtained from apparently healthy donors were incubated with 5 and 10 μm Ru360 for 4 h at 37 °C. Viability was assessed using propidium iodide staining; motility was determined by computer-aided sperm analysis, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels using a luminescence-based method, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) using JC-1 staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production using dihydroethidium dye. Our results show that mCU blocking significantly reduced total sperm motility and ATP levels without affecting sperm viability, ΔΨm and ROS production. In conclusion, mCU contributes to the maintenance of sperm motility and ATP levels in human spermatozoa. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Microfluidic single sperm entrapment and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagenaar, B.; Berendsen, Johanna Theodora Wilhelmina; Berendsen, J.T.W.; Bomer, Johan G.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    Selection of healthy spermatozoa is of crucial importance for the success rates of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilization and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. Although sperm selection for ART procedures is predominantly based on sperm motility, successful

  13. Live pups from evaporatively dried mouse sperm stored at ambient temperature for up to 2 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a mouse sperm preservation method based on evaporative drying. Mouse sperm were evaporatively dried and stored at 4°C and ambient temperature for 3 months to 2 years. Upon rehydration, a single sperm was injected into a mature oocyte to develop into a blastocyst after culture or a live birth after embryo transfer to a recipient female. For the samples stored at 4°C for 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, the blastocyst formation rate was 61.5%, 49.1%, 31.5%, 32.2%, and 41.4%, respectively. The blastocyst rate for those stored at ambient temperature (∼22°C for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months was 57.8%, 36.2%, 33.6%, and 34.4%, respectively. Fifteen, eight and three live pups were produced from sperm stored at room temperature for 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively. This is the first report of live offspring produced from dried mouse sperm stored at ambient temperature for up to 2 years. Based on these results, we suggest that evaporative drying is a potentially useful method for the routine preservation of mouse sperm.

  14. Exposure to Cadmium Impairs Sperm Functions by Reducing CatSper in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Feng Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cadmium (Cd, a common environmental heavy metal and endocrine disruptor, is known to exert toxic effects on the testes. However, the mechanisms accounting for its toxicity in mature spermatozoa remain unclear. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were orally administered with CdCl2 for 5 weeks at 3 mg·kg-1·day-1. Additionally, mouse spermatozoa were incubated in vitro with different doses of CdCl2 (0, 10, 50, 250 µM. Several sperm functions including the sperm motility, viability and acrosome reaction (AR ratio were then examined. Furthermore, the current and expression levels of both the sperm-specific Ca2+ channel (CatSper and the sperm-specific K+ channel (KSper were evaluated by patch-clamping and western blotting, respectively. Results: Our data showed that the motility, viability and AR of sperm exposed to cadmium significantly decreased in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, these changes were correlated with changes in CatSper but not KSper. Conclusion: The findings indicate sperm dysfunction during both chronic and acute cadmium exposure as well as a specific role for CatSper in the reproductive toxicity of cadmium.

  15. Sperm head vacuoles are not affected by in-vitro conditions, as analysed by a system of sperm-microcapture channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyer, Anton; Vanderzwalmen, Pierre; Bach, Magnus; Stecher, Astrid; Spitzer, Dietmar; Zech, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Since the introduction of the motile sperm organelle morphology examination, there has been increasing recognition of the fact that the presence of large nuclear vacuoles might have deleterious effects on embryo development. Nevertheless, one fundamental question still being debated is whether specific in-vitro conditions during the handling of semen have an impact on vacuole formation. This study's objective was to analyse whether incubation temperature (20, 37°C) or oxidative stress stimulates the formation of nuclear vacuoles. Furthermore, it examined whether vacuoles disappear in the presence of an acrosome reaction inducer. Therefore, a system of sperm-microcapture channels was developed to permit the observation of the same living spermatozoa over a period of 24h. Neither incubation at 37°C nor induction of oxidative stress led to de-novo formation of nuclear vacuoles. Induction of the acrosome reaction using calcium ionophore A23587 did not lead to any modifications in the proportion of spermatozoa with vacuoles or to the disappearance of pre-existing vacuoles. According to these observations, it is concluded that nuclear vacuoles on the sperm head are already produced at earlier stages of sperm maturation and are not induced or modulated by routine laboratory environments. The examination of spermatozoa at very high magnification has led to the increasingly widespread recognition that the presence of large vacuoles in the human sperm head has deleterious effects on embryo development. One fundamental question, however, still remains: do specific conditions in the laboratory during the preparation and the handling of semen have an impact on vacuole formation? Our initial objective was to analyse whether different incubation temperatures (20, 37°C) and the induction of oxidative stress lead to the formation of sperm head vacuoles. Furthermore, we examined whether vacuoles disappear in the presence of an acrosome reaction inducer. In order to do this we

  16. Solea senegalensis sperm cryopreservation: New insights on sperm quality.

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    Marta F Riesco

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of Senegalese sole sperm can represent an alternative to overcome some reproductive problems of this species. However, it is important to guarantee the safe use of cryopreserved sperm by selecting an appropriate protocol according to a high demand quality need to be ensured. It has been demonstrated that traditional assays such as motility and viability do not provide enough information to identify specific damage caused by cryopreservation process (freezing and thawing. Specific tests, including lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, should be performed. In the present study, motility and lipid peroxidation were performed as specific tests allowing us to discard cryopreservation conditions such as methanol as internal cryoprotectant and bovine serum albumin as external cryoprotectant. In addition, a caspase 3/7 detection by flow cytometry was performed to analyze apoptosis activity in the best selected conditions. Moreover, new highly sensitive tests based on transcript number detection have recently been described in fish sperm cryopreservation. For this reason, a transcript level detection assay was performed on certain oxidative and chaperone genes related to fertilization ability and embryo development (hsp70, hsp90BB, hsp90AA, gpx to select the best cryopreservation conditions. DMSO+ egg yolk proved to be the best cryoprotectant combination in terms of transcript level. This study describes an optimized cryopreservation protocol for Solea senegalensis sperm demonstrating for the first time that transcript degradation is the most sensitive predictor of cell status in this species after cryopreservation.

  17. No evidence for sperm priming responses under varying sperm competition risk or intensity in guppies

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    Evans, Jonathan P.

    2009-07-01

    Sperm competition theory predicts that males should tailor their investment in ejaculates according to the number of rival males competing to fertilize a female’s eggs. Research spanning several taxa supports this prediction by showing that males are often sensitive to the level of sperm competition and adjust their investment in sperm numbers accordingly. More recent work has revealed that males may also tailor the quality of sperm according to the number of males competing for fertilization. Here I test for both effects in guppies ( Poecilia reticulata) in an experiment that simultaneously evaluates the risk and intensity models of sperm competition. The experiment determined whether male guppies adjust the number (stripped ejaculate size) and quality (sperm velocity and viability) of sperm that are primed over a 3-day period according to experimental changes in the perceived level of sperm competition. A total of 136 focal males were initially stripped of all retrievable sperm and assayed for these sperm traits before being allocated at random to one of four treatments simulating different levels of sperm competition risk and intensity. During the 3-day treatment phase, focal males had visual and olfactory access to a sexually receptive (initially virgin) female maintained with different numbers of stimulus males to simulate variation in the risk and intensity of sperm competition. Following this, males were assayed again for the sperm traits. Contrary to predictions, there was no significant change in any of the measured variables among treatments, although qualitatively the patterns for sperm velocity and viability did conform to expectation. The lack of any trend for the number of sperm primed was unequivocal and future work examining the effects of sperm competition on sperm production should focus on whether males differentially allocate sperm numbers among matings that differ in the level of sperm competition.

  18. Population Blocks.

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    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  19. The effect of polymer dots on bioactivity of mouse sperm in vitro

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    Feng, Gang; Chen, Qiang; Zhai, Peng; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Guimiao; Xu, Gaixia; Chen, Danni

    2014-09-01

    Objective: In recent years, semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots)have caught considerable attention for their outstanding optical characteristics in biomedical imaging applications. Not as semiconductor quantum dots, Pdots are composed of nonmetallic material and their biological effects remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the effects of a band new polymer dots on bioactivity of mouse sperm using a computer-aided sperm analysis system(CASA) and an in vitro fertilization (IVF) model. Methods: The semiconducting polymer dots used in this study is CN-PPV Pdots, which emits in the orange wavelength range with high brightness. Epididymal mouse sperm were collected from 7-8weeks old Balb/c mouse. Firstly, CN-PPV Pdots was added into the Human Tubal Fluid (HTF) media at various concentrations (0, 1, 10, 100 nmol/L respectively ), then sperm bioactivity and vitality were evaluated every 10 minutes. Secondly, the treated sperm were co-cultured with matured oocytes in HTF media, fertilization rate and oocytes development were recorded after 24 hours co-incubation. Results: Sperm viability in the control group (0 nmol/L) and experimental group (1, 10,100 nmol/L) were 57.20+/-4.51%, 58.17+/-4.81%, 55.50+/-4.52%, 46.26%+/-3.83%, respectively. Fertilization rate in different groups showed no obvious differences, control group (0 nmol/L) and experimental group (1, 10, 100 nmol/L) were 38.75+/-1.71%, 37.01+/-4.69%, 32.75+/-1.71%, 35.24+/-2.37%, respectively. Conclusion: Our data indicated that the CN-PPV Pdots had a very high biocompatibility on sperm in both the activation and the IVF process, even in extreme high Pdots concentration,the sperm bioactivity only got slight restrained. The effect of CN-PPV Pdots seems has no or little toxicity,and the long-term embryonic development has yet to be verified.

  20. Cat fertilization by mouse sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yong-Xun; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Yu, Xian-Feng; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Wang, Qing-Ling; Gao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Yong-Nan; Sun, Shao-Chen; Kong, Il-Keun; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2012-11-01

    Interspecies intracytoplasmic sperm injection has been carried out to understand species-specific differences in oocyte environments and sperm components during fertilization. While sperm aster organization during cat fertilization requires a paternally derived centriole, mouse and hamster fertilization occur within the maternal centrosomal components. To address the questions of where sperm aster assembly occurs and whether complete fertilization is achieved in cat oocytes by interspecies sperm, we studied the fertilization processes of cat oocytes following the injection of cat, mouse, or hamster sperm. Male and female pronuclear formations were not different in the cat oocytes at 6 h following cat, mouse or hamster sperm injection. Microtubule asters were seen in all oocytes following intracytoplasmic injection of cat, mouse or hamster sperm. Immunocytochemical staining with a histone H3-m2K9 antibody revealed that mouse sperm chromatin is incorporated normally with cat egg chromatin, and that the cat eggs fertilized with mouse sperm enter metaphase and become normal 2-cell stage embryos. These results suggest that sperm aster formation is maternally dependent, and that fertilization processes and cleavage occur in a non-species specific manner in cat oocytes.

  1. Epididymal sperm from Spix's yellow-toothed cavies sperm successfully cryopreserved in Tris extender with 6% glycerol and 20% egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andréia M; Praxedes, Erica C G; Campos, Lívia B; Bezerra, Luana G P; Moreira, Samara S J; Maia, Keilla M; Souza, Ana L P; Silva, Alexandre R

    2018-04-01

    As a non-threatened hystricognath rodent species, Spix's yellow-toothed cavies can be used as a model for the development of assisted reproductive techniques for the conservation of closely related species. The objective was to establish a functional protocol for cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from these cavies. Twelve sexually mature males, ∼2 y old and weighing ∼300 g, were euthanized. Sperm were recovered by retrograde flushing of the vas deferens and cauda epididymis with Tris extender. Thereafter, sperm were extended in Tris plus 20% egg yolk, with 3%, 6% or 9% glycerol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), placed in 0.25 mL straws and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Sperm concentration, motility (using computer-assisted sperm analysis; CASA), plasma membrane integrity, osmotic response, morphology and sperm binding-ability were determined in fresh and frozen-thawed sperm. For most sperm endpoints, glycerol was a more desirable cryoprotectant than DMSO. Data (mean ± SEM) were similar with use of 3%, 6%, and 9% glycerol (P > 0.05) in osmotic response (40.66 ± 6.3%, 42.5 ± 7.1%, and 39.5 ± 5.0% respectably), and membrane integrity (55.17 ± 5.5%, 68.4 ± 4.1%, and 59.1 ± 4.9% respectably). Among concentrations assessed, the use of 6% glycerol resulted in the greatest (P < 0.05) post-thaw values for total motility (60.9 ± 4.4%), rapid subpopulation motility (27.7 ± 3.1%) and sperm-binding capability (227.0 ± 20.2). In conclusion, epididymal sperm from the Spix's yellow-toothed cavies (G. spixii) are optimally cryopreserved in Tris extender with 6% glycerol and 20% egg yolk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sperm competition promotes diversity of sperm bundles in Ohomopterus ground beetles

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    Takami, Yasuoki; Sota, Teiji

    2007-07-01

    Diversification of sperm morphology has been investigated in the context of sperm competition, but the adaptive significance of sperm bundles is still unclear. In analyzing 10 taxa of the genus Carabus subgenus Ohomopterus and one related Carabus ground beetles, we found that dimorphic sperm bundles occurred in most species with varied degrees of bimodality, whereas sperm were generally monomorphic. Comparative analyses with phylogenetically independent contrasts revealed that the sizes of large and small sperm bundles evolved more rapidly than, and were not correlated with, the length of sperm, suggesting more intense selection on sperm bundle sizes and their independent responses to different evolutionary forces. The size of large sperm bundles was positively correlated with male genital morphology (pertinent to displacement of rival spermatophores) and postcopulatory guarding duration as well as male body length, suggesting that larger sperm bundles have been favored when the risk of spermatophore displacement is high. Larger sperm bundles may be advantageous because of their ability to migrate more rapidly into the spermatheca. In contrast, no clear association was detected between the small sperm bundle size and mating traits despite its rapid diversification. The present study provides the first record of heteromorphic sperm bundles, the diversity of which may be promoted by sperm competition.

  3. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schärer, Lukas

    2013-04-22

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm production on mating behaviour and paternity success have so far been scarce, mainly because sperm production is difficult to manipulate directly in animals. Here, we used phenotypic engineering to manipulate sperm-production rate, by employing dose-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) of a spermatogenesis-specific gene, macbol1, in the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We demonstrate (i) that our novel dose-dependent RNAi approach allows us to induce high variability in sperm-production rate; (ii) that a reduced sperm-production rate is associated with a decreased copulation frequency, suggesting conditional adjustment of mating behaviour; and (iii) that both sperm production and copulation frequency are important determinants of paternity success in a competitive situation, as predicted by sperm competition theory. Our study clearly documents the potential of phenotypic engineering via dose-dependent RNAi to test quantitative predictions of evolutionary theory.

  4. Sperm quality of Litopenaeus vannamei broostock injected by PMSG and antidopamin

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    Fahmi Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The important role in determining the productivity of shrimp was the quality and quantity of shrimp sperm. The decreasing of hatching rate was predicted as the effect of the decreasing quality of sperm. It then could  influence  the number and quality of naupli produced. Hormonal induction of maturation is one of alternative solution that can improve shrimp sperm quality. This study was conducted to examine the effect of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG and antidopamine (AD injection on white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei sperm quality. This research consisted of six treatments which were treatment without eyestalk ablation, eyestalk ablation, and premix PMSG hormone, and AD at the dose  of 0.1 mL/kg, 0.25 mL/kg, 0.5 mL/kg, and 1 mL/kg. The observed parameters were sperm count and percentage of normal and abnormal sperm. The results showed that PMSG hormone and AD injection could improve sperm quality of L. vannamei shrimp. Hormone at the dose of 0.25 mL/kg and 0.5 mL/kg were the optimal doses to increase sperm count and the percentage of normal sperm, also to lower the percentage of abnormal sperm. Keyword: PMSG, AD, sperm quality, Litopenaeus vannamei  ABSTRAK Kuantitas dan kualitas sperma udang jantan sangat berperan penting dalam menentukan produktivitas udang. Terjadinya penurunan daya tetas telur udang diduga karena terjadinya penurunan kualitas sperma. Hal ini berpengaruh terhadap jumlah dan kualitas nauplius yang diproduksi. Induksi maturasi secara hormonal merupakan salah satu alternatif yang dapat meningkatkan kualitas sperma udang. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengkaji pengaruh penyuntikan pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG dan antidopamin (AD terhadap kualitas sperma udang vaname Litopenaeus vannamei. Penelitian terdiri atas enam perlakuan, yaitu perlakuan tanpa ablasi mata, ablasi mata, dan injeksi dengan premix hormon PMSG dan AD dosis 0,1 mL/kg, 0,25 mL/kg, 0,5 mL/kg, dan 1 mL/kg. Parameter yang diamati

  5. Differences between epididymal and ejaculated sperm characteristics in donkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alessia; Contri, Alberto; De Amicis, Ippolito; Robbe, Domenico; Carluccio, Augusto

    2011-10-01

    Spermatozoa acquire their motility and fertilizing ability during their passage through the epididymal canal. In the epididymal caput and corpus spermatozoa undergo several biochemical and metabolic changes while the cauda of the epididymis should be considered as the primarily site for storage of the spermatozoa. In the horse spermatozoa from cauda epididymis were collected and frozen, and the fertility of semen assessed. However, no studies have detailed semen characteristics of spermatozoa collected from the cauda epididymis in the jackass. In this study sperm characteristics of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymis of the donkey was reported and a comparison with ejaculated spermatozoal characteristics was performed. Samples from 10 Martina Franca jackasses were collected and analyzed for viability (Propidium iodide/Sybr-14® fluorescent stain), mitochondrial activity (Mitotraker® fluorescent stain), objective motility characteristics (by Computer Assisted Sperm Analyzer - CASA) and morphology. A higher viability and mitochondrial activity in the cauda epididymis samples were reported in this paper. Samples reported in this paper were identified and the percentage of total and progressive spermatozoa was comparable, but trajectories were more rapid (higher VCL) with less progressiveness (higher ALH and lower STR and LIN) in the cauda epididymis. Sperm morphology showed a pronounced variability between jackasses, with comparable values for all morphological subclasses. In this study the loss of the distal cytoplasmic droplets happen close to or after ejaculation because the percentage fell to nearly 0% after ejaculation. As suggested for bulls, the presence of a similar percentage in sperm with proximal cytoplasmic droplet in epididymal and ejaculated semen is likely to indicate a failure in the maturation process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative Glycopeptide Changes in Rat Sperm During Epididymal Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Ana Izabel Silva Balbin; Hetherington, Louise; Baker, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa acquire fertilizing potential as they undergo a series of changes during epididymal transit. One major facet of such is the alterations in the sperm glycome. Modifications of the sialic acid content within glycan moieties are known to regulate epitope presentation and cellular adhesion and signaling, all of which may be critical for sperm to successfully reach and fertilize the egg. To date, there is paucity of information regarding the sialic acid changes that occur on spermatozoa during epididymal transit. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify N-linked sialylated glycoproteins in rat epididymal sperm and investigate whether they are regulated during epididymal transit. Sialylated glycopeptides from caput, corpus, and cauda spermatozoa were enriched using titanium dioxide beads. Bound N-linked glycopeptides were released by enzymatic deglycosylation using PNGase F and then analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. A total of 92 unique N-linked sialylated glycopeptides were identified from 65 different proteins. These included members of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein family (ADAM), Basigin, and Testis-expressed protein 101 (TEX101). Remarkably, label-free quantification showed that more than half of these peptides (48/92) were regulated during epididymal transit. Of interest, the protein TEX101 exhibited PNGase F-resistant deglycosylation under the conditions used in this study. The results from this study showed that changes in the N-linked sialoglycoprotein profile is a major hallmark of sperm maturation in rats. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  7. The microRNA signature of mouse spermatozoa is substantially modified during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Stanger, Simone J; Mihalas, Bettina P; Reilly, Jackson N; Anderson, Amanda L; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E; McLaughlin, Eileen A

    2015-10-01

    In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the epigenetic control of sperm development, leading to an increased appreciation of the importance of RNA interference pathways, and in particular miRNAs, as key regulators of spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation. It has also been shown that sperm are endowed with an impressive array of miRNA that have been implicated in various aspects of fertilization and embryo development. However, to date there have been no reports on whether the sperm miRNA signature is static or whether it is influenced by their prolonged maturation within the male reproductive tract. To investigate this phenomenon, we employed next-generation sequencing to systematically profile the miRNA signature of maturing mouse spermatozoa. In so doing we have provided the first evidence for the posttesticular modification of the sperm miRNA profile under normal physiological conditions. Such modifications include the apparent loss and acquisition of an impressive cohort of some 113 and 115 miRNAs, respectively, between the proximal and distal epididymal segments. Interestingly, the majority of these changes occur late in maturation and include the uptake of novel miRNA species in addition to a significant increase in many miRNAs natively expressed in immature sperm. Because sperm are not capable of de novo transcription, these findings identify the epididymis as an important site in establishing the sperm epigenome with the potential to influence the peri-conceptual environment of the female reproductive tract, contribute to the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and/or alter the developmental trajectory of the resulting offspring. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  8. Morphology and function of the reproductive tract of the spider crab Libinia spinosa (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majoidea): pattern of sperm storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sal Moyano, M. P.; Gavio, M. A.; Cuartas, E. I.

    2010-09-01

    Morphology and function of the male reproductive tract, female spermatheca and patterns of sperm storage were assessed in the crab Libinia spinosa using histological methods. Testes are characterized by the presence of peripheral spermatogonia and different sequences of sperm maturity. Spermatophores begin to be packed in the last portion. The vas deferens consists of three sections: anterior, with undeveloped spermatophores and free sperm; median, with well-developed spermatophores; and posterior with granular secretions. Female spermathecae are of the ventral type, with a velum separating dorsal and ventral chambers. Live individuals were kept in the laboratory and arranged in pairs. An experiment was conducted toward the end of the reproductive season, in which males with the right gonopod excised were placed with receptive females. After mating, females were killed and the spermathecae dissected for histological study and observation of the pattern of sperm storage. Spermatozoa were found forming discrete sperm packages. New ejaculates can fill the entire spermatheca or be restricted to the ventral chamber; sperm are rounded, with a distinguishable acrosomal core. Old ejaculates are restricted to the dorsal chamber and are of irregular shape and larger size; an acrosomal core was not distinguishable. The secretions produced by the glandular epithelium of the dorsal chamber of the spermathecae are likely to have a role in the removal of dead sperm.

  9. Progesterone from the cumulus cells is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte cumulus complex.

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    Héctor Alejandro Guidobaldi

    Full Text Available Sperm chemotaxis in mammals have been identified towards several female sources as follicular fluid (FF, oviduct fluid, and conditioned medium from the cumulus oophorus (CU and the oocyte (O. Though several substances were confirmed as sperm chemoattractant, Progesterone (P seems to be the best chemoattractant candidate, because: 1 spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor, 2 capacitated spermatozoa are chemotactically attracted in vitro by gradients of low quantities of P; 3 the CU cells produce and secrete P after ovulation; 4 a gradient of P may be kept stable along the CU; and 5 the most probable site for sperm chemotaxis in vivo could be near and/or inside the CU. The aim of this study was to verify whether P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the rabbit oocyte-cumulus complex (OCC in the rabbit, as a mammalian animal model. By means of videomicroscopy and computer image analysis we observed that only the CU are a stable source of sperm attractants. The CU produce and secrete P since the hormone was localized inside these cells by immunocytochemistry and in the conditioned medium by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, rabbit spermatozoa express a cell surface P receptor detected by western blot and localized over the acrosomal region by immunocytochemistry. To confirm that P is the sperm chemoattractant secreted by the CU, the sperm chemotactic response towards the OCC conditioned medium was inhibited by three different approaches: P from the OCC conditioned medium was removed with an anti-P antibody, the attractant gradient of the OCC conditioned medium was disrupted by a P counter gradient, and the sperm P receptor was blocked with a specific antibody. We concluded that only the CU but not the oocyte secretes P, and the latter chemoattract spermatozoa by means of a cell surface receptor. Our findings may be of interest in assisted reproduction procedures in humans, animals of economic importance and endangered species.

  10. On the origin of sperm epigenetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentino, Sandra; Borgmann, Jennifer; Gromoll, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    The influence of epigenetic modifications on reproduction and on the function of male germ cells has been thoroughly demonstrated. In particular, aberrant DNA methylation levels in sperm have been associated with abnormal sperm parameters, lower fertilization rates and impaired embryo development. Recent reports have indicated that human sperm might be epigenetically heterogeneous and that abnormal DNA methylation levels found in the sperm of infertile men could be due to the presence of sperm populations with different epigenetic quality. However, the origin and the contribution of different germ cell types to this suspected heterogeneity remain unclear. In this review, we focus on sperm epigenetics at the DNA methylation level and its importance in reproduction. We take into account the latest developments and hypotheses concerning the functional significance of epigenetic heterogeneity coming from the field of stem cell and cancer biology and discuss the potential importance and consequences of sperm epigenetic heterogeneity for reproduction, male (in)fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Based on the current information, we propose a model in which spermatogonial stem cell variability, either intrinsic or due to external factors (such as endocrine action and environmental stimuli), can lead to epigenetic sperm heterogeneity, sperm epimutations and male infertility. The elucidation of the precise causes for epimutations, the conception of adequate therapeutic options and the development of sperm selection technologies based on epigenetic quality should be regarded as crucial to the improvement of ART outcome in the near future. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Sperm competition and reproductive mode influence sperm dimensions and structure among snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S; Giojalas, Laura C; Chiaraviglio, Margarita

    2009-10-01

    The role of sperm competition in increasing sperm length is a controversial issue, because findings from different taxa seem contradictory. We present a comparative study of 25 species of snakes with different levels of sperm competition to test whether it influences the size and structure of different sperm components. We show that, as levels of sperm competition increase, so does sperm length, and that this elongation is largely explained by increases in midpiece length. In snakes, the midpiece is comparatively large and it contains structures, which in other taxa are present in the rest of the flagellum, suggesting that it may integrate some of its functions. Thus, increases in sperm midpiece size would result in more energy as well as greater propulsion force. Sperm competition also increases the area occupied by the fibrous sheath and outer dense fibers within the sperm midpiece, revealing for the first time an effect upon structural elements within the sperm. Finally, differences in male-male encounter rates between oviparous and viviparous species seem to lead to differences in levels of sperm competition. We conclude that the influence of sperm competition upon different sperm components varies between taxa, because their structure and function is different.

  12. Evaluation of reproductive parameters of vas deferens sperms in Caucasian snake (Gloydius halys caucasicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Sayedeh Zahra; Shiravi, Abdolhossein; Todehdehghan, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive parameters evaluation is considered as helpful tool for gene bank formation in ecological and economically important animals species. Gloydius halys caucasicus is venomous, viviparous pit viper of northwest of Iran. In this research, the spermatic reproductive parameters of this taxon were studied. Twenty six male snakes were collected from Takht-e-Soleiman region between September and October, 2010. Findings revealed that male snakes with body length of 45.07 ± 2.83 cm and body weight of 51.50 ± 10.42 g, and right and left gonads volume of 0.12 ± 0.03 mL and 0.06 ± 0.01 mL are mature ones and sperms concentration in first, middle and final regions of vas deferens duct were, 22.30 ± 19.34 ×10(6) mL(-1), 30.34 ± 11.55 ×10(6) mL(-1), and 37.65 ± 16.46×10(6) mL(-1), respectively. The sperms motility at three regions of duct were 60.53%, 62.07%, and 60.00% and percentage of immotile sperms in these regions were 39.46%, 37.92%, and 39.84%, respectively. Percentage of morphologically normal sperms was 69.23 ± 10.57% and abnormal sperms was 30.76 ± 10.57%; including 12.69 ± 5.25% spiral tailed, 7.33 ± 4.37% coiled tailed and 4.16 ± 2.51% folded tailed sperms. Percentage of live sperms in the first, middle and final regions of duct were 55.76 ± 10.77%, 58.84 ± 12.77%, and 57.69 ± 9.91%, respectively and percentage of dead sperm in these regions were 44.23 ± 10.77%, 41.15 ± 12.77%, and 42.30 ± 9.91%, respectively. Results suggested, mature sperms with acceptable reproductive quality could be collected from Gloydius halys caucasicus snake of Iran between September and October.

  13. Evaluation of reproductive parameters of vas deferens sperms in Caucasian snake (Gloydius halys caucasicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayedeh Zahra Mozafari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive parameters evaluation is considered as helpful tool for gene bank formation in ecological and economically important animals species. Gloydius halys caucasicus is venomous, viviparous pit viper of northwest of Iran. In this research, the spermatic reproductive parameters of this taxon were studied. Twenty six male snakes were collected from Takht-e-Soleiman region between September and October, 2010. Findings revealed that male snakes with body length of 45.07 ± 2.83 cm and body weight of 51.50 ± 10.42 g, and right and left gonads volume of 0.12 ± 0.03 mL and 0.06 ± 0.01 mL are mature ones and sperms concentration in first, middle and final regions of vas deferens duct were, 22.30 ± 19.34 ×106 mL-1, 30.34 ± 11.55 ×106 mL-1, and 37.65 ± 16.46×106 mL-1, respectively. The sperms motility at three regions of duct were 60.53%, 62.07%, and 60.00% and percentage of immotile sperms in these regions were 39.46%, 37.92%, and 39.84%, respectively. Percentage of morphologically normal sperms was 69.23 ± 10.57% and abnormal sperms was 30.76 ± 10.57%; including 12.69 ± 5.25% spiral tailed, 7.33 ± 4.37% coiled tailed and 4.16 ± 2.51% folded tailed sperms. Percentage of live sperms in the first, middle and final regions of duct were 55.76 ± 10.77%, 58.84 ± 12.77%, and 57.69 ± 9.91%, respectively and percentage of dead sperm in these regions were 44.23 ± 10.77%, 41.15 ± 12.77%, and 42.30 ± 9.91%, respectively. Results suggested, mature sperms with acceptable reproductive quality could be collected from Gloydius halys caucasicus snake of Iran between September and October.

  14. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

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    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  15. Ficoll-400 density gradient method as an effective sperm preparation technique for assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highland, Hyacinth N; Rishika, A Sharma; Almira, S Shaikh; Kanthi, P Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Infertility being a burning issue, the male itself contributes about 40% as a cause, as evident by statistical data. However, Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has emerged as a powerful tool in the management of infertility. Sperm preparation techniques govern the selection procedure to separate functional spermatozoa which can then be used in IUI, IVF, and ART and for cryopreservation. The present study was aimed at evaluation of sperm preparation techniques for reliability, performance and to determine the most effective, feasible and economical technique. The subjects under study includes males with normal proven fertility (n=40) and the males with unexplained infertility (n=40). Four sperm separation techniques, viz., Swim-up, Swim-down, Sucrose and Ficoll-400 density gradient techniques were evaluated for their efficacy in separation of good quality fraction of spermatozoa. Sperm viability, morphology and maturation status of spermatozoa were taken as evaluation parameters following the standard methods (WHO 2010). Data was analyzed using student's t -test and the four selected techniques were compared with the normal semen samples for scoring the efficiency of the techniques. Out of the several techniques used, Ficoll-400 was found to be more efficient method for separation of spermatozoa. The percentage of change in each parameter was calculated and taken as the index for recovery of potent sperm from the original sperm. Ficoll-400 density gradient yielded higher percentage of live, mature, morphologically normal spermatozoa in an isolated fraction as compared to other three techniques. It was observed that a combination of Ficoll-400 gradient separation with Swim-up technique could give quality spermatozoa which in-turn would directly have an impact on the success of IVF and other ART techniques.

  16. No evidence of trade-offs in the evolution of sperm numbers and sperm size in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourmente, M; Delbarco Trillo, J; Roldan, E R S

    2015-10-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection, in the form sperm competition, has influenced the evolution of several male reproductive traits. However, theory predicts that sperm competition would lead to trade-offs between numbers and size of spermatozoa because increased costs per cell would result in a reduction of sperm number if both traits share the same energetic budget. Theoretical models have proposed that, in large animals, increased sperm size would have minimal fitness advantage compared with increased sperm numbers. Thus, sperm numbers would evolve more rapidly than sperm size under sperm competition pressure. We tested in mammals whether sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers and size, and whether there is a trade-off between these traits. Our results showed that sperm competition maximizes sperm numbers in eutherian and metatherian mammals. There was no evidence of a trade-off between sperm numbers and sperm size in any of the two mammalian clades as we did not observe any significant relationship between sperm numbers and sperm size once the effect of sperm competition was taken into account. Maximization of both numbers and size in mammals may occur because each trait is crucial at different stages in sperm's life; for example size-determined sperm velocity is a key determinant of fertilization success. In addition, numbers and size may also be influenced by diverse energetic budgets required at different stages of sperm formation. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Temporal trends in sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Hagai; Jørgensen, Niels; Martino-Andrade, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    , method of measuring SC and semen volume, exclusion criteria and indicators of completeness of covariate data]. The slopes of SC and TSC were estimated as functions of sample collection year using both simple linear regression and weighted meta-regression models and the latter were adjusted for pre......-determined covariates and modification by fertility and geographic group. Assumptions were examined using multiple sensitivity analyses and nonlinear models. OUTCOMES: SC declined significantly between 1973 and 2011 (slope in unadjusted simple regression models -0.70 million/ml/year; 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.69; P ...BACKGROUND: Reported declines in sperm counts remain controversial today and recent trends are unknown. A definitive meta-analysis is critical given the predictive value of sperm count for fertility, morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: To provide a systematic review and meta-regression...

  18. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  19. Sperm interaction with the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druart, X

    2012-08-01

    Sperm transit in the female tract is a critical event for the success of fertilization. From their deposition in the vagina to final migration in the oviduct, sperm pass through the different compartments of the genital tract in which they encounter different environments. The cervix and the uterotubal junction (UTJ) are two barriers with different relative importance according to the species. The protein composition, the degree of glycosylation and the hydration of the cervical mucus change during the oestrous cycle. Several sperm surface proteins are associated with their migration through the cervical mucus and the UTJ. Data regarding the interaction of sperm with secretions of the epithelial tissue lining the different compartments of the female genital tract during the sperm transit are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on the migration of sperm through the cervix. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Ejaculate Economics: Testing the Effects of Male Sexual History on the Trade-Off between Sperm and Immune Function in Australian Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Damian K.; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2012-01-01

    Trade-offs between investment into male sexual traits and immune function provide the foundation for some of the most prominent models of sexual selection. Post-copulatory sexual selection on the male ejaculate is intense, and therefore trade-offs should occur between investment into the ejaculate and the immune system. Examples of such trade-offs exist, including that between sperm quality and immunity in the Australian cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. Here, we explore the dynamics of this trade-off, examining the effects that increased levels of sexual interaction have on the viability of a male's sperm across time, and the concomitant effects on immune function. Males were assigned to a treatment, whereby they cohabited with females that were sexually immature, sexually mature but incapable of copulation, or sexually mature and capable of copulation. Sperm viability of each male was then assessed at two time points: six and 13 days into the treatment, and immune function at day 13. Sperm viability decreased across the time points, but only for males exposed to treatment classes involving sexually mature females. This decrease was similar in magnitude across both sexually mature classes, indicating that costs to the expression of high sperm viability are incurred largely through levels of pre-copulatory investment. Males exposed to immature females produced sperm of low viability at both time points. Although we confirmed a weak negative association between sperm viability and lytic activity (a measure of immune response to bacterial infection) at day 13, this relationship was not altered across the mating treatment. Our results highlight that sperm viability is a labile trait, costly to produce, and subject to strategic allocation in these crickets. PMID:22253916

  1. Ejaculate economics: testing the effects of male sexual history on the trade-off between sperm and immune function in Australian crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian K Dowling

    Full Text Available Trade-offs between investment into male sexual traits and immune function provide the foundation for some of the most prominent models of sexual selection. Post-copulatory sexual selection on the male ejaculate is intense, and therefore trade-offs should occur between investment into the ejaculate and the immune system. Examples of such trade-offs exist, including that between sperm quality and immunity in the Australian cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. Here, we explore the dynamics of this trade-off, examining the effects that increased levels of sexual interaction have on the viability of a male's sperm across time, and the concomitant effects on immune function. Males were assigned to a treatment, whereby they cohabited with females that were sexually immature, sexually mature but incapable of copulation, or sexually mature and capable of copulation. Sperm viability of each male was then assessed at two time points: six and 13 days into the treatment, and immune function at day 13. Sperm viability decreased across the time points, but only for males exposed to treatment classes involving sexually mature females. This decrease was similar in magnitude across both sexually mature classes, indicating that costs to the expression of high sperm viability are incurred largely through levels of pre-copulatory investment. Males exposed to immature females produced sperm of low viability at both time points. Although we confirmed a weak negative association between sperm viability and lytic activity (a measure of immune response to bacterial infection at day 13, this relationship was not altered across the mating treatment. Our results highlight that sperm viability is a labile trait, costly to produce, and subject to strategic allocation in these crickets.

  2. Swedish sperm donors are driven by altruism, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhovd, Erling; Faurskov, Anders; Werner, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Swedish legislation requires that sperm donors are identifiable to offspring. In Denmark sperm donors remain anonymous. The aim of this study was to examine sperm donation in Sweden by identifying socio-demographic backgrounds, motivations and attitudes among donors and to describe options and plans of sperm recipients. Furthermore, the willingness of Swedish health care providers to assist in treatment abroad, where sperm from an anonymous donor were to be used, was assessed. The extent of travelling to Denmark for reproductive purposes was also examined. Thirty Swedish sperm donors completed a questionnaire and were interviewed about their backgrounds, motivations and attitudes. Thirty couples where the infertility workup had shown azoospermia were interviewed about their options for achieving parenthood. The willingness to assist in fertility treatment abroad and the extent of reproductive cross border travelling were assessed by interviewing health care providers and by contacting Danish clinics. Almost all donors were Caucasian. The main motivation for sperm donors was to help others. Owing to shortage of sperm donors many Caucasian recipients intended to have treatment abroad. For most non-Caucasian recipients sperm from a donor of appropriate ethnicity were not available in Sweden. Whether the sperm donor was anonymous or identifiable was not of major importance to most sperm recipients. Health care providers expressed unanimous willingness to assist in treatment with sperm from an anonymous donor. Our inquiry indicated that more than 250 Swedish sperm recipients travel to Denmark annually. Identifiable sperm donors are driven by altruistic motives, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling. Recruitment strategies to increase the number of sperm donors in Sweden are therefore warranted.

  3. Ejaculated mouse sperm enter cumulus-oocyte complexes more efficiently in vitro than epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honggang; Hung, Pei-Hsuan; Suarez, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is an established and popular animal model for studying reproductive biology. Epididymal mouse sperm, which lack exposure to secretions of male accessory glands and do not precisely represent ejaculated sperm for the study of sperm functions, have been almost exclusively used in studies. We compared ejaculated and epididymal sperm in an in vitro fertilization setting to examine whether ejaculated sperm enter cumulus-oocyte complexes more efficiently. In order to prepare sperm for fertilization, they were incubated under capacitating conditions. At the outset of incubation, ejaculated sperm stuck to the glass surfaces of slides and the incidences of sticking decreased with time; whereas, very few epididymal sperm stuck to glass at any time point, indicating differences in surface charge. At the end of the capacitating incubation, when sperm were added to cumulus-oocyte complexes, the form of flagellar movement differed dramatically; specifically, ejaculated sperm predominantly exhibited increased bending on one side of the flagellum (a process termed pro-hook hyperactivation), while epididymal sperm equally exhibited increased bending on one or the other side of the flagellum (pro-hook or anti-hook hyperactivation). This indicates that accessory sex gland secretions might have modified Ca2+ signaling activities in sperm, because the two forms of hyperactivation are reported to be triggered by different Ca2+ signaling patterns. Lastly, over time, more ejaculated than epididymal sperm entered the cumulus oocyte complexes. We concluded that modification of sperm by male accessory gland secretions affects the behavior of ejaculated sperm, possibly providing them with an advantage over epididymal sperm for reaching the eggs in vivo.

  4. Maturity and maturity models in lean construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Nesensohn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing interest in maturity models in management-related disciplines; which reflects a growing recognition that becoming more mature and having a model to guide the route to maturity can help organisations in managing major transformational change. Lean Construction (LC is an increasingly important improvement approach that organisations seek to embed. This study explores how to apply the maturity models to LC. Hence the attitudes, opinions and experiences of key industry informants with high levels of knowledge of LC were investigated. To achieve this, a review of maturity models was conducted, and data for the analysis was collected through a sequential process involving three methods. First a group interview with seven key informants. Second a follow up discussion with the same individuals to investigate some of the issues raised in more depth. Third an online discussion held via LinkedIn in which members shared their views on some of the results. Overall, we found that there is a lack of common understanding as to what maturity means in LC, though there is general agreement that the concept of maturity is a suitable one to reflect the path of evolution for LC within organisations.

  5. Sperm Bundles in the Seminal Vesicle of the Crematogaster victima (Smith) Adult Males (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C M; Moreira, J; Gomes, L F; Camargo-Mathias, M I; Lino-Neto, J

    2014-06-01

    This study establishes the presence of spermatodesm in the seminal vesicles of sexually mature males of Crematogaster victima (Smith). In this species, the spermatozoa are maintained together by an extracellular matrix in which the acrosomal regions are embedded. This characteristic has not yet been observed in any other Aculeata. However, the sperm morphology in this species is similar to that described for other ants. The spermatozoa measure on average 100 μm in length, and the number of sperm per bundle is up to 256. They are composed of a head formed by the acrosome and nucleus; this is followed by the flagellum, which is formed by the centriolar adjunct, an axoneme with a 9 + 9 + 2 microtubule pattern, two mitochondrial derivatives, and two accessory bodies. The acrosome is formed by the acrosomal vesicle and perforatorium. The nucleus is filled with compact chromatin with many areas of thick and non-compacted filaments. Both mitochondrial derivatives have the same shape and diameters. The presence of sperm bundles in sexually mature males differentiates C. victima from other ants; however, the similarities in the sperm ultrastructure support the monophyly of this insect group.

  6. Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2): Regulatory Roles in Germ Cell Development and Sperm Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Cui, Jinwei; De Iuliis, Geoffry N

    2017-01-01

    Among the numerous families of heat shock protein (HSP) that have been implicated in the regulation of reproductive system development and function, those belonging to the 70 kDa HSP family have emerged as being indispensable for male fertility. In particular, the testis-enriched heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2) has been shown to be critical for the progression of germ cell differentiation during spermatogenesis in the mouse model. Beyond this developmentally important window, mounting evidence has also implicated HSPA2 in the functional transformation of the human sperm cell during their ascent of the female reproductive tract. Specifically, HSPA2 appears to coordinate the remodelling of specialised sperm domains overlying the anterior region of the sperm head compatible with their principle role in oocyte recognition. The fact that levels of the HSPA2 protein in mature spermatozoa tightly correlate with the efficacy of oocyte binding highlight its utility as a powerful prognostic biomarker of male fertility. In this chapter, we consider the unique structural and biochemical characteristics of HSPA2 that enable this heat shock protein to fulfil its prominent roles in orchestrating the morphological differentiation of male germ cells during spermatogenesis as well as their functional transformation during post-testicular sperm maturation.

  7. Slab replacement maturity guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the use of maturity method to determine early age strength of concrete in slab : replacement application. Specific objectives were (1) to evaluate effects of various factors on the compressive : maturity-strength relationship ...

  8. Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, Michel, E-mail: michel.lafleur@umontreal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Courtemanche, Lesley [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 579, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Schwartz, Jean-Louis [Department of Physiology, Groupe d' etude des Proteines Membranaires, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Manjunath, Puttaswamy [Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center and Faculty of Medecine, Universite de Montreal, 5415 L' Assomption Blvd, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 (Canada)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. {yields} In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. {yields} The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

  9. Reactive oxygen species and sperm function--in sickness and in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, R John; Jones, Keith T; Robertson, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    The ability of spermatozoa to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been appreciated since the 1940s. It is a universal property of mature spermatozoa from all mammalian species and a major contributor to the oxidative stress responsible for defective sperm function. The mechanisms by which oxidative stress limits the functional competence of mammalian spermatozoa involve the peroxidation of lipids, the induction of oxidative DNA damage, and the formation of protein adducts. ROS production in these cells involves electron leakage from the sperm mitochondria, triggered by a multitude of factors that impede electron flow along the electron transport chain. The net result of mitochondrial ROS generation is to damage these organelles and initiate an intrinsic apoptotic cascade, as a consequence of which spermatozoa lose their motility, DNA integrity, and vitality. This pathway of programmed senescence also results in the exteriorization of phosphatidylserine, which may facilitate the silent phagocytosis of these cells in the aftermath of insemination, in turn influencing the female tract immune response to sperm antigens and future fertility. Despite the vulnerability of sperm to oxidative stress, it is also clear that normal sperm function depends on low levels of ROS generation in order to promote the signal transduction pathways associated with capacitation. Modulators of ROS generation by spermatozoa may therefore have clinical utility in regulating the fertilizing capacity of these cells and preventing the development of antisperm immunity. Achievement of these objectives will require a systematic evaluation of pro- and antioxidant strategies in vivo and in vitro.

  10. Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, Michel; Courtemanche, Lesley; Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. → In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. → The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

  11. Impact of obesity on male fertility, sperm function and molecular composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nicole O.; Bakos, Hassan W.; Fullston, Tod; Lane, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Male obesity in reproductive-age men has nearly tripled in the past 30 y and coincides with an increase in male infertility worldwide. There is now emerging evidence that male obesity impacts negatively on male reproductive potential not only reducing sperm quality, but in particular altering the physical and molecular structure of germ cells in the testes and ultimately mature sperm. Recent data has shown that male obesity also impairs offspring metabolic and reproductive health suggesting that paternal health cues are transmitted to the next generation with the mediator mostly likely occurring via the sperm. Interestingly the molecular profile of germ cells in the testes and sperm from obese males is altered with changes to epigenetic modifiers. The increasing prevalence of male obesity calls for better public health awareness at the time of conception, with a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved during spermatogenesis required along with the potential of interventions in reversing these deleterious effects. This review will focus on how male obesity affects fertility and sperm quality with a focus on proposed mechanisms and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects. PMID:23248766

  12. Artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID): heterogeneity in sperm banking facilities in a single country (Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, A.; Dhont, N.; Vandormael, E.; Cox, A.; Klerkx, E.; Creemers, E.; Ombelet, W.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high inflow of foreign patients seeking cross-border reproductive care in Belgium and the increased number of lesbian couples and single women who call for artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID), Belgian sperm banks nowadays face a shortage in donor sperm. However, since there is no central registration system for sperm donors in Belgium, no figures are currently available supporting this statement. Therefore a study was performed to obtain a detailed overview of the sperm banking facilities in Belgium. Questionnaires were sent to all Belgian centres for assisted reproduction with laboratory facilities (n = 18) to report on their sperm banking methods. The results showed that 82% of the centres rely partially or completely on foreign donor sperm. Moreover, four of the thirteen centres that have their own sperm bank use imported donor sperm in > 95% AID cycles. Our results show that in 63% of the Belgian AID cycles imported Danish donor sperm is being used. Donor recruitment is mainly performed through the centre’s website (61%) or by distributing flyers in the centre (46%) and 9 to 180 potential donors have been recruited per centre in 2013. Eventually, 15 to 50% of these candidate donors were accepted. Different criteria for donor acceptance are handled by the centres: donor age limits range from 18-25 to 36-46 years old, and thresholds for sperm normality differ considerably. We can conclude that a wide variation in methods associated with sperm banking is observed in Belgian centres. PMID:25009728

  13. Intraspecific variation in sperm length is negatively related to sperm competition in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Fossøy, Frode; Robertson, Raleigh J; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2008-02-01

    Spermatozoa are among the most diversified cells in the animal kingdom, but the underlying evolutionary forces affecting intraspecific variation in sperm morphology are poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that sperm competition is a potent selection pressure on sperm variation within species. Here, we examine intraspecific variation in total sperm length of 22 wild passerine bird species (21 genera, 11 families) in relation to the risk of sperm competition, as expressed by the frequency of extrapair paternity and relative testis size. We demonstrate, by using phylogenetic comparative methods, that between-male variation in sperm length within species is closely and negatively linked to the risk of sperm competition. This relationship was even stronger when only considering species in which data on sperm length and extrapair paternity originated from the same populations. Intramale variation in sperm length within species was also negatively, although nonsignificantly, related to sperm competition risk. Our findings suggest that postcopulatory sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force reducing the intraspecific phenotypic variation in sperm-size traits, potentially driving the diversification of sperm morphology across populations and species.

  14. Sperm cryopreservation update: Cryodamage, markers, and factors affecting the sperm freezability in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the most efficient method for long-term preservation of mammalian sperm. However, freeze-thawing procedures may strongly impair the sperm function and survival and thus decrease the reproductive performance. In addition, the sperm resilience to withstand cryopreservation, also known as freezability, presents a high individual variability. The present work summarizes the principles of cryoinjury and the relevance of permeating and nonpermeating cryoprotective agents. Descriptions about sperm cryodamage are mainly focused on boar sperm, but reference to other mammalian species is also made when relevant. Main cryoinjuries not only regard to sperm motility and membrane integrity, but also to the degradation effect exerted by freeze-thawing on other important components for sperm fertilizing ability, such as mRNAs. After delving into the main differences between good and poor freezability boar ejaculates, those protein markers predicting the sperm ability to sustain cryopreservation are also mentioned. Moreover, factors that may influence sperm freezability, such as season, diet, breed, or ejaculate fractions are discussed, together with the effects of different additives, like seminal plasma and antioxidants. After briefly referring to the effects of long-term sperm preservation in frozen state and the reproductive performance of frozen-thawed boar sperm, this work speculates with new research horizons on the preservation of boar sperm, such as vitrification and freeze-drying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Varicocele Negatively Affects Sperm Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Albani, Denise; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of varicocele on oxidative stress, sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, sperm morphology, and semen parameters. A total of 20 patients with varicocele and 20 normozoospermic subjects without varicocele (control group) were recruited from a medical center for reproductive biology. The levels of serum reactive oxygen metabolites and seminal lipid peroxides were assessed for both control and varicocele subjects. Sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation was measured by sperm chromatin dispersion test. Mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically treated sperm cells. In this study, varicocele patients were compared with men without varicoceles. Oxidative stress was observed in the serum and seminal fluid of varicocele patients. These patients showed an increase of 59% (P <.05) in serum reactive oxygen metabolites and a 3-fold increase in the level of sperm lipid peroxides. A parallel and significant increase (a 2-fold increase; P <.05) in the degree of sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation was also observed. Varicocele patients showed a 27% decrease (P <.05) in mitochondrial respiratory activity in comparison to the control group. A 32% increase (P <.05) in sperm midpiece defects and a 41% decrease (P <.05) in sperm concentration and motility were also observed. Men with varicocele have increased markers of oxidative stress and decreased mitochondrial respiratory activity. These results correlated with abnormalities in semen parameters. For morphology, these correlated with midpiece defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  17. TLR signalling affects sperm mitochondrial function and motility via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase-3α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xingxing; Shi, Dongyan; Li, Xiaoqian; Gong, Weijuan; Wu, Fengjiao; Guo, Xuejiang; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Infection in male and female genital tracts can lead to infertility. The underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved structures and respond to pathogens by initiating signals that activate inflammatory gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that TLR activation in sperm reduces sperm motility via signalling through myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3α. Upon TLR activation, phosphorylated forms of PI3K and GSK3α were detected in the mitochondria, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was impaired in sperm. In addition, mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased after TLR agonist stimulation. Furthermore, blocking PI3K or GSK3α activation abrogated these effects and reversed the TLR-induced reduction in sperm motility. These results identify a previously unrecognized TLR signalling pathway that leads to dysfunctional sperm mitochondria, which reduce sperm motility. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which pathogenic infection affects sperm motility and possibly leads to infertility. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Sperm competition selects beyond relative testes size in birds

    OpenAIRE

    Lüpold S; Linz GM; Rivers JW; Westneat DF; Birkhead TR

    2009-01-01

    Sperm morphology varies considerably across taxa and postcopulatory sexual selection is thought to be one of the main forces responsible for this diversity. Several studies have investigated the effects of the variation in sperm design on sperm function but the consequences of variation in sperm design on testis morphology have been overlooked. Testes size or architecture may determine the size of the sperm they produce and selection for longer sperm may require concomitant adaptations in the...

  19. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; García-Álvarez, Olga; Ramón, Manuel; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Santos, M. Rocío; Soler, Ana J.; Garde, José Julián

    2016-01-01

    The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cr...

  20. Single blastocyst transfer after ICSI from ejaculate spermatozoa, percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE)

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Staffan; Waldenström, Urban; Engström, Ann-Britt; Hellberg, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcome of IVF following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) from ejaculate, percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE), with subsequent blastocyst culture and single blastocyst transfer.

  1. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Maroto-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cryoresistance and male fertility is also discussed. For this, the evaluation of patterns of change of sperm head morphometry throughout a process, instead of the study of the morphometric characteristics of the sperm head at different stages, allows a better identification of the males with different sperm cryoconservation ability. These new approaches, together with more studies employing a greater number of individuals, are needed to obtain novel results concerning the role of sperm morphometry on sperm function. Future studies should aim at understanding the causes of sperm design diversity and the mechanisms that generate them, giving increased attention to other sperm structures besides the sperm head. The implementation of scientific and technological advances could benefit the simultaneous examination of sperm phenotype and sperm function, demonstrating that sperm morphometry could be a useful tool for sperm assessment.

  2. Current status and potential of morphometric sperm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; García-Álvarez, Olga; Ramón, Manuel; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Fernández-Santos, M Rocío; Soler, A Josefa; Garde, José Julián

    2016-01-01

    The spermatozoon is the most diverse cell type known and this diversity is considered to reflect differences in sperm function. How the diversity in sperm morphology arose during speciation and what role the different specializations play in sperm function, however, remain incompletely characterized. This work reviews the hypotheses proposed to explain sperm morphological evolution, with a focus on some aspects of sperm morphometric evaluation; the ability of morphometrics to predict sperm cryoresistance and male fertility is also discussed. For this, the evaluation of patterns of change of sperm head morphometry throughout a process, instead of the study of the morphometric characteristics of the sperm head at different stages, allows a better identification of the males with different sperm cryoconservation ability. These new approaches, together with more studies employing a greater number of individuals, are needed to obtain novel results concerning the role of sperm morphometry on sperm function. Future studies should aim at understanding the causes of sperm design diversity and the mechanisms that generate them, giving increased attention to other sperm structures besides the sperm head. The implementation of scientific and technological advances could benefit the simultaneous examination of sperm phenotype and sperm function, demonstrating that sperm morphometry could be a useful tool for sperm assessment.

  3. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  4. Observation of sperm-head vacuoles and sperm morphology under light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Seog; Park, Sol; Ko, Duck Sung; Park, Dong Wook; Seo, Ju Tae; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-09-01

    The presence of sperm-head vacuoles has been suspected to be deleterious to the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). It is difficult to accurately distinguish morphologically abnormal sperm with vacuoles under a light microscope. This study was performed to analyze the result of the observation of sperm-head vacuoles using Papanicolaou staining under a light microscope and whether the male partner's age affects these vacuoles. Sperm morphology with vacuoles was evaluated using Papanicolaou staining and observed under a light microscope (400×) in 980 men. The normal morphology was divided into three categories (group A, 14% of normal morphology). The criteria for the sperm-head vacuoles were those given in the World Health Organization manual. For the analysis of the age factor, the participants were divided into the following groups: 26-30 years, 31-35 years, 36-40 years, 41-45 years, and 46-50 years. The percentage of sperm-head vacuoles increased with normal sperm morphology (group A vs. groups B, C) (p<0.05). In the case of the age factor, a statistically significant difference was not observed across any of the age groups. A majority of the sperm-head vacuoles showed a statistically significant difference among normal morphology groups. Therefore, we should consider the probability of the percentage of sperm-head vacuoles not increasing with age but with abnormal sperm morphology. A further study is required to clarify the effect of the sperm-head vacuoles on ART outcomes.

  5. Methamidophos alters sperm function and DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urióstegui-Acosta, Mayrut; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Piña-Guzmán, Belem [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-UPIBI, D.F. (Mexico); Rafael-Vázquez, Leticia; Solís-Heredia, M.J.; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico); Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet, E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Toxicología, CINVESTAV-IPN, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Methamidophos (MET) is a highly toxic organophosphate (OP) pesticide that is widely used in developing countries. MET has male reproductive effects, including decreased fertility. We evaluated MET effects on sperm quality, fertilization and DNA integrity, exploring the sensitivity of different stages of spermatogenesis. Adult male mice received MET (3.75 or 5 mg/kg-bw/ip/day/4 days) and were euthanized 1, 28 or 45 days post-treatment (dpt) to evaluate MET's effects on epididymal maturation, meiosis or mitosis, respectively. Spermatozoa were obtained from the cauda epididymis–vas deferens and were evaluated for sperm quality, acrosome reaction (AR; Coomassie staining), mitochondrial membrane potential (by JC-1), DNA damage (comet assay), oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) production), in vitro fertilization and protein phosphorylation (immunodetection), and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. At 1-dpt, MET inhibited AChE (43–57%) and increased abnormal cells (6%). While at 28- and 45-dpt, sperm motility and viability were significantly reduced with an increasing MET dose, and abnormal morphology increased at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days. MDA and mitochondrial activity were not affected at any dose or time. DNA damage (OTM and %DNA) was observed at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days in a time-dependent manner, whereas both parameters were altered in cells from mice exposed to 3.75 mg/kg/day/4 days only at 28-dpt. Depending on the time of collection, initial-, spontaneous- and induced-AR were altered at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days, and the fertilization capacity also decreased. Sperm phosphorylation (at serine and tyrosine residues) was observed at all time points. Data suggest that meiosis and mitosis are the more sensitive stages of spermatogenesis for MET reproductive toxicity compared to epididymal maturation. - Highlights: • Methamidophos alters sperm cell function at different stages of spermatogenesis. • Testicular stages of spermatogenesis are more sensitive to

  6. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency is positively correlated with human sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Provenzano, Sara Pinto; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    To correlate sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency with variations in sperm motility and with sperm morphologic anomalies. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically-treated sperm cells. A possible relationship among sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, sperm motility, and morphologic anomalies was investigated. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was positively correlated with sperm motility and negatively correlated with the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. Moreover, midpiece defects impaired mitochondrial functionality. Our data indicate that an increase in sperm motility requires a parallel increase in mitochondrial respiratory capacity, thereby supporting the fundamental role played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in sperm motility of normozoospermic subjects. These results are of physiopathological relevance because they suggest that disturbances of sperm mitochondrial function and of energy production could be responsible for asthenozoospermia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P amphibian sperm in general and anurans reversion from internal to external fertilization. Our findings provide a greater understanding of the reproductive biology of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians, and a biological foundation for the further development of reproduction technologies for their sustainable management.

  8. Mitochondrial PKA mediates sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Rashel; Breitbart, Haim

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of ATP to power sperm motility. Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has been proposed as a major regulatory mechanism for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted analyzer, protein detection by western blotting, membrane potential by tetramethylrhodamine, cellular ATP by luciferase assay and localization of PKA by immuno-electron microscopy. Bicarbonate is essential for the creation of mitochondrial electro-chemical gradient, ATP synthesis and sperm motility. Bicarbonate stimulates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of two 60kDa proteins identified as Tektin and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by respiration inhibition and phosphorylation could be restored by glucose in the presence of bicarbonate. However, this effect of glucose cannot be seen when the mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchanger was inhibited indicating that glycolytic-produced ATP is transported into the mitochondria and allows PKA-dependent protein phosphorylation inside the mitochondria. Bicarbonate activates mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) which catalyzes cAMP production leading to the activation of mitochondrial PKA. Glucose can overcome the lack of ATP in the absence of bicarbonate but it cannot affect the mitochondrial sAC/PKA system, therefore the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the 60kDa proteins does not occur in the absence of bicarbonate. Production of CO2 in Krebs cycle, which is converted to bicarbonate is essential for sAC/PKA activation leading to mitochondrial membrane potential creation and ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Children conceived after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau, C; Juul, A; Main, K M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate current medical knowledge about children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with respect to congenital malformations, chromosome abnormalities and postnatal growth.......The aim of the study was to evaluate current medical knowledge about children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with respect to congenital malformations, chromosome abnormalities and postnatal growth....

  10. Short communication Relationship between sperm plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Matshidiso MB. Masenya

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... Abstract. Sperm quality plays an important role in determining fertility. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between sperm plasma membrane integrity and morphology, and fertility following artificial insemination (AI). A total of 16 ejaculates were collected from three Large White boars using ...

  11. Relationship between sperm plasma membrane integrity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm quality plays an important role in determining fertility. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between sperm plasma membrane integrity and morphology, and fertility following artificial insemination (AI). A total of 16 ejaculates were collected from three Large White boars using the gloved hand ...

  12. Mass-specific metabolic rate and sperm competition determine sperm size in marsupial mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Tourmente

    Full Text Available Two complementary hypotheses have been proposed to explain variation in sperm size. The first proposes that post-copulatory sexual selection favors an increase in sperm size because it enhances sperm swimming speed, which is an important determinant of fertilization success in competitive contexts. The second hypothesis proposes that mass-specific metabolic rate acts as a constraint, because large animals with low mass-specific metabolic rates will not be able to process resources at the rates needed to produce large sperm. This constraint is expected to be particularly pronounced among mammals, given that this group contains some of the largest species on Earth. We tested these hypotheses among marsupials, a group in which mass-specific metabolic rates are roughly 30% lower than those of eutherian mammals of similar size, leading to the expectation that metabolic rate should be a major constraint. Our findings support both hypotheses because levels of sperm competition are associated with increases in sperm size, but low mass-specific metabolic rate constrains sperm size among large species. We also found that the relationship between sperm size and mass-specific metabolic rate is steeper among marsupials and shallower among eutherian mammals. This finding has two implications: marsupials respond to changes in mass-specific metabolic rate by modifying sperm length to a greater extent, suggesting that they are more constrained by metabolic rate. In addition, for any given mass-specific metabolic rate, marsupials produce longer sperm. We suggest that this is the consequence of marsupials diverting resources away from sperm numbers and into sperm size, due to their efficient sperm transport along the female tract and the existence of mechanisms to protect sperm.

  13. Mass-specific metabolic rate and sperm competition determine sperm size in marsupial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2011-01-01

    Two complementary hypotheses have been proposed to explain variation in sperm size. The first proposes that post-copulatory sexual selection favors an increase in sperm size because it enhances sperm swimming speed, which is an important determinant of fertilization success in competitive contexts. The second hypothesis proposes that mass-specific metabolic rate acts as a constraint, because large animals with low mass-specific metabolic rates will not be able to process resources at the rates needed to produce large sperm. This constraint is expected to be particularly pronounced among mammals, given that this group contains some of the largest species on Earth. We tested these hypotheses among marsupials, a group in which mass-specific metabolic rates are roughly 30% lower than those of eutherian mammals of similar size, leading to the expectation that metabolic rate should be a major constraint. Our findings support both hypotheses because levels of sperm competition are associated with increases in sperm size, but low mass-specific metabolic rate constrains sperm size among large species. We also found that the relationship between sperm size and mass-specific metabolic rate is steeper among marsupials and shallower among eutherian mammals. This finding has two implications: marsupials respond to changes in mass-specific metabolic rate by modifying sperm length to a greater extent, suggesting that they are more constrained by metabolic rate. In addition, for any given mass-specific metabolic rate, marsupials produce longer sperm. We suggest that this is the consequence of marsupials diverting resources away from sperm numbers and into sperm size, due to their efficient sperm transport along the female tract and the existence of mechanisms to protect sperm.

  14. Testicular Damage following Testicular Sperm Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, Jens; Marcussen, Niels; Fedder, Maja D.K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible development of histological abnormalities such as fibrosis and microcalcifications after sperm retrieval in a ram model. Fourteen testicles in nine rams were exposed to open biopsy, multiple TESAs, or TESE, and the remaining four testicles were...... left unoperated on as controls. Three months after sperm retrieval, the testicles were removed, fixed, and cut into 1/2 cm thick slices and systematically put onto a glass plate exposing macroscopic abnormalities. Tissue from abnormal areas was cut into 3 μm sections and stained for histological...... evaluation. Pathological abnormalities were observed in testicles exposed to sperm retrieval (≥11 of 14) compared to 0 of 4 control testicles. Testicular damage was found independently of the kind of intervention used. Therefore, cryopreservation of excess sperm should be considered while retrieving sperm....

  15. BMI in relation to sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sermondade, N; Faure, C; Fezeu, L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The global obesity epidemic has paralleled a decrease in semen quality. Yet, the association between obesity and sperm parameters remains controversial. The purpose of this report was to update the evidence on the association between BMI and sperm count through a systematic review...... with meta-analysis. METHODS A systematic review of available literature (with no language restriction) was performed to investigate the impact of BMI on sperm count. Relevant studies published until June 2012 were identified from a Pubmed and EMBASE search. We also included unpublished data (n = 717 men...... studies were included in the meta-analysis, resulting in a sample of 13 077 men from the general population and attending fertility clinics. Data were stratified according to the total sperm count as normozoospermia, oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Standardized weighted mean differences in sperm...

  16. Sperm ultra-structure and spermiogenesis in Syllis krohni (Polychaeta: Syllidae, with some observations on its reproductive biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lepore

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available yllidae show a wide spectrum of both reproductive strategies and sperm types. Analysis of their reproductive patterns could drastically change the presently accepted taxonomic hierarchy of the group. To further contribute to the knowledge of Syllidae we have described the sperm ultra-structure and the spermiogenesis of Syllis krohni (Ehlers, 1864. Mature sperm has a cone-shaped acrosome whose distal end is notched by a trough that transversely encircles its anterior portion. During spermiogenesis, the acrosomal vesicle undergoes modifications leading to its final shape with a posterior opening. The nucleus appears flattened anteriorly and forms a cleft that surrounds the proximal centriole in its distal region. A 9+2 flagellar axoneme is observed. Up to five mitochondria surround the distal centriole. The spermatozoon of S. krohni can be ascribed to the ect-aquasperm type that is typical in species having external fertilisation and appears to be very similar in appearance to that of the congeneric species thus far investigated. The main difference is in the shape of the acrosome, which is more elongated and as long as the nucleus. Reproduction of syllids seems to be conservative within sub-families, and the sperm morphology can probably help in phylogenetic reconstruction. External fertilisation is a widespread strategy within the genus Syllis, probably leading to a substantial similarity in sperm morphology being maintained. It is hypothesised, however, that within the same sperm type linked to a particularly reproductive strategy, the acrosome ultra-structure can be indicative of phylogeny.

  17. Partial deletion of chromosome 8 β-defensin cluster confers sperm dysfunction and infertility in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu S Zhou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available β-defensin peptides are a family of antimicrobial peptides present at mucosal surfaces, with the main site of expression under normal conditions in the male reproductive tract. Although they kill microbes in vitro and interact with immune cells, the precise role of these genes in vivo remains uncertain. We show here that homozygous deletion of a cluster of nine β-defensin genes (DefbΔ9 in the mouse results in male sterility. The sperm derived from the mutants have reduced motility and increased fragility. Epididymal sperm isolated from the cauda should require capacitation to induce the acrosome reaction but sperm from the mutants demonstrate precocious capacitation and increased spontaneous acrosome reaction compared to wild-types but have reduced ability to bind the zona pellucida of oocytes. Ultrastructural examination reveals a defect in microtubule structure of the axoneme with increased disintegration in mutant derived sperm present in the epididymis cauda region, but not in caput region or testes. Consistent with premature acrosome reaction, sperm from mutant animals have significantly increased intracellular calcium content. Thus we demonstrate in vivo that β-defensins are essential for successful sperm maturation, and their disruption leads to alteration in intracellular calcium, inappropriate spontaneous acrosome reaction and profound male infertility.

  18. Sperm aneuploidy in faroese men with lifetime exposure to dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylenchandigarhe(P,p´-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Melissa J; Young, Heather A.; Grandjean, P.

    2016-01-01

    participated in Faroe Islands health studies were analyzed for p,p´-DDE and PCBs 118, 138, 153, and 180 and adjusted for total lipids. Cord blood and age-14 serum were available for a subgroup (n = 40) and were also analyzed for p,p´-DDE and PCBs. Sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes...... not consistently significant. conclusions: Organochlorine exposures measured at age 14 and in adulthood were associated with sperm disomy in this sample of high-exposure men, suggesting that the impacts of persistent pollutants on testicular maturation and function require further investigation. © 2016, Public...

  19. Relationship between Porcine Sperm Motility and Sperm Enzymatic Activity using Paper-based Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Koji; Huang, Han-Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian sperm motility has traditionally been analyzed to determine fertility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) systems. To develop low-cost and robust male fertility diagnostics, we created a paper-based MTT assay and used it to estimate motile sperm concentration. When porcine sperm motility was inhibited using sperm enzyme inhibitors for sperm enzymes related to mitochondrial activity and glycolysis, we simultaneously recorded sperm motility and enzymatic reactivity using a portable motility analysis system (iSperm) and a paper-based MTT assay, respectively. When using our paper-based MTT-assay, we calculated the area mean value signal intensity (AMV) to evaluate enzymatic reactivity. Both sperm motility and AMV decreased following treatment with iodoacetamide (IODO) and 3-bromopyruvic acid (3BP), both of which are inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). We found a correlation between recorded motility using iSperm and AMV from our paper-based assay (P coupled with catalysis of GAPDH and was promoted by electron transfer from NADH. Based on this inhibitor study, sperm motility can be estimated using our paper-based MTT-assay.

  20. The influence of benign prostatic hyperplasia on sperm morphological features and sperm DNA integrity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R B; Angrimani, Dsr; Rui, B R; Brito, M M; Abreu, R A; Vannucchi, C I

    2017-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has a high incidence in older intact dogs. Due to the increased prostatic oxidative stress and hormonal imbalance of BPH, sperm damage can arise, such as sperm morphological alterations and DNA fragmentation. This study aimed to compare the reproductive potential of healthy dogs and those affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia. Ten dogs were assigned to two experimental groups: dogs without BPH (control; n = 5) and dogs diagnosed with BPH (n = 5), based on clinical signs and ultrasonographic findings. Three semen collections were performed from each dog within one month and analysed using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) and functional tests. Control group showed higher percentage of sperm DNA integrity (95 ± 1.8%) compared to the BPH group (79.2 ± 6.4%). On the other hand, the percentage of minor sperm defects, amplitude of lateral sperm head displacement of the spermatozoa and medium sperm mitochondrial activity were higher in the BPH group. In conclusion, BPH decreases sperm DNA integrity, increases mitochondrial activity, as well as modifies sperm movement pattern. Therefore, a careful sperm analysis of aged dogs with BPH is required before a reproductive programme can be established for such patients. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article is aimed at developing a set of recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. Methodology. For the purposes of the current research, the available information sources on the components of project management system are analysed; the essence of “organizational maturity” and the existing models of organizational maturity are studied. The method of systemic and structural analysis, as well as the method of logical generalization, are employed in order to study the existing models of organizational maturity, to describe levels of organizational maturity, and finally to develop a set of methodological recommendations for achieving a higher level of organizational project maturity at a given enterprise. The results of the research showed that the core elements of project management system are methodological, organizational, programtechnical, and motivational components. Project management encompasses a wide range of issues connected with organizational structure, project team, communication management, project participants, etc. However, the fundamental basis for developing project management concept within a given enterprise starts with defining its level of organizational maturity. The present paper describes various models of organizational maturity (staged, continuous, petal-shaped and their common types (H. Кеrzner Organizational Maturity Model, Berkeley PM Maturity Model, Organizational Project Management Maturity Model, Portfolio, Program & Project Management Maturity Model. The analysis of available theoretic works showed that the notion “organizational project maturity” refers to the capability of an enterprise to select projects and manage them with the intention of achieving its strategic goals in the most effective way. Importantly, the level of maturity can be improved by means of formalizing the acquired knowledge, regulating project-related activities

  2. Sertoli cell specific knockdown of RAR-related orphan receptor (ROR) alpha at puberty reduces sperm count in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kamal; Sarkar, Rajesh K; Sen Sharma, Souvik; Jain, Ayushi; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2018-01-30

    Globally, there is an alarming decline in sperm count. Very often hormonal supplementation fails to restore normal sperm count. Sertoli cells (Sc) present within seminiferous tubules provide appropriate niche and factors required for the differentiation of germ cells (Gc) into mature sperm (spermatogenesis). Functionally compromised Sc may be one of the reasons for failure of hormones to facilitate normal spermatogenesis. Although role of secretory proteins and signaling molecules of Sc has been studied well, role of transcription factors regulating sperm count has not been addressed appropriately. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-alpha is one of such transcription factors reported in testis but its role in testicular function is not yet known. In a separate study, we found abundant ROR-alpha binding sites on promoter regions of several genes upregulated in pubertal rat Sc as compared to infant Sc. Immunostaining studies also revealed presence of ROR alpha in nucleus of pubertal Sc. We generated a transgenic knockdown rat model expressing shRNA targeted to ROR-alpha under Sc specific promoter, which is transcriptionally active only at and after puberty. ROR-alpha knockdown animals were found to have abnormal association of Sc and Gc, including Gc sloughing and restricted release of sperm. The knockdown animals displayed compromised spermatogenesis leading to significant reduction in sperm count. This is the first report describing the Sc specific role of ROR-alpha in maintaining quantitatively normal sperm output. Identification of various such molecules can generate avenues to limit or reverse an alarmingly declining sperm count witnessed globally in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of sex-sorting and cryopreservation on the post-thaw sperm quality of Iberian red deer spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anel-López, L; García-Álvarez, O; Parrilla, I; Del Olmo, D; Maroto-Morales, A; Fernandez-Santos, M R; Ortiz, J A; Soler, A J; Martínez, E M; Vazquez, J M; Garde, J J

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of sex-sorting and cryopreservation on post-thaw characteristics and fertility of red deer (Cervus elaphus) sperm for the first time. Semen was collected by electroejaculation from 10 mature stags during the breeding season, and each ejaculate split into four experimental groups: Bulk sorted spermatozoa, sorted but not sexed (BSS); sorted high purity X-spermatozoa (XSS); sorted high purity Y-spermatozoa (YSS); and, control non-sorted spermatozoa (NS). Following, all samples were frozen over liquid nitrogen. Two straws per stag and sample type were analyzed immediately post-thaw and following a 2-h incubation period at 37 °C. Post-thaw total motility (TM) as assessed by CASA was not different (P  0.05) to that of YSS (47%) sperm. The percentage of apoptotic spermatozoa as assessed by PI/YO-PRO-1 and flow cytometry analysis, was higher (17%, P ≤ 0.05) for XSS sperm than NS (12%), BSS (13%) and YSS (14%) sperm. Following incubation there were no differences (P > 0.05) in TM or percent apoptosis among treatments. Post-thaw chromatin stability calculated as the DNA fragmentation index (%DFI) was similar among treatments; following incubation %DFI increased in all except YSS, which displayed the lowest value (P spermatozoa, respectively (P < 0.05). In summary, Y-sorted sperm displayed acceptable post-thaw sperm evaluation parameters and the expected offspring sex ratio. More studies are needed to understand the source of sperm damage that may compromise the fertility of Y-sorted red deer sperm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sperm cryopreservation of the Indian major carp, Labeo calbasu: effects of cryoprotectants, cooling rates and thawing rates on egg fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahiduzzaman, Md; Hassan, Md Mahbubul; Roy, Pankoz Kumar; Hossain, Md Akhtar; Hossain, Mostafa Ali Reza; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2012-12-01

    A sperm cryopreservation protocol for the Indian major carp, Labeo calbasu, was developed for long-term preservation and artificial fertilization. Milt collected from mature male fish were placed in Alsever's solution (296mOsmolkg(-1)) to immobilize the sperm. Cryoprotectant toxicity was evaluated by motility assessment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol at 5, 10 and 15% concentrations. DMSO was more toxic at higher concentrations than methanol, and consequently 15% DMSO was excluded from further study. A one-step cooling protocol (from 5 to 80°C) with two cooling rates (5 and 10°C/min) was carried out in a computer-controlled freezer (FREEZE CONTROL(®) CL-3300; Australia). Based on post-thaw motility, the 10°C/min cooling rate with either 10% DMSO or 10% methanol yielded significantly higher (P=0.011) post-thaw motility than the other rate and cryoprotectant concentrations. Sperm thawed at 40°C for 15s and fresh sperm were used to fertilize freshly collected L. calbasu eggs and significant differences were observed (P=0.001) in percent fertilization between cryopreserved and fresh sperm as well as among different sperm-to-egg ratios (P=0.001). The highest fertilization and hatching rates were observed for thawed sperm at a sperm-to-egg ratio of 4.1×10(5):1. The cryopreservation protocol developed can facilitate hatchery operations and long-term conservation of genetic resources of L. calbasu. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Office-based sperm concentration: A simplified method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Semen samples from 51 sperm donors were used. Following swim-up separation, the sperm concentration of the retrieved motile fraction was counted, as well as progressive motile sperm using a standardised wet preparation. The number of sperm in a 10 μL droplet covered with a 22 × 22 mm coverslip was ...

  6. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian O′Flaherty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility.

  7. Sperm Preservation using Freeze-Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAKDIR SAILI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cryopreservation method for bull semen, cryopreservation become an alternative method for maintaining gamet resources of certain animal which is threatened or near extinction. This technology was then applied to the preservation of embryo, oocyte, ovary and testis. The application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI for which sperm motility is unnecessary had supported the effort to create simplified method such as freeze-drying for sperm preservation. Due to the benefit of ICSI over the conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF the spermatozoon could be mechanically driven to pass through the zona pellucida and entering the cytoplasm of oocytes prior to fertilization. The freeze-drying method is an alternative method in sperm preservation which ignored the motility of sperm. The sperm resulted from this technique is in drying state, therefore, it might be stored in room temperature or in refrigerator. Many reports have claimed that freeze-dried sperm which is not motile but has an intact DNA was able to fertilize oocytes, even produced offspring in mouse.

  8. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  9. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, B M; Juelicher, F [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: ben@pks.mpg.de, E-mail: julicher@pks.mpg.de

    2008-12-15

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  10. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Jülicher, F.

    2008-12-01

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  11. How accurate is sperm morphology as an indicator of sperm function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, D R

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphology has been consistently correlated with fertilisation success or failure. The clinical relevance of the percentage normal spermatozoa has been a widely discussed topic amongst infertility specialists and scientists. This study aimed to evaluate the role of sperm morphology as an indicator of additional sperm functions among 114 andrology referrals. The sperm functions that were investigated included chromatin packaging quality (CMA3 test (n = 109), zona-induced acrosome reaction (ZIAR test; n = 36), hemizona assay (HZI; n = 36) and progressive motility (n = 47). Chromatin packaging quality had a negative and significant (P = 0.0001, r = -0.74) correlation with the percentage normal spermatozoa, while progressive motility had a significant and positive correlation (P = 0.0001, 0.59). Accurate sperm morphology scoring as described by the WHO 2010 manual can therefore be used as an indicator of specific sperm functions. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Tenacity of exogenous human papillomavirus DNA in sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossfield, J E; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-07-01

    Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm. Prewashed sperm were equally divided and sperm in one portion were exposed to L1 HPV DNA fragments for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Untreated washed sperm served as the control. After transfection, the sperm were washed by either centrifuge, two-layer Isolate colloid wash, or test-yolk buffer procedures. Sperm parameters were measured on a Hamilton Thorn HTM-C analyzer. Sperm DNA were extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out targeting the L1 consensus gene of HPV and the designated sentinel gene, 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Amplified products were analyzed in 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR analyses detected the consensus L1 HPV gene in sperm after they were processed through either of the three procedures. Controls were negative for the L1 gene. Extracted DNA were verified by PCR amplification of 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Transfected sperm had higher percentages of total motility and progression compared with the control. Centrifuged, washed, transfected sperm exhibited a greater curvilinear velocity and hyperactivation. The data showed that washing would not remove exogenous HPV DNA from sperm cells. The viral DNA was tenaciously bound to the sperm, suggesting an internalization into the sperm. The viral DNA also increased the motility of the sperm by affecting the velocity and progression of the sperm, which suggested either an increase in metabolism, an enhancement of the calcium-regulated motility mechanism, or an artifact of PCR reagents. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of DNA stimulated sperm motility.

  13. Direct action of endocrine disrupting chemicals on human sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Müller, Astrid; Egeberg, Dorte L

    2014-01-01

    sperm. We show that structurally diverse EDCs activate the sperm-specific CatSper channel and, thereby, evoke an intracellular Ca(2+) increase, a motility response, and acrosomal exocytosis. Moreover, EDCs desensitize sperm for physiological CatSper ligands and cooperate in low-dose mixtures to elevate...... Ca(2+) levels in sperm. We conclude that EDCs interfere with various sperm functions and, thereby, might impair human fertilization....

  14. Sperm immobilization by dental focus microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linossier, A; Thumann, A; Bustos-Obregon, E

    1982-01-01

    Focal infections and their ability to produce alterations in different tissues have been in dispute for long time. The purpose of this work was to observe "in vitro" the effect of an Escherichia coli filtrate obtained from open pulpar necrosis on human sperm motility. It was observed that the E. coli filtrate produced a loss in sperm motility. The immobilizating factor was studied and characterized as a heat-stable, resistant to lyophilization and non-dializable substance, which could via blood stream reach the male reproductive system and affect sperm motility.

  15. Ovarian fluid mediates the temporal decline in sperm viability in a fish with sperm storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Gasparini

    Full Text Available A loss of sperm viability and functionality during sperm transfer and storage within the female reproductive tract can have important fitness implications by disrupting fertilization and impairing offspring development and survival. Consequently, mechanisms that mitigate the temporal decline in sperm function are likely to be important targets of selection. In many species, ovarian fluid is known to regulate and maintain sperm quality. In this paper, we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata, a highly polyandrous freshwater fish exhibiting internal fertilization and sperm storage, to determine whether ovarian fluid (OF influences the decline in sperm viability (the proportion of live sperm in the ejaculate over time and whether any observed effects depend on male sexual ornamentation. To address these questions we used a paired experimental design in which ejaculates from individual males were tested in vitro both in presence and absence of OF. Our results revealed that the temporal decline in sperm viability was significantly reduced in the presence of OF compared to a saline control. This finding raises the intriguing possibility that OF may play a role in mediating the decline in sperm quality due to the deleterious effects of sperm ageing, although other possible explanations for this observation are discussed. Interestingly, we also show that the age-related decline in sperm viability was contingent on male sexual ornamentation; males with relatively high levels of iridescence (indicating higher sexual attractiveness exhibited a more pronounced decline in sperm viability over time than their less ornamented counterparts. This latter finding offers possible insights into the functional basis for the previously observed trade-off between these key components of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection.

  16. Use of testicular sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection in men with high sperm DNA fragmentation: a SWOT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C; Roque, Matheus; Garrido, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    Spermatozoa retrieved from the testis of men with high levels of sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in the neat semen tend to have better DNA quality. Given the negative impact of SDF on the outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART), an increased interest has emerged about the use of testicular sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (Testi-ICSI). In this article, we used a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis to summarize the advantages and drawbacks of this intervention. The rationale of Testi-ICSI is bypass posttesticular DNA fragmentation caused by oxidative stress during sperm transit through the epididymis. Hence, oocyte fertilization by genomically intact testicular spermatozoa may be optimized, thus increasing the chances of creating a normal embryonic genome and the likelihood of achieving a live birth, as recently demonstrated in men with high SDF. However, there is still limited evidence as regards the clinical efficacy of Testi-ICSI, thus creating opportunities for further confirmatory clinical research as well as investigation of Testi-ICSI in clinical scenarios other than high SDF. Furthermore, Testi-ICSI can be compared to other laboratory preparation methods for deselecting sperm with damaged DNA. At present, the available literature supports the use of testicular sperm when performing ICSI in infertile couples whose male partners have posttesticular SDF. Due to inherent risks of sperm retrieval, Testi-ICSI should be offered when less invasive treatments for alleviating DNA damage have failed. A call for continuous monitoring is nonetheless required concerning the health of generated offspring and the potential complications of sperm retrieval. PMID:28440264

  17. Use of testicular sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection in men with high sperm DNA fragmentation: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C; Roque, Matheus; Garrido, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    Spermatozoa retrieved from the testis of men with high levels of sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in the neat semen tend to have better DNA quality. Given the negative impact of SDF on the outcomes of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART), an increased interest has emerged about the use of testicular sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (Testi-ICSI). In this article, we used a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis to summarize the advantages and drawbacks of this intervention. The rationale of Testi-ICSI is bypass posttesticular DNA fragmentation caused by oxidative stress during sperm transit through the epididymis. Hence, oocyte fertilization by genomically intact testicular spermatozoa may be optimized, thus increasing the chances of creating a normal embryonic genome and the likelihood of achieving a live birth, as recently demonstrated in men with high SDF. However, there is still limited evidence as regards the clinical efficacy of Testi-ICSI, thus creating opportunities for further confirmatory clinical research as well as investigation of Testi-ICSI in clinical scenarios other than high SDF. Furthermore, Testi-ICSI can be compared to other laboratory preparation methods for deselecting sperm with damaged DNA. At present, the available literature supports the use of testicular sperm when performing ICSI in infertile couples whose male partners have posttesticular SDF. Due to inherent risks of sperm retrieval, Testi-ICSI should be offered when less invasive treatments for alleviating DNA damage have failed. A call for continuous monitoring is nonetheless required concerning the health of generated offspring and the potential complications of sperm retrieval.

  18. Key factors enhancing sperm fertilizing ability are transferred from the epididymis to the spermatozoa via epididymosomes in the domestic cat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlison, Tricia; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Comizzoli, Pierre

    2017-11-14

    Spermatozoa undergo critical changes in structure and function during the epididymal transit. Our previous studies in the domestic cat demonstrated that incidence of cenexin-a key protein involved in the centrosomal maturation-progressively increases in sperm cells from caput to cauda epididymidis. The objectives of the study were to (1) characterize mechanisms involved in transferring key factors-using the cenexin as a marker-between the epididymis and maturing sperm cells and (2) demonstrate the impact of such mechanisms on the acquisition of functional properties by spermatozoa. Epididymides were dissected from adult cat testes to assess the presence and localization of cenexin in testicular tissues and each epididymal segment (caput, corpus, and cauda) via immunofluorescence, Western blot, and mass spectrometry. Results showed that tissues, luminal fluid, and isolated epididymosomes from each segment contained cenexin. Co-incubation of immature sperm cells for 3 h with luminal fluid or epididymosomes followed by immunostaining revealed that percentages of sperm cells containing cenexin significantly increased in samples co-incubated with epididymosome suspensions. Additionally, epididymosome co-incubation with immature spermatozoa resulted in sustained motility compared to untreated spermatozoa while there was no significant effect on acrosome integrity. Taken together, these results suggest that epididymosomes play a critical role in epididymal sperm maturation and could be ideal vehicles to assist in the enhancement or suppression of male fertility.

  19. Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) and sperm head vacuoles: state of the art in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrix, Anne; Rives, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 10 years after the first publication introducing the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), many questions remained about sperm vacuoles: frequency, size, localization, mode of occurrence, biological significance and impact on male fertility potential. Many studies have tried to characterize sperm vacuoles, to determine the sperm abnormalities possibly associated with vacuoles, to test the diagnostic value of MSOME for male infertility or to question the benefits of intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). METHODS We searched PubMed for articles in the English language published in 2001-2012 regarding human sperm head vacuoles, MSOME and IMSI. RESULTS A bibliographic analysis revealed consensus for the following findings: (i) sperm vacuoles appeared frequently, often multiple and preferentially anterior; (ii) sperm vacuoles and sperm chromatin immaturity have been associated, particularly in the case of large vacuoles; (iii) teratozoospermia was a preferred indication of MSOME and IMSI. CONCLUSION The high-magnification system appears to be a powerful method to improve our understanding of human spermatozoa. However, its clinical use remains unclear in the fields of male infertility diagnosis and assisted reproduction techniques (ARTs).

  20. Importance of sperm morphology during sperm transport and fertilization in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A García-Vázquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After natural or artificial insemination, the spermatozoon starts a journey from the site of deposition to the place of fertilization. However, only a small subset of the spermatozoa deposited achieves their goal: to reach and fertilize the egg. Factors involved in controlling sperm transport and fertilization include the female reproductive tract environment, cell-cell interactions, gene expression, and phenotypic sperm traits. Some of the significant determinants of fertilization are known (i.e., motility or DNA status, but many sperm traits are still indecipherable. One example is the influence of sperm dimensions and shape upon transport within the female genital tract towards the oocyte. Biophysical associations between sperm size and motility may influence the progression of spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract, but uncertainties remain concerning how sperm morphology influences the fertilization process, and whether only the sperm dimensions per se are involved. Moreover, such explanations do not allow the possibility that the female tract is capable of distinguishing fertile spermatozoa on the basis of their morphology, as seems to be the case with biochemical, molecular, and genetic properties. This review focuses on the influence of sperm size and shape in evolution and their putative role in sperm transport and selection within the uterus and the ability to fertilize the oocyte.

  1. Widespread epigenetic abnormalities suggest a broad DNA methylation erasure defect in abnormal human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Houshdaran

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis.We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm.This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line.

  2. Heat shock suppresses mating and sperm transfer in the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H J; Qian, Q; Liu, X D

    2014-06-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor in determining the population size of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in summer. High temperatures inhibit survival, development and fecundity of this insect. However, biological responses of female and male adults to heat shock, and physiological mechanism of high temperature suppressing population development are still ambiguous. We experimentally tested the impact of heat shock (5 h day-1) on biological traits, spermatogenesis and sperm transfer of adults of C. medinalis. The result showed that heat exposure to 39 and 40 °C for 5 h reduced longevity and copulation frequency of adults, and hatchability of eggs. Immediate survival rate of males was lower than that of females after 3 days of exposure to 41 °C. The oviposition period, copulation frequency, fecundity of adults and hatchability of eggs were significantly lower when male adults were exposed to 40 or 41 °C for 3 days. Heat shock decreased frequency and success rate of mating when males were exposed, and it also resulted in postponement of mating behaviour and prolongation of mating duration as both the female and male adults were exposed. Heat shock did not affect spermatogenesis, but significantly inhibited sperms maturation. Moreover, males could not ejaculate sperm into females during copulation when these male moths received heat shock. Heat shock remarkably suppressed mating behaviour and sperm transfer, which led to a dramatic decline of rice leaf folder populations.

  3. Testicular and Related Size Evaluations in Nigerian Sahel Goats with Optimal Cauda Epididymal Sperm Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Y; Igbokwe, I O

    2015-01-01

    Testicular sizes of animals are important for identification of those with adequate sperm production. The aim of this study was to define the testicular and related size estimates that would be associated with optimal cauda epididymal sperm counts (ESC) in Sahel goats based on postmortem evaluations. A stratified quota sample population of 125 male goats inclusive of all testicular sizes was taken at a slaughterhouse in Maiduguri, Nigeria. The bucks were aged 18-30 months and weighed 17.04 ± 2.99 (12-25) kg. Body, testicular, and epididymal weights of each goat with other related size measurements were estimated. ESC was determined from homogenized tissue using a manual cytometer. At the cut-off ESC of >1.1 × 10(9) sperm heads, 66 (52.80%) of the goats had optimal ESC which was associated with testicular weight of 59.90 ± 16.10 (31.40-86.20) g, gonadosomatic index of 3.51 ± 0.69 (2.00-4.50) g/kg, and scrotal circumference of 19.07 ± 1.29 (17.00-21.80) cm. The size variables of the scrotum and testis correlated with one another and with the ESC. These findings provide data that may be used to anticipate adequate antemortem sperm reserve based on testicular size during preliminary selection of sires for breeding from a sexually mature Sahel buck population.

  4. Current approach to male infertility treatment: sperm selection procedure based on hyaluronic acid binding ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zobova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracytoplasmic sperm injection into an oocyte is widely used throughout the world in assisted reproductive technologies programs in the presence of male infertility factor. However, this approach can allow selection of a single sperm, which is carrying different types of pathologies. Minimizing of any potential risks, entailing the occurrence of abnormalities in the embryos development (apoptosis, fragmentation of embryos, alterations in gene expression, aneuploidies is a very important condition for reducing the potential negative consequences resulting the manipulation with gametes. Processes that could be influenced by the embryologist must be fulfilled in safe and physiological way as much as it is possible. Data of numerous publications reporting about the positive effects of using the technology of sperm selection by hyaluronic acid binding, let make a conclusion about the high prospects of this approach in the treatment of male infertility by methods of in vitro fertilization. The selection of sperm with improved characteristics, which determine the maturity and genetic integrity, provides an opportunity to improve the parameters of pre-implantation embryogenesis, having thus a positive effect on clinical outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies programs.

  5. A test of the sexy-sperm and good-sperm hypotheses for the evolution of polyandry

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn B. McNamara; Emile van Lieshout; Leigh W. Simmons

    2014-01-01

    The sexy-sperm hypothesis proposes that polyandrous females will have a selective advantage over monandrous females as their sons will be sired by males with competitively superior sperm and will inherit this trait. Although the good-sperm hypothesis also predicts that offspring will be sired by males with competitively superior sperm, it additionally assumes a positive correlation between offspring sperm quality and the general viability of both sons and daughters. We examined the potential ...

  6. Protective effect of royal jelly on the sperm parameters and testosterone level and lipid peroxidation in adult mice treated with oxymetholone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Zahmatkesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters, testosterone level, and malondialdehyde (MDA production in mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult male NMRI mice weighing 30±2 g were used. All the animals were divided into 4 groups. Control group: received saline 0.1 ml/mouse/day orally for 30 days. Royal Jelly group (RJ: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Oxymetholone group: the received Oxymetholone (OX at dose of 5 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Royal Jelly+Oxymetholone group: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg/day orally concomitant with OX administration. Sperm count, sperm motility, viability, maturity, and DNA integrity were analyzed. Furthermore, serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were determined. Results: In Oxymetholone group, sperm count, motility as well as testosterone concentration reduced significantly (p

  7. Function of the sperm nuclear matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey A; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Ward, W Steven

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa contain some of the most highly compact chromatin. This is due to the DNA binding proteins, the protamines, which replace most of the histones during spermiogenesis. This chromatin, however, shares some features with somatic cell chromatin. One of these is the organization of DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to a proteinaceous nuclear matrix. Several groups have shown that the sites at which DNA associates with the sperm nuclear matrix contain chromatin structures that are linked with specific functions. Recent data also suggest that the sperm nuclear matrix plays essential roles in the paternal pronucleus of the newly fertilized oocyte, suggesting that the sperm cell provides more information to the new embryo than solely the genetic material it delivers. Here, we will review these data which together give insight into the functional significance and requirements of sperm nuclear structure.

  8. Life after Death. Sperm, Property, and Hope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte; Willum Adrian, Stine

    A tragic workplace accident led in 2010 to the death of Mark Edwards. Subsequently, his wife Joycelyn Edwards requested for the New South Wales Superior Court´s permission to extract sperm posthumous from her husband. She got the permission and one year later, the Court decided to grant her access...... Danish legal and bioethical discussions on the use of dead men’s sperm, and similar debates in New South Wales that led to the Edwards court ruling....... to the sperm her husband had deposited. Following a vivid media debate has taken place while the legislation was processed in the Parliament changing the legislation by legalizing the use of sperm from a dead man. Freezing technologies and extraction techniques has with the development of new reproductive...

  9. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  10. Rat sperm motility analysis: methodologic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample c...

  11. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed.

  12. Epididymis seleno-independent glutathione peroxidase 5 maintains sperm DNA integrity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabory, Eléonore; Damon, Christelle; Lenoir, Alain; Kauselmann, Gary; Kern, Hedrun; Zevnik, Branko; Garrel, Catherine; Saez, Fabrice; Cadet, Rémi; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Schoor, Michael; Gottwald, Ulrich; Habenicht, Ursula; Drevet, Joël R.; Vernet, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian epididymis provides sperm with an environment that promotes their maturation and protects them from external stresses. For example, it harbors an array of antioxidants, including non-conventional glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPX5), to protect them from oxidative stress. To explore the role of GPX5 in the epididymis, we generated mice that lack epididymal expression of the enzyme. Histological analyses of Gpx5–/– epididymides and sperm cells revealed no obvious defects. Furthermore, there were no apparent differences in the fertilization rate of sexually mature Gpx5–/– male mice compared with WT male mice. However, a higher incidence of miscarriages and developmental defects were observed when WT female mice were mated with Gpx5-deficient males over 1 year old compared with WT males of the same age. Flow cytometric analysis of spermatozoa recovered from Gpx5-null and WT male mice revealed that sperm DNA compaction was substantially lower in the cauda epididymides of Gpx5-null animals and that they suffered from DNA oxidative attacks. Real-time PCR analysis of enzymatic scavengers expressed in the mouse epididymis indicated that the cauda epididymidis epithelium of Gpx5-null male mice mounted an antioxidant response to cope with an excess of ROS. These observations suggest that GPX5 is a potent antioxidant scavenger in the luminal compartment of the mouse cauda epididymidis that protects spermatozoa from oxidative injuries that could compromise their integrity and, consequently, embryo viability. PMID:19546506

  13. The sperm epigenome: implications for the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, John R; Emery, Benjamin R; Jenkins, Timothy G; Carrell, Douglas T

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances, including the human genome project and numerous studies of cancer and other diseases, have shown that the genetic code is not simply limited to the sequence of the four bases of DNA but also includes epigenetic programming, heritable changes that affect gene expression [Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (2007) Introduction. In: Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (eds) Epigenetics mechanisms of gene regulation. Cold Spring Harbor Press, New York]. The science of epigenetics is important in understanding many diseases and biological processes, including in identifying the causes of disease and better understanding the mechanisms by which the environment can affect gene expression [Carrell Fertil Steril 97 (2):267-274, 2012]. This chapter will focus on the epigenome of sperm and particularly highlight the potential role of the sperm epigenome in embryogenesis.The sperm epigenome is unique and highly specialized because of the unique nature and function of sperm and because of the diverse requirements for successful fertilization. Due to the need for motility, sperm chromatin must be compacted and highly organized. During spermiogenesis the chromatin is packaged tightly into the sperm head by the replacement of most histones with protamines. This allows for protection of the DNA from the hostile environment in the female reproductive tract. Remaining histones can have chemical modifications to the tails of the protein that either facilitate or repress gene transcription. Sperm, like embryonic stem cells, have a unique pattern of histone modifications that includes both activating and silencing marks in the promoters of genes associated with development. These bivalent marks, along with DNA hypomethylation, comprise a unique state in which the key genes are "poised" for possible activation in embryogenesis. Sperm epigenetic abnormalities have been linked with multiple diseases including male factor infertility and poor embryogenesis.

  14. Seasonal changes in reproductive activity, sperm variables and sperm freezability in Blanca Andaluza bucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego-Calvo, L.; Gatica, M.C.; Santiago-Moreno, J.; Guzmán, J.L.; Zarazaga, L.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the preservation of endangered breeds such as the Blanca Andaluza goat, has increased and some steps should be therefore taken to ensure it. The study was designed to determine the seasonal reproductive pattern of Blanca Andaluza bucks, and whether this affects the quality of their semen and its freezability over the year. Seven bucks were used and their body weight, testicular weight, plasma testosterone concentration and fresh sperm quality determined every week. The collected sperm was cryopreserved and stored; it was then thawed and the same sperm quality variables measured every fortnight. High plasma testosterone concentrations were recorded during the summer and autumn, and low concentrations were recorded during winter and spring (p<0.001). No differences were seen between seasons in terms of the percentage of bucks ejaculating, the percentage of active bucks, or ejaculate volume. However, the sperm concentration, the total number of sperm per ejaculate, and the values for most fresh sperm variables were lower during the winter period (at least p<0.05). After freezing-thawing, the quality of winter-collected sperm was better, in some respects, than that of summer-collected sperm (at least p<0.05). These results reveal that Blanca Andaluza bucks show seasonal reproductive activity in terms of their plasma testosterone concentration, but no clear change in their sexual behaviour between seasons was observed. The values of fresh sperm variables also vary over the year, reaching their lowest during winter. However, after freezing-thawing, winter-collected sperm is of overall better quality than sperm collected during the summer. (Author)

  15. Seasonal changes in reproductive activity, sperm variables and sperm freezability in Blanca Andaluza bucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Gallego-Calvo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the preservation of endangered breeds such as the Blanca Andaluza goat, has increased and some steps should be therefore taken to ensure it. The study was designed to determine the seasonal reproductive pattern of Blanca Andaluza bucks, and whether this affects the quality of their semen and its freezability over the year. Seven bucks were used and their body weight, testicular weight, plasma testosterone concentration and fresh sperm quality determined every week. The collected sperm was cryopreserved and stored; it was then thawed and the same sperm quality variables measured every fortnight. High plasma testosterone concentrations were recorded during the summer and autumn, and low concentrations were recorded during winter and spring (p<0.001. No differences were seen between seasons in terms of the percentage of bucks ejaculating, the percentage of active bucks, or ejaculate volume. However, the sperm concentration, the total number of sperm per ejaculate, and the values for most fresh sperm variables were lower during the winter period (at least p<0.05. After freezing-thawing, the quality of winter-collected sperm was better, in some respects, than that of summer-collected sperm (at least p<0.05. These results reveal that Blanca Andaluza bucks show seasonal reproductive activity in terms of their plasma testosterone concentration, but no clear change in their sexual behaviour between seasons was observed. The values of fresh sperm variables also vary over the year, reaching their lowest during winter. However, after freezing-thawing, winter-collected sperm is of overall better quality than sperm collected during the summer.

  16. Oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hagedorn

    Full Text Available Laboratories around the world have produced tens of thousands of mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines. As with mice, maintaining all of these valuable zebrafish genotypes is expensive, risky, and beyond the capacity of even the largest stock centers. Because reducing oxidative stress has become an important aspect of reducing the variability in mouse sperm cryopreservation, we examined whether antioxidants might improve cryopreservation of zebrafish sperm. Four experiments were conducted in this study. First, we used the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO system to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS. The X-XO system was capable of producing a stress reaction in zebrafish sperm reducing its sperm motility in a concentration dependent manner (P0.05, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD and vitamin E did not (P0.05, producing a mean 2.0 to 2.9-fold increase in post-thaw motility. Fourth, we examined the effect of additional cryoprotectants and CAT on fresh sperm motility. Cryoprotectants, 8% methanol and 10% dimethylacetamide (DMA, reduced the motility over the control value (P0.05. Zebrafish sperm protocols should be modified to improve the reliability of the cryopreservation process, perhaps using a different cryoprotectant. Regardless, the simple addition of CAT to present-day procedures will significantly improve this process, assuring increased and less variable fertilization success and allowing resource managers to dependably plan how many straws are needed to safely cryopreserve a genetic line.

  17. Viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm, with sperm orienting in the same direction within each cluster, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. A long-chain polyacrylamide solution was used as a model viscoelastic fluid such that its rheology can be fine-tuned to mimic that of bovine cervical mucus. In viscoelastic fluid, sperm formed dynamic clusters, and the cluster size increased with elasticity of the polyacrylamide solution. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian fluids of similar viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction is facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function. We will discuss what the orientation fluctuation within a cluster reveals about the interaction strength. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  18. Oxidative stress negatively affects human sperm mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Pinto Provenzano, Sara; Montagna, Daniela Domenica; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2013-07-01

    To correlate the level of oxidative stress in serum and seminal fluid and the level of sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation with sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically treated sperm cells. A possible relationship between sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, the level of oxidative stress, and the level of sperm DNA fragmentation was investigated. Sperm motility was positively correlated with mitochondrial respiration but negatively correlated with oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was negatively affected by oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Our data indicate that sperm mitochondrial respiration is decreased in patients with high levels of reactive oxygen species by an uncoupling between electron transport and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. This reduction in mitochondrial functionality might be 1 of the reasons responsible for the decrease in spermatozoa motility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenotypic plasticity in sperm traits in scorpionflies (Mecoptera : Panorpidae): Consequences of larval history and seasonality on sperm length and sperm transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Andreas; Engels, Sierk; Engqvist, Leif; Sauer, Klaus Peter

    2009-01-01

    We examined effects of seasonality, larval food availability and larval rearing density on sperm length, sperm transfer rates and body size in the bivoltine scorpionfly Panorpa vulgaris. Males of the first annual generation were larger and had larger sperm. Comparing individuals of two summer

  20. Oocyte maturation in bitches

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Bicudo, S. D.; Lopes, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The canine species has been used as an experimental model for preservation of endangered species. Biotechnologies of reproduction, such as in vitro maturation (IVM), have been used to meet this objective. Several protocols for in vitro embryo production (IVEP) in swine and bovine species have been adapted for canids. However, the highest rate reported for in vitro maturation in canids is only 39%, which is still lower than those in other species. Therefore, current research on assisted reprod...

  1. Sexual selection and the evolution of sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, John L; Lüpold, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Sperm experience intense and varied selection that dramatically impacts the evolution of sperm quality. Selection acts to ensure that sperm are fertilization-competent and able to overcome the many challenges experienced on their way towards eggs. However, simply being able to fertilize an egg is not enough to ensure male fertility in most species. Owing to the prevalence of female multiple mating throughout the animal kingdom, successful fertilization requires sperm to outcompete rival sperm. In addition, females can actively influence sperm quality, storage or utilization to influence male fertility. This review provides an overview of how these selective forces influence the evolution of sperm quality. After exploring the link between sperm traits and male fertility, we examine how post-mating competition between rival ejaculates influences the evolution of sperm quality. We then describe how complex genetic, social and sexual interactions influence sperm quality, focusing on the importance of seminal fluid and interactions between sperm and the female's reproductive tract. In light of the complexities of selection on sperm traits, greater use of multivariate approaches that incorporate male-male, sperm-sperm and sperm-female interactions to study sperm quality will enhance our understanding of how selection acts on sperm traits and factors influencing male fertility. Because the metric of male reproductive success--fertilization--is the same across the animal kingdom, we argue that information about sperm evolution gained from non-human animals has enormous potential to further our understanding of the factors that impact human fertility. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Variation in sperm morphometry and sperm competition among barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laskemoen, T.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Bonisoli-Alquati, A.; Cepák, J.; De Lope, F.; Hermosell, I. G.; Johannessen, L. E.; Kleven, O.; Marzal, A.; Mousseau, T. A.; Moller, A. P.; Robertson, R. J.; Rudolfsen, G.; Saino, N.; Vortman, Y.; Lifjeld, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 2 (2013), s. 301-309 ISSN 0340-5443 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/2472 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Barn swallow * Extrapair paternity * Hirundo rustica * Sperm competition * Sperm size Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.049, year: 2013

  3. Toward microfluidic sperm refinement: continuous flow label-free analysis and sorting of sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagenaar, B.; Dekker, Stefan; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript reports upon the development of a microfluidic setup to detect and sort sperm cells from polystyrene beads label-free and non-invasively. Detection is performed by impedance analysis. When sperm cells passed the microelectrodes, the recorded impedance (19.6 ± 5.7 Ω) was higher

  4. Sperm depletion as a consequence of increased sperm competition risk in the European bitterling, Rhodeus amarus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, C.; Pateman-Jones, C.; Zieba, G.; Przybylski, M.; Reichard, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2009), s. 1227-1233 ISSN 0003-3472 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : alternative mating tactics * European bitterling * mating system * sexual conflict * sexual selection * sneaking * sperm competition * sperm economy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.890, year: 2009

  5. Sperm-attractant peptide influences the spermatozoa swimming behavior in internal fertilization in Octopus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisa, Emilia; Salzano, Anna Maria; Moccia, Francesco; Scaloni, Andrea; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Marine invertebrates exhibit both chemokinesis and chemotaxis phenomena, induced in most cases by the release of water-borne peptides or pheromones. In mollusks, several peptides released during egg-laying improve both male attraction and mating. Unlike other cephalopods, Octopus vulgaris adopts an indirect internal fertilization strategy. We here report on the identification and characterization of a chemoattractant peptide isolated from mature eggs of octopus females. Using two-chamber and time-lapse microscopy assays, we demonstrate that this bioactive peptide is able to increase sperm motility and induce chemotaxis by changing the octopus spermatozoa swimming behavior in a dose-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that chemotaxis in the octopus requires the presence of extracellular calcium and membrane protein phophorylation at tyrosine. This study is the first report on a sperm-activating factor in a non-free-spawning marine animal.

  6. Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in the Biological Functions Associated with Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi W. Ijiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In sexual reproduction, two gamete cells (i.e., egg and sperm fuse (fertilization to create a newborn with a genetic identity distinct from those of the parents. In the course of these developmental processes, a variety of signal transduction events occur simultaneously in each of the two gametes, as well as in the fertilized egg/zygote/early embryo. In particular, a growing body of knowledge suggests that the tyrosine kinase Src and/or other protein-tyrosine kinases are important elements that facilitate successful implementation of the aforementioned processes in many animal species. In this paper, we summarize recent findings on the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in many sperm-related processes (from spermatogenesis to epididymal maturation, capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis, and fertilization.

  7. One-shot genitalia are not an evolutionary dead end - Regained male polygamy in a sperm limited spider species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalik Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monogynous mating systems with extremely low male mating rates have several independent evolutionary origins and are associated with drastic adaptations involving self-sacrifice, one-shot genitalia, genital damage, and termination of spermatogenesis immediately after maturation. The combination of such extreme traits likely restricts evolutionary potential perhaps up to the point of making low male mating rates irreversible and hence may constitute an evolutionary dead end. Here, we explore the case of a reversion to multiple mating from monogynous ancestry in golden orb-web spiders, Nephila senegalensis. Results Male multiple mating is regained by the loss of genital damage and sexual cannibalism but spermatogenesis is terminated with maturation, restricting males to a single loading of their secondary mating organs and a fixed supply of sperm. However, males re-use their mating organs and by experimentally mating males to many females, we show that the sperm supply is divided between copulations without reloading the pedipalps. Conclusion By portioning their precious sperm supply, males achieve an average mating rate of four females which effectively doubles the maximal mating rate of their ancestors. A heritage of one-shot genitalia does not completely restrict the potential to increase mating rates in Nephila although an upper limit is defined by the available sperm load. Future studies should now investigate how males use this potential in the field and identify selection pressures responsible for a reversal from monogynous to polygynous mating strategies.

  8. The effects of pyridaben pesticide on the DNA integrity of sperms and early in vitro embryonic development in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodrat Ebadi Manas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyridaben, a pyridazinone derivative, is a new acaricide and insecticide for control of mites and some insects such as white flies, aphids and thrips. Objective: This study was designed to elucidate how pyridaben can affect the sperms' morphological parameters, its DNA integrity, and to estimate the effect of various quantities of pyridaben on in vitro fertilization rate. Materials and Methods: In this study, 80 adult male Balb/C strain mice were used. Animals were divided into control and two test groups. Control group received distilled water. The test group was divided into two subgroups, viz, high dose (212 mg/kg/day and low dose (53 mg/kg/day and they received the pyridaben, orally for duration of 45 days. The spermatozoa were obtained from caudae epididymides on day 45 in all groups. Sperm viability, protamin compression (nuclear maturity, DNA double-strand breaks, and in vitro fertilizing (IVF ability were examined. Results: The pyridaben treatment provoked a significant decrease in sperm population and viability in epididymides. The data obtained from this experiment revealed that, the pyridaben brings about negative impact on the sperm maturation and DNA integrity in a time-dependent manner, which consequently caused a significant (p<0.05 reduction in IVF capability. Embryo developing arrest was significantly (p<0.05 higher in treated than the control group. Conclusion: Theses results confirmed that, the pyridaben is able to induce DNA damage and chromatin abnormalities in spermatozoa which were evident by low IVF rate.

  9. Protective Effect of Melatonin on the Quality of Spermatogenesis and Sperm Parameters in the Mice Treated with Acetylsalicylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mohammad Ghasemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Melatonin, the most important secretary hormone of pineal gland, as a powerful antioxidant has a high potent for neutralizing the toxicity of drugs. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the effect of melatonin on testicular damage and sperm parameters deficiency induced by acetylsalicylic acid, in adult male mice. Materials & Methods: Male NMRI mice were divided into 4 groups: 1 control 2 acetylsalicylic acid treated group 3 melatonin treated group 4 Melatonin-acetylsalicylic acid treated group. Acetylsalicylic acid was administered at a dose of 50mg/kg orally through gavage for 14 days. Melatonin was administered in dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 days intraperitoneally. The control mice were received vehicle (normal saline orally through gavage. The animals were sacrificed and their testes and epididymis were dissected on the 15th day after the treatment. Evaluations were made by determining Johnson's score, epididymal sperm count, and sperm morphology and sperm motility. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA test. Results: Acetylsalicylic acid treated mice showed a reduction in Johnson's score and quality of spermatogenesis (P<0.05, sperm count, normal morphology and motility percent (P<0.001, compared to the control. Melatonin in group 4, significantly increased maturation of seminiferous tubules (P<0.05, and quality and quantity of sperm parameters (P<0.05 in comparison with group 2. Conclusion: It seems that intraperitoneal administration of melatonin for 5 days is a potentially beneficial agent to improve the quality of spermatogenesis and sperm parameters in testis damaged by acetylsalicylic acid, probably by decreasing oxidative stresses. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:29-36

  10. Accountings of Selecting Sperm on the (ethical) border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past years, Denmark has become a destination for fertility travellers, in need for donated sperm. Today, treatment is possible no matter of marital status or sexuality. Furthermore, users of sperm donation can choose between anonymous and non-anonymous sperm, with either basic informat......During the past years, Denmark has become a destination for fertility travellers, in need for donated sperm. Today, treatment is possible no matter of marital status or sexuality. Furthermore, users of sperm donation can choose between anonymous and non-anonymous sperm, with either basic...

  11. What use is an infertile sperm? A comparative study of sperm-heteromorphic Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Freckleton, Robert P; Snook, Rhonda R

    2007-01-01

    Sperm size and number are important determinants of male reproductive success. The genus Drosophila exhibits a remarkable diversity of sperm production strategies, including the production of multiple sperm morphs by individual males, a phenomenon called sperm heteromorphism. Sperm......-heteromorphic Drosophila species in the obscura group produce large numbers of infertile "parasperm" in addition to fertile eusperm. Parasperm have been hypothesized to perform a number of roles in place of fertilization, predominantly focused on their potential function in postcopulatory sexual selection. However......, the evolutionary significance of parasperm remains unknown. Here we measured several male and female morphological, behavioral, and life-history traits in 13 obscura group species to test competing hypotheses of parasperm function using comparative methods. We found that parasperm size was unrelated to female...

  12. Posttranslational Modifications in Spermatozoa and Effects on Male Fertility and Sperm Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohi, Rahim Dad; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process. The ability of spermatozoa to perform its function depends on multiple physiological and genetic factors that are not fully understood. Notably, due to lack of transcriptional and translational activity in spermatozoa, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play key roles in determining their viability. PTMs not only confer structural changes in the proteome of the spermatozoa cells, but also increase the diversity of the proteome and introduce specific modifications that could be translated into functional changes in the affected spermatozoa. Multiple PTMs of active proteins have been identified in the developing spermatogonia. This review summarizes a diverse range of PTMs taking place in the developing spermatozoa, and analyzes their effects on male fertility and sperm viability. In particular, we discuss how SUMOylation, ubiquitination, phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation, and disulphide bond formation in proteins play a role in spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, movement of maturing spermatozoa to epididymis, capacitation, hyperactivation, spermatozoa motility, subversion of immune detection by spermatozoa, sperm to egg recognition and fusion, and the fertilization process. When possible, the specific proteins involved in these processes are highlighted. We point to existing knowledge gaps in the field of proteomics, and provide suggestions for future research on sperm viability and male fertility. We discuss briefly, as an example, the observations in water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, which provides both meat and milk, and therefore is a reliable source for energy and protein needs of human populations. In conclusions, understanding the ways in which PTMs impact mammalian fertility and reproduction is important to make significant strides for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in the near future.

  13. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  14. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendeluk Gabriela Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010. A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03, achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms.

  15. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  16. Age-associated sperm DNA methylation alterations: possible implications in offspring disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Timothy G; Aston, Kenneth I; Pflueger, Christian; Cairns, Bradley R; Carrell, Douglas T

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates a role for paternal aging on offspring disease susceptibility. It is well established that various neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, autism, etc.), trinucleotide expansion associated diseases (myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's, etc.) and even some forms of cancer have increased incidence in the offspring of older fathers. Despite strong epidemiological evidence that these alterations are more common in offspring sired by older fathers, in most cases the mechanisms that drive these processes are unclear. However, it is commonly believed that epigenetics, and specifically DNA methylation alterations, likely play a role. In this study we have investigated the impact of aging on DNA methylation in mature human sperm. Using a methylation array approach we evaluated changes to sperm DNA methylation patterns in 17 fertile donors by comparing the sperm methylome of 2 samples collected from each individual 9-19 years apart. With this design we have identified 139 regions that are significantly and consistently hypomethylated with age and 8 regions that are significantly hypermethylated with age. A representative subset of these alterations have been confirmed in an independent cohort. A total of 117 genes are associated with these regions of methylation alterations (promoter or gene body). Intriguingly, a portion of the age-related changes in sperm DNA methylation are located at genes previously associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While our data does not establish a causative relationship, it does raise the possibility that the age-associated methylation of the candidate genes that we observe in sperm might contribute to the increased incidence of neuropsychiatric and other disorders in the offspring of older males. However, further study is required to determine whether, and to what extent, a causative relationship exists.

  17. Age-associated sperm DNA methylation alterations: possible implications in offspring disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G Jenkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence demonstrates a role for paternal aging on offspring disease susceptibility. It is well established that various neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, autism, etc., trinucleotide expansion associated diseases (myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's, etc. and even some forms of cancer have increased incidence in the offspring of older fathers. Despite strong epidemiological evidence that these alterations are more common in offspring sired by older fathers, in most cases the mechanisms that drive these processes are unclear. However, it is commonly believed that epigenetics, and specifically DNA methylation alterations, likely play a role. In this study we have investigated the impact of aging on DNA methylation in mature human sperm. Using a methylation array approach we evaluated changes to sperm DNA methylation patterns in 17 fertile donors by comparing the sperm methylome of 2 samples collected from each individual 9-19 years apart. With this design we have identified 139 regions that are significantly and consistently hypomethylated with age and 8 regions that are significantly hypermethylated with age. A representative subset of these alterations have been confirmed in an independent cohort. A total of 117 genes are associated with these regions of methylation alterations (promoter or gene body. Intriguingly, a portion of the age-related changes in sperm DNA methylation are located at genes previously associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While our data does not establish a causative relationship, it does raise the possibility that the age-associated methylation of the candidate genes that we observe in sperm might contribute to the increased incidence of neuropsychiatric and other disorders in the offspring of older males. However, further study is required to determine whether, and to what extent, a causative relationship exists.

  18. Experimental evolution of sperm competitiveness in a mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons Leigh W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When females mate with multiple partners, sperm from rival males compete to fertilise the ova. Studies of experimental evolution have proven the selective action of sperm competition on male reproductive traits. However, while reproductive traits may evolve in response to sperm competition, this does not necessarily provide evidence that sperm competitive ability responds to selection. Indeed, a study of Drosophila failed to observe divergence in sperm competitive ability of males in lines selected for enhanced sperm offence and defence. Results Adopting the naturally polygamous house mouse (Mus domesticus as our vertebrate model, we performed an experimental evolution study and observed genetic divergence in sperm quality; males from the polygamous selection lines produced ejaculates with increased sperm numbers and greater sperm motility compared to males from the monogamous lines. Here, after 12 generations of experimental evolution, we conducted competitive matings between males from lineages evolving under sperm competition and males from lineages subject to relaxed selection. We reduced variation in paternity arising from embryo mortality by genotyping embryos in utero at 14 days gestation. Our microsatellite data revealed a significant paternity bias toward males that evolved under the selective regime of sperm competition. Conclusion We provide evidence that the sperm competitiveness phenotype can respond to selection, and show that improved sperm quality translates to greater competitive fertilisation success in house mice.

  19. CD9-positive microvesicles mediate the transfer of molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Julieta N; Frenette, Gilles; Belleannée, Clémence; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30-120 nm) containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece) as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn(2+) did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26.

  20. Sedimentation properties in density gradients correspond with levels of sperm DNA fragmentation, chromatin compaction and binding affinity to hyaluronic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Torabi, F; Binduraihem, A; Miller, D

    2017-01-01

    Mature spermatozoa bind hyaluronic acid in the extracellular matrix via hyaladherins. Immature spermatozoa may be unable to interact because they do not express the appropriate hyaladherins on their surface. Fresh human semen samples were fractionated using differential density gradient centrifugation (DDGC) and the ability of these fractions to bind hyaluronic acid was evaluated. The presence of sperm hyaladherins was also assessed. CD44 was located mainly on the acrosome and equatorial segm...

  1. Analysis of sperm quality in recombinant inbred mouse strains: correlation of sperm head shape with sperm abnormalities and with the incidence of supplementary spermatozoa in the perivitelline space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzanowska, H; Styrna, J; Wabik-Sliz, B

    1995-07-01

    Recombinant inbred strains were developed from reciprocal crosses between two inbred strains of mice (CBA and KE) differing in sperm head shape, proportion of normal sperm heads (CBA, 95%; KE, 78%) and fertilization efficiency (CBA, 100% of fertilized ova; KE, 72%), to determine whether the indices of sperm morphology and function were correlated. The following parameters were analysed in recombinant inbred and progenitor strains: index of sperm head shape (head width in the middle of its length/head length), percentage of abnormal sperm heads, percentage of spermatozoa with progressive movements, efficiency of penetration of hyaluronic acid polymer (Sperm Select) and percentage of fertilized ova after mating males from the tested strains with females from an outbred stock. For each investigated character, recombinant inbred strains, recombinant inbred EXCB and CBXE, could be divided into at least three categories: KE-like, CBA-like and intermediate, suggesting that in each case a minimum of two genes was involved. Recombinant strains derived from the reciprocal crosses of progenitor strains differed only with respect to the proportion of abnormal sperm heads, showing the involvement of the Y chromosome in determining this character. Penetration into Sperm Select was significantly correlated both with fertilization efficiency and sperm motility, while correlation with the proportion of normal spermatozoa did not reach the level of significance. However, there was a significant negative correlation of both sperm abnormalities and the incidence of supplementary spermatozoa in the perivitelline space with the index of sperm head shape.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M; Mochtar, M H; de Melker, A A; van der Veen, F; Repping, S; Gerrits, T

    2016-05-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that donor-offspring actually sought contact. Most studies on sperm donors are on anonymous donors and focus on recruitment, financial compensation, anonymity and motivations. There is limited knowledge on the value that identifiable sperm donors place on psychosocial counselling and what their needs are in this respect. We performed a qualitative study from March until June 2014 with 25 identifiable sperm donors, who were or had been a donor at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam any time between 1989 and 2014. We held semi-structured in-depth interviews with identifiable sperm donors with an average age of 44 years. The interviews were fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. Twelve out of 15 donors (former donors ITALIC! n = 8, active donors ITALIC! n = 7) who had received a counselling session during their intake procedure found it important that they had been able to talk about issues such as the emotional consequences of donation, disclosure to their own children, family and friends, future contact with donor-offspring and rules and regulations. Of the 10 former donors who had received no counselling session, 8 had regretted the lack of intensive counselling. In the years following their donation, most donors simply wanted to know how many offspring had been born using their sperm and had no need for further counselling. Nevertheless, they frequently mentioned that they were concerned about the well-being of 'their' offspring. In addition, they would value the availability of psychosocial counselling in the event that donor-offspring actually sought contact. A limitation of our study is its

  3. Sperm Donation and the Right to Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallich, Oliver

    2017-07-01

    Sperm donation is an increasingly common method of assisted reproduction. In the debate on sperm donation, the right to privacy - construed as a right that refers to the limits of the realm of information to which others have access - plays a pivotal role with regard to two questions. The first question is whether the sperm donor's right to privacy implies his right to retain his anonymity, the second is whether the gamete recipients' right to privacy entitles them to withhold information about the circumstances of their conception from their donor-conceived offspring. In this contribution, I tackle these two interrelated questions. In part (1), I defend the view that there is a prima facie right of sperm donors to remain anonymous. Part (2) widens the perspective by taking into consideration the welfare of donor-conceived offspring. I argue that anonymity may harm the child only if the gametes' recipients decide to disclose information about the circumstances of her birth to the child. Non-disclosure of these circumstances, however, is morally problematic because it may not necessarily harm, but wrong the child. In section (3), I attempt to rebut some arguments in defense of non-disclosure. In part (4), I defend the view that the best practice of sperm donation would be 'direct donation', i.e. that the identity of the donor is known from the time of conception. Part (5) concludes.

  4. Gas6 downregulation impaired cytoplasmic maturation and pronuclear formation independent to the MPF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeoung-Hwa Kim

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that the growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6 is more highly expressed in germinal vesicle (GV oocytes than in metaphase II (MII oocytes using annealing control primer (ACP-PCR technology. The current study was undertaken to investigate the role of Gas6 in oocyte maturation and fertilization using RNA interference (RNAi. Interestingly, despite the specific and marked decrease in Gas6 mRNA and protein expression in GVs after Gas6 RNAi, nuclear maturation including spindle structures and chromosome segregation was not affected. The only discernible effect induced by Gas6 RNAi was a change in maturation promoting factor (MPF activity. After parthenogenetic activation, Gas6 RNAi-treated oocytes at the MII stage had not developed further and arrested at MII (90.0%. After stimulation with Sr(2+, Gas6-silenced MII oocytes had markedly reduced Ca(2+ oscillation and exhibited no exocytosis of cortical granules. In these oocytes, sperm penetration occurred during fertilization but not pronucleus (PN formation. By roscovitine and colcemid treatment, we found that the Gas6 knockdown affected cytoplasmic maturation directly, independent to the changed MPF activity. These results strongly suggest that 1 the Gas6 signaling itself is important to the cytoplasmic maturation, but not nuclear maturation, and 2 the decreased Gas6 expression and decreased MPF activity separately or mutually influence sperm head decondensation and PN formation.

  5. Short communication Sperm DNA damage in relation to lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leyland Fraser

    2017-03-08

    LPO) and sperm DNA damage following freezing-thawing of boar semen in different extenders. The comet assay was used to measure the extent of sperm DNA damage in a cryoprotectant-free extender or in cryoprotectant-based ...

  6. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced...... a number of interesting results, it has some potential pitfalls that have rarely been discussed. In the present paper, I review the major findings of ecology and evolution studies employing sperm viability staining and outline the method's principle limitations. The key problem is that the viability assay...... may itself kill sperm, which is likely to confound many common experimental designs in addition to producing artificially low estimates of sperm viability. I further suggest that sperm number should be routinely measured in sperm viability studies, as it may be an important but overlooked source...

  7. Prudent sperm use by leaf-cutter ant queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Baer, Boris; Dreier, Stéphanie Agnès Jeanine

    2009-01-01

    In many species, females store sperm between copulation and egg fertilization, but the consequences of sperm storage and patterns of sperm use for female life history and reproductive success have not been investigated in great detail. In hymenopteran insect societies (ants, bees, wasps......), reproduction is usually monopolized by one or relatively few queens, who mate only during a brief period early in life and store sperm for later use. The queens of some ants are particularly long-lived and have the potential to produce millions of offspring during their life. To do so, queens store many sperm...... cells, and this sperm must remain viable throughout the years of storage. Queens should also be under strong selection to use stored sperm prudently when fertilizing eggs. We used the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica to investigate the dynamics of sperm use during egg fertilization. We show that queens...

  8. Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Lauvas, Anna Jacobsen; Christensen, Preben

    2018-01-01

    inflammation is a potential modulator of endocrine function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials on sperm quality parameters in an experimental mouse model.Methods: Effects on sperm quality after pulmonary inflammation induced by carbonaceous....... Pulmonary inflammation was determined by differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Epididymal sperm concentration and motility were measured by computer-assisted sperm analysis. Epididymal sperm viability and morphological abnormalities were assessed manually using Hoechst 33,342/PI...... flourescent and Spermac staining, respectively. Epididymal sperm were assessed with regard to sperm DNA integrity (damage). Daily sperm production was measured in the testis, and testosterone levels were measured in blood plasma by ELISA.Results: Neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar fluid showed...

  9. Gulf of Mexico sperm whale photo-ID catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photo-identification data on sperm whales occupying the north central Gulf of Mexico have been collected during vessel surveys. Photographs of sperm whales are taken...

  10. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and chromosomally abnormal spermatozoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. in 't Veld; F.J.M. Broekmans (Frank); H.F. de France; P.L. Pearson; M.H. Pieters; R.J. van Kooij

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAn infertile couple was referred for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) because of primary infertility and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) in the male. It was observed that although the sperm cells presented with an unusual head size and multiple

  11. Long Maturity Forward Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    The paper aims to improve the knowledge of the empirical properties of the long maturity region of the forward rate curve. Firstly, the theoretical negative correlation between the slope at the long end of the forward rate curve and the term structure variance is recovered empirically and found...... to be statistically significant. Secondly, the expectations hypothesis is analyzed for the long maturity region of the forward rate curve using "forward rate" regressions. The expectations hypothesis is numerically close to being accepted but is statistically rejected. The findings provide mixed support...

  12. Does breastfeeding influence future sperm quality and reproductive hormones?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, J M; Jensen, M S; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2011-01-01

    was not statistically significantly associated with sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility or morphology, oligozoospermia, follicle-stimulating hormone, inhibin B, luteinizing hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), the calculated level of free testosterone, free oestradiol, the free testosterone...... testosterone nor free oestradiol was different between the two groups. This study shows no association between breastfeeding and sperm quality or reproductive hormones and a strong association is unlikely. A larger study would be needed to detect more subtle effects....

  13. Study of sperm proteins in different mammalian species

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlová, Alžběta

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction is an essential feature of all animals and a fundamental step to produce new generations. Study of sperm proteins is crucial for understanding of the sperm-egg recognition. We searched out sperm surface proteins involving in the zona pellucida (ZP) binding and studied whether these proteins are preserved throughout mammalian species. Indirect immunofluorescent technique was used to test a panel of monoclonal antibodies prepared against boar sperm surface proteins on spermatozoa o...

  14. Sperm retrieval outcomes with microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) in men with cryptozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrabeeah, K; Wachter, A; Phillips, S; Cohen, B; Al-Hathal, N; Zini, A

    2015-05-01

    Several studies support of the use of testicular rather than ejaculated spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in couples with virtual azoospermia or cryptozoospermia, although this approach remains controversial. We sought to evaluate sperm retrieval outcomes with microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) in men with cryptozoospermia. We conducted a retrospective study of 24 consecutive micro-TESEs in men with cryptozoospermia. We also evaluated the outcomes of seven consecutive TESAs (testicular sperm aspiration) in cryptozoospermic men during the same time period (January 2007 and September 2014). Micro-TESE and TESA were performed on the day prior to ICSI. Final assessment of sperm recovery (reported on the day of ICSI) was recorded as (i) successful (available spermatozoa for ICSI) or (ii) unsuccessful (no spermatozoa for ICSI). The decision to perform a unilateral or bilateral micro-TESE was guided by the intra-operative evaluation of sperm recovery from the first testicle. A unilateral procedure was performed in 87.5% (21/24) and 57% (4/7) of the micro-TESE and TESA cohorts, respectively. Sperm recovery was successful in 96% (23/24) of the men who underwent micro-TESE and 43% (3/7) of the men who underwent TESA (p TESE and TESA groups were comparable [33% (6/18) and 50% (1/2), respectively]. The data indicate that micro-TESE is a highly successful sperm retrieval technique for men with cryptozoospermia and few of these men will require a bilateral procedure. Moreover, sperm retrieval rates are higher with micro-TESE than TESA in this group of men. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822922

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced

  16. Evolutionary genetics and ecology of sperm-dependent parthenogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, L.W.; Vrijenhoek, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Sperm-dependent (or pseudogamous) forms of parthenogenetic reproduction occur in a wide variety of animals. Inheritance is typically clonal and matroclinous (of female descent), but sperm are needed to initiate normal development. As opposed to true parthenogenesis (i.e., sperm-independent

  17. Effect of 4-nonylphenol on the sperm dynamic parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4-Nonylphenol (NP) is a compound that causes endocrine disruption and affects sperm quality of mammals and fish. However, the effects of NP on the sperm and fertilization rate of amphibians remain unknown. This study investigates the in vivo and in vitro effects of NP on the sperm dynamic parameters and fertilization ...

  18. Sperm storage and duration of fertility in female ostriches ( Struthio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , the duration of sperm storage and the fertile period following separation of sexes were investigated by egg break-out and by counting the sperm in the perivitelline membrane (spermOPVL) above the germinal disc (GD) region. Fertilisation ...

  19. LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY. AE Lavers*1, GR Klinefelter2, DW Hamilton1, KP Roberts1, 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and 2US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. SP22 is a sperm membrane protein that has been implicated in sperm function d...

  20. Sperm DNA fragmentation, recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is increasing that the integrity of sperm DNA may also be related to implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage (RM. To investigate this, the sperm DNA fragmentation in partners of 35 women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF following in vitro fertilization, 16 women diagnosed with RM and seven recent fathers (control were examined. Sperm were examined pre- and post-density centrifugation by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD test and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. There were no significant differences in the age of either partner or sperm concentration, motility or morphology between three groups. Moreover, there were no obvious differences in sperm DNA fragmentation measured by either test. However, whilst on average sperm DNA fragmentation in all groups was statistically lower in prepared sperm when measured by the SCD test, this was not seen with the results from the TUNEL assay. These results do not support the hypothesis that sperm DNA fragmentation is an important cause of RIF or RM, or that sperm DNA integrity testing has value in such patients. It also highlights significant differences between test methodologies and sperm preparation methods in interpreting the data from sperm DNA fragmentation tests.

  1. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy ( Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites.

  2. Thinking though eggs, sperm and embryos- diffractive readings at the fertility clinic and sperm bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    questions may an analytical starting point in eggs, sperm and embryos, enable me to ask, and what diffractive stories of creation can I tell? These questions not only intrigue me, because I am deeply fascinated about new creation stories that may be told when assisted reproductive technologies are at use...... stories are told about egg, sperm and embryos (Adrian 2006), my current work has moved to look at negotiations of ethical borders and boundaries in relation to globalization of Danish donor sperm. This move in research questions is not only empirically based. It is also a shift indebted to my...

  3. Purification and characterization of a sperm motility inhibiting factor from caprine epididymal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Das

    Full Text Available Several studies have been reported on the occurrence of sperm motility inhibiting factors in the male reproductive fluids of different mammalian species, but these proteins have not been adequately purified and characterized. A novel sperm motility inhibiting factor (MIF-II has been purified from caprine epididymal plasma (EP by Hydroxylapatite gel adsorption chromatography, DEAE-Cellulose ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The MIF-II has been purified to apparent homogeneity and the molecular weight estimated by Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration is 160 kDa. MIF-II is a dimeric protein, made up of two subunits each having a molecular mass of 80 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric point of MIF-II is 5.1 as determined by chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing. It is a heat labile protein and maximal active at the pH 6.9 to 7.5. The sperm motility inhibiting protein factor at 2 microg/ml (12.5 nM level showed maximal motility-inhibiting activity. The observation that the epididymal plasma factor lowered the intracellular cAMP level of spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent manner suggests that it may block the motility of caprine cauda spermatozoa by interfering the cAMP dependent motility function. The results revealed that the purified protein factor has the potential of sperm motility inhibition and may serve as a vaginal contraceptive. The antibody raised against the MIF-II has the potential for enhancement of forward motility of cauda-spermatozoa. This antibody may thus be useful for solving some of the problems of male infertility due to low sperm motility.

  4. ERK1/2 mediates sperm acrosome reaction through elevation of intracellular calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaldety, Yael; Breitbart, Haim

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilization capacity after residing in the female reproductive tract for a few hours in a process called capacitation. Only capacitated sperm can bind the zona pellucida (ZP) of the egg and undergo the acrosome reaction, a process that allows penetration and fertilization. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mediates signalling in many cell types, however its role in sperm function is largely unknown. Here we show that ERK1/2 is highly phosphorylated/activated after a short incubation of mouse sperm under capacitation conditions and that this phosphorylation is reduced after longer incubation. Further phosphorylation was observed upon addition of crude extract of egg ZP or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The mitogen-activated ERK-kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 abolished ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in vitro fertilization rate and the acrosome reaction induced by ZP or EGF but not by the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 along the capacitation process diminished almost completely the sperm's ability to go through the acrosome reaction, while inhibition at the end of capacitation attenuated the acrosome reaction rate by only 45%. The fact that the acrosome reaction, induced by the Ca2+ -ionophore A23187, was not inhibited by U0126 suggests that ERK1/2 mediates the acrosome reaction by activating Ca2+ transport into the cell. Direct determination of intracellular [Ca2+] revealed that Ca2+ influx induced by EGF or ZP was completely blocked by U0126. Thus, it has been established that the increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation/activation in response to ZP or by activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by EGF, is a key event for intracellular Ca2+ elevation and the subsequent occurrence of the acrosome reaction.

  5. The effects of different levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase in modified Beltsville extender on rooster post-thawed sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mahmood Reza; Kohram, Hamid; Zare-Shahaneh, Ahmad; Zhandi, Mahdi; Sharideh, Hossein; Nabi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative damage of sperm by means of reactive oxygen species generated by the cellular components of semen is one of the main reasons for decreased sperm motility and fertility during the freeze-thawing process. This study was conducted to determine the influence of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) on rooster sperm motility, viability and MDA level after freezing and thawing. Semen samples from 10 sexually-mature Ross 308 breeder roosters were collected and pooled, divided into nine equal parts and diluted with modified Beltsville extender containing no antioxidants (control), or supplemented with 50, 100, 200 and 300 μg/mL CAT, or 50, 100, 200 and 300 U/mL SOD. After thawing, sperm motility and motion parameters were assessed using a CASA system. Sperm viability and MDA level were assessed by eosin-nigrosin and MDA test, respectively. The results of this experiment showed that the extender supplemented with 100 and 200 μg CAT, and 50 U SOD had the highest sperm motility (Peffect on quality of post-thawed rooster semen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  7. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Gertsman, I.; May, E.R.; Brooks, C.L.; Johnson, J.E.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material

  8. Maturing interorganisational information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313946809

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of nine chapters, divided over five parts. PART I is an introduction and the last part contains the conclusions. The remaining, intermediate parts are: PART II: Developing a maturity model for chain digitisation. This part contains two related studies concerning the development

  9. Grammar Maturity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaytsev, V.; Pierantonio, A.; Schätz, B.; Tamzalit, D.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a software language (whether modelled by a grammar or a schema or a metamodel) is not limited to development of new versions and dialects. An important dimension of a software language evolution is maturing in the sense of improving the quality of its definition. In this paper, we

  10. Fate of the sperm mitochondria, and the incorporation, conversion, and disassembly of the sperm tail structures during bovine fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutovsky, P; Navara, C S; Schatten, G

    1996-12-01

    Sperm incorporation and the conversion of the sperm-derived components into zygotic structures during in vitro fertilization of bovine oocytes was explored by combining ultrastructural studies with observations of the fertilizing sperm tagged with a mitochondrion-specific vital dye MitoTracker green FM. The zygotes fertilized by the MitoTracker-labeled sperm were fixed at various times after fertilization and then processed for immunocytochemistry to examine the distribution of DNA, microtubules, and sperm tail components, including the fibrous sheath and axonemal microtubules. We show here that the complete incorporation of the sperm, but not sperm-oocyte binding and oocyte activation, depends upon the integrity of oocyte microfilaments and is inhibited by the microfilament disrupter cytochalasin B. After sperm incorporation, the mitochondria are displaced from the sperm's connecting piece, and the sperm centriole is exposed to the egg cytoplasm. This event is followed by the formation of the microtubule-based sperm aster, which is responsible for the union of male and female pronuclei. Concomitantly, the major structure of the sperm principal piece, the fibrous sheath, disappears. After the first mitosis, the compact mitochondrial sheath can be seen in one of the blastomeres. An aggregate of the sperm mitochondria is observed at the entry of the second mitosis, although they remain in the vicinity of the nucleus and can later be seen at one pole of the metaphase spindle. The mitochondrial cluster is occasionally found in one of the blastomeres in the early-stage four-cell embryos, but it is no longer detected by the beginning of the third mitotic cycle. These data suggest that the disassembly of the sperm tail during bovine fertilization occurs as a series of precisely orchestrated events involving the destruction (fibrous sheath and mitochondrial sheath) and transformation (DNA, sperm centriole) of particular sperm structures into zygotic and embryonic

  11. Effect of transfection and co-incubation of bovine sperm with exogenous DNA on sperm quality and functional parameters for its use in sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María Elena; Sánchez-Villalba, Esther; Delgado, Andrea; Felmer, Ricardo

    2017-02-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is based on the capacity of sperm to bind exogenous DNA and transfer it into the oocyte during fertilization. In bovines, the progress of this technology has been slow due to the poor reproducibility and efficiency of the production of transgenic embryos. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different sperm transfection systems on the quality and functional parameters of sperm. Additionally, the ability of sperm to bind and incorporate exogenous DNA was assessed. These analyses were carried out by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and motility parameters were also evaluated by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Transfection was carried out using complexes of plasmid DNA with Lipofectamine, SuperFect and TurboFect for 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 h. The results showed that all of the transfection treatments promoted sperm binding and incorporation of exogenous DNA, similar to sperm incorporation of DNA alone, without affecting the viability. Nevertheless, the treatments and incubation times significantly affected the motility parameters, although no effect on the integrity of DNA or the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed. Additionally, we observed that transfection using SuperFect and TurboFect negatively affected the acrosome integrity, and TurboFect affected the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm. In conclusion, we demonstrated binding and incorporation of exogenous DNA by sperm after transfection and confirmed the capacity of sperm to spontaneously incorporate exogenous DNA. These findings will allow the establishment of the most appropriate method [intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF)] of generating transgenic embryos via SMGT based on the fertilization capacity of transfected sperm.

  12. The maintenance of sperm variability: context-dependent selection on sperm morphology in a broadcast spawning invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Darren W; Monro, Keyne; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-05-01

    Why are sperm so variable despite having a singular, critical function and an intimate relationship with fitness? A key to understanding the evolution of sperm morphology is identifying which traits enable sperm to be successful fertilizers. Several sperm traits (e.g., tail length, overall size) are implicated in sperm performance, but the benefits of these traits are likely to be highly context dependent. Here, we examined phenotypic selection on sperm morphology of a broadcast spawning tube worm (Galeolaria gemineoa). We conducted laboratory experiments to measure the relationship between average sperm morphology and relative fertilization success across a range of sperm environments that were designed to approximate the range of sperm concentrations and ages encountered by eggs in nature. We found that the strength and form of multivariate selection varied substantially across our environmental gradients. Sperm with long tails and small heads were favored in high-concentration environments, whereas sperm with long heads were favored at low concentrations and old ages. We suggest variation in the local fertilization environment and resulting differences in selection can preserve variability in sperm morphology both within and among males. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution © 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Exogenous neurotensin modulates sperm function in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Kohei; Hiradate, Yuuki; Oikawa, Toshinori; Ishiguro, Hirotoshi; Numabe, Takashi; Hara, Kenshiro; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2016-08-25

    Recently, the conception rates after artificial insemination have been pointed out to decline continuously. To overcome this problem, the control of frozen and thawed sperm quality is required. However, the mechanism of bovine sperm functional regulation is still largely unknown. In mammals, the ejaculated sperm are capable of showing fertilizing ability during migration in the female reproductive organs. It is well known that these female organs secrete several factors contributing to sperm capacitation. We previously reported that neurotensin (NT) secreted from the oviduct and cumulus cells enhanced sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in mice. In this study, we confirmed the expression of the NT receptor (NTR1) in the bovine sperm neck region and the secretion of NT in the bovine uterus and oviduct. The similar expression patterns of NT and NTR1 suggests a conserved mechanism of sperm functional regulation between mouse and cattle. Thus, we examined the effects of exogenous NT on the bovine sperm functions. First, we showed that NT induced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT enhances sperm capacitation. Second, we showed that NT induced acrosome reactions of capacitated sperm in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that NT facilitates acrosome reaction. Finally, we used a computer-aided sperm analysis system to show that NT did not have a great effect on sperm motility. These results suggest that NT acts as a facilitator of sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in the female reproductive tracts in cattle, highlighting the importance of NT-mediated signaling to regulate sperm functions.

  14. Improving sperm banking efficiency in endangered species through the use of a sperm selection method in brown bear (Ursus arctos) thawed sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anel-Lopez, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Álvarez, M; Borragán, S; Chamorro, C; Peña, F J; Morrell, J; Anel, L; de Paz, P

    2017-06-26

    Sperm selection methods such as Single Layer Centrifugation (SLC) have been demonstrated to be a useful tool to improve the quality of sperm samples and therefore to increase the efficiency of other artificial reproductive techniques in several species. This procedure could help to improve the quality of genetic resource banks, which is essential for endangered species. In contrast, these sperm selection methods are optimized and focused on farm animals, where the recovery task is not as important as in endangered species because of their higher sperm availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate two centrifugation methods (300 x g/20 min and 600 x g/10 min) and three concentrations of SLC media (Androcoll-Bear -80, 65 and 50%) to optimise the procedure in order to recover as many sperm with the highest quality as possible. Sperm morphology could be important in the hydrodynamic relationship between the cell and centrifugation medium and thus the effect of sperm head morphometry on sperm yield and its hydrodynamic relationship were studied. The samples selected with Androcoll-Bear 65% showed a very good yield (53.1 ± 2.9) although the yield from Androcoll-Bear 80% was lower (19.3 ± 3.3). The latter showed higher values of motility than the control immediately after post-thawing selection. However, both concentrations of colloid (65 and 80%) showed higher values of viable sperm and viable sperm with intact acrosome than the control. After an incubation of 2 h at 37 °C, the samples from Androcoll-Bear 80% had higher kinematics and proportion of viable sperm with intact acrosome. In the morphometric analysis, the sperm selected by the Androcoll-Bear 80% showed a head with a bigger area which was more elongated than the sperm from other treatments. We conclude that sperm selection with Androcoll-Bear at either 65% or 80% is a suitable technique that allows a sperm population with better quality than the initial sample to be obtained. We recommend the

  15. Missense Mutations in SLC26A8, Encoding a Sperm-Specific Activator of CFTR, Are Associated with Human Asthenozoospermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirami, Thassadite; Rode, Baptiste; Jollivet, Mathilde; Da Silva, Nathalie; Escalier, Denise; Gaitch, Natacha; Norez, Caroline; Tuffery, Pierre; Wolf, Jean-Philippe; Becq, Frédéric; Ray, Pierre F.; Dulioust, Emmanuel; Gacon, Gérard; Bienvenu, Thierry; Touré, Aminata

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in mature sperm and is required for sperm motility and capacitation. Both these processes are controlled by ions fluxes and are essential for fertilization. We have shown that SLC26A8, a sperm-specific member of the SLC26 family of anion exchangers, associates with the CFTR channel and strongly stimulates its activity. This suggests that the two proteins cooperate to regulate the anion fluxes required for correct sperm motility and capacitation. Here, we report on three heterozygous SLC26A8 missense mutations identified in a cohort of 146 men presenting with asthenozoospermia: c.260G>A (p.Arg87Gln), c.2434G>A (p.Glu812Lys), and c.2860C>T (p.Arg954Cys). These mutations were not present in 121 controls matched for ethnicity, and statistical analysis on a control population of 8,600 individuals (from dbSNP and 1000 Genomes) showed them to be associated with asthenozoospermia with a power > 95%. By cotransfecting Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells with SLC26A8 variants and CFTR, we showed that the physical interaction between the two proteins was partly conserved but that the capacity to activate CFTR-dependent anion transport was completely abolished for all mutants. Biochemical studies revealed the presence of much smaller amounts of protein for all variants, but these amounts were restored to wild-type levels upon treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Immunocytochemistry also showed the amounts of SLC26A8 in sperm to be abnormally small in individuals carrying the mutations. These mutations might therefore impair formation of the SLC26A8-CFTR complex, principally by affecting SLC26A8 stability, consistent with an impairment of CFTR-dependent sperm-activation events in affected individuals. PMID:23582645

  16. Study of Sperm Parameters and Sperm Fertility in Mice were Exposed to Tamoxifen during Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Soleimanirad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tamoxifen is steroidal drug, which mainly treats breast cancer and also used to stimulate ovulation. The purpose of the present study was the evaluation of sperm parameters and fertility of mice whose mothers had received tamoxifen during pregnancy. Methods: In this study, 30 female and 15 male mice of NMRI were selected for mating. After mating female mice were randomly divided into two groups, the first group (control and second group (experimental. All of which contained 15 mice. From the day 13th day of pregnancy, experimental group has received tamoxifen with the dosage of 5 mg/kg for 7 days. After childbirth of the mated mice, male infants were selected. After reaching the age of puberty (6-8Weeks, adult mice were sacrificed by the cervical dislocation. After take sperm, sperm parameters (count, normality and motility, and sperm fertility was performed. In this study SPSS software and statistical t-test was used (p <0.001. Results: Studies showed that sperm parameters and sperm fertilization were significantly different. The number of sperm in the control group was 83.50±28.20 million, and in the experimental group was 60±14.14 million. There was a decrease in average sperm count in the experimental group compared with the control group (p <0.001. Our findings from in vitro fertilization culture media showed that embryos formation and oocyte disruption between control and experimental groups significantly different (p <0.001. Conclusion: The results showed that tamoxifen exposure during development can cause histological changes in the seminiferous tubules, which can lead to infertility.

  17. Advances in Collection, Transport and Maturation of Equine Oocytes for Assisted Reproductive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Elaine M

    2016-12-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques that are based on oocyte manipulations have gained acceptance in the equine industry. Methods to collect and handle immature or maturing oocytes have been developed, and systems to ship oocytes now allow for collection in one location and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in another. Subsequently, ICSI-produced embryos can be transferred onsite, shipped to another location, or cryopreserved. Methods for the collection, identification, culture, maturation, and shipment of equine oocytes are reviewed, with an emphasis on procedures from laboratories providing clinical services with documented success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Galactosylceramidase deficiency causes sperm abnormalities in the mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luddi, A.; Strazza, M.; Carbone, M.; Moretti, E.; Costantino-Ceccarini, E.

    2005-01-01

    The classical recessive mouse mutant, 'the twitcher,' is one of the several animal models of the human globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease) caused by a deficiency in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). The failure to hydrolyze galactosylceramide (gal-cer) and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) leads to degeneration of oligodendrocytes and severe demyelination. Substrate for GALC is also the galactosyl-alkyl-acyl-glycerol (GalAAG), precursor of the seminolipid, the most abundant glycolipid in spermatozoa of mammals. In this paper, we report the pathobiology of the testis and sperm in the twitcher mouse and demonstrate the importance of GALC for normal sperm maturation and function. The GALC deficit results in accumulation of GalAAG in the testis of the twitcher mouse. Morphological studies revealed that affected spermatozoa have abnormally swollen acrosomes and angulation of the flagellum mainly at midpiece-principal piece junction. Multiple folding of the principal piece was also observed. Electron microscopy analysis showed that in the twitcher sperm, acrosomal membrane is redundant, detached from the nucleus and folded over. Disorganization and abnormal arrangements of the axoneme components were also detected. These results provide in vivo evidence that GALC plays a critical role in spermiogenesis

  19. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. van den Berg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI Stations is limited.

  20. Single bovine sperm sex typing by amelogenin nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, A; Buhr, M; Golovan, S P

    2008-10-01

    Sex-sorted bovine semen has become a valuable tool in animal production for sex preselection. Development of novel sperm sexing technologies, or evaluation of the quality of existing methods, often requires a single-sperm, sex-typing method that is reliable and easy to perform. In the present study, we report the development, validation, and application of a simple, reliable, and cost-effective method for single-sperm sex typing using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), based on the amelogenin gene. Several hundred single sperm were isolated using a simple manual technique, or a high-speed flow-sorter, and were successfully sex-typed using the amelogenin nested PCR. Based on the pooled results of individual sperm, there was no significant difference in the semen sex ratio of unsorted (44.6% X-sperm and 55.4% Y-sperm) or X/Y-sorted semen (91.4% X-sperm and 94.0% Y-sperm), as compared to the expected ratio in unsorted semen or the post-sorting reanalysis data, respectively. The amelogenin single-sperm sexing method was an adaptable, accurate, and reliable tool for single-sperm sex typing.

  1. Increased competitiveness of nematode sperm bearing the male X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMunyon, C W; Ward, S

    1997-01-07

    Male offspring, which cannot reproduce independently, represent a cost of sexual reproduction. This cost is eliminated by the production of hermaphroditic offspring in the self-fertilizing nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae. However, these hermaphrodites can outcross by mating with males. Half the sperm received from males contain no sex chromosome and therefore give rise to male progeny. Mating with males should thus impose the cost of making male offspring. We found that male sperm took immediate precedence over hermaphrodite sperm, resulting in maximized outcrossing, but the appearance of male progeny was delayed after mating. This delay is caused by the male X-bearing sperm outcompeting their nullo-X counterparts. The competitive advantage of X-bearing sperm over nullo-X sperm is limited to sperm from males; it did not occur in a mutant hermaphrodite that produces both types of sperm. The chromosomal effect on sperm competitiveness in C. briggsae, which has not been observed in other species, suggests that the X chromosome has evolved a form of meiotic drive, selfishly increasing the competitiveness of sperm that bear it over those that do not. Thus, the multiple levels of sperm competitiveness found in C. briggsae maximize outcrossing after mating while delaying the cost of making male offspring.

  2. The sperm of Hylodinae species (Anura, Leptodactylidae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 3. The sperm of Hylodinae species (Anura, Leptodactylidae): Ultrastructural characteristics and their relevance to interspecific taxonomic relationships. O Aguiar-Jr A A Giaretta S M Recco-Pimentel. Articles Volume 31 Issue 3 September 2006 pp 379-388 ...

  3. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and morphology of adult Wistar rats fed either low or normal protein-energy diets and orally dosed with ... of adult Wistar rats orally dosed aqueous extracts of C. australis seed (LPSE and NPSE) and stem (LPST and NPST), 300mg of extract/kg body weight of rat/day, ...

  4. Exposures that may affect sperm DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsen, L B; Spano, M; Bonde, J P

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal lifestyle exposures are linked to alterations in conventional semen characteristics. Sperm DNA integrity is another marker of semen quality shown to be altered in mice prenatally exposed to chemicals. From a Danish pregnancy cohort established in 1984-1987, sons were selected for a follow...

  5. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and morphology of adult Wistar rats fed either low or normal protein-energy diets and orally dosed with aqueous Cuscuta australis extracts. 1. Omirinde, J.O., *. 1. Ozegbe, P.C. and. 2. Oyeyemi, M.O.. Departments of 1Veterinary Anatomy and 2Veterinary Surgery and ...

  6. Psychosocial counselling in donor sperm treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2018-01-01

    For decades, donor sperm treatment is offered to men and women to build a family. In daily life, parents, children and donors have to deal with the consequences of this treatment. The studies of this thesis show that there are gaps in knowledge about specialist psychosocial counselling and guidance

  7. Cryopreservation of mutton snapper ( Lutjanus analis sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO G. SANCHES

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a protocol of semen cryopreservation of the mutton snapper Lutjanus analis. The interaction between three extenders ( pH 6.1; 7.8 and 8.2 , two concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide ( DMSO, 5 and 10% and three cooling rates ( -90; -60 and -30°C.min−1 on the sperm motility rate and motility time were analyzed by a factorial experiment. A sample of 30 fishes ( 1,261 ± 449 g collected in the nature was kept in floating net cages. The semen was frozen by using cryogenic straws, in nitrogen vapour and transferred, later, to liquid nitrogen. Fertilization test was accomplished to evaluate the viability of the cryopreserved sperm. The highest sperm motility rate and motility time ( P < 0.05 was achieved by combining extender C ( pH 8.2 with DMSO ( 10% and cooling rate of -60°C.min−1 ( P < 0.05 . The use of cryopreserved sperm presented fertilization rates higher than 59% validating the present protocol for mutton snapper.

  8. Sperm Quality and Fertility Following Prolonged Immobilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm Quality and Fertility Following Prolonged Immobilization Stress in Wistar Rats. ... All the females that were mated with the control males became pregnant and produced litters. On the ... These results therefore, confirm and expand existing literatures reporting impaired fertility following long-term exposure to stress.

  9. Microsurgical and Percutaneous Epididymal Sperm Aspiration for Sperm Collection from Live Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Auke; Olszanska, Olga; Walter, Ingrid; Rülicke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Spermatozoa for in vitro fertilization of mouse oocytes and other methods of assisted reproduction typically are collected from the cauda epididymis of euthanized male mice. As an alternative to this terminal protocol, we developed and examined 2 methods for collecting sperm from anesthetized male mice without decreasing subsequent fertility: microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration and, as a refinement, percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration. Collected sperm was evaluated in terms of motility, concentration and in vitro fertilization ability. After recovery, both treated and untreated control male mice underwent in vivo fertility testing and subsequent histologic analysis of the treated male reproductive tract (epididymis and testis). In vitro fertilization using sperm recovered by the 2 collection methods was successfully achieved in all cases. The in vivo fertility test and the histologic analysis revealed no impairment of fertility and no permanent histologic alteration in the treated mice. Therefore, we recommend both techniques as simple and effective methods for recovering high-quality epididymal mouse sperm without having to euthanize fertile male mice.

  10. Effect of environmental pH on sperm kinematic characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, Hiva; Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Dissing, Marianne Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Semen preparation medium have an important role in assisted reproduction techniques and their composition influences sperm binding and motility. Some studies have assessed the influence of pH on sperm kinetics. However, no study to date has assessed the effect of environmental pH on subtle...... differences in the details of the sperm movement (kinematics) of human sperm provided by computerized sperm analysis systems. This study was designed to assess the effect of two different media pH levels on kinematic parameters of the human sperm. Samples were prepared using the 40%/80% Pureception (Sage, USA....... Linearity and Wobble showed significant difference after 24 hours. This study demonstrated a difference in the sperm motion pattern and velocity in different environmental pH levels. Based on these findings, further investigations are required to elucidate knowledge about possible effect of marginal p...

  11. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  12. Response of midpiece vesicles on human sperm to osmotic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abraham-Peskir, Joanna V; Chantler, Eric; Uggerhøj, Erik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the osmotic response of midpiece vesicles (MPV) on human sperm. METHODS: Light microscopy, transmission X-ray microscopy and computer-aided semen analysis was used to investigate sperm in normozoospermic semen from healthy donors, separated from semen and suspended...... in hyper- or hypo-osmotic solutions. RESULTS: The mean incidence of MPV-bearing sperm in semen was 31% (range 8-71; n = 47). MPV were morphologically different from cytoplasmic droplets. The incidence of MPV-bearing sperm in separated populations increased reversibly after washing in Sperm Preparation...... Medium but not after washing in seminal plasma. There was an inverse relationship between medium osmolality and both MPV-bearing sperm incidence and MPV diameter. However, initial osmolality in semen from different donors did not correlate with incidence of MPV-bearing sperm. Furthermore, a direct...

  13. Sperm storage induces an immunity cost in ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Armitage, Sophie A O; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    Ant queens are among the most long-lived insects known. They mate early in adult life and maintain millions of viable sperm in their sperm storage organ until they die many years later. Because they never re-mate, the reproductive success of queens is ultimately sperm-limited, but it is not known...... what selective forces determine the upper limit to sperm storage. Here we show that sperm storage carries a significant cost of reduced immunity during colony founding. Newly mated queens of the leaf-cutting ant Atta colombica upregulate their immune response shortly after completing their nest burrow......, probably as an adaptive response to a greater exposure to pathogens in the absence of grooming workers. However, the immune response nine days after colony founding is negatively correlated with the amount of sperm in the sperm storage organ, indicating that short-term survival is traded off against long...

  14. COMP-1 promotes competitive advantage of nematode sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jody M; Chavez, Daniela R; Stanfield, Gillian M

    2015-03-19

    Competition among sperm to fertilize oocytes is a ubiquitous feature of sexual reproduction as well as a profoundly important aspect of sexual selection. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms sperm use to gain competitive advantage or how these mechanisms are regulated genetically. In this study, we utilize a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify a gene, comp-1, whose function is specifically required in competitive contexts. We show that comp-1 functions in sperm to modulate their migration through and localization within the reproductive tract, thereby promoting their access to oocytes. Contrary to previously described models, comp-1 mutant sperm show no defects in size or velocity, thereby defining a novel pathway for preferential usage. Our results indicate not only that sperm functional traits can influence the outcome of sperm competition, but also that these traits can be modulated in a context-dependent manner depending on the presence of competing sperm.

  15. Maturity in technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alberts

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept is developed that modern technology, because of its relationship with pure science, can never really become mature, but will always grow as the pool of scientific knowledge grows. Parameters indicating to some extent the degree of technological prowess in a society are compared for a spectrum of countries. It is clear that in spite of some internationally outstanding successes. South Africa must be regarded on average as a developing society.

  16. Sperm flagellum volume determines freezability in red deer spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ros-Santaella

    Full Text Available The factors affecting the inter-individual differences in sperm freezability is a major line of research in spermatology. Poor sperm freezability is mainly characterised by a low sperm velocity, which in turn is associated with low fertility rates in most animal species. Studies concerning the implications of sperm morphometry on freezability are quite limited, and most of them are based on sperm head size regardless of the structural parts of the flagellum, which provides sperm motility. Here, for the first time, we determined the volumes of the flagellum structures in fresh epididymal red deer spermatozoa using a stereological method under phase contrast microscopy. Sperm samples from thirty-three stags were frozen and classified as good freezers (GF or bad freezers (BF at two hours post-thawing using three sperm kinetic parameters which are strongly correlated with fertility in this species. Fourteen stags were clearly identified as GF, whereas nineteen were BF. No significant difference in sperm head size between the two groups was found. On the contrary, the GF exhibited a lower principal piece volume than the BF (6.13 µm3 vs 6.61 µm3, respectively, p = 0.006. The volume of the flagellum structures showed a strong negative relationship with post-thawing sperm velocity. For instance, the volume of the sperm principal piece was negatively correlated with sperm velocity at two hours post-thawing (r = -0.60; p<0.001. Our results clearly show that a higher volume of the sperm principal piece results in poor freezability, and highlights the key role of flagellum size in sperm cryopreservation success.

  17. Sperm antibody production in female sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, L; Scheidel, P; Shirwani, D

    1974-01-01

    A review of the immunological implications in reproductive physiology is presented. Although attempts have been made to ascribe the antigenicity of semen to individual components, it has not been possible to isolate the human semen antigen responsible for infertility. In monkeys total ejaculates and seminal plasma have shown higher antigenicity than washed spermatozoa. In bulls some evidence of such antigens have been found in the seminal plasma. They are iron-binding proteins resembling lactoferrin. Most investigators have found no evidence for any participation of the ABO blood group antigens in cases of sterility. On the surface of human spermatozoa histo-incompatibility antigens have been detected. Transplantation antigens may be related to sterility. However, an immulogic tolerance of the maternal organism exists against the genetically foreign fetal tissue. Autoimmune spermagglutinating antibodies have been detected in the sera and in the seminal plasma of males with sterility. An obstruction of the seminal pathways may facilitate the production of such antibodies against retained sperm. Isoimmunity in females against seminal components has been shown in cases of sterility; however, fertile women have also been shown to have such conditions. In a group of infertile women spermagglutination activity was detected in 7.5% of cases. In another series of 46 cases with primary unexplained infertility agglutinating antibodies were found in 17.4%. Other investigators have also reported higher rates than the authors. The sperm immobilization test seems to be more sensitive than the agglutination test. No sera were found positive with both tests. With immunofluorescent techniques humoral sperm antibodies have been found to be the IgM and IgG fractions. Each acts on a different part of the spermatozoa. The only promising therapy against humoral sperm antibodies is avoidance of sperm contact over a long period of time. Reported results have been conflicting. Cortisone

  18. A new approach to sperm preservation based on bioenergetic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froman, D P; Feltmann, A J

    2010-04-01

    To date, attempts to preserve chicken sperm have been based on a trial-and-error experimental approach. The present work outlines the development of an alternative approach based on empiricism and bioenergetic theory. In previous work, we found fowl sperm motility to be dependent on mitochondrial calcium cycling, phospholipase A(2), and long-chain fatty acids as an endogenous energy source. It is noteworthy that fowl sperm reside within the sperm storage tubules (SST) of the oviduct over an interval of days to weeks after insemination. In this regard, a model for in vivo sperm storage was developed and tested in additional previous research. Sperm penetration of the SST, sperm residence within the SST, and sperm egress from the SST can be explained in terms mitochondrial function. Understanding sperm function and longevity in terms of bioenergetics presented the possibility that sperm could be inactivated by disrupting mitochondrial calcium cycling and could thereby be preserved. However, this possibility also posed a problem: maintenance of the inner membrane potential of the mitochondrion within inactivated sperm. This report describes a series of experiments in which fowl sperm were inactivated by treatment with the calcium chelator tetrasodium 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, and then reactivated by treatment with calcium ions. The effect of tetrasodium 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid on mitochondrial calcium cycling was confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. When treated sperm were cooled to 10 degrees C, inactivated sperm could be reactivated throughout a 5-h storage interval. When stored sperm were held for 3 h before reactivation and insemination, fertility was 88% of the control. Storage did not affect hatchability. In summary, short-term storage was realized by manipulating mitochondrial function. We propose that 1) complex V consumes ATP within inactivated sperm and, by doing so, maintains

  19. Pharmacological targeting of native CatSper channels reveals a required role in maintenance of sperm hyperactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Carlson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The four sperm-specific CatSper ion channel proteins are required for hyperactivated motility and male fertility, and for Ca(2+ entry evoked by alkaline depolarization. In the absence of external Ca(2+, Na(+ carries current through CatSper channels in voltage-clamped sperm. Here we show that CatSper channel activity can be monitored optically with the [Na(+](i-reporting probe SBFI in populations of intact sperm. Removal of external Ca(2+ increases SBFI signals in wild-type but not CatSper2-null sperm. The rate of the indicated rise of [Na(+](i is greater for sperm alkalinized with NH(4Cl than for sperm acidified with propionic acid, reflecting the alkaline-promoted signature property of CatSper currents. In contrast, the [Na(+](i rise is slowed by candidate CatSper blocker HC-056456 (IC(50 approximately 3 microM. HC-056456 similarly slows the rise of [Ca(2+](i that is evoked by alkaline depolarization and reported by fura-2. HC-056456 also selectively and reversibly decreased CatSper currents recorded from patch-clamped sperm. HC-056456 does not prevent activation of motility by HCO(3 (- but does prevent the development of hyperactivated motility by capacitating incubations, thus producing a phenocopy of the CatSper-null sperm. When applied to hyperactivated sperm, HC-056456 causes a rapid, reversible loss of flagellar waveform asymmetry, similar to the loss that occurs when Ca(2+ entry through the CatSper channel is terminated by removal of external Ca(2+. Thus, open CatSper channels and entry of external Ca(2+ through them sustains hyperactivated motility. These results indicate that pharmacological targeting of the CatSper channel may impose a selective late-stage block to fertility, and that high-throughput screening with an optical reporter of CatSper channel activity may identify additional selective blockers with potential for male-directed contraception.

  20. Effects of cryopreservation on sperm viability, synthesis of reactive oxygen species, and DNA damage of bovine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürler, H; Malama, E; Heppelmann, M; Calisici, O; Leiding, C; Kastelic, J P; Bollwein, H

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to examine if there are relationships between alterations in sperm viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis, and DNA integrity induced by cryopreservation of bovine sperm. Four ejaculates were collected from each of six bulls. Each ejaculate was diluted and divided into two aliquots; one was incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C, and the other frozen, thawed, and incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C. Analyses of quality of sperm were performed after 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours of incubation. Progressive motile sperm was determined with computer assisted sperm analysis. Percentages of plasma membrane- and acrosome-intact sperm, sperm with a high mitochondrial membrane potential, sperm showing a high degree of DNA fragmentation (%DFI), and their reactive oxygen species content were assessed with dichlorofluorescein-diacetate, dihydrorhodamine, diaminofluorescein diacetate, and mitochondrial superoxide indicator using flow cytometry. Although all other sperm parameters showed alterations (P  0.05, 0.91 ± 0.23) in nonfrozen sperm. Cryopreservation induced changes of all sperm parameters (P reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation in stallion (Equus caballus) and donkey (Equus asinus) using the sperm chromatin dispersion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Crespo, F; Serres-Dalmau, C; Gutiérrez de las Rozas, A L; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; López-Fernández, C; Gósalvez, J

    2009-10-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) is an important parameter to assessing sperm quality. Information about sperm quality is not available for donkeys, especially in some breeds at risk of extinction. The objectives of this research were to test the four commercial variants of sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD; sperm Halomax test), originally developed to assess sDF in boars, bulls, rams and stallions, in order to scrutinize their applicability in the study of sDF in a donkey breed at risk of extinction (Zamorano-Leonesa), for which there is no specific test available to analyze sperm at present. Only the SCD test, originally developed for stallions, produced stable and consistent results, and was deemed suitable to assess DNA fragmentation in sperm samples from donkeys. Image analysis was used to compare differences between the SCD methodology applied to stallion and donkey semen samples processed under the same experimental conditions. The extent of SCD in the SCD test was approximately 20% lower in donkey sperm than in stallion sperm. Yet, the ratio of chromatin sperm dispersion achieved in fragmented and unfragmented nuclei did not differ significantly between species. These data suggest that a similar protein depletion treatment can cause differences in protein removal in equivalent cells from different species and that sperm chromatin may be organized differently in stallions and donkeys.

  2. Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME: intervariation study of normal sperm and sperm with large nuclear vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruffi Ricardo LR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME was developed only as a selection criterion, its application as a method for classifying sperm morphology may represent an improvement in evaluation of semen quality, with potential clinical repercussions. The present study aimed to evaluate individual variations in the motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME analysis after a time interval. Methods Two semen samples were obtained from 240 men from an unselected group of couples undergoing infertility investigation and treatment. Mean time interval between the two semen evaluations was 119 +/- 102 days. No clinical or surgical treatment was realized between the two observations. Spermatozoa were analyzed at greater than or equal to 8400× magnification by inverted microscope equipped with DIC/Nomarski differential interference contrast optics. At least 200 motile spermatozoa per semen sample were evaluated and percentages of normal spermatozoa and spermatozoa with large nuclear vacuoles (LNV/one or more vacuoles occupying >50% of the sperm nuclear area were determined. A spermatozoon was classified as morphologically normal when it exhibited a normal nucleus (smooth, symmetric and oval nucleus, width 3.28 +/- 0.20 μm, length 4.75 +/- 0.20 μm/absence of vacuoles occupying >4% of nuclear area as well as acrosome, post-acrosomal lamina, neck and tail, besides not presenting cytoplasm around the head. One examiner, blinded to subject identity, performed the entire study. Results Mean percentages of morphologically normal and LNV spermatozoa were identical in the two MSOME analyses (1.6 +/- 2.2% vs. 1.6 +/- 2.1% P = 0.83 and 25.2 +/- 19.2% vs. 26.1 +/- 19.0% P = 0.31, respectively. Regression analysis between the two samples revealed significant positive correlation for morphologically normal and for LNV spermatozoa (r = 0.57 95% CI:0.47-0.65 P P Conclusions The significant positive correlation and

  3. Immunization against lysozyme-like proteins affect sperm function and fertility in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narmadha, Ganapathy; Yenugu, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the epididymal and testicular mileu contribute to sperm maturation and a vast majority of them remain uncharacterised. In this study, the role of three Lysozyme-like (LYZL) proteins, namely LYZL1, LYZL4 and LYZL6 in sperm function was assessed using in vitro neutralization and auto antibodies generation model. Rats immunized with LYZL1, LYZL4 and LYZL6 proteins had a litter size of 5.93, 8.47 and 2.10 respectively compared to 9.96 in the control rats. The litter size was further reduced to 4.53, 7.67 and 1.23 for the corresponding proteins in the second mating conducted 14 weeks after immunization. Epididymal and testicular fluids obtained from the immunized rats displayed a very high antibody titre against all the three proteins. Sperm count was significantly reduced in rats immunized with LYZL1 or LYZL6 and to a lower extent in LYZL4 group. Acrosome reaction associated calcium release was inhibited in spermatozoa obtained from LYZL1 or LYZL4 or LYZL6 immunized rats as well as in spermatozoa incubated with antiserum against the three proteins. Impairment in path velocity, progressive velocity and track speed were observed in spermatozoa obtained from LYZL6 immunized rats. Treatment of spermatozoa with LYZL6 recombinant protein did not potentiate calcium release and acrosome reaction. Results of this study indicate a role for LYZL proteins in sperm function and further studies are warranted to explore them as potential contraceptive agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyaluronidase 2: a novel germ cell hyaluronidase with epididymal expression and functional roles in mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Mark J; Menlah, Gladys; Wang, Yipei; Dash, Soma; Wu, Kathie; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    To initiate the crucial cell adhesion events necessary for fertilization, sperm must penetrate extracellular matrix barriers containing hyaluronic acid (HA), a task thought to be accomplished by neutral-active hyaluronidases. Here we report that the ~57 kDa hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) that in somatic tissues has been highly characterized to be acid-active is present in mouse and human sperm, as detected by Western blot, flow cytometric, and immunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence revealed its presence on the plasma membrane over the acrosome, the midpiece, and proximal principal piece in mice where protein fractionation demonstrated a differential distribution in subcellular compartments. It is significantly more abundant in the acrosome-reacted (P = 0.04) and soluble acrosomal fractions (P = 0.006) (microenvironments where acid-active hyaluronidases function) compared to that of the plasma membrane where neutral hyaluronidases mediate cumulus penetration. Using HA substrate gel electrophoresis, immunoprecipitated HYAL 2 was shown to have catalytic activity at pH 4.0. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation assays reveal that HYAL2 is associated with its cofactor, CD44, consistent with CD44-dependent HYAL2 activity. HYAL2 is also present throughout the epididymis, where Hyal2 transcripts were detected, and in the epididymal luminal fluids. In vitro assays demonstrated that HYAL2 can be acquired on the sperm membrane from epididymal luminal fluids, suggesting that it plays a role in epididymal maturation. Because similar biphasic kinetics are seen for HYAL2 and SPAM1 (Sperm adhesion molecule 1), it is likely that HYAL2 plays a redundant role in the catalysis of megadalton HA to its 20 kDa intermediate during fertilization. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  5. Testis Morphometry and Stages of the Seminiferous Epithelium Cycle in an Epididymal Sperm-storing Neotropical Vespertilionid, Myotis levis (Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, T O; Notini, A A; Talamoni, S A; Godinho, H P

    2015-10-01

    Yellowish myotis, Myotis levis, is a seasonal, epididymal sperm-storing Neotropical vespertilionid. In the dry season, males show simultaneous testis regression and sperm storage in cauda epididymis, enabling them to mate during this season. In this study, we investigated seasonal variations in body mass, diameter and height of seminiferous tubules and nuclei of Leydig cells in a population of southeastern Brazil. We also determined the frequencies of the stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle (SEC) of mature individuals of this population. Body mass and diameter of Leydig cell nuclei showed no significant differences between dry and rainy seasons and stages of annual reproductive cycle; however, all other morphometric parameters varied significantly. The relative cumulative frequency of pre-meiotic stages of the SEC (1-3) was 51%, of meiotic stage (4) was 2% and of post-meiotic stages (5-8) was 47%. We confirmed that the yellowish myotis presents seasonal sperm production as revealed by testis regression and epididymal sperm storage during the dry season. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Enhanced fat consumption potentiates acrylamide-induced oxidative stress in epididymis and epididymal sperm and effect spermatogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J X; Yue, W B; Ren, Y S; Zhang, C X

    2010-02-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) and high contents of fat could be found co-existent in many foods processed by high temperature, such as deep-frying and roasting. This study investigated the effect of enhanced fat consumption on deficits of spermatogenesis induced by ACR, and explored potential mechanisms of oxidative damage involved in this pathology in mice. Results show that enhanced feeding of corn oil and pork fat on mice potentiated the decreases of spermatogonia along with mature sperms after treatment of ACR, and that spermatozoa quality is significantly reduced as a result of enhanced feeding of corn oil and pork fat on mice treated with ACR. Moreover, enhanced consumption of corn oil and pork fat potentiated the up-regulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) level in epididymal sperm and cauda epididymides, also up-regulated level of Protein carbonyls (PCOs) in cauda epididymides, of mice after treatment of ACR. Last, enhanced consumption of corn oil and pork fat potentiated the reduced activity of superoxide dismutases (SOD) in epididymal sperm, corpus, and cauda epididymides, also reduced activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in cauda epididymides, of mice treated with ACR. These data suggest that enhanced feeding of corn oil and pork fat on mice potentiates ACR-induced oxidative stress in the epididymis and epididymal sperm and a subsequent effect on spermatogenesis.

  7. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  8. Decline of semen quality among Chinese sperm bank donors within 7 years (2008-2014

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    Li Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen from 5210 sperm bank donors was analyzed and trends in semen quality were evaluated at Shandong Human Sperm Bank between 2008 and 2014. After 2-7 days of abstinence, semen samples were collected. Measurements of semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count were performed. There were significant declining trends in semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count. Our results indicate that the quality of semen in this cohort of sperm donors had decreased during the study period.

  9. Sperm morphology and function in passerine birds: insights from intra- and interspecific studies

    OpenAIRE

    Laskemoen, Terje

    2010-01-01

    Sperm cells are the most variable animal cells, and a tremendous variation in sperm phenotypes exists among species, from minute amoeboid sperm to giant sperm in some species of fruit flies. Much effort has been devoted to the study of sperm evolution. Sperm competition, when sperm from two or more males compete over fertilization of a set of ova, is thought to be the major force driving the evolution of sperm. There are several ways in which sperm competition can effect the evolution of sper...

  10. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  11. Iqcg is essential for sperm flagellum formation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Ke Li

    Full Text Available Mammalian spermatogenesis comprises three successive phases: mitosis phase, meiosis phase, and spermiogenesis. During spermiogenesis, round spermatid undergoes dramatic morphogenesis to give rise to mature spermatozoon, including the condensation and elongation of nucleus, development of acrosome, formation of flagellum, and removal of excessive cytoplasm. Although these transformations are well defined at the morphological level, the mechanisms underlying these intricate processes are largely unknown. Here, we report that Iqcg, which was previously characterized to be involved in a chromosome translocation of human leukemia, is highly expressed in the spermatogenesis of mice and localized to the manchette in developing spermatids. Iqcg knockout causes male infertility, due to severe defects of spermiogenesis and resultant total immobility of spermatozoa. The axoneme in the Iqcg knockout sperm flagellum is disorganized and hardly any typical ("9+2" pattern of microtubule arrangement could be found in Iqcg knockout spermatids. Iqcg interacts with calmodulin in a calcium dependent manner in the testis, suggesting that Iqcg may play a role through calcium signaling. Furthermore, cilia structures in the trachea and oviduct, as well as histological appearances of other major tissues, remain unchanged in the Iqcg knockout mice, suggesting that Iqcg is specifically required for spermiogenesis in mammals. These results might also provide new insights into the genetic causes of human infertility.

  12. Impact of peak/mid luteal estradiol on pregnancy outcome after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, R.; Hussain, Z.; Zahir, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare peak to mid estradiol ratio with the probability of successful conception after intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. Method: The quasi-experimental study was conducted in an infertility clinic at Islamabad from June 2010 till August 2011, and comprised couples subjected to intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection. Down-regulation of ovaries was followed by calculated stimulation, ovulation induction, oocytes retrieval, intra cytoplasmic sperm injection, in vitro maturation of embryos and finally blastocysts transfer. Serum estradiol was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on ovulation induction day and the day of embryo transfer. Failure of procedure was detected by beta human chorionic gonadotropin 5-25mIU/ml (Group I; non-pregnant). Females with beta human chorionic gonadotropin>25mIU/ml and no cardiac activity after 4 weeks of transfer were placed in Group II (pre-clinical abortion), and confirmation of foetal heart in the latter comprised Group III (clinical pregnancy). Data was analysed using SPSS 15. Results: Of the 323 couples initially enrolled, embryo transfer was carried out in 282(87.3%) females. Clinical pregnancy was achieved in 101(36%) of the cases, while 61(21.63%) had pre-clinical abortion, and 120(42%) remained non-pregnant. The peak/mid-luteal estradiolratio was low (2.3) in patients who had high oocyte maturity (p=0.001) and fertilisation rate (p=0.003) compared to non-pregnant patients with high peak/mid-luteal estradiolratio (2.56). Conclusion: High peak estradiol with maintenance of optimal levels in mid-luteal phase is required for implantation of fertilised ovum and accomplishment of clinical pregnancy. (author)

  13. Sperm vacuoles are linked to capacitation and acrosomal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montjean, Debbie; Belloc, Stephanie; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Dalleac, Alain; Ménézo, Yves

    2012-10-01

    Is the presence of nuclear vacuoles really a negative parameter? As sperm vacuoles are associated with acrosomal and capacitation status, they appear to be a reflection of normal sperm physiology. The selection of sperm under a high magnification has been proposed as a strategy to increase the success rates of ICSI, through a better selection of sperm for injection. The presence of vacuoles on the sperm head is said to be a negative parameter. We incubated processed sperm for 90 min with two strong inducers of acrosome reaction (AR), i.e. hyaluronic acid (HA) and follicular fluid (FF) and studied the evolution of nuclear vacuoles, sperm morphology and chromatin compaction. We tested the effect of incubating sperm samples with HA and FF for 90 min at 37°C on nuclear vacuoles. Both HA and FF strongly induce AR after 90 min, without significantly modifying sperm nuclear condensation and morphology (Bartoov's criteria). We simultaneously observed a highly significant decrease in the presence of vacuoles. This is a descriptive study based on in vitro manipulations. Although intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection may be of benefit for couples with specific treatment indications, the results of this study make it difficult to justify its large-scale application. Funding was granted by Laboratoire d'Eylau, Unilabs.

  14. Factors affecting sperm quality before and after mating of calopterygid damselflies.

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    Kaori Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available Damselflies (Odonata: Zygoptera have a more complex sperm transfer system than other internally ejaculating insects. Males translocate sperm from the internal reproductive organs to the specific sperm vesicles, a small cavity on the body surface, and then transfer them into the female. To examine how the additional steps of sperm transfer contribute to decreases in sperm quality, we assessed sperm viability (the proportion of live sperm at each stage of mating and after different storage times in male and female reproductive organs in two damselfly species, Mnais pruinosa and Calopteryx cornelia. Viability of stored sperm in females was lower than that of male stores even just after copulation. Male sperm vesicles were not equipped to maintain sperm quality for longer periods than the internal reproductive organs. However, the sperm vesicles were only used for short-term storage; therefore, this process appeared unlikely to reduce sperm viability when transferred to the female. Males remove rival sperm prior to transfer of their own ejaculate using a peculiar-shaped aedeagus, but sperm removal by males is not always complete. Thus, dilution occurs between newly received sperm and aged sperm already stored in the female, causing lower viability of sperm inside the female than that of sperm transferred by males. If females do not remate, sperm viability gradually decreases with the duration of storage. Frequent mating of females may therefore contribute to the maintenance of high sperm quality.

  15. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and mature spermatozoa in the flatworm Prosthiostomum siphunculus (Polycladida, Cotylea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammoudi, Mehrez; Salvenmoser, Willi; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Tekaya, Saïda; Egger, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study investigating spermatogenesis and spermatozoan ultrastructure in the polyclad flatworm Prosthiostomum siphunculus. The testes are numerous and scattered as follicles ventrally between the digestive ramifications. Each follicle contains the different stages of sperm differentiation. Spermatocytes and spermatids derive from a spermatogonium and the spermatids remain connected by intercellular bridges. Chromatoid bodies are present in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia up to spermatids. During early spermiogenesis, a differentiation zone appears in the distal part of spermatids. A ring of microtubules extends along the entire sperm shaft just beneath the cell membrane. An intercentriolar body is present and gives rise to two axonemes, each with a 9 + "1" micro-tubular pattern. Development of the spermatid leads to cell elongation and formation of a filiform, mature spermatozoon with two free flagella and with cortical microtubules along the sperm shaft. The flagella exit the sperm shaft at different levels, a finding common for acotyleans, but so far unique for cotylean polyclads. The Golgi complex produces numerous electron-dense bodies of two types and of different sizes. These bodies are located around a perinuclear row of mitochondria. The elongated nucleus extends almost along the entire sperm body. The nucleus is wide in the proximal part and becomes narrow going towards the distal end. Thread-like chromatin mixed with electron-dense intranuclear spindle-shaped bodies are present throughout nucleus. The general sperm ultrastructure, the presence of intranuclear bodies and a second type of cytoplasmic electron-dense bodies may provide characters useful for phylogenetic analysis. © 2015 The Authors. Cell Biology International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Cell Biology.

  16. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  17. DNA fragmentation and sperm head morphometry in cat epididymal spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Valentina; Morselli, Maria Giorgia; Lange Consiglio, Anna; Faustini, Massimo; Luvoni, Gaia Cecilia

    2014-10-15

    Sperm DNA fragmentation is an important parameter to assess sperm quality and can be a putative fertility predictor. Because the sperm head consists almost entirely of DNA, subtle differences in sperm head morphometry might be related to DNA status. Several techniques are available to analyze sperm DNA fragmentation, but they are labor-intensive and require expensive instrumentations. Recently, a kit (Sperm-Halomax) based on the sperm chromatin dispersion test and developed for spermatozoa of different species, but not for cat spermatozoa, became commercially available. The first aim of the present study was to verify the suitability of Sperm-Halomax assay, specifically developed for canine semen, for the evaluation of DNA fragmentation of epididymal cat spermatozoa. For this purpose, DNA fragmentation indexes (DFIs) obtained with Sperm-Halomax and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL) were compared. The second aim was to investigate whether a correlation between DNA status, sperm head morphology, and morphometry assessed by computer-assisted semen analysis exists in cat epididymal spermatozoa. No differences were observed in DFIs obtained with Sperm-Halomax and TUNEL. This result indicates that Sperm-Halomax assay provides a reliable evaluation of DNA fragmentation of epididymal feline spermatozoa. The DFI seems to be independent from all the measured variables of sperm head morphology and morphometry. Thus, the evaluation of the DNA status of spermatozoa could effectively contribute to the completion of the standard analysis of fresh or frozen semen used in assisted reproductive technologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  19. Sperm vacuoles cannot help to differentiate fertile men from infertile men with normal sperm parameter values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatimel, N; Léandri, R D; Marino, L; Esquerre-Lamare, C; Parinaud, J

    2014-11-01

    Can the assessment of sperm vacuoles at high magnification contribute to the explanation of idiopathic infertility? The characteristics of sperm head vacuoles (number, area, position) are no different between fertile controls and patients with unexplained infertility. Until now, the assessment of sperm head vacuoles has been focused on a therapeutic goal in the intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) procedure, but it could be pertinent as a new diagnostic tool for the evaluation of male fertility. This diagnostic test study with blind assessment included a population of 50 fertile men and 51 men with idiopathic infertility. They were selected from September 2011 to May 2013. Fertile men were within couples who had a spontaneous pregnancy in the last 2 years. Infertile men were within couples who had unexplained infertility and were consulting in our centre. After analysis of conventional sperm parameters, we investigated the number, position and area of sperm head vacuoles at high magnification (×6000) with interference contrast using an image analysis software. We also carried out a nuclear status analysis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay (TUNEL), sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and aniline blue staining. Concerning the vacuoles data, we did not find any significant difference between the two populations. We found no significant correlation between the vacuolar parameters (mean number of vacuoles, relative vacuole area and percentage of spermatozoa with large vacuoles) and either conventional semen parameters, male age or the data from the aniline blue staining, SCSA assay and TUNEL assay. Despite the fact all of the vacuole parameters values were identical in fertile and infertile men, we cannot totally exclude that a very small cause of unexplained infertilities could be related to an excess of sperm vacuoles. In line with its widely debated use as a therapeutic tool, sperm vacuole

  20. Effects of Synthetic Serum Supplementation in Sperm Preparation Media on Sperm Capacitation and Function Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Fu Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Albumin supplementation of culture media induces sperm capacitation in assisted reproduction technique cycles. Synthetic serum supplementation is clinically used to replace albumin for preventing transmission of infectious agents. However, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation have rarely been investigated. Spermatozoa from 30 men with normal basic semen analysis results were collected, divided into five aliquots, and cultured in capacitating conditions in four combinations of two synthetic serum supplements, serum substitute supplement (SSS and serum protein substitute (SPS, and two fertilization media, Quinns Advantage™ Fertilization (QF and human tubular fluid (HTF media. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in spermatozoa were measured through chemiluminescence. Furthermore, acrosome reaction and western blotting for tyrosine phosphorylation were used to evaluate sperm capacitation. HTF+SSS had significantly higher ROS levels than QF+SPS did (11,725 ± 1,172 versus 6,278 ± 864 relative light units. In addition, the spermatozoa cultured in QF+SPS had lower motility, acrosome reaction rates, and tyrosine phosphorylation levels compared with those cultured in HTF+SSS. In conclusion, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation varied according to the combination of media. These differences may lead to variations in spermatozoon ROS levels, thus affecting sperm function test results.

  1. Sperm Impairment by Sperm Agglutinating Factor Isolated from Escherichia coli: Receptor Specific Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranjeet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier work done in our laboratory, we have been able to isolate a sperm agglutinating strain of Escherichia coli from the semen sample of a male attending infertility clinic. Further, factor responsible for sperm agglutination (SAF was isolated and purified, and, using SAF as a tool, corresponding SAF binding receptor from human spermatozoa has been purified. Characterization of SAF and SAF binding receptor using MALDI-TOF showed homology to glutamate decarboxylase and MHC class I molecule, respectively. Coincubation of SAF with spermatozoa not only resulted in spermagglutination but could also compromise other sperm parameters, namely, Mg2+ dependent ATPase activity and apoptosis. Intravaginal administration of SAF could lead to infertility in Balb/c mice. SAF induced impairment of sperm parameters, and infertility was observed to be due to interaction of SAF with sperm surface receptor component as, when purified receptor was introduced, receptor completely inhibited all the detrimental effects induced by SAF. From these results, it could be concluded that interaction of SAF with spermatozoa is receptor mediated.

  2. Evaluation of Lasting Effects of Heat Stress on Sperm Profile and Oxidative Status of Ram Semen and Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Rose dos Santos Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperatures lead to an increase of testicular metabolism that results in spermatic damage. Oxidative stress is the main factor responsible for testicular damage caused by heat stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate lasting effects of heat stress on ejaculated sperm and immediate or long-term effects of heat stress on epididymal sperm. We observed decrease in motility and mass motility of ejaculated sperm, as well as an increase in the percentages of sperm showing major and minor defects, damaged plasma and acrosome membranes, and a decrease in the percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated group until one spermatic cycle. An increased enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase and an increase of stressed cells were observed in ejaculated sperm of the treated group. A decrease in the percentage of epididymal sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in the treated group. However, when comparing immediate and long-term effects, we observed an increase in the percentage of sperm with low mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, testicular heat stress induced oxidative stress that led to rescuable alterations after one spermatic cycle in ejaculated sperm and also after 30 days in epididymal sperm.

  3. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  4. Method-related estimates of sperm vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Trevor G; Hellenkemper, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of methods that estimate viability of human spermatozoa by monitoring head membrane permeability revealed that wet preparations (whether using positive or negative phase-contrast microscopy) generated significantly higher percentages of nonviable cells than did air-dried eosin-nigrosin smears. Only with the latter method did the sum of motile (presumed live) and stained (presumed dead) preparations never exceed 100%, making this the method of choice for sperm viability estimates.

  5. Methods for cryopreservation of guinea fowl sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Váradi

    Full Text Available Conservation of indigenous poultry species is an important part of the new Hungarian agricultural strategy. Semen cryopreservation is the most practical method for the long term storage of poultry genetic material. The objective was to compare four protocols for cryopreservation of guinea fowl sperm (slow and fast programmable, freezing in nitrogen vapor, and pellet and three cryoprotectants (10% ethylene glycol, 6% dimethyl-formamide and 6% dimethyl-acetamide. The efficiency of the methods was examined by in vitro tests (subjective motility scoring, sperm concentration, morphological and live/dead sperm analysis with eosin-aniline staining. Thereafter, the two most promising methods were tested by artificial insemination of frozen-thawed semen (3 times a week for 3 weeks using 300 million spermatozoa/hen, followed by candling of incubated eggs, assessment of fertilization, embryonic death, and hatching rate. The survival rate of live, intact spermatozoa was greatest (p≤0.05 in pellet method and the slow programmable protocol (with 10% ethylene glycol (28.6 and 23.5%. The two best protocols (based on in vitro assessment of post-thaw semen quality were subsequently tested in vivo with artificial insemination. The pellet method yielded a 64% fertility rate compared to slow protocol with only 30% fertility. Regardless, both freezing protocols significantly increased embryonic deaths compared to the control group (16,7; 9,1 and 8,3%, respectively. During the 3-week in vivo trial, fertility increased and early embryonic death decreased over time. According to the results the guinea fowl sperm could tolerate the fast freezing in pellet better than the slower freezing rates and resulted acceptable fertility rate.

  6. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jikeli, Jan F.; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Wilson, Laurence G.; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U. Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an `off' Ca2+ response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes.

  7. Aspermy, sperm quality and radiation in Chernobyl birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination.

  8. Progress and challenges of fish sperm vitrification: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Miaomiao; Siddique, Mohammad Abdul Momin; Dzyuba, Borys; Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Shaliutina-Kolešová, Anna; Linhart, Otomar

    2017-08-01

    To survive low temperature is required for a long-term storage (cryopreservation), cells should be vitrified to a state in which intracellular water is solidified without ice crystal formation. Two different approaches are described for fish sperm cryopreservation: 1) sperm conventional cryopreservation, in which extracellular water is partially crystallized and 2) sperm vitrification, in which both intra- and extra-cellular liquids are vitrified. Sperm vitrification has been applied to some fish species with limited success. Traditional vitrification requires rapid cooling/warming rates, small sample carriers, and using high permeable cryoprotectant concentrations. The latter cause cytotoxic effects which must be well managed and will require continuous effort to match an appropriate cryoprotectant with suitable apparatus and warming methods. Novel cryoprotectant-free sperm vitrification approach has been applied to several fishes. This review summarizes development of basic procedures and discusses advantages and disadvantages of vitrification when applied it to fish sperm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mating duration and sperm precedence in the spider Linyphia triangularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Ditte L.; Toft, Søren; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2011-01-01

    , especially the males, are able to influence the outcome of mating for their own benefit. We studied the linyphiid spider Linyphia triangularis in which mating follows a strict sequence during which the male inducts two droplets of sperm and transfers them to the female. We performed sperm competition...... experiments (sterile-male technique) including four treatments, in which the copulation of the first male was interrupted at prescribed phases of the mating sequence, while the second male was allowed a complete mating. Second males spent a shorter time than first males on the behaviours prior to sperm...... transfer, but the amount of sperm (2 droplets) and the time spent in sperm transfer were independent of the females’ mating status. The proportion of females accepting the second male depended on the mating duration of the first male, i.e. whether the first male had transferred one or two sperm droplets...

  10. Association between chronic pain and the sperm motion characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Alipour, Hiva; Nielsen, Hans Ingolf

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones play an important role in pain in many chronic pain conditions. Relationship between chronic pain and sperm quality has not been investigated thoroughly and may provide an insight to better understanding, management and treatment of cases where chronic pain and male sub-fertility co......-exist. Neat (fresh semen) and processed sperm from 15 males with orthopedic chronic pain (CP) were assessed and compared with 15 healthy age matched controls. Sperm analysis was performed using the SCA computer-aided sperm analyzer. There was no significant difference in any parameters of the neat semen...... significantly higher in the processed sample of the CP group. This study demonstrated that chronic pain does not affect the sperm morphology, total concentration and motility based on conventional analysis but has significant influence at the level of sperm motion kinetics which could prove to be clinically...

  11. Accountings of Selecting Sperm on the (ethical) border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    During the past years, Denmark has become a destination for fertility travellers, in need for donated sperm. Today, treatment is possible no matter of marital status or sexuality. Furthermore, users of sperm donation can choose between anonymous and non-anonymous sperm, with either basic...... will analyze how women and their partners crossing the Danish border accounts for their donor choice, and their practices of choosing. I will be exploring the question: How are women and their partners accounting for choosing a sperm donor, crossing the (ethical) border to Denmark? The use of the term......-sited ethnographic fieldwork at a Danish private fertility clinic, and a Danish sperm bank. The presentation will mainly draw on interviews with fertility travellers going through treatment with donor sperm in Denmark....

  12. Some Reflections on Intracytoplasmic Morphologically Selected Sperm Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ebner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI allows proper fertilization in most cases of male sub fertility, it is one of the most unphysiological techniques in assisted reproductive technologies (ART. Thus, over the last decade, researchers have tried to improve sperm observation with higher-resolution microscopy techniques such as the intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI technique. In order to identify literatures for this review, the PubMed database was searched from 2000 onwards using the terms IMSI, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME and sperm vacuole. Approximately 10 years after the introduction of the MSOME and IMSI procedures, several questions related to the prevalence, origin, location, and clinical consequences of sperm vacuoles have not yet been clarified. It seems that IMSI as a routine application is not state of the art and the only confirmed indications for IMSI are recurrent implantation failure following ICSI and severe male factor.

  13. Puma (Puma concolor) epididymal sperm morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucho, Hernán; Alarcón, Virgilio; Ordóñez, César; Ampuero, Enrique; Meza, Aydee; Soler, Carles

    2016-01-01

    The Andean puma (Puma concolor) has not been widely studied, particularly in reference to its semen characteristics. The aim of the present study was to define the morphometry of puma sperm heads and classify their subpopulations by cluster analysis. Samples were recovered postmortem from two epididymides from one animal and prepared for morphological observation after staining with the Hemacolor kit. Morphometric data were obtained from 581 spermatozoa using a CASA-Morph system, rendering 13 morphometric parameters. The principal component (PC) analysis was performed followed by cluster analysis for the establishment of subpopulations. Two PC components were obtained, the first related to size and the second to shape. Three subpopulations were observed, corresponding to elongated and intermediate-size sperm heads and acrosomes, to large heads with large acrosomes, and to small heads with short acrosomes. In conclusion, puma spermatozoa showed no uniform sperm morphology but three clear subpopulations. These results should be used for future work in the establishment of an adequate germplasm bank of this species.

  14. Treating boar sperm with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins or cyclodextrins prior to cryopreservation: effects on post-thaw in vitro sperm quality of sperm cryopreserved in different freezing extenders.

    OpenAIRE

    BLANCH TORRES, EVA

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Cryopreserved boar sperm is not used extensively for artificial insemination due to poor fertility rates of the sperm after freezing and thawing. The sperm membrane is damaged when cooled from body temperature to 5 ºC (cold shock), as well as during the freeze-thaw process. Increasing the cholesterol content of boar sperm membranes could increase their post-thaw survival, similarly to other species that are cold shock sensitive. Cholesterol can be easily added to sperm membranes using ch...

  15. A dictionary learning approach for human sperm heads classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Fariba; Monadjemi, S Amirhassan; Alirezaie, Javad; Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad Reza

    2017-12-01

    To diagnose infertility in men, semen analysis is conducted in which sperm morphology is one of the factors that are evaluated. Since manual assessment of sperm morphology is time-consuming and subjective, automatic classification methods are being developed. Automatic classification of sperm heads is a complicated task due to the intra-class differences and inter-class similarities of class objects. In this research, a Dictionary Learning (DL) technique is utilized to construct a dictionary of sperm head shapes. This dictionary is used to classify the sperm heads into four different classes. Square patches are extracted from the sperm head images. Columnized patches from each class of sperm are used to learn class-specific dictionaries. The patches from a test image are reconstructed using each class-specific dictionary and the overall reconstruction error for each class is used to select the best matching class. Average accuracy, precision, recall, and F-score are used to evaluate the classification method. The method is evaluated using two publicly available datasets of human sperm head shapes. The proposed DL based method achieved an average accuracy of 92.2% on the HuSHeM dataset, and an average recall of 62% on the SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS dataset. The results show a significant improvement compared to a previously published shape-feature-based method. We have achieved high-performance results. In addition, our proposed approach offers a more balanced classifier in which all four classes are recognized with high precision and recall. In this paper, we use a Dictionary Learning approach in classifying human sperm heads. It is shown that the Dictionary Learning method is far more effective in classifying human sperm heads than classifiers using shape-based features. Also, a dataset of human sperm head shapes is introduced to facilitate future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Good Quality - the Routinization of Sperm Banking in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    Good Quality is an assemblage ethnography of how sperm banking came to be routinized in China. Based on 8 years of episodic fieldwork at China’s oldest and largest sperm bank in Changsha, Hunan province, the book meticulously chronicles how, beginning in the early 1980s, a unique style of sperm...... banking would emerge in China, shaped by the cultural, juridical, economic and social configurations that make up China’s restrictive reproductive complex....

  17. A sterile sperm caste protects brother fertile sperm from female-mediated death in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Snook, Rhonda R

    2008-01-01

    Spermicide (i.e., female-mediated sperm death) is an understudied but potentially widespread phenomenon that has important ramifications for the study of sexual conflict, postcopulatory sexual selection, and fertility [1, 2]. Males are predicted to evolve adaptations against spermicide, but few...... antispermicidal mechanisms have been definitively identified. One such adaptation may be the enigmatic infertile sperm morphs or "parasperm" produced by many species, which have been hypothesized to protect their fertile brother "eusperm" from spermicide [2, 3]. Here, we show that female Drosophila pseudoobscura...... reproductive tracts are spermicidal and that the survival of eusperm after exposure to the female tract is highest when males produce many parasperm. This study clarifies the adaptive significance of infertile sperm castes, which has remained elusive in Drosophila and other taxa despite much recent interest [2...

  18. On the relative effect of spawning asynchrony, sperm quantity and sperm quality on paternity under sperm competition in an external fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torvald Blikra Egeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available How much of a fitness benefit is obtained by dominant males of external fertilizers from releasing ejaculates in synchrony with female egg-release when engaging in sperm competition, and what is the most important sperm trait for paternity in these situations? The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus is an external fertilizer experiencing intense male-male competition over reproductive opportunities including sperm competition. To compensate for their disadvantage the sneaker males, which often spawn out of synchrony with the female, produce more and faster sperm than the guarding males. We used controlled in vitro fertilization trials with experimentally produced dominant and subordinate, sneaker males to test what effect relative synchrony in gamete release, sperm quality (i.e., motility and velocity and sperm quantity have on a male’s fertilization success in pair-wise sperm competitions. When the sneaker males released ejaculates after the guarding male there was no overall difference in fertilization success. The quality (i.e., motility and velocity of a male’s sperm relative to that of the competing male was the best predictor of male fertilization success regardless of their mating tactic and spawning synchrony. The relative number of sperm cells also had an effect on fertilization success, but mainly when the dominant and sneaker male ejaculated synchronously. Our close imitation of natural sperm competition in charr shows that the sneaker males of external fertilizing species may fully compensate for their disadvantaged mating role by producing ejaculates of higher quality - an adjustment strangely not met by dominants.

  19. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  20. Relationship between viticultural climatic indices and grape maturity in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, C.; Barlow, E.; Darbyshire, R.; Eckard, R.; Goodwin, I.

    2017-10-01

    Historical temperature data and maturity records were analyzed for 45 vineyard blocks in 15 winegrowing regions across Australia in order to evaluate the suitability of common viticultural indices to estimate date of grape maturity. Five temperature-based viticultural indices (mean January temperature, mean growing season temperature, growing degree days, biologically effective degree days, Huglin Index) along with four springtime temperature indices (mean and maximum temperature summations for September, October, and November; growing degree days and biologically effective degree days modified to include September) were compared to maturity data in order to investigate index relationship to observed maturity timing. Daily heat summations for the months of September, October, and November showed the best correlation to day of year of maturity, suggesting that springtime temperatures are important relative to the timing of grape maturity. Mean January temperature, a commonly used index, had the poorest correlation with day of year of maturity of all the indices included in this study. Indices that included the month of April had poorer correlation than indices that shifted the months included in the growing season to be from September to March inclusive. Calculated index values for the past 30 years for every region included in this study showed increasing temporal trends to various degrees, indicating that all regions studied are experiencing warming temperatures during the growing season. These results emphasize the need to reevaluate viticultural indices in the context of a changing climate.

  1. Proteomic analysis of mature and immature ejaculated spermatozoa from fertile men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhihong; Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional spermatozoa maturation is the main reason for the decrease in sperm motility and morphology in infertile men. Ejaculated spermatozoa from healthy fertile men were separated into four fractions using three-layer density gradient. Proteins were extracted and bands were digested on a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite hybrid mass spectrometer system. Functional annotations of proteins were obtained using bioinformatics tools and pathway databases. Western blotting was performed to verify the expression levels of the proteins of interest. 1469 proteins were identified in four fractions of spermatozoa. The number of detected proteins decreased according to the maturation level of spermatozoa. During spermatozoa maturation, proteins involved in gamete generation, cell motility, energy metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation processes showed increasing expression levels and those involved in protein biosynthesis, protein transport, protein ubiquitination, and response to oxidative stress processes showed decreasing expression levels. We validated four proteins (HSP 70 1A, clusterin, tektin 2 and tektin 3) by Western blotting. The study shows protein markers that may provide insight into the ejaculated spermatozoa proteins in different stages of sperm maturation that may be altered or modified in infertile men. PMID:26510506

  2. Evaluation of methods to determine sperm density for the european eel, anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sune Riis; Gallego, V.; Pérez, L.

    2013-01-01

    , computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) and flow cytometry (FCM), using Neubauer Improved haemocytometer as benchmark. Initially, relationships between spermatocrit, haemocytometer counts and sperm motility were analysed, as well as the effect of sperm dilution on haemocytometer counts. Furthermore...

  3. Sperm density required for inducing gynogenetic haploidy in scallop Chlamys nobilis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.

    Experiments conducted for standardizing sperm density for artificial insemination and inducing gynogenesis by ultra-violet rays irradiated sperms in Chlamys nobilis showed that 10:1 ratio of sperms to eggs, gave maximum rate of fertilization...

  4. Nuclear chromatin variations in human spermatozoa undergoing swim-up and cryopreservation evaluated by the flow cytometric sperm chromatin structure assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, M; Cordelli, E; Leter, G; Lombardo, F; Lenzi, A; Gandini, L

    1999-01-01

    The sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) is a flow cytometric (FCM) technique which exploits the metachromatic properties of Acridine Orange to monitor the susceptibility of sperm chromatin DNA to in-situ acid denaturation. SCSA was used to study the chromatin structure variations of human spermatozoa in semen, both before and after swim-up and after cryopreservation. Semen samples were provided by 19 healthy normozoospermic subjects attending pre-marriage checks. Each sample was divided into three aliquots: the first aliquot was evaluated without further treatment, the second underwent swim-up, and the third was stored according to standard cryopreservation techniques in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. Samples were also analysed by light and fluorescence microscopy (after Acridine Orange staining to evaluate the number of green fluorescent sperm heads), and by computer-assisted semen analysis. The results showed that post-rise spermatozoa represent a subpopulation characterized by a general improvement of the morphological (reduction of the percentage of abnormal forms and heads, increase of the green head sperm percentage) and kinetic parameters. This subpopulation also exhibited improved chromatin structure properties, confirming that these cells have the best structural and functional characteristics, indicative of optimal fertilizing ability. On the other hand, overall sperm quality deteriorates after cryopreservation. When thawed spermatozoa underwent an additional swim-up round, a general improvement of nuclear maturity was seen in the post-rise spermatozoa.

  5. Use of sex-sorted and unsorted frozen/thawed sperm and in vitro fertilization events in bovine oocytes derived from ultrasound-guided aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Ruiz López

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to investigate the effects of sex-sorting on early fertilization events in ovum pick up (OPU derived oocytes fertilized in vitro with frozen-thawed sperm at different co-incubation lengths. Eighty-four OPU sessions were carried out in 18 cyclic, dry and non-stimulated Holstein Friesian and German black pied cows. Ovum pick up oocytes were matured in vitro for 24 hours and fertilized with frozen-thawed sex sorted or unsorted sperm from the same ejaculate. Fertilization was achieved by two experimental protocols: 1 short gamete co-incubation length: 4, 8 and 12 hours; and 2 long gamete co-incubation length: 18 and 24 hours. After in vitro fertilization, ova were fixed and stained to identify early fertilization events. Sperm penetration, monospermy, pronuclear formation and syngamy did not differ, whether sexed or unsexed sperm was used. Overall, the findings demonstrate similar fertilizing potential between sex-sorted and unsorted sperm.

  6. An update on sperm retrieval techniques for azoospermic males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-ejaculated sperm coupled with intracytoplasmic sperm injection has become a globally established procedure for couples with azoospermic male partners who wish to have biological offspring. Surgical methods have been developed to retrieve spermatozoa from the epididymides and the testes of such patients. This article reviews the methods currently available for sperm acquisition in azoospermia, with a particular focus on the perioperative, anesthetic and technical aspects of these procedures. A critical analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of these sperm retrieval methods is provided, including the authors' methods of choice and anesthesia preferences.

  7. Vitrification of neat semen alters sperm parameters and DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Adib, Maryam; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-06

    Our aim was to evaluate the effect of neat semen vitrification on human sperm vital parameters and DNA integrity in men with normal and abnormal sperm parameters. Semen samples were 17 normozoospermic samples and 17 specimens with abnormal sperm parameters. Semen analysis was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Then, the smear was provided from each sample and fixed for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Vitrification of neat semen was done by plunging cryoloops directly into liquid nitrogen and preserved for 7 days. The samples were warmed and re-evaluated for sperm parameters as well as DNA integrity. Besides, the correlation between sperm parameters and DNA fragmentation was assessed pre- and post vitrification. Cryopreserved spermatozoa showed significant decrease in sperm motility, viability and normal morphology after thawing in both normal and abnormal semen. Also, the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly higher after vitrification compared to fresh samples in normal (24.76 ± 5.03 and 16.41 ± 4.53, P = .002) and abnormal (34.29 ± 10.02 and 23.5 ± 8.31, P neat ejaculates has negative impact on sperm parameters as well as DNA integrity, particularly among abnormal semen subjects. It is, therefore, recommend to process semen samples and vitrify the sperm pellets.

  8. Average sperm count remains unchanged despite reduction in maternal smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priskorn, L; Nordkap, L; Bang, A K

    2018-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: How are temporal trends in lifestyle factors, including exposure to maternal smoking in utero, associated to semen quality in young men from the general population? SUMMARY ANSWER: Exposure to maternal smoking was associated with lower sperm counts but no overall increase in sperm...... temporal trends. Parental age increased, and exposure in utero to maternal smoking declined from 40% among men investigated in 1996-2000 to 18% among men investigated in 2011-2016. Exposure to maternal smoking was associated with lower sperm counts but no overall increase in sperm counts was observed...

  9. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm.

  10. Sperm quality in New Zealand: Is the downward trend continuing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, Mary A; Peek, John; Valiapan, Sumithra

    2015-10-16

    To investigate whether the decline in sperm concentration in New Zealand sperm donors observed from 1987 to 2007 continued in the period 2008-2014. A retrospective study from 2008 to 2014. The first semen sample of 285 men presenting as sperm donors in Auckland and Wellington was analysed for sperm concentration, seminal fluid volume and the percentage of motile sperm. These results were compared to results from 1987 to 2007 from the same clinics. The decline in semen volume and sperm concentration observed between 1987 and 2007 did not continue in 2008-2014. Sperm concentration decreased from 1987 until some time between 1997 and 2001, and has remained stable at an average of 62x106/ml between 2001 and 2014. Sperm motility declined significantly (8%) in the period 2008-2014, but there was no significant change over the total period studied, between 1987 and 2014. After a decline between 1987 and sometime during 1997-2001, the sperm concentration in men presenting as donors remained unchanged between 2002 and 2014, suggesting semen quality has not changed in New Zealand men over the last decade.

  11. Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Spyridis, Panagiotis; Mehari Abraha, Hyab; Carrier, David R; Pataky, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Herman Melville's novel Moby Dick was inspired by historical instances in which large sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L.) sank 19th century whaling ships by ramming them with their foreheads. The immense forehead of sperm whales is possibly the largest, and one of the strangest, anatomical structures in the animal kingdom. It contains two large oil-filled compartments, known as the "spermaceti organ" and "junk," that constitute up to one-quarter of body mass and extend one-third of the total length of the whale. Recognized as playing an important role in echolocation, previous studies have also attributed the complex structural configuration of the spermaceti organ and junk to acoustic sexual selection, acoustic prey debilitation, buoyancy control, and aggressive ramming. Of these additional suggested functions, ramming remains the most controversial, and the potential mechanical roles of the structural components of the spermaceti organ and junk in ramming remain untested. Here we explore the aggressive ramming hypothesis using a novel combination of structural engineering principles and probabilistic simulation to determine if the unique structure of the junk significantly reduces stress in the skull during quasi-static impact. Our analyses indicate that the connective tissue partitions in the junk reduce von Mises stresses across the skull and that the load-redistribution functionality of the former is insensitive to moderate variation in tissue material parameters, the thickness of the partitions, and variations in the location and angle of the applied load. Absence of the connective tissue partitions increases skull stresses, particularly in the rostral aspect of the upper jaw, further hinting of the important role the architecture of the junk may play in ramming events. Our study also found that impact loads on the spermaceti organ generate lower skull stresses than an impact on the junk. Nevertheless, whilst an impact on the spermaceti organ would

  12. Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Panagiotopoulou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick was inspired by historical instances in which large sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L. sank 19th century whaling ships by ramming them with their foreheads. The immense forehead of sperm whales is possibly the largest, and one of the strangest, anatomical structures in the animal kingdom. It contains two large oil-filled compartments, known as the “spermaceti organ” and “junk,” that constitute up to one-quarter of body mass and extend one-third of the total length of the whale. Recognized as playing an important role in echolocation, previous studies have also attributed the complex structural configuration of the spermaceti organ and junk to acoustic sexual selection, acoustic prey debilitation, buoyancy control, and aggressive ramming. Of these additional suggested functions, ramming remains the most controversial, and the potential mechanical roles of the structural components of the spermaceti organ and junk in ramming remain untested. Here we explore the aggressive ramming hypothesis using a novel combination of structural engineering principles and probabilistic simulation to determine if the unique structure of the junk significantly reduces stress in the skull during quasi-static impact. Our analyses indicate that the connective tissue partitions in the junk reduce von Mises stresses across the skull and that the load-redistribution functionality of the former is insensitive to moderate variation in tissue material parameters, the thickness of the partitions, and variations in the location and angle of the applied load. Absence of the connective tissue partitions increases skull stresses, particularly in the rostral aspect of the upper jaw, further hinting of the important role the architecture of the junk may play in ramming events. Our study also found that impact loads on the spermaceti organ generate lower skull stresses than an impact on the junk. Nevertheless, whilst an impact on the

  13. Mass spectrometry profiling of oxysterols in human sperm identifies 25-hydroxycholesterol as a marker of sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zerbinati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a main lipid component of sperm cell that is essential for sperm membrane fluidity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction. Recent data obtained in bovine sperm showed that sperm capacitation is associated to the formation of oxysterols, oxidized products of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to profile oxysterol content in human semen, and to investigate their potential role in sperm pathophysiology. Among the 12 oxysterols analyzed, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC resulted the most represented in normozoospermic samples, and its concentration positively correlated with spermatozoa number. We detected Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for 25-HC production, in human spermatozoa at the level of the neck and the post acrosomal area. Upon incubation with spermatozoa, 25-HC induced calcium and cholesterol transients in connection with the acrosomal reaction. Our results support a role for 25-HC in sperm function.

  14. Mass spectrometry profiling of oxysterols in human sperm identifies 25-hydroxycholesterol as a marker of sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbinati, Chiara; Caponecchia, Luisa; Puca, Rosa; Ciacciarelli, Marco; Salacone, Pietro; Sebastianelli, Annalisa; Pastore, Antonio; Palleschi, Giovanni; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Porta, Natale; Rago, Rocco; Carbone, Antonio; Iuliano, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Cholesterol is a main lipid component of sperm cell that is essential for sperm membrane fluidity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction. Recent data obtained in bovine sperm showed that sperm capacitation is associated to the formation of oxysterols, oxidized products of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to profile oxysterol content in human semen, and to investigate their potential role in sperm pathophysiology. Among the 12 oxysterols analyzed, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) resulted the most represented in normozoospermic samples, and its concentration positively correlated with spermatozoa number. We detected Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for 25-HC production, in human spermatozoa at the level of the neck and the post acrosomal area. Upon incubation with spermatozoa, 25-HC induced calcium and cholesterol transients in connection with the acrosomal reaction. Our results support a role for 25-HC in sperm function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hu, Haikun; Guo, Jing; Liu, Zeping; Liu, Renkai; Li, Fan; Zou, Shujuan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dental and skeletal maturity. Digital panoramic radiographs and lateral skull cephalograms of 302 patients (134 boys and 168 girls, ranging from 8 to 16 years of age) were examined. Dental maturity was assessed by calcification stages of the mandibular canines, first and second premolars, and second molars, whereas skeletal maturity was estimated by the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient was used to measure the association between CVM stage and dental calcification stage of individual teeth. The mean chronologic age of girls was significantly lower than that of boys in each CVM stage. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients between dental maturity and cervical vertebral maturity ranged from 0.391 to 0.582 for girls and from 0.464 to 0.496 for boys (P cervical vertebral maturation stage. The development of the mandibular second molar in females and that of the mandibular canine in males had the strongest correlations with cervical vertebral maturity. Therefore, it is practical to consider the relationship between dental and skeletal maturity when planning orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Honey bee males and queens use glandular secretions to enhance sperm viability before and after storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan; Baer, Boris

    2009-01-01

    on sperm survival. After sperm storage, the queens also provide sperm with secretions from spermathecal glands and we show that these secretions have a comparable positive effect on sperm viability. SDS gels show that the proteomic profiles of accessory gland secretion and spermathecal fluid secretion...... hardly overlap, which suggests that males and females use different proteins to enhance sperm viability during, respectively, ejaculation and final sperm storage....

  17. Evidence for biased use of sperm sources in wild female giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama)

    OpenAIRE

    Naud, Marie-José; Shaw, Paul W; Hanlon, Roger T; Havenhand, Jon N

    2005-01-01

    In species where females store sperm from their mates prior to fertilization, sperm competition is particularly probable. Female Sepia apama are polyandrous and have access to sperm from packages (spermatangia) deposited by males onto their buccal area during mating and to sperm stored in internal sperm-storage organs (receptacles) located below the beak. Here, we describe the structure of the sperm stores in the female's buccal area, use microsatellite DNA analyses to determine the genetic d...

  18. Sperm survival in the female reproductive tract in the fly Scathophaga stercoraria (L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bernasconi, G.; Hellriegel, B.; Heyland, A.; Ward, P. I.

    2002-01-01

    While sperm competition risk favours males transferring many sperm to secure fertilizations, females of a variety of species actively reduce sperm numbers reaching their reproductive tract, e.g. by extrusion or killing. Potential benefits of spermicide to females include nutritional gains, influence over sperm storage and paternity, and the elimination of sperm bearing somatic mutations that would lower zygote fitness.We investigated changes in sperm viability after in vivo and in vitro expos...

  19. Application of artificial insemination technique to eupyrene and/or apyrene sperm in Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Sahara, Ken; Takemura, Yoko

    2003-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has a dimorphic sperm system. The eupyrene sperm is the sperm to fertilize eggs and the apyrene sperm plays a crucial role for assisting fertilization. Heat-treated (331C for 96h) Daizo (DH) males, one of the strains in the silkworm, produce only eupyrene sperm, while in triploid males only apyrene sperm are functional. Though both types of males are found to be sterile, double copulation of the two males with a single female greatly increases fertili...

  20. Albumin is synthesized in epididymis and aggregates in a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex involved in sperm-egg fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kélen Fabíola Arroteia

    Full Text Available The epididymis has an important role in the maturation of sperm for fertilization, but little is known about the epididymal molecules involved in sperm modifications during this process. We have previously described the expression pattern for an antigen in epididymal epithelial cells that reacts with the monoclonal antibody (mAb TRA 54. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses suggest that the epitope of the epididymal antigen probably involves a sugar moiety that is released into the epididymal lumen in an androgen-dependent manner and subsequently binds to luminal sperm. Using column chromatography, SDS-PAGE with in situ digestion and mass spectrometry, we have identified the protein recognized by mAb TRA 54 in mouse epididymal epithelial cells. The ∼65 kDa protein is part of a high molecular mass complex (∼260 kDa that is also present in the sperm acrosomal vesicle and is completely released after the acrosomal reaction. The amino acid sequence of the protein corresponded to that of albumin. Immunoprecipitates with anti-albumin antibody contained the antigen recognized by mAb TRA 54, indicating that the epididymal molecule recognized by mAb TRA 54 is albumin. RT-PCR detected albumin mRNA in the epididymis and fertilization assays in vitro showed that the glycoprotein complex containing albumin was involved in the ability of sperm to recognize and penetrate the egg zona pellucida. Together, these results indicate that epididymal-derived albumin participates in the formation of a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex that has an important role in egg fertilization.

  1. Albumin is synthesized in epididymis and aggregates in a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex involved in sperm-egg fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroteia, Kélen Fabíola; Barbieri, Mainara Ferreira; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Hyslop, Stephen; Alvares, Lúcia Elvira; Pereira, Luís Antonio Violin Dias

    2014-01-01

    The epididymis has an important role in the maturation of sperm for fertilization, but little is known about the epididymal molecules involved in sperm modifications during this process. We have previously described the expression pattern for an antigen in epididymal epithelial cells that reacts with the monoclonal antibody (mAb) TRA 54. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses suggest that the epitope of the epididymal antigen probably involves a sugar moiety that is released into the epididymal lumen in an androgen-dependent manner and subsequently binds to luminal sperm. Using column chromatography, SDS-PAGE with in situ digestion and mass spectrometry, we have identified the protein recognized by mAb TRA 54 in mouse epididymal epithelial cells. The ∼65 kDa protein is part of a high molecular mass complex (∼260 kDa) that is also present in the sperm acrosomal vesicle and is completely released after the acrosomal reaction. The amino acid sequence of the protein corresponded to that of albumin. Immunoprecipitates with anti-albumin antibody contained the antigen recognized by mAb TRA 54, indicating that the epididymal molecule recognized by mAb TRA 54 is albumin. RT-PCR detected albumin mRNA in the epididymis and fertilization assays in vitro showed that the glycoprotein complex containing albumin was involved in the ability of sperm to recognize and penetrate the egg zona pellucida. Together, these results indicate that epididymal-derived albumin participates in the formation of a high molecular mass glycoprotein complex that has an important role in egg fertilization.

  2. Implementing an open-access CASA software for the assessment of stallion sperm motility: Relationship with other sperm quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaretta, Elisa; Munerato, Mauro; Yeste, Marc; Galeati, Giovanna; Spinaci, Marcella; Tamanini, Carlo; Mari, Gaetano; Bucci, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Setting an open-access computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) may benefit the evaluation of motility in mammalian sperm, especially when economic constraints do not allow the use of a commercial system. There have been successful attempts to develop such a device in Zebra fish sperm and the system has been used in very few studies on mammalian spermatozoa. Against this background, the present study aimed at developing an open-access CASA system for mammalian sperm using the horse as a model and based upon the Image J software previously established for Zebra fish sperm. Along with determining the sperm progressive motility and other kinetic parameters (such as amplitude of lateral head displacement), the "results" window was adjusted to simplify subsequent statistical analyses. The path window was enriched with colored sperm trajectories on the basis of the subpopulation they belong to and a number that allowed the sperm track to be associated to the sperm motility data shown in the "results" window. Data obtained from the novel plugin (named as CASA_bgm) were compared with those of the commercial CASA Hamilton-Thorn IVOS Vers.12, through Bland Altman's plots. While the percentage of total and progressive motile sperm, VCL, VAP, VSL, LIN and STR and ALH were in agreement with those obtained with the commercial system, BCF significantly differed between the two systems probably due to their settings. Interestingly, a positive and significant correlation between the percentages of total motile sperm evaluated through CASA_bgm and those showing high mitochondrial membrane potential evaluated by JC-1 staining was found. In conclusion, CASA_bgm ImageJ plugin could be useful and reliable for stallion sperm motility analysis and it is our aim to apply this system to other mammalian species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of vitamins during maturation of caprine oocytes on subsequent developmental potential in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Charles L; Ongeri, E Moige; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2003-03-01

    Only a small proportion of goat oocytes selected for in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM) can successfully complete cytoplasmic maturation and support embryonic development. To produce goat blastocysts more efficiently in vitro, it is necessary to identify factors required during oocyte maturation. The objective of this study was to determine the role of vitamins during maturation of caprine oocytes in semi-defined medium on subsequent developmental capacity in vitro. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) collected from a local abattoir were matured in synthetic oviductal fluid (SOF) medium supplemented with BSA, LH, FSH, and EGF in the presence or absence of MEM vitamins for 24 h. The COCs were co-incubated with frozen-thawed sperm in Bracket and Oliphant fertilization medium for 18-22 h. Embryos were cultured in G1.2 medium for 72 h followed by culture in G2.2 medium for an additional 72 h. Addition of vitamins significantly increased (Pdevelopment (16.4+/-1.2% versus 12.3+/-1.1%), and tended to increase (Pembryos (61.4+/-3.0% versus 52.7+/-2.6%). Addition of MEM vitamins to SOF maturation medium significantly increased (Pvitamin-treated group (150.5+/-8.4 versus 123.4+/-8.8). These results suggest that addition of vitamins during oocyte maturation is beneficial for subsequent blastocyst development and viability.

  4. Seasonal variation of sperm quality and the relationship between spermatocrit and sperm concentration in yamú Brycon amazonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz-Casallas, Pablo E.; Medina-Robles, Víctor M.; Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.

    2007-01-01

    and sperm concentration were examined over two reproductive seasons. Activation time, spermatocrit, and sperm concentration were significantly higher in 2003 than in 2004. Spermatocrit and sperm concentration showed a significant positive relationship (r2=0.79). During the 2004 reproductive season......, a significant variation was observed for spermatocrit and sperm concentration between the initial period (February 15th to March 14th) and the middle and final periods (March 15th to April 14th and April 15th to May 14th, respectively). Neither the ion concentrations nor the glucose and cholesterol...

  5. Flow cytometric sexing of spider sperm reveals an equal sperm production ratio in a female-biased species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanthournout, Bram; Deswarte, K; Hammad, H

    2014-01-01

    that other factors influence sex ratio variation. In this paper, we investigate whether this additional variation can be explained by the unequal production of male- and female-determining sperm cells during sperm production. Using flow cytometry, we show that males produce equal amounts of male- and female......-determining sperm cells; thus bias in sperm production does not contribute to the sex ratio bias observed in this species. This demonstrates that other factors such as parental genes suppressing endosymbiont effects and cryptic female choice might play a role in sex allocation in this species....

  6. Effect of postthaw storage time and sperm-to-egg ratio on fertility of cryopreserved brook trout sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynca, J; Dietrich, G J; Dobosz, S; Zalewski, T; Ciereszko, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to test the influence of postthaw storage time on sperm motility parameters of brook trout (n = 9). Furthermore, we examined the effect of sperm-to-egg ratios of 300,000:1 and 600,000:1 on fertility of postthaw, cryopreserved, brook trout sperm. The application of a cryopreservation procedure produced very high postthaw sperm motility (56.8 ± 4.0%). The cryopreserved sperm of brook trout could be stored up to 60 minutes without loss of the percentage of sperm motility (52.0 ± 9.0%). The fertilization capacity of brook trout postthaw sperm was comparable with the fertilization rate of fresh semen at a sperm-to-egg ratio as low as 300,000:1 (42.4 ± 14.0% and 36.5 ± 11.0% for eyed and hatched stages, respectively). The possibility of postthaw semen storage for the prolonged time and the obtainment of high fertilization rate at low sperm-to-egg ratio can lead to the significant improvement of brook trout semen cryopreservation procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sperm-egg recognition in the mouse: characterization of sp56, a sperm protein having specific affinity for ZP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A; Le, T; Palacios, M; Bookbinder, L H; Wassarman, P M; Suzuki, F; Bleil, J D

    1994-05-01

    Recognition between mammalian gametes occurs when the plasma membrane of the sperm head binds to the zona pellucida (ZP), an extracellular coat surrounding eggs. ZP3, one of three glycoproteins in the ZP, is the egg protein recognized by sperm. A mouse sperm surface protein, sp56 (M(r) = 56,000), has been identified on the basis of its specific affinity for ZP3 (Bleil, J. D., and P. M. Wassarman. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:5563-5567). Studies presented here were designed to characterize mouse sperm sp56 and to further test whether or not this protein specifically recognizes ZP3. sp56 was purified by both ZP3 affinity chromatography and by ion exchange chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified native protein eluted from size-exclusion columns as a homomultimer (M(r) approximately 110,000). Each monomer of the protein contains intramolecular disulfide bonds, consistent with its extracellular location. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting studies, using monoclonal antibodies, demonstrated that sp56 is a peripheral membrane protein located on the outer surface of the sperm head plasma membrane, precisely where sperm bind ZP3. Results of crosslinking experiments demonstrated that the ZP3 oligosaccharide recognized by sperm has specific affinity for sp56. Collectively, these results suggest that sp56 may be the sperm protein responsible for sperm-egg recognition in the mouse.

  8. The predictive value of parameters of clinical presentations for sperm yield in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia receiving microdissection testicular sperm extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsuan Ku

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Clinical presentations or phenotypes can be used as predictive factors for successful sperm retrieval during mTESE in patients with NOA. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and cases with UDT history have a higher chance of sperm retrieval. Initial testicular needle biopsy, if available, can provide valuable information about chances of sperm retrieval. Hypospermatogenesis predicts high sperm yield rate, and LMA can have best upgrade results of sperm yield after mTESE.

  9. Air pollution and quality of sperm: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Namvar, Farideh; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid; Hadizadeh Talasaz, Zahra; Esmaeli, Mahin

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is common in all countries and affects reproductive functions in men and women. It particularly impacts sperm parameters in men. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of air pollution on the quality of sperm. The scientific databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, Cochrane Library, and Elsevier were searched to identify relevant articles published between 1978 to 2013. In the first step, 76 articles were selected. These studies were ecological correlation, cohort, retrospective, cross-sectional, and case control ones that were found through electronic and hand search of references about air pollution and male infertility. The outcome measurement was the change in sperm parameters. A total of 11 articles were ultimately included in a meta-analysis to examine the impact of air pollution on sperm parameters. The authors applied meta-analysis sheets from Cochrane library, then data extraction, including mean and standard deviation of sperm parameters were calculated and finally their confidence interval (CI) were compared to CI of standard parameters. The CI for pooled means were as follows: 2.68 ± 0.32 for ejaculation volume (mL), 62.1 ± 15.88 for sperm concentration (million per milliliter), 39.4 ± 5.52 for sperm motility (%), 23.91 ± 13.43 for sperm morphology (%) and 49.53 ± 11.08 for sperm count. The results of this meta-analysis showed that air pollution reduces sperm motility, but has no impact on the other sperm parameters of spermogram.

  10. Clinical aspects of sperm DNA fragmentation detection and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Donald P; Wixon, Regina

    2006-03-15

    Over the past 25 years, various methods have been developed to measure sperm DNA strand breaks in situ. Currently, there are four major tests of sperm DNA fragmentation, including the Comet, Tunel, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the acridine orange test (AOT). The Comet assay is a light microscope technique where the sperm cells are mixed with melted agarose and then placed on a glass slide. The cells are lysed and then subjected to horizontal electrophoresis. The Tunel assay, another light microscope technique, transfers labeled nucleotide to the 3'OH group of a broken DNA strand with the use of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. The fluorescence intensity of each scored sperm is determined as a "yes" or "no" for sperm on a light microscope slide or by channels of fluorescent intensity in a flow cytometer. The light microscope-based AOT, uses the metachromatic properties of acridine orange to stain sperm cells. The SCSA treats sperm with low pH to denature DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks, followed by acridine orange (AO) staining of green for native DNA and red for denatured DNA as measured by flow cytometry (FCM) as well as % sperm with high DNA stainability (HDS: immature sperm with intact DNA related to decreased fertilization rates). The SCSA method has defined a 27-30% DNA fragmentation index (DFI) as the point in which a man is placed into a statistical category of taking a longer time to in vivo pregnancy, intra uterine insemination (IUI) and more routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles or no pregnancy. Current data suggest that intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may help overcome the diminished pregnancy prognosis with high DFI over the other ART or natural methods.

  11. Rosiglitazone Improves Stallion Sperm Motility, ATP Content, and Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swegen, Aleona; Lambourne, Sarah Renay; Aitken, R John; Gibb, Zamira

    2016-11-01

    Media used for equine sperm storage often contain relatively high concentrations of glucose, even though stallion spermatozoa preferentially utilize oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) over glycolysis to generate ATP and support motility. Rosiglitazone is an antidiabetic compound that enhances metabolic flexibility and glucose utilization in various cell types, but its effects on sperm metabolism are unknown. This study investigated the effects of rosiglitazone on stallion sperm function in vitro, along with the possible role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mediating these effects. Spermatozoa were incubated with or without rosiglitazone, GW9662 (an antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-gamma), and compound C (CC; an AMPK inhibitor). Sperm motility, viability, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial membrane potential (mMP), ATP content, and glucose uptake capacity were measured. Samples incubated with rosiglitazone displayed significantly higher motility, percentage of cells with normal mMP, ATP content, and glucose uptake capacity, while sperm viability was unaffected. The percentage of spermatozoa positive for mitochondrial ROS was also significantly lower in rosiglitazone-treated samples. AMPK localized to the sperm midpiece, and its phosphorylation, was increased in rosiglitazone-treated spermatozoa. CC decreased sperm AMPK phosphorylation and reduced sperm motility, and successfully inhibited the effects of rosiglitazone. Inclusion of rosiglitazone in a room temperature sperm storage medium maintained sperm motility above 60% for 6 days, attaining significantly higher motility than sperm stored in control media. The ability of rosiglitazone to substantially alleviate the time-dependent deterioration of stallion spermatozoa by diverting metabolism away from OXPHOS and toward glycolysis has novel implications for the long-term, functional preservation of these cells. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction

  12. Pentoxifylline effects on capacitation and fertility of stallion epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasti, P N; Monteiro, G A; Maziero, R R D; Carmo, M T; Dell'Aqua, J A; Crespilho, A M; Rifai, E A; Papa, F O

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determinate whether pentoxifylline (PTX) increases the motion parameters of fresh and frozen-thawed equine epididymal spermatozoa, to evaluate the tyrosine phosphorylation of frozen-thawed epididymal sperm in the presence of PTX and to determine whether the PTX-treatment of stallion epididymal sperm prior to freezing improves the fertility response of mares to a reduced number of spermatozoa per insemination dose. Fifty epididymis were flushed with a skim milk based extender with or without PTX. The pre-treatment with PTX enhanced the sperm motility after being harvested (Psperm kinematics between control and treated samples (P>0.05). Plasma membrane integrity did not differ between control and PTX group after recovery and after thawing (P>0.05), as observed in tyrosine phosphorylation, which the PTX treatment did not alter the percentage of tail-associated immunofluorescence of cryopreserved epididymal sperm (P>0.05). For the fertility trial, different insemination groups were tested: 800×10 6 epididymal sperm (C800); 100×10 6 epididymal sperm (C100); 100×10 6 epididymal sperm recovered in an extender containing PTX (PTX100). The conception rates for C800; C100 and PTX100 were 68.7% (11/16); 31.5% (5/16) and 50% (8/16), respectively. The conception rate did not differ among groups (P>0.05), however, a low number of animals was used in this study. A trend toward significance (P=0.07) was observed between C800 and C100 groups. In conclusion, PTX has no deleterious effect on sperm motility, viability and capacitation of cryopreserved stallion epididymal sperm. The conventional artificial insemination with 100×10 6 sperm recovered with PTX ensures acceptable conception rates and maximize the limited number of doses of cryopreserved stallion epididymal sperm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular changes and signaling events occurring in spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasi, M G; Visconti, P E

    2017-03-01

    After leaving the testis, spermatozoa have not yet acquired the ability to move progressively and are unable to fertilize oocytes. To become fertilization competent, they must go through an epididymal maturation process in the male, and capacitation in the female tract. Epididymal maturation can be defined as those changes occurring to spermatozoa in the epididymis that render the spermatozoa the ability to capacitate in the female tract. As part of this process, sperm cells undergo a series of biochemical and physiological changes that require incorporation of new molecules derived from the epididymal epithelium, as well as post-translational modifications of endogenous proteins synthesized during spermiogenesis in the testis. This review will focus on epididymal maturation events, with emphasis in recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of this process. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. Effects of Crocin Supplementation during In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Oocytes on Glutathione Synthesis and Cytoplasmic Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Mokhber Maleki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crocin is an active ingredient of saffron (Crocus sativus L. and its antioxidant properties have been previously investigated. This carotenoid scavenges free radicals and stimulates glutathione (GSH synthesis; consequently, it may protect cells against oxidative stress. The aim of this research is to protect oocytes from oxidative stress by the addition of a natural source antioxidant. Materials and Methods: In the present in vitro experimental study, we collected cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs from mouse ovaries of euthanized, 6-8 week-old female Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI mice. Oocytes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM in the presence of either crocin (5 or 10 μg/ml, 5 mM buthionine-[S-R]- sulfoximine (BSO, or the combination of crocin plus BSO. Oocytes that matured in vitro in a medium without crocin or BSO supplements were considered as controls. Following 16-18 hours of IVM, matured oocytes (n=631 were fertilized by capacitated sperm from NMRI male mice, and cultured in vitro for up to 96 hours to assess preimplantation embryonic development. The levels of GSH in metaphase II (MII oocytes after IVM (n=240 were also assessed by the 5, 5-dithio-bis (2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB-GSH reductase recycling assay. Results: Supplementation of IVM media with 10 μg/ml crocin significantly (P<0.05 increased nuclear maturation, preimplantation development and GSH concentrations compared with the control group. Maturation of oocytes in IVM medium supplemented with BSO alone or the combination of 5 μg/ml crocin and BSO drastically decreased GSH concentrations and subsequently resulted in low rates of maturation, fertilization and blastocyst development. However, the combination of 10 μg/ml crocin with 5 mM BSO increased the level of nuclear maturation which was comparable to the control group. Conclusion: Supplementation of IVM media with crocin can improve nuclear maturation rates and subsequent developmental potential

  15. Adverse testicular effects of Botox® in mature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breikaa, Randa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Mosli, Hisham A. [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Nagy, Ayman A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim.pharma@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-01

    Botox® injections are taking a consistently increasing place in urology. Intracremasteric injections, particularly, have been applied for cryptorchidism and painful testicular spasms. Studies outlining their safety for this use are, however, scanty. Thus, the present study aimed at evaluating possible testicular toxicity of Botox® injections and their effect on male fertility. Mature rats were given intracremasteric Botox® injections (10, 20 and 40 U/kg) three times in a two-week interval. Changes in body and testes weights were examined and gonadosomatic index compared to control group. Semen quality, sperm parameters, fructose, protein, cholesterol and triglycerides contents were assessed. Effects on normal testicular function were investigated by measuring testosterone levels and changes in enzyme activities (lactate dehydrogenase-X and acid phosphatase). To draw a complete picture, changes in oxidative and inflammatory states were examined, in addition to the extent of connective tissue deposition between seminiferous tubules. In an attempt to have more accurate information about possible spermatotoxic effects of Botox®, flowcytometric analysis and histopathological examination were carried out. Botox®-injected rats showed altered testicular physiology and function. Seminiferous tubules were separated by dense fibers, especially with the highest dose. Flowcytometric analysis showed a decrease in mature sperms and histopathology confirmed the findings. The oxidative state was, however, comparable to control group. This study is the first to show that intracremasteric injections of Botox® induce adverse testicular effects evidenced by inhibited spermatogenesis and initiation of histopathological changes. In conclusion, decreased fertility may be a serious problem Botox® injections could cause. - Highlights: • Botox® injections are the trend nowadays, for both medical and non-medical uses. • They were recently suggested for cryptorchidism and

  16. Birefringence characteristics in sperm heads allow for the selection of reacted spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianaroli, Luca; Magli, M Cristina; Ferraretti, Anna P; Crippa, Andor; Lappi, Michela; Capitani, Serena; Baccetti, Baccio

    2010-02-01

    To verify clinical outcome after injection of spermatozoa that have undergone the acrosome reaction (reacted spermatozoa) vs. those still having an intact acrosome (nonreacted spermatozoa). Prospective, randomized study. Reproductive Medicine Unit, Italian Society for the Study of Reproductive Medicine, Bologna, Italy. According to a prospective randomization including 71 couples with severe male factor infertility, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was performed under polarized light that permitted analysis of the pattern of birefringence in the sperm head. Twenty-three patients had their oocytes injected with reacted spermatozoa, 26 patient's oocytes were injected with nonreacted spermatozoa, and in 22 patients both reacted and nonreacted spermatozoa were injected. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection was performed under polarized light to selectively inject acrosome-reacted and acrosome-nonreacted spermatozoa. Rates of fertilization, cleavage, pregnancy, implantation, and ongoing implantation. There was no effect on the fertilizing capacity and embryo development of either type of sperm, whereas the implantation rate was higher in oocytes injected with reacted spermatozoa (39.0%) vs. those injected with nonreacted spermatozoa (8.6%). The implantation rate was 24.4% in the group injected with both reacted and nonreacted spermatozoa. The delivery rate per cycle followed the same trend. Spermatozoa that have undergone the acrosome reaction seem to be more prone to supporting the development of viable ICSI embryos. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards microfluidic sperm refinement : impedance-based analysis and sorting of sperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagenaar, B.; Dekker, Stefan; de Boer, Hans L.; Bomer, Johan G.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2016-01-01

    The use of high quality semen for artificial insemination in the livestock industry is essential for successful outcome. Insemination using semen with a high number of sperm cells containing morphological defects has a negative impact on fertilization outcome. Therefore, semen with a high number of

  18. Cryopreservation of European catfish Silurus glanis sperm: Sperm motility, viability and hatching success of embryos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linhart, Otomar; Rodina, Marek; Flajšhans, Martin; Gela, David; Kocour, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2005), s. 250-261 ISSN 0011-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/03/0178; GA AV ČR IBS5045314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : fish * sperm * aquaculture Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2005

  19. Transmembrane Signal Transduction in Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization: Focusing on Xenopus laevis as a Model Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a cell biological phenomenon of crucial importance for the birth of new life in a variety of multicellular and sexual reproduction species such as algae, animal and plants. Fertilization involves a sequence of events, in which the female gamete “egg” and the male gamete “spermatozoon (sperm” develop, acquire their functions, meet and fuse with each other, to initiate embryonic and zygotic development. Here, it will be briefly reviewed how oocyte cytoplasmic components are orchestrated to undergo hormone-induced oocyte maturation and sperm-induced activation of development. I then review how sperm-egg membrane interaction/fusion and activation of development in the fertilized egg are accomplished and regulated through egg coat- or egg plasma membrane-associated components, highlighting recent findings and future directions in the studies using Xenopus laevis as a model experimental animal.

  20. [Artificial insemination with donor sperm in the Netherlands: future-proof?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kop, P A L Femke; Janssens, Pim M W; Mochtar, Monique H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years much has changed in care for artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID). Since new laws and regulations were implemented, a large number of sperm banks have closed and the total number of sperm donors and their availability have decreased. Long waiting times and the use of sperm donors recruited by foreign commercial sperm banks can indicate a shortage of sperm donors. The fact that the internet offers women the possibility of ordering donor sperm and starting treatment without the intervention of a sperm bank means that future donor-conceived children may be prevented from obtaining the identity of their sperm donor as stipulated in the Dutch law on donor information in the context of artificial insemination. In order to comply with this law, an active recruitment policy is needed for Dutch sperm donors, to prevent waiting lists and treatments outside Dutch sperm banks. Only then can current AID care be guaranteed in the Netherlands in the future.

  1. Evolving minimum standards in responsible international sperm donor offspring quota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Pim M. W.; Thorn, Petra; Castilla, Jose A.; Frith, Lucy; Crawshaw, Marilyn; Mochtar, Monique; Bjorndahl, Lars; Kvist, Ulrik; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson C.

    2015-01-01

    An international working group was established with the aim of making recommendations on the number of offspring for a sperm donor that should be allowable in cases of international use of his sperm. Considerations from genetic, psychosocial, operational and ethical points of view were debated. For

  2. Sperm DNA damage in relation to lipid peroxidation following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationships between lipid peroxidation (LPO) and sperm DNA damage following freezing-thawing of boar semen in different extenders. The comet assay was used to measure the extent of sperm DNA damage in a cryoprotectant-free extender or in cryoprotectant-based extenders after single ...

  3. Reproductive tract modifications of the boar sperm surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, Bart M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115389873

    2017-01-01

    The sperm cell has a unique, polarized and segregated surface that is modified extensively by the changing environments in both the male and the female reproductive tracts. The sperm cannot refresh its surface, as protein translation and membrane recycling by intracellular vesicular transport have

  4. Sperm use economy of honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Collins, Jason; Maalaps, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    the fecundity and longevity of queens and therefore colony fitness. We quantified the number of sperm that honeybee (Apis mellifera) queens use to fertilize eggs. We examined sperm use in naturally mated queens of different ages and in queens artificially inseminated with different volumes of semen. We found...

  5. Modifications in sperm quality of Wister Albino Rats by Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a well known herb, Phyllanthus amarus on the sperm characteristics in male albino rats was studied. This was an investigation of the age-long claim by the locales in the rural communities in the southern states of Nigeria where this plant is consumed religiously that it affects sperm quality, hence sexual potency ...

  6. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    2015-06-08

    Jun 8, 2015 ... Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells. B.M. van den Berg*. Barex Biochemical Products, Seb. Centenweg 45, 1602ML Enkhuizen, The Netherlands. Abstract. The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric.

  7. Modifications in sperm quality of Wister Albino Rats by Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Abstract. The effect of a well known herb, Phyllanthus amarus on the sperm characteristics in male albino rats was studied. This was an investigation of the age-long claim by the locales in the rural communities in the southern states of Nigeria where this plant is consumed religiously that it affects sperm quality, hence ...

  8. A Study of Anti-Sperm Antibodies among Infertile Subjects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) can interfere with sperm functions and fertility and may be found in the blood, lymph or local secretions such as seminal and cervico-vaginal fluids in both men and women. Objective: to evaluate the contribution of ASA to infertility in male and female subjects investigated for ...

  9. Cephalopods in the diet of sperm whales caught commercially off ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collection from stomach contents of 30 sperm whales Physeter catodon comprised a total of 46 cephalopods belonging to six families. Nine species were identified, including Ommastrephes bartramii, which is recorded for the first time in the diet of sperm whales caught off South Africa, and Todarodes filippovae, which has ...

  10. The effect of sperm morphology and testicular spermatozoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the correlation between sperm morphology groups (strict criteria) and testicular spermatozoa, and day 2 and 3 embryo quality in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) cases. Methods. A retrospective study was done of 2 402 IVF and ICSI-fertilised embryos classified as ...

  11. Evidence for decreasing sperm count in African population from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This meta-analysis, following our previous reports those documented an overall 57% diminution in mean sperm concentration around the globe over past 35 years and 32.5% decline in past 50 years in European population, attempts to report the declining trend of sperm concentrations in African population ...

  12. in human sperm motility and level of calcium and magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J. Valsa

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... Abstract A detailed sperm motility study for 24 h after collection was done. The level of calcium and magnesium in seminal plasma during this period was also seen to understand the role of these electrolytes on sperm motility. Good care was taken in selection of subjects (young and healthy), collection and ...

  13. Maintenance of sperm variation in a highly promiscuous wild bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhim, Sara; Double, Michael C; Margraf, Nicolas; Birkhead, Tim R; Cockburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection is an important force in the evolution of reproductive traits, including sperm morphology. In birds, sperm morphology is known to be highly heritable and largely condition-independent. Theory predicts, and recent comparative work corroborates, that strong selection in such traits reduces intraspecific phenotypic variation. Here we show that some variation can be maintained despite extreme promiscuity, as a result of opposing, copulation-role-specific selection forces. After controlling for known correlates of siring success in the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), we found that (a) lifetime extra-pair paternity success was associated with sperm with a shorter flagellum and relatively large head, and (b) males whose sperm had a longer flagellum and a relatively smaller head achieved higher within-pair paternity. In this species extrapair copulations occur in the same morning, but preceding, pair copulations during a female's fertile period, suggesting that shorter and relatively larger-headed sperm are most successful in securing storage (defense), whereas the opposite phenotype might be better at outcompeting stored sperm (offense). Furthermore, since cuckolding ability is a major contributor to differential male reproductive output, stronger selection on defense sperm competition traits might explain the short sperm of malurids relative to other promiscuous passerines.

  14. Maintenance of sperm variation in a highly promiscuous wild bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Calhim

    Full Text Available Postcopulatory sexual selection is an important force in the evolution of reproductive traits, including sperm morphology. In birds, sperm morphology is known to be highly heritable and largely condition-independent. Theory predicts, and recent comparative work corroborates, that strong selection in such traits reduces intraspecific phenotypic variation. Here we show that some variation can be maintained despite extreme promiscuity, as a result of opposing, copulation-role-specific selection forces. After controlling for known correlates of siring success in the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus, we found that (a lifetime extra-pair paternity success was associated with sperm with a shorter flagellum and relatively large head, and (b males whose sperm had a longer flagellum and a relatively smaller head achieved higher within-pair paternity. In this species extrapair copulations occur in the same morning, but preceding, pair copulations during a female's fertile period, suggesting that shorter and relatively larger-headed sperm are most successful in securing storage (defense, whereas the opposite phenotype might be better at outcompeting stored sperm (offense. Furthermore, since cuckolding ability is a major contributor to differential male reproductive output, stronger selection on defense sperm competition traits might explain the short sperm of malurids relative to other promiscuous passerines.

  15. Heritability of sperm length in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; de Jong, Gerdien; Schmid-Hempel, Regula

    2006-01-01

    Sperm length is highly variable, both between and within species, but the evolutionary significance of this variation is poorly understood. Sexual selection on sperm length requires a significant additive genetic variance, but few studies have actually measured this. Here we present the first est...

  16. Evidence for decreasing sperm count in African population from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Purpose: This meta-analysis, following our previous reports those documented an overall 57% diminution in mean sperm con- centration around the globe over past 35 years and 32.5% decline in past 50 years in European population, attempts to report the declining trend of sperm concentrations in African ...

  17. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm

  18. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  19. A sperm competition model for the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, Carl; Reichard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 150, č. 14 (2013), s. 1709-1730 ISSN 0005-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1163 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Acheilognathinae * alternative mating tactics * mating system * sneaking * sperm competition * sperm motility Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2013

  20. Sperm banking for male cancer patients: social and semen profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana C.S. Bonetti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Report the characteristics of cryopreserved semen from a cohort of male cancer patients, attitudes towards cryopreservation and outcomes of semen samples based on a 12-year cryopreservation program. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 98 male cancer patients whose sperm samples were banked were evaluated. Demographic parameters, semen characteristics, destination of sperm banked samples and questionnaires answered by the patients regarding cryopreservation time were evaluated. RESULTS: The cancer diagnoses were testicle (56.1%, prostate (15.3%, Hodgkin’s lymphomas (9.2%, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (7.1%, leukemia (3.1% and other malignancies (9.2%. The patients with testicular cancer presented lower sperm concentration (p < 0.001; however, there were no differences with the percentage of normozoospermic patients among cancer type groups (p = 0.185. A shorter time between cancer diagnosis and sperm banking was observed for testicular and prostate cancer patients (p < 0.001. Most of the patients (89.5% favored sperm banking as a fertility preservation method. CONCLUSIONS: Although less than 20% of banked sperm samples were disposed of, the majority of patients related sperm banking with safe for fertility preservation. Our results show that all male cancer patients of reproductive age facing cancer treatment could be offered sperm banking.

  1. CatSper channel, sperm function and male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhand Pratap; Rajender, Singh

    2015-01-01

    A number of physiological events, such as sperm hyperactivation, chemotaxis towards the egg, capacitation and acrosome reaction, are triggered by activation of sperm ion channels in response to a diverse range of chemical cues. Cation channel of sperm (CatSper), a sperm-specific ion channel, is unique in orchestrating the events for fertilization, and seems to be exclusively evolved for sperm function and male fertility. CatSper acts as a polymodal, chemosensory calcium channel and plays a vital role in the regulation of sperm hyperactivation. CatSper knockout models and application of patch clamp recordings have shown that it is indispensable for male fertility, and mutations and deletions in CatSper gene(s) may lead to infertility. In fact, mutations in CatSper1 and 2 have been identified in infertile individuals; however, CatSper3 and 4 have not been explored. Restricted localization and expression of CatSper in sperm offer an added advantage to developing gamete-based safe non-hormonal contraceptives. This review concisely covers identification, structure, function, and mechanism of action of CatSper channels. The functional importance of this complex ion channel in sperm motility and male fertility is highlighted for further research on male fertility, infertility, and contraception. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancement of Sexual Libido and Sperm Production in rabbits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancement of Sexual Libido and Sperm Production in rabbits using Clomiphene citrate (Clomid®) ... The results obtained in Trial II showed that sperm concentration was higher (P<0.05) in animals treated with 6.25mg of the drug than their counterparts treated with 12.50mg of the drug. The Chinchilla bucks were of higher ...

  3. Human sperm swimming in a high viscosity mucus analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2018-02-17

    Remarkably, mammalian sperm maintain a substantive proportion of their progressive swimming speed within highly viscous fluids, including those of the female reproductive tract. Here, we analyse the digital microscopy of a human sperm swimming in a highly viscous, weakly elastic mucus analogue. We exploit principal component analysis to simplify its flagellar beat pattern, from which boundary element calculations are used to determine the time-dependent flow field around the sperm cell. The sperm flow field is further approximated in terms of regularized point forces, and estimates of the mechanical power consumption are determined, for comparison with analogous low viscosity media studies. This highlights extensive differences in the structure of the flows surrounding human sperm in different media, indicating how the cell-cell and cell-boundary hydrodynamic interactions significantly differ with the physical microenvironment. The regularized point force decomposition also provides cell-level information that may ultimately be incorporated into sperm population models. We further observe indications that the core feature in explaining the effectiveness of sperm swimming in high viscosity media is the loss of cell yawing, which is related with a greater density of regularized point force singularities along the axis of symmetry of the flagellar beat to represent the flow field. In turn this implicates a reduction of the wavelength of the distal beat pattern - and hence dynamical wavelength selection of the flagellar beat - as the dominant feature governing the effectiveness of sperm swimming in highly viscous media. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN THE EVALUATION OF SPERM QUALITY ...