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Sample records for blocks phencyclidine-induced neurotoxicity

  1. In Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats, Subclinical Diabetic Neuropathy Increases In Vivo Lidocaine Block Duration But Not In Vitro Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Flatz, Magdalena; Haller, Ingrid; Hausott, Barbara; Blumenthal, Stephan; Stevens, Markus F.; Suzuki, Suzuko; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gerner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Application of local anesthetics may lead to nerve damage. Increasing evidence suggests that risk of neurotoxicity is higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In addition, block duration may be prolonged in neuropathy. We sought to investigate neurotoxicity

  2. Nereistoxin and cartap neurotoxicity attributable to direct block of the insect nicotinic receptor/channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seog-Jong; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2003-04-23

    Nereistoxin (NTX) (4-dimethylamino-1,2-dithiolane) is the naturally occurring prototype for cartap [the bis(thiocarbamate) derivative of the NTX dithiol], which is generally regarded as a proinsecticide reverting to NTX. The aim of this study is to define the target site(s) for dithiolanes and dithiol esters. The affinity of [(3)H]NTX was not suitable for binding assays with honeybee (Apis mellifera) head membranes. However, NTX and cartap are equally potent, direct-acting, and competitive displacers of [(3)H]thienylcyclohexylpiperidine binding at the noncompetitive blocker (NCB) site of the Apis nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)/channel. NTX also binds at the Apis [(3)H]imidacloprid agonist site, but cartap does not. As candidate metabolic pathways, sequential N-desmethylation and S-oxidation of NTX progressively reduce its potency at the NCB site and toxicity to houseflies. A P450 inhibitor reduces the toxicity of NTX and enhances it with cartap. Surprisingly, cartap is not just a pro-NTX but instead directly induces inhibitory neurotoxicity by blocking the nAChR/channel, whereas NTX may have dual NCB and agonist targets.

  3. The neurotoxic effects of amitriptyline are mediated by apoptosis and are effectively blocked by inhibition of caspase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Haller, Ingrid; Hausott, Barbara; Ingorokva, Shota; Deibl, Martina; Gerner, Peter; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oral tricyclic antidepressants, widely used as adjuncts in the treatment of chronic pain, block sodium channels in vitro and nerve conduction in vivo. However, toxicity of amitriptyline has been observed after neural application. We therefore investigated the mechanism and possible prevention of

  4. Thalidomide neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, O J; Olsen, P Z; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1984-01-01

    therapy. Since reports on thalidomide neurotoxicity have shown that the neurological symptoms are long standing and possibly irreversible, it is obviously important to inform patients of this possible side effect and to evaluate them closely for the symptoms and electrophysiological signs of evolving...

  5. Endocytic pathways mediating oligomeric Aβ42 neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxton Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is amyloid plaques, composed primarily of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Over-production or diminished clearance of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ42 in the brain leads to accumulation of soluble Aβ and plaque formation. Soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ has recently emerged to be as a likely proximal cause of AD. Results Here we demonstrate that endocytosis is critical in mediating oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. Inhibition of clathrin function either with a pharmacological inhibitor, knock-down of clathrin heavy chain expression, or expression of the dominant-negative mutant of clathrin-assembly protein AP180 did not block oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity or intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. However, inhibition of dynamin and RhoA by expression of dominant negative mutants reduced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of the dynamin-mediated endocytic pathway by genistein also reduced neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data suggest that dynamin-mediated and RhoA-regulated endocytosis are integral steps for oligomeric Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation.

  6. Methods for antagonizing glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D W

    1990-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glutamate-induced neuronal damage may contribute importantly to neuronal death in several neurological diseases, including cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. This review outlines a range of measures that might be used to protect neurons from such excitotoxic damage. The organizing thesis is a speculative consideration of glutamate neurotoxicity as a sequential three-stage process--induction, amplification, and expression--each perhaps specifically amenable to therapeutic interference. Overstimulation of glutamate receptors likely induces the intracellular accumulation of several substances, including Ca2+, Na+, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate, and diacylglycerol. Blockade of this induction might be accomplished most easily by antagonizing postsynaptic glutamate receptors, but also might be accomplished by reducing glutamate release from presynaptic terminals, or improving glutamate clearance from synaptic clefts. Following induction, several steps may importantly amplify the resultant rise in intracellular free Ca2+, and promote the spread of excessive excitation to other circuit neurons. Protective strategies operative at this level might include blockade of additional Ca2+ influx, blockade of Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and interference with the mechanisms coupling glutamate receptor stimulation to lasting enhancements of excitatory synaptic efficacy. Following amplification, toxic levels of intracellular free Ca2+ might trigger destructive cascades bearing direct responsibility for resultant neuronal degeneration--the expression of excitotoxicity. The most important cascades to block may be those related to the activation of catabolic enzymes, and the generation of free radicals. Broad consideration of possible methods for antagonizing glutamate neurotoxicity may be needed to develop therapies with the greatest efficacy, and least adverse consequences for brain function.

  7. Neurotoxicities of current leukemia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzo, P.A.; Poplack, D.G.; Bleyer, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    While major advances have been made in the treatment of acute leukemia, complications of therapy are significant. One of the most worrisome complications is the neurotoxicity which is related to the central nervous system. We review the clinical signs and offer recommendations for monitoring, evaluating, and treating patients with potential or proven neurotoxicity

  8. Neurotoxicity of Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassereau, Julien; Ferré, Marc; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Codron, Philippe; Verny, Christophe; Homedan, Chadi; Lenaers, Guy; Procaccio, Vincent; May-Panloup, Pascale; Reynier, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Human exposure to insecticides raises serious public health concerns worldwide. Insecticides constitute a wide-ranging heterogeneous group of chemicals, most of which target the nervous system and disrupt neurometabolism and/or neurotransmission. Although the acute effects of insecticide poisoning in humans are well documented, the chronic and long-term effects remain difficult to investigate. We sought to review the present state-of-knowledge of acute, chronic, neurodevelopmental and neurological consequences of human exposure to insecticides. Animal and epidemiologic studies indicate cognitive, behavioral and psychomotor alterations in mammals chronically exposed to insecticides. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and depression, have been regularly associated with insecticide exposure. Clinical studies, supported by experiments on animal models, demonstrate the neurotoxic impact of insecticide exposure during the period of cerebral development, the developing brain being particularly vulnerable to the action of insecticides. Moreover, detoxifying systems that are highly polymorph lead to great inter-individual variability in susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of insecticides. Studies on mild chronic exposure to insecticides suggest significant involvement in the pathogenesis of multifactorial neurological diseases. However, the tardive appearance of neurodegenerative disorders and the large variability of inter-individual susceptibility to neurotoxicants make it difficult to assess the relative contribution of insecticide exposure. Close vigilance should therefore be exercised with regard to possible exposure to insecticides, particularly during the period of cerebral development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn ME van; Egmond HP van; Speijers GJA; CSR; ARO

    2001-01-01

    This review contains information on the neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) syndrome and the provoking toxins called brevetoxins, produced by the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve. Data on chemical structures and detection methods for brevetoxins, sources for brevetoxins, marine organisms associated

  11. Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn ME van; Egmond HP van; Speijers GJA; CSR; ARO

    2001-01-01

    Dit literatuuroverzicht bevat informatie betreffende het "neurotoxic shellfish poisoning" (NSP) syndroom en de veroorzakende toxines, nl.de brevetoxines, welke geproduceerd worden door de dinoflagellaat Gymnodinium breve. Chemische structuren en detectie-methodes van de brevetoxines,

  12. Cadmium and Its Neurotoxic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is a heavy metal that has received considerable concern environmentally and occupationally. Cd has a long biological half-life mainly due to its low rate of excretion from the body. Thus, prolonged exposure to Cd will cause toxic effect due to its accumulation over time in a variety of tissues, including kidneys, liver, central nervous system (CNS, and peripheral neuronal systems. Cd can be uptaken from the nasal mucosa or olfactory pathways into the peripheral and central neurons; for the latter, Cd can increase the blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. However, mechanisms underlying Cd neurotoxicity remain not completely understood. Effect of Cd neurotransmitter, oxidative damage, interaction with other metals such as cobalt and zinc, estrogen-like, effect and epigenetic modification may all be the underlying mechanisms. Here, we review the in vitro and in vivo evidence of neurotoxic effects of Cd. The available finding indicates the neurotoxic effects of Cd that was associated with both biochemical changes of the cell and functional changes of central nervous system, suggesting that neurotoxic effects may play a role in the systemic toxic effects of the exposure to Cd, particularly the long-term exposure.

  13. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  14. Peripheral Ammonia as a Mediator of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Laura E.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is metabolized by the liver and has established neurological effects. The current study examined the possibility that ammonia contributes to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH). The results show that a binge dosing regimen of METH to the rat increased plasma and brain ammonia concentrations that were paralleled by evidence of hepatotoxicity. The role of peripheral ammonia in the neurotoxic effects of METH was further substantiated by the demonstration that the enhancement of peripheral ammonia excretion blocked the increases in brain and plasma ammonia and attenuated the long term depletions of dopamine and serotonin typically produced by METH. Conversely, the localized perfusion of ammonia in combination with METH, but not METH alone or ammonia alone, into the striatum recapitulated the neuronal damage produced by the systemic administration of METH. Furthermore, this damage produced by the local administration of ammonia and METH was blocked by the GYKI 52466, an AMPA receptor antagonist. These findings highlight the importance of ammonia derived from the periphery as a small molecule mediator of METH neurotoxicity and more broadly emphasize the importance of peripheral organ damage as a possible mechanism that mediates the neuropathology produced by drugs of abuse and other neuroactive molecules. PMID:22993432

  15. Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roser; Bruna, Jordi

    2015-04-28

    Taxane-derived agents are chemotherapy drugs widely employed in cancer treatment. Among them, paclitaxel and docetaxel are most commonly administered, but newer formulations are being investigated. Taxane antineoplastic activity is mainly based on the ability of the drugs to promote microtubule assembly, leading to mitotic arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Peripheral neurotoxicity is the major non-hematological adverse effect of taxane, often manifested as painful neuropathy experienced during treatment, and it is sometimes irreversible. Unfortunately, taxane-induced neurotoxicity is an uncertainty prior to the initiation of treatment. The present review aims to dissect current knowledge on real incidence, underlying pathophysiology, clinical features and predisposing factors related with the development of taxane-induced neuropathy.

  16. Neurophysiological evidence of methylmercury neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Grandjean, Philippe; Dakeishi, Miwako

    2007-01-01

    of hearing and speech, mental disturbances, excessive sweating, and hypersalivation. Neuropathological lesions involved visual, auditory, and post- and pre-central cortex areas. Neurophysiological changes involved in methylmercury, as assessed by EPs and HRV, were found to be in accordance with both clinical...... neurotoxicity and to examine the usefulness of those measures. METHODS: The reports addressing both neurophysiological measures and methylmercury exposure in humans were identified and evaluated. RESULTS: The neurological signs and symptoms of MD included paresthesias, constriction of visual fields, impairment...

  17. Occupational Neurotoxic Diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hung Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational neurotoxic diseases have become increasingly common in Taiwan due to industrialization. Over the past 40 years, Taiwan has transformed from an agricultural society to an industrial society. The most common neurotoxic diseases also changed from organophosphate poisoning to heavy metal intoxication, and then to organic solvent and semiconductor agent poisoning. The nervous system is particularly vulnerable to toxic agents because of its high metabolic rate. Neurological manifestations may be transient or permanent, and may range from cognitive dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction to neuromuscular junction disorders. This study attempts to provide a review of the major outbreaks of occupational neurotoxins from 1968 to 2012. A total of 16 occupational neurotoxins, including organophosphates, toxic gases, heavy metals, organic solvents, and other toxic chemicals, were reviewed. Peer-reviewed articles related to the electrophysiology, neuroimaging, treatment and long-term follow up of these neurotoxic diseases were also obtained. The heavy metals involved consisted of lead, manganese, organic tin, mercury, arsenic, and thallium. The organic solvents included n-hexane, toluene, mixed solvents and carbon disulfide. Toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide were also included, along with toxic chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, organophosphates, and dimethylamine borane. In addition we attempted to correlate these events to the timeline of industrial development in Taiwan. By researching this topic, the hope is that it may help other developing countries to improve industrial hygiene and promote occupational safety and health care during the process of industrialization.

  18. Multiple mechanisms of PCB neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.O.; Stoner, C.T.; Lawrence, D.A. [Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been implicated in cancer, but many of the symptoms in humans exposed to PCBs are related to the nervous system and behavior. We demonstrated three different direct mechanisms whereby PCBs are neurotoxic in rats. By using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the orthosubstituted PCB congener 2,4,4{prime}, but neither TCDD nor the coplanar PCB congener 3,4,5,3{prime},4{prime}, causes rapid death of cerebellar granule cells. The ortho-substituted congener 2,4,4{prime} reduced long-term potentiation, an indicator of cognitive potential, in hippocampal brain slices, but a similar effect was observed for the coplanar congener 3,4,3{prime},4{prime}, indicating that this effect may be caused by both ortho- and coplanar congeners by mechanisms presumably not mediated via the Ah receptor. It was previously shown that some ortho-substituted PCB congeners cause a reduction in levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine, and we present in vitro and in vivo evidence that this is due to reduction of synthesis of dopamine via inhibition of the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. Thus, PCBs have a variety of mechanisms of primary neurotoxicity, and neurotoxicity is a characteristic of ortho-substituted, non-dioxin-like congeners as well as some coplanar congeners. The relative contribution of each of these mechanisms to the loss of cognitive function in humans exposed to PCBs remains to be determined. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Developmental neurotoxicity of industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, P; Landrigan, P J

    2006-12-16

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, attention deficit disorder, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy are common, costly, and can cause lifelong disability. Their causes are mostly unknown. A few industrial chemicals (eg, lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], arsenic, and toluene) are recognised causes of neurodevelopmental disorders and subclinical brain dysfunction. Exposure to these chemicals during early fetal development can cause brain injury at doses much lower than those affecting adult brain function. Recognition of these risks has led to evidence-based programmes of prevention, such as elimination of lead additives in petrol. Although these prevention campaigns are highly successful, most were initiated only after substantial delays. Another 200 chemicals are known to cause clinical neurotoxic effects in adults. Despite an absence of systematic testing, many additional chemicals have been shown to be neurotoxic in laboratory models. The toxic effects of such chemicals in the developing human brain are not known and they are not regulated to protect children. The two main impediments to prevention of neurodevelopmental deficits of chemical origin are the great gaps in testing chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity and the high level of proof required for regulation. New, precautionary approaches that recognise the unique vulnerability of the developing brain are needed for testing and control of chemicals.

  20. Reversible Lithium Neurotoxicity: Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Sources: A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. Study Selection: A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Extraction: The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Data Synthesis: Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Conclusions: Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate

  1. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity: review of the literatur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan; Phutane, Vivek H

    2012-01-01

    Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate preventive measures. This recognition will help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of

  2. The WD40 domain is required for LRRK2 neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Jorgensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson disease (PD. LRRK2 contains an "enzymatic core" composed of GTPase and kinase domains that is flanked by leucine-rich repeat (LRR and WD40 protein-protein interaction domains. While kinase activity and GTP-binding have both been implicated in LRRK2 neurotoxicity, the potential role of other LRRK2 domains has not been as extensively explored. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that LRRK2 normally exists in a dimeric complex, and that removing the WD40 domain prevents complex formation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, loss of the WD40 domain completely blocks the neurotoxicity of multiple LRRK2 PD mutations. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that LRRK2 dimerization and autophosphorylation may be required for the neurotoxicity of LRRK2 PD mutations and highlight a potential role for the WD40 domain in the mechanism of LRRK2-mediated cell death.

  3. What is microglia neurotoxicity (Not)?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biber, Knut; Owens, Trevor; Boddeke, Erik

    2014-01-01

    and vulnerable organ like the brain should host numerous potential killers, we here review the concept of microglia neurotoxicity. On one hand it is discussed that most of our understanding about how microglia kill neurons is based on in vitro experiments or correlative staining studies that suffer from...... the difficulty to discriminate microglia and peripheral myeloid cells in the diseased brain. On the other hand it is described that a more functional approach by mutating, inactivating or deleting microglia is seldom associated with a beneficial outcome in an acute injury situation, suggesting that microglia...

  4. Neurotoxic effects of ecstasy on the thalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Jager, Gerry; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schilt, Thelma; Lavini, Cristina; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D.; Ramsey, Nick F.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; van den Brink, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurotoxic effects of ecstasy have been reported, although it remains unclear whether effects can be attributed to ecstasy, other recreational drugs or a combination of these. Aims To assess specific/independent neurotoxic effects of heavy ecstasy use and contributions of amphetamine,

  5. Environmental chemicals and human neurotoxicity: magnitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The neurotoxic effects of exposure to chemicals in the environment, though insufficiently recognized, remains a topic of substantial current concern and interest. Neurotoxicities may be protean; expressed as neuropathologic or as altered neurocthemical, electrophysiological or behavioural functions. The adverse effects of ...

  6. Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include limb weakness or numbness; loss of memory, vision, and/or intellect; headache; cognitive and behavioral problems; ... may include limb weakness or numbness; loss of memory, vision, and/or intellect; headache; cognitive and behavioral problems; ...

  7. MR findings of cyclosporine neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Po Song; Ahn, Kook Jin; Ahn, Bo Young; Jung, Hae An; Kim, Hee Je; Lee, Jae Mun

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the MR findings of cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity in patients receiving high dose of cyclosporine and to suggest the possible pathogenetic mechanism. The cases of seven patients (2 males, 5 females;18-36 years old) who suffered seizures after receiving high-dose cyclosporine for bone marrow transplantation due to diseases such as aplastic anemia or leukemia were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the location and pattern of abnormal signal intensity seen on T2 weighted images, the presence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen on follow-up MR performed at intervals of 12-30 days after initial MR in five of seven patients. We analyzed levels of blood cyclosporine and magnesium, and investigated the presence of hypertension at the sity of the seizure. Locations of the lesions were bilateral(n=3D5), unilateral(n=3D2), parietal(n=3D6), occipital(n=3D6), temporal(n=3D4), and in the frontal lobe(n=3D3). Frontal lesions showed high signal intensities in the borderline ischemic zone of the frontal lobe between the territory of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. In six of the seven patients, cortical and subcortical areas including subcortical U-fibers were seen on T2-weighted images to be involved in the parietooccipital lobes. Only one of the seven showed high signal intensity in the left basal ganglia. All lesions showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and iso to low signal intensity on T1-weighted. In five of seven patients there was no definite enhancement, but in the other two, enhancement was slight. In four of seven patients seizures occurred within high therapeutic ranges(250-450ng/ml), while others suffered such attacks at levels below the therapeutic range. After cyclospirine was administered at a reduced dosage or stopped, follow-up MR images showed the complete or near-total disappearance of the abnormal findings previously described. Only two patients had hypertension, and the others normotension. Five of the

  8. Sulforaphane-induced autophagy flux prevents prion protein-mediated neurotoxicity through AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, J-K; Park, S-Y

    2014-10-10

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative and infectious disorders that involve accumulation of misfolded scrapie prion protein, and which are characterized by spongiform degeneration. Autophagy, a major homeostatic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, has garnered attention as the potential target for neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease. We focused on protective effects of sulforaphane found in cruciferous vegetables on prion-mediated neurotoxicity and the mechanism of sulforaphane related to autophagy. In human neuroblastoma cells, sulforaphane protected prion protein (PrP) (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and increased autophagy flux marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II protein levels, following a decrease of p62 protein level. Pharmacological and genetical inhibition of autophagy by 3MA, wortmannin and knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) led to block the effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore we demonstrated that both sulforaphane-induced autophagy and protective effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity are dependent on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present results indicated that sulforaphane of cruciferous vegetables enhanced autophagy flux led to the protection effects against prion-mediated neurotoxicity, which was regulated by AMPK signaling pathways in human neuron cells. Our data also suggest that sulforaphane has a potential value as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disease including prion diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Developmental neurotoxicity of succeeding generations of insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Levin, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    Insecticides are by design toxic. They must be toxic to effectively kill target species of insects. Unfortunately, they also have off-target toxic effects that can harm other species, including humans. Developmental neurotoxicity is one of the most prominent off-target toxic risks of insecticides. Over the past seven decades several classes of insecticides have been developed, each with their own mechanisms of effect and toxic side effects. This review covers the developmental neurotoxicity of the succeeding generations of insecticides including organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates and neonicotinoids. The goal of new insecticide development is to more effectively kill target species with fewer toxic side effects on non-target species. From the experience with the developmental neurotoxicity caused by the generations of insecticides developed in the past advice is offered how to proceed with future insecticide development to decrease neurotoxic risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experience with Vincristine - Associated Neurotoxicity | Othieno ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated neurotoxicity. Design: A retrospective case series study. Setting: Burlingham Oncology Clinic, Nairobi. Subjects: Thirty-eight patients treated for various neoplasms with vincristine containing chemotherapeutic regimens. Main outcome ...

  11. Developmental neurotoxicity of propylthiouracil in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Hansen, Pernille Reimer; Christiansen, Sofie

    2007-01-01

    . The overall aim was to provide detailed knowledge on the relationship between effects on thyroid hormone levels and long-lasting developmental neurotoxicity effects. Groups of 16–18 pregnant rats (HanTac:WH) were dosed with PTU (0, 0.8, 1.6 or 2.4 mg/(kg day)) from gestation day 7 to postnatal day (PND) 16...... behaviour and hearing function. This supports that exposure to TDC's in general may cause long-lasting developmental neurotoxicity....

  12. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  13. Neurogenesis and developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Berg, Daniel A; Furmanski, Orion; Jackson, William M; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Gray, Christy D; Mintz, C David

    The mechanism by which anesthetics might act on the developing brain in order to cause long term deficits remains incompletely understood. The hippocampus has been identified as a structure that is likely to be involved, as rodent models show numerous deficits in behavioral tasks of learning that are hippocampal-dependent. The hippocampus is an unusual structure in that it is the site of large amounts of neurogenesis postnatally, particularly in the first year of life in humans, and these newly generated neurons are critical to the function of this structure. Intriguingly, neurogenesis is a major developmental event that occurs during postulated windows of vulnerability to developmental anesthetic neurotoxicity across the different species in which it has been studied. In this review, we examine the evidence for anesthetic effects on neurogenesis in the early postnatal period and ask whether neurogenesis should be studied further as a putative mechanism of injury. Multiple anesthetics are considered, and both in vivo and in vitro work is presented. While there is abundant evidence that anesthetics act to suppress neurogenesis at several different phases, evidence of a causal link between these effects and any change in learning behavior remains elusive. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 3-Acetylpyridine Neurotoxicity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, L.; Marrero-Rosado, B.; Engberg, M.E.; Johns, B.E.; Philpot, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    3-acetylpyridine (3-AP) is a metabolic antagonist used in research to decrease levels of nicotinamide (niacinamide) in laboratory animals. The administration of 3-AP followed by nicotinamide to rats leads to the selective destruction of neurons in the medial inferior olive, resulting in a loss of climbing fibers innervating cerebellar Purkinje cells and a consequent ataxia manifest by alterations in both balance and gait. Although 3-AP has also been administered to mice to destroy neurons in the inferior olive, there are limited studies quantifying the consequent effects on balance, and no studies on gait. Further, the relationship between 3-AP-induced lesions of the inferior olive and behavior has not been elucidated. Because 3-AP continues to be used for experiments involving mice, this study characterized the effects of this toxin on both balance and gait, and on the neuronal integrity of several brain regions involved in motor coordination. Results indicate that C57BL/6 mice are less sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of 3-AP than rats, and a dose more than 6.5 times that used for rats produces deficits in both balance and gait comparable to those in rats. This dose led to a significant (p< 0.05) loss of NeuN(+) neurons in several subregions of the inferior olive including the rostral medial nucleus, dorsomedial cell column, ventrolateral protrusion, and cap of Kooy. Further, the number of NeuN(+) neurons in these subregions, with the exception of the dorsomedial cell column, was significantly (p<0.05) related to rotorod performance, implicating their involvement in this behavior. PMID:27986589

  15. Elevated environmental temperature and methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Diane B.; O'Callaghan, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Amphetamines have been of considerable research interest for the last several decades. More recent work has renewed interest in the role of ambient temperature in both the toxicity and neurotoxicity of these drugs. We have determined that the striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity observed in the mouse is linked in some fashion to both body and environmental temperature. Most studies of d-methamphetamine (d-METH) neurotoxicity are conducted at standard laboratory ambient temperatures (e.g., ∼21-22 deg. C) and utilizing a repeated dosage regimen (e.g., three to four injections spaced 2 h apart). A lowering of the ambient temperature provides neuro protection, while an elevation increases neurotoxicity. d-METH causes long-term depletions of triatal dopamine (DA) that are accompanied by other changes that are indicative of nerve terminal degeneration. These include argyrophilia, as detected by silver degeneration stains, and an elevation in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of reactive gliosis in response to injury, as well as a long-term decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels. here we show that increasing the ambient temperature during and for some time following dosing increases the neurotoxicity of d-METH. Mice (female 57BL6/J) given a single dosage of d-METH (20 mg/kg s.c.) and maintained at the usual laboratory ambient temperature show minimal striatal damage (an ∼15% depletion of DA and an ∼ 86% increase in GFAP). substantial striatal damage (e.g., an ∼70% depletion of DA and an ∼200% elevation in GFAP) was induced by this regimen if mice were maintained at 27 deg. C for 24 or 72 h following dosing. An increase in neurotoxicity was also apparent in mice kept at an elevated temperature for only 5 or 9 h, but keeping animals at 27 deg. C for 24 or 72 h was the most effective in increasing the neurotoxicity of d-METH. Our data show how a relatively minor change in ambient temperature can have a major impact on the degree of

  16. Current status of developmental neurotoxicity: regulatory view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    . Until recently, however, developmental neurotoxicity testing of industrial chemicals has not been a clear regulatory requirement in EU, probably due to the lack of an accepted OECD TG. The revised EU Technical Guidance Document for Risk Assessment (EU-TGD) has now included the OECD draft TG 426...... in the testing strategy for new and existing substances, and biocides. Hopefully, this will lead to an improved database for risk assessment of potential developmental neurotoxicants. However, the regulatory authorities and toxicologists will also be faced with the challenge that decisions have to be made......The need for developmental neurotoxicity testing has been recognized for decades and guidelines are available, as the USEPA guideline and the OECD draft TG 426. Regulatory testing of industrial chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity is required to some extent, especially for pesticides in the US...

  17. Organophosphorus ester-induced chronic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B

    2003-08-01

    Organophosphorus compounds are potent neurotoxic chemicals that are widely used in medicine, industry, and agriculture. The neurotoxicity of these chemicals has been documented in accidental human poisoning, epidemiological studies, and animal models. Organophosphorus compounds have 3 distinct neurotoxic actions. The primary action is the irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, resulting in the accumulation of acetylcholine and subsequent overstimulation of the nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, resulting in cholinergic effects. Another action of some of these compounds, arising from single or repeated exposure, is a delayed onset of ataxia, accompanied by a Wallerian-type degeneration of the axon and myelin in the most distal portion of the longest tracts in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, and is known as organophosphorus ester-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). In addition, since the introduction and extensive use of synthetic organophosphorus compounds in agriculture and industry half a century ago, many studies have reported long-term, persistent, chronic neurotoxicity symptoms in individuals as a result of acute exposure to high doses that cause acute cholinergic toxicity, or from long-term, low-level, subclinical doses of these chemicals. The author attempts to define the neuronal disorder that results from organophosphorus ester-induced chronic neurotoxicity (OPICN), which leads to long-term neurological and neurobehavioral deficits. Although the mechanisms of this neurodegenerative disorder have yet to be established, the sparse available data suggest that large toxic doses of organophosphorus compounds cause acute necrotic neuronal cell death in the brain, whereas sublethal or subclinical doses produce apoptotic neuronal cell death and involve oxidative stress.

  18. Pb Neurotoxicity: Neuropsychological Effects of Lead Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa H. Mason

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxicity is a term used to describe neurophysiological changes caused by exposure to toxic agents. Such exposure can result in neurocognitive symptoms and/or psychiatric disturbances. Common toxic agents include heavy metals, drugs, organophosphates, bacterial, and animal neurotoxins. Among heavy metal exposures, lead exposure is one of the most common exposures that can lead to significant neuropsychological and functional decline in humans. In this review, neurotoxic lead exposure's pathophysiology, etiology, and epidemiology are explored. In addition, commonly associated neuropsychological difficulties in intelligence, memory, executive functioning, attention, processing speed, language, visuospatial skills, motor skills, and affect/mood are explored.

  19. Neurotoxicity of fragrance compounds: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Adi; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Aschner, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Fragrance compounds are chemicals belonging to one of several families, which are used frequently and globally in cosmetics, household products, foods and beverages. A complete list of such compounds is rarely found on the ingredients-list of such products, as "fragrance mixtures" are defined as "trade secrets" and thus protected by law. While some information regarding the general toxicity of some of these compounds is available, their neurotoxicity is known to a lesser extent. Here, we discuss the prevalence and neurotoxicity of fragrance compounds belonging to the three most common groups: phthalates, synthetic musks and chemical sensitizers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. ► Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. ► Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H 2 S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H 2 S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  1. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Kume, Toshiaki [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Kinki University School of Science and Engineering, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Akaike, Akinori [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida-shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kawabata, Atsufumi, E-mail: kawabata@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H{sub 2}S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H{sub 2}S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  2. Environmental Chemicals and Human Neurotoxicity: Magnitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olaleye

    An impressive list of commonly used and internationally traded agricultural and industrial chemicals has been evaluated since its inception (IPCS, 1992). How well these functions are ... The growing list of neurotoxicities induced mainly by synthetic ..... scientist observed that toxic chemicals, in particular metals in water ...

  3. Anaesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity | Taylor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, concerns regarding anaesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN) have emerged. The aim of this review was to summarise the available information on AIDN, and to assist the practising anaesthetist in making safe decisions with regard to the administration of anaesthesia in the young child. Keywords: ...

  4. Memantine prevents MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-01-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity. Previous studies demonstrated the interaction of MDMA with alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in mouse brain membranes and the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility of memantine (MEM), an alpha-7 nAChR antagonist used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients, to prevent neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in rats and the oxidative effect of this amphetamine derivative in mice striatal synaptosomes. In isolated mouse striatal synaptosomes (an in vitro model of MDMA neurotoxicity of dopaminergic origin), MDMA (50 microM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that was fully inhibited by MEM (0.3 microM). This effect of MEM was fully prevented by PNU 282987 (0.5 microM), a specific agonist of alpha-7 nAChR. The preventive effect of MEM on this oxidative effect can be attributed to a direct antagonism between MDMA (acting probably as agonist) and MEM (acting as antagonist) at the alpha-7 nAChR. In Dark Agouti rats (an in vivo model of MDMA neurotoxicity of serotonergic origin), a single dose of MDMA (18 mg/kg) induced persistent hyperthermia, which was not affected by MEM pre-treatment. [(3)H]Paroxetine binding (a marker of serotonergic injury) was measured in the hippocampus of animals killed at 24h and 7 days after treatment. MDMA induced a significant reduction in [(3)H]paroxetine binding sites at both times of sacrifice that was fully prevented by pre-treatment with MEM. Since previous studies demonstrate that increased glutamate activity is not involved in the neurotoxic action of MDMA, it can be concluded that the effectiveness of MEM against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity would be the result of blockade of alpha-7 nAChR, although an indirect mechanism based on the interplay among the various neurotransmission systems leading to an

  5. Neurotoxic pesticides and behavioural effects upon birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C H

    2003-01-01

    Organochlorine, organophosphorus, carbamate, pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides and organomercury fungicides are all neurotoxic and therefore have the potential to cause behavioural disturbances in birds. A number of studies have described behavioural effects caused to captive birds by neurotoxic pesticides, but it is very difficult to measure such effects in the field, which is a serous limitation given their potential to cause adverse effects at the population level. The mode of action, and the neurotoxic and behavioural effects of these compounds are briefly reviewed before considering evidence for their effects in the laboratory and field. Behavioural effects may cause adverse changes at the population level either directly or indirectly. Direct effects upon avian populations may be due to disturbances of reproduction, feeding, or avoidance of predation. Indirect effects on predators may be the consequence of direct action upon the prey population leading to either (1) reduction of numbers of the prey population, or (2) selective predation by the predator upon the most contaminated individuals within the prey population. Attention is given to the historic evidence for neurotoxic and behavioural effects of persistent organochlorine insecticides, raising the question of retrospective analysis of existing data for this once important and intensively studied class of compounds. Less persistent pesticides currently in use may also have neurotoxic effects upon birds in the field. Sometimes, as with some OPs, their effects may outlast the persistence of their residues, and the ecotoxicity and persistence of some may be affected by interactions with other environmental chemicals. The development of new mechanistic biomarker assays could improve understanding of behavioural effects and possible associated effects at the population level caused by such compounds in the field.

  6. THC Prevents MDMA Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Touriño

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The majority of MDMA (ecstasy recreational users also consume cannabis. Despite the rewarding effects that both drugs have, they induce several opposite pharmacological responses. MDMA causes hyperthermia, oxidative stress and neuronal damage, especially at warm ambient temperature. However, THC, the main psychoactive compound of cannabis, produces hypothermic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Therefore, THC may have a neuroprotective effect against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Mice receiving a neurotoxic regimen of MDMA (20 mg/kg x 4 were pretreated with THC (3 mg/kg x 4 at room (21 degrees C and at warm (26 degrees C temperature, and body temperature, striatal glial activation and DA terminal loss were assessed. To find out the mechanisms by which THC may prevent MDMA hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, the same procedure was carried out in animals pretreated with the CB(1 receptor antagonist AM251 and the CB(2 receptor antagonist AM630, as well as in CB(1, CB(2 and CB(1/CB(2 deficient mice. THC prevented MDMA-induced-hyperthermia and glial activation in animals housed at both room and warm temperature. Surprisingly, MDMA-induced DA terminal loss was only observed in animals housed at warm but not at room temperature, and this neurotoxic effect was reversed by THC administration. However, THC did not prevent MDMA-induced hyperthermia, glial activation, and DA terminal loss in animals treated with the CB(1 receptor antagonist AM251, neither in CB(1 and CB(1/CB(2 knockout mice. On the other hand, THC prevented MDMA-induced hyperthermia and DA terminal loss, but only partially suppressed glial activation in animals treated with the CB(2 cannabinoid antagonist and in CB(2 knockout animals. Our results indicate that THC protects against MDMA neurotoxicity, and suggest that these neuroprotective actions are primarily mediated by the reduction of hyperthermia through the activation of CB(1 receptor, although CB(2 receptors may also contribute to

  7. Clinical Neurotoxic Disorders : Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nag Devika

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxins have existed on the earth from times immemorial. Old neurotoxic disorders were due to ingestion/ exposure of heavy metals and food like lathyrus sativus over a long period of time. The 20th Century with rapid industrialsation and expanding chemical and drug industry has spawned several new, hitherto unknown disorders. Old disorders continue to exist e.g. fluorosis, arsenicosis, lathyrism, manganism and lead neuropathy, along with new diseases like Minamata disease, subacute myelo optic neuropathy (SMON, MPTP-Parkinsonian syndorme, triorthcresyl phosphate (TOCP neuroparalytic disease, pesticide induced seizures, tremor and neuropathy, solvent encephalopthy, antipileptic drug foetal syndrome and excitotoxin induced behavioural disorders. Studies on pesticides Organochlorine and organophosphates, synthetic pyrethrins, solvents, heavy metals and substances abuse in the Indian context confirm the neurotoxic nature of many synthetic substances. Future problems envisaged are of concern to clinical neurologists as many of these neurotoxic disorders mimic syndromes of well known neurological disease. The new millenium poses a challenge to the clinician as newer compounds in industry, food, drugs and chemical war agents are being developed. Molecular genetics has advanced rapidly with release of the human genome map. Animal cloning and genetically modified plant products have entered the food chain. How safe are these new inventions for the central nervous system is a big question? India cannot afford disasters like Union Carbide′s Bhopal gas leak nor be a silent spectator to manipulative biotechnology. Unless it is proven beyond all doubt to be a safe innovation, Chemicals have to be cautiously introduced in our environment. To Study, ascertain and confirm safety or neurotoxicity is an exciting challenge for the neuroscientists of the 21st century.

  8. Neurotoxicity of Acrylamide in Exposed Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Malaguarnera

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acrylamide (ACR is a water-soluble chemical used in different industrial and laboratory processes. ACR monomer is neurotoxic in humans and laboratory animals. Subchronic exposure to this chemical causes neuropathies, hands and feet numbness, gait abnormalities, muscle weakness, ataxia, skin and in some cases, cerebellar alterations. ACR neurotoxicity involves mostly the peripheral but also the central nervous system, because of damage to the nerve terminal through membrane fusion mechanisms and tubulovescicular alterations. Nevertheless, the exact action mechanism is not completely elucidated. In this paper we have reviewed the current literature on its neurotoxicity connected to work-related ACR exposure. We have analyzed not only the different pathogenetic hypotheses focusing on possible neuropathological targets, but also the critical behavior of ACR poisoning. In addition we have evaluated the ACR-exposed workers case studies. Despite all the amount of work which have being carried out on this topic more studies are necessary to fully understand the pathogenetic mechanisms, in order to propose suitable therapies.

  9. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  10. Assessing Delayed Neurotoxicity in Rodents after Nerve Gas Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    K. Husain; S.C. Pant; V. Vijayara; Ram Singh

    1994-01-01

    Delayed neurotoxicity of an organophosphorus nerve gas Sarin (a chemical warfare agent) following repeated inhalation exposure in rats and mice, was studied by behavioural, biochemical and histopathological analyses. Rats exposed to Sarin aerosols (12.5 mg/m/sup 3/ for 20 min) daily for ten days did not exhibit any clinical sign of delayed neurotoxicity. Neurotoxic esterase (NTE) activity in the brain, spinal cord and platelets was significantly inhibited, but the inhibition was below ...

  11. Holdase activity of secreted Hsp70 masks amyloid-β42 neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; de Mena, Lorena; Zhang, Yan; Levites, Yona; Khare, Swati; Golde, Todd E; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2016-08-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent of a large group of related proteinopathies for which there is currently no cure. Here, we used Drosophila to explore a strategy to block Aβ42 neurotoxicity through engineering of the Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a chaperone that has demonstrated neuroprotective activity against several intracellular amyloids. To target its protective activity against extracellular Aβ42, we added a signal peptide to Hsp70. This secreted form of Hsp70 (secHsp70) suppresses Aβ42 neurotoxicity in adult eyes, reduces cell death, protects the structural integrity of adult neurons, alleviates locomotor dysfunction, and extends lifespan. SecHsp70 binding to Aβ42 through its holdase domain is neuroprotective, but its ATPase activity is not required in the extracellular space. Thus, the holdase activity of secHsp70 masks Aβ42 neurotoxicity by promoting the accumulation of nontoxic aggregates. Combined with other approaches, this strategy may contribute to reduce the burden of AD and other extracellular proteinopathies.

  12. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  13. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Ni [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiz-Yuh [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ching-Tien [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chih-Hung [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chien-Cheng [Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jia-Yi, E-mail: jywang2010@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  14. Protective effect of quercetin on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    certain side effects, especially neurotoxicity. It has been shown that neurotoxicity caused by local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine are related to changes in calcium homeostasis, resulting in intracellular calcium overload [1]. Calcium homeostasis is regulated by many different kinds of calcium channels such.

  15. Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity: Implications to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakye, Gunnar F; Jiménez, Jennifer; Jiménez, Jessica A; Aschner, Michael

    2018-04-10

    Atropa belladonna, commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade, ranks among one of the most poisonous plants in Europe and other parts of the world. The plant contains tropane alkaloids, including atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, which are used as anticholinergics in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and homeopathic remedies. These alkaloids can be very toxic at high dose. The FDA has recently reported that Hyland's baby teething tablets contain inconsistent amounts of Atropa belladonna that may have adverse effects on the nervous system and cause death in children, thus recalled the product in 2017. A greater understanding of the neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna and its modification of genetic polymorphisms in the nervous system is critical in order to develop better treatment strategies, therapies, regulations, education of at-risk populations, and a more cohesive paradigm for future research. This review offers an integrated view of the homeopathy and neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna in children, adults and animal models, as well as its implications to neurological disorders. Particular attention is dedicated to the pharmaco/toxicodynamics, pharmaco/toxicokinetics, pathophysiology, epidemiological cases, and animal studies associated with the effects of Atropa belladonna on the nervous system. Additionally, we discuss the influence of active tropane alkaloids in Atropa belladonna and other similar plants on FDA-approved therapeutic drugs for treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Luo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has long been used as a mood stabilizer in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar disorder. Recent studies suggest that lithium has neuroprotective properties and may be useful in the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemia and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the most important neuroprotective properties of lithium is its anti-apoptotic action. Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD are caused by maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. Ethanol exposure causes neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Excessive alcohol consumption is also associated with Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that lithium is able to ameliorate ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. Lithium is an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 which has recently been identified as a mediator of ethanol neurotoxicity. Lithium’s neuroprotection may be mediated by its inhibition of GSK3. In addition, lithium also affects many other signaling proteins and pathways that regulate neuronal survival and differentiation. This review discusses the recent evidence of lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity and potential underlying mechanisms.

  17. Neurotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Sharma, Aruna

    2012-02-01

    Human exposure to metal nanoparticles such as silver (Ag), copper (Cu) or aluminum (Al) is very common at work places involving automobile, aerospace industry, gun factories or defense related explosives making. Additional sources of exposure to engineered nanoparticles affecting human health are chemical, electronics and communication industries. The nanoparticles (ca. 20 to 120 nm) easily enter the body through inhalation and are deposited into various tissues and organs including brain, where they could stay there for long periods of time. However, the pathophysiological reactions of nanoparticles in vivo on brain function are still not well known. Previous observations from our laboratory showed that engineered nanoparticles from Ag, Cu or Al (50-60 nm) when administered through systemic or intracerebral routes in rats or mice induce neurotoxicity depending on their type, dose and duration of the exposure. These nanoparticles also altered sensory, motor and cognitive functions at the time of development of brain pathologies. Thus, neuronal, glial, axonal and endothelial cell damages are most pronounced following Ag and Cu intoxication as compared to Al in identical doses that are more pronounced in mice as compared to rats of similar age group. The functional significance of these findings and the probable mechanisms of metal nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity are discussed in this review largely based on our own investigations.

  18. Chronic exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate induces behavior defects and neurotoxicity through oxidative damages, in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is an emerging persistent pollutant which shows multiple adverse health effects. However, the neurotoxicity of PFOS and its mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods, the present study provides a detailed description of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Results showed that the median lethal concentration of PFOS was 2.03 mM in Caenorhabditis elegans for 48 h exposure. 20 µM PFOS caused decrease of locomotor behaviors including forward movement, body bend and head thrash. Additionally, PFOS exposure reduced chemotaxis index of C. elegans, which indicates the decline of chemotaxis learning ability. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled transgenic strains, we found that PFOS caused down-regulated expression of a chemoreceptor gene, gcy-5, in ASE chemosensory neurons, but did not affect cholinergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, 48 h exposure to 25 µM and 50 µM PFOS induced cell damage, apoptosis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. PFOS caused significant increases of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity, but an actual decrease of glutathione peroxidase activity. Furthermore, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine rescued cells from PFOS-induced apoptosis via blocking ROS. Our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS can cause obvious neurotoxicity and behavior defects. Oxidative damage and anti-oxidative deficit are crucial mechanisms in neurotoxicity of PFOS.

  19. The neurotoxicity of pyridinium metabolites of haloperidol

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    Agnieszka Górska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haloperydol is a butyrophenone, typical neuroleptic agent characterized as a high antipsychotics effects in the treatment of schizophrenia and in palliative care to alleviation many syndromes, such as naursea, vomiting and delirium. Clinical problems occurs during and after administration of the drug are side effects, particularly extrapyrramidal symptoms (EPS. The neurotoxicity of haloperydol may be initiated by the cationic metabolites of haloperydol, HPP+, RHPP+, formed by oxidation and reduction pathways. These metabolites are transported by human organic cation transporters (hOCT to several brain structures for exapmle, in substantia nigra, striatum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus. After reaching the dopaminergic neurons inhibits mitochondrial complex I, evidence for free radical involvement, thus leading to neurodegeneration.

  20. [Link between aluminum neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum is an old element that has been known for a long time, but some of its properties are only now being discovered. Although environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life; in fact, because of its specific chemical properties, aluminum inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and exerts various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. Aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin. It has been suggested that there is a relationship between exposure to aluminum and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, as well as Alzheimer' s disease: however, this claim remains to be verified. In this chapter, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity and the link between Alzheimer' s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, based on recent findings on metal-metal interactions and the functions of metalloproteins in synapses.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity

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    Fanmuyi Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6. UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  2. Neurotoxicity and mode of action of N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET.

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    Daniel R Swale

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and that this action may result in neurotoxicity and pose a risk to humans from its use as an insect repellent. We investigated the mode of action of DEET neurotoxicity in order to define the specific neuronal targets related to its acute toxicity in insects and mammals. Although toxic to mosquitoes (LD50 ca. 1.5 µg/mg, DEET was a poor acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (<10% inhibition, even at a concentration of 10 mM. IC50 values for DEET against Drosophila melanogaster, Musca domestica, and human acetylcholinesterases were 6-12 mM. Neurophysiological recordings showed that DEET had excitatory effects on the housefly larval central nervous system (EC50: 120 µM, but was over 300-fold less potent than propoxur, a standard anticholinesterase insecticide. Phentolamine, an octopamine receptor antagonist, completely blocked the central neuroexcitation by DEET and octopamine, but was essentially ineffective against hyperexcitation by propoxur and 4-aminopyridine, a potassium channel blocker. DEET was found to illuminate the firefly light organ, a tissue utilizing octopamine as the principal neurotransmitter. Additionally, DEET was shown to increase internal free calcium via the octopamine receptors of Sf21 cells, an effect blocked by phentolamine. DEET also blocked Na(+ and K(+ channels in patch clamped rat cortical neurons, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. These findings suggest DEET is likely targeting octopaminergic synapses to induce neuroexcitation and toxicity in insects, while acetylcholinesterase in both insects and mammals has low (mM sensitivity to DEET. The ion channel blocking action of DEET in neurons may contribute to the numbness experienced after inadvertent application to the lips or mouth of humans.

  3. Vanadium induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase Cdelta dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms: Relevance to etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, Robert; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V 2 O 5 ). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V 2 O 5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC 50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (> fourfold) and caspase-3 (> ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V 2 O 5 -induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V 2 O 5 -induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration.

  4. Exocytosis: using amperometry to study presynaptic mechanisms of neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    The development of carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry enabled detailed investigation of the presynaptic response at the single cell level with single vesicle resolution. Consequently, amperometry allowed for detailed studies into the presynaptic mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity. This review

  5. Toxicologic evidence of developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Nielsen, J B; Grandjean, P

    2000-01-01

    , exposure to neurotoxic chemicals during critical periods of brain development has induced permanent functional disturbances in the CNS. Although available data suggest that proper animal models exist, only few chemicals have been tested. Neurotoxicity testing is not required by national authorities......Developmental neurotoxicity constitutes effects occurring in the offspring primarily as a result of exposure of the mother during pregnancy and lactation. To exert their effect, these chemicals or their metabolites must pass the placenta and/or the blood-brain barrier. In experimental animals...... for classification of chemicals. Epidemiological evidence is very limited, but severe irreversible effects have been observed in humans following in utero exposures to a few known developmental neurotoxicants. The large number of chemicals with a potential for developmental neurotoxicity in humans stresses...

  6. Phencyclidine-induced abnormal behaviors in rats as measured by the hole board apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T; Sonoda, R; Nakato, K; Koshiya, K; Wanibuchi, F; Yamaguchi, T

    2000-02-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) and methamphetamine (MAP) are known as psychotomimetic agents. Both agents produce behavioral alterations in animals. The present study investigated the difference in behavioral alterations in rats induced by these two psychotomimetic agents using the hole board apparatus (HBA). In addition, mechanisms underlying PCP-induced behavioral changes were also investigated. After the administration of PCP (1-4 mg/kg SC) or MAP (1-4 mg/kg SC), locomotor activity and dipping behavior were assessed using HBA. Effect of selective NMDA antagonists, (+)MK801 and 3-((+/-)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), on rat behaviors were also assessed. The effects of D-alanine (D-Ala), a coagonist of NMDA receptors, or neuroleptics, haloperidol, clozapine and risperidone, on PCP-induced behavioral changes were investigated. PCP increased locomotor activity and decreased exploratory behaviors of rats in HBA. On the other hand, MAP increased locomotor activity but did not decrease exploratory behaviors. (+)MK-801 produced hyperactivity as well as decreased exploratory behaviors, eliciting behavioral changes very similar to those of PCP. CPP decreased the exploratory behavior but failed to produce hyperactivity. D-Ala attenuated both behavioral changes induced by PCP. Three neuroleptics tested here inhibited hyperactivity but did not attenuate decreases in exploratory behavior. These results suggest that PCP-induced decrease in exploratory behavior are attributable to antagonism of NMDA receptors and may not involve dopaminergic transmission via D2 receptors.

  7. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in phencyclidine-induced cognitive deficits modelling schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, Daniela; Guidali, Cinzia; Petrosino, Stefania; Realini, Natalia; Rubino, Tiziana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Parolaro, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Recent advances in the neurobiology of cannabinoids have renewed interest in the association between cannabis and schizophrenia. Our studies showed that chronic-intermittent phencyclidine (PCP) treatment of rats, an animal model of schizophrenia-like cognitive deficit, impaired recognition memory in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and induced alterations in CB1 receptor functionality and in endocannabinoid levels mainly in the prefrontal cortex. In this region, we observed a significant reduction in GTPgammaS binding (-41%) accompanied by an increase in the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG (+38%) in PCP-treated rats, suggesting that a maladaptation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute to the glutamatergic-related cognitive symptoms encountered in schizophrenia disorders. Moreover, we evaluated the ability of the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), to modulate the cognitive dysfunctions and neuroadaptations in the endocannabinoid system induced by PCP. Chronic THC co-treatment worsened PCP-induced cognitive impairment, without inducing any effect per se, and in parallel, it provoked a severe reduction in the levels of the other endocannabinoid, AEA, vs. either vehicle (-73%) or PCP (-64%), whereas it reversed the PCP-induced increase in 2-AG levels. These results point to the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in this pharmacological model of cognitive dysfunction, with a potentially different role of AEA and 2-AG in schizophrenia-like behaviours and suggest that prolonged cannabis use might aggravate cognitive performances induced by chronic PCP by throwing off-balance the endocannabinoid system.

  8. Effects of a novel, selective, sigma1-ligand, MS-377, on phencyclidine-induced behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Takagi, K; Horikomi, K

    2001-07-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP)-induced head-weaving is inhibited by a novel selective sigma1-ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), but not by dopamine D2 antagonists. In the present study, we examined the effects of two potent and selective sigma1-ligands, MS-377 and N,N-dipropyl-2-(4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl) ethylamine (NE-100), on PCP-induced rearing behaviour, hyperlocomotion and ataxia in comparison with the currently available antipsychotic agents with affinity for D2 receptors, haloperidol, sultopride and risperidone. Male Wistar rats or ddY mice were administered MS-377, NE-100, haloperidol, sultopride or risperidone, and PCP was administered 60 min later (in the case of NE-100 10 min later). Rearing behaviour, hyperlocomotion and ataxia were examined 10 min after PCP administration. MS-377, haloperidol, sultopride and risperidone dose-dependently inhibited PCP-induced rearing and hyperlocomotion, but did not antagonize PCP-induced ataxia. In contrast, the other selective sigma1-ligand, NE-100, did not affect any of the PCP-induced behaviour patterns in this study. These results suggest that there are at least two types of ligands for sigma1-receptors and that some sigma1-ligands, including MS-377, have more comprehensive effects against PCP-induced abnormal behaviour than other sigma1-ligands or D2 antagonists.

  9. Memantine protects against amphetamine derivatives-induced neurotoxic damage in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Torres, I; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-06-01

    We hypothesize that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) interact with alpha-7 nicotinic receptors (nAChR). Here we examine whether memantine (MEM), an antagonist of NMDAR and alpha-7 nAChR, prevents MDMA and METH neurotoxicity. MEM prevented both serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rat and dopaminergic lesion by METH in mice. MEM has a better protective effect in front of MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity than methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific alpha-7 nAChR antagonist. The double antagonism that MEM exerts on NMDA receptor and on alpha-7 nAChR, probably contributes to its effectiveness. MEM inhibited reactive oxygen species production induced by MDMA or METH in synaptosomes. This effect was not modified by NMDA receptor antagonists, but reversed by alpha-7 nAChR agonist (PNU 282987), demonstrating a preventive effect of MEM as a result of it blocking alpha-7 nAChR. In synaptosomes, MDMA decreased 5-HT uptake by about 40%. This decrease was prevented by MEM and by MLA but enhanced by PNU 282987. A similar pattern was observed when we measured the dopamine transport inhibited by METH. The inhibition of both transporters by amphetamine derivatives seems to be regulated by the calcium incorporation after activation of alpha-7 nAChR. MDMA competitively displaces [(3)H]MLA from rat brain membranes. MEM and METH also displace [(3)H]MLA with non-competitive displacement profiles that fit a two-site model. We conclude that MEM prevents MDMA and METH effects in rodents. MEM may offer neuroprotection against neurotoxicity induced by MDMA and METH by preventing the deleterious effects of these amphetamine derivatives on their respective transporters.

  10. Neurotoxicity of traffic-related air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lucio G; Cole, Toby B; Coburn, Jacki; Chang, Yu-Chi; Dao, Khoi; Roqué, Pamela J

    2017-03-01

    The central nervous system is emerging as an important target for adverse health effects of air pollution, where it may contribute to neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Air pollution comprises several components, including particulate matter (PM) and ultrafine particulate matter (UFPM), gases, organic compounds, and metals. An important source of ambient PM and UFPM is represented by traffic-related air pollution, primarily diesel exhaust (DE). Human epidemiological studies and controlled animal studies have shown that exposure to air pollution, and to traffic-related air pollution or DE in particular, may lead to neurotoxicity. In particular, air pollution is emerging as a possible etiological factor in neurodevelopmental (e.g. autism spectrum disorders) and neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease) disorders. The most prominent effects caused by air pollution in both humans and animals are oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation. Studies in mice acutely exposed to DE (250-300μg/m 3 for 6h) have shown microglia activation, increased lipid peroxidation, and neuro-inflammation in various brain regions, particularly the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb. An impairment of adult neurogenesis was also found. In most cases, the effects of DE were more pronounced in male mice, possibly because of lower antioxidant abilities due to lower expression of paraoxonase 2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protection against neurotoxicity by an autophagic mechanism

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    Kangyong Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 3-n-butylphthalide (NBP on a 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+-induced cellular model of Parkinson’s disease (PD and to illustrate the potential mechanism of autophagy in this process. For this purpose, rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells were treated with MPP+ (1 mM for 24 h following pretreatment with NBP (0.1 mM. Cell metabolic viability was determined by the MTT assay and cell ultrastructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The intracellular distribution and expression of α-synuclein and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 were detected by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that: 1 NBP prevented MPP+-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells by promoting metabolic viability. 2 NBP induced the accumulation of autophagosomes in MPP+-treated PC12 cells. 3 Further study of the molecular mechanism demonstrated that NBP enhanced the colocalization of α-synuclein and LC3 and up-regulated the protein level of LC3-II. These results demonstrate that NBP protects PC12 cells against MPP+-induced neurotoxicity by activating autophagy-mediated α-synuclein degradation, implying that it may be a potential effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of PD.

  12. Endocannabinoid signaling in neurotoxicity and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C; Mechoulam, R; Parsons, L

    2010-09-01

    The cannabis plant and products produced from it, such as marijuana and hashish, have been used for centuries for their psychoactive properties. The mechanism for how Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active constituent of cannabis, elicits these neurological effects remained elusive until relatively recently, when specific G-protein coupled receptors were discovered that appeared to mediate cellular actions of THC. Shortly after discovery of these specific receptors, endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) were identified. Since that time, an extensive number of papers have been published on the endocannabinoid signaling system, a widespread neuromodulatory mechanism that influences neurotransmission throughout the nervous system. This paper summarizes presentations given at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting that described the potential role of endocannabinoids in the expression of neurotoxicity. Dr. Raphael Mechoulam first gave an overview of the discovery of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids and their potential for neuroprotection in a variety of conditions. Dr. Larry Parsons then described studies suggesting that endocannabinoid signaling may play a selective role in drug reinforcement. Dr. Carey Pope presented information on the role that endocannabinoid signaling may have in the expression of cholinergic toxicity following anticholinesterase exposures. Together, these presentations highlighted the diverse types of neurological insults that may be modulated by endocannabinoids and drugs/toxicants which might influence endocannabinoid signaling pathways. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of Prion Protein Aggregation in Neurotoxicity

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    Tullio Florio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson, Alzheimer’s, Huntington, and prion diseases, the deposition of aggregated misfolded proteins is believed to be responsible for the neurotoxicity that characterizes these diseases. Prion protein (PrP, the protein responsible of prion diseases, has been deeply studied for the peculiar feature of its misfolded oligomers that are able to propagate within affected brains, inducing the conversion of the natively folded PrP into the pathological conformation. In this review, we summarize the available experimental evidence concerning the relationship between aggregation status of misfolded PrP and neuronal death in the course of prion diseases. In particular, we describe the main findings resulting from the use of different synthetic (mainly PrP106-126 and recombinant PrP-derived peptides, as far as mechanisms of aggregation and amyloid formation, and how these different spatial conformations can affect neuronal death. In particular, most data support the involvement of non-fibrillar oligomers rather than actual amyloid fibers as the determinant of neuronal death.

  14. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

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    Troco K. Mihali

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin (STX and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs. PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes, which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids.

  15. Alternative Test Methods for Developmental Neurotoxicity: A ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to environmental contaminants is well documented to adversely impact the development of the nervous system. However, the time, animal and resource intensive EPA and OECD testing guideline methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) are not a viable solution to characterizing potential chemical hazards for the thousands of untested chemicals currently in commerce. Thus, research efforts over the past decade have endeavored to develop cost-effective alternative DNT testing methods. These efforts have begun to generate data that can inform regulatory decisions. Yet there are major challenges to both the acceptance and use of this data. Major scientific challenges for DNT include development of new methods and models that are “fit for purpose”, development of a decision-use framework, and regulatory acceptance of the methods. It is critical to understand that use of data from these methods will be driven mainly by the regulatory problems being addressed. Some problems may be addressed with limited datasets, while others may require data for large numbers of chemicals, or require the development and use of new biological and computational models. For example mechanistic information derived from in vitro DNT assays can be used to inform weight of evidence (WoE) or integrated approaches to testing and assessment (IATA) approaches for chemical-specific assessments. Alternatively, in vitro data can be used to prioritize (for further testing) the thousands

  16. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of statins against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that disruption of the homeostasis of lipid metabolism affects the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain has been reported to considerably increase the risk of developing AD. Thus, dysregulation of lipid homeostasis may increase the amyloid β (Aβ levels by affecting amyloid precursor protein (APP cleavage, which is the most important risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Previous research demonstrated that Aβ can trigger neuronal insulin resistance, which plays an important role in response to Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD. Epidemiological studies also suggested that statin use is associated with a decreased incidence of AD. Therefore, statins are believed to be a good candidate for conferring neuroprotective effects against AD. Statins may play a beneficial role in reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Their effect involves a putative mechanism beyond its cholesterol-lowering effects in preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the protective effect of statins have not been clearly determined in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Given that statins may provide benefits beyond the inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, these drugs may also improve the brain. Thus, statins may have beneficial effects on impaired insulin signaling by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in neuronal cells. They play a potential therapeutic role in targeting Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  18. Neurotoxicity Caused by the Treatment with Platinum Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousana Amptoulach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum agents (cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin are a class of chemotherapy agents that have a broad spectrum of activity against several solid tumors. Toxicity to the peripheral nervous system is the major dose-limiting toxicity of at least some of the platinum drugs of clinical interest. Among the platinum compounds in clinical use, cisplatin is the most neurotoxic, inducing mainly sensory neuropathy of the upper and lower extremities. Carboplatin is generally considered to be less neurotoxic than cisplatin, but it is associated with a higher risk of neurological dysfunction if administered at high dose or in combination with agents considered to be neurotoxic. Oxaliplatin induces two types of peripheral neuropathy, acute and chronic. The incidence of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy is related to various risk factors such as treatment schedule, cumulative dose, and time of infusion. To date, several neuroprotective agents including thiol compounds, vitamin E, various anticonvulsants, calcium-magnesium infusions, and other nonpharmacological strategies have been tested for their ability to prevent platinum-induced neurotoxicity with controversial results. Further studies on the prevention and treatment of neurotoxicity of platinum analogues are warranted.

  19. Elucidating the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Deruiter, Jack; Clark, Randall; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2014-04-17

    There is a rapid increase in the use of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its structural congeners/analogs globally. MDMA and MDMA-analogs have been synthesized illegally in furtive dwellings and are abused due to its addictive potential. Furthermore, MDMA and MDMA-analogs have shown to have induced several adverse effects. Hence, understanding the mechanisms mediating this neurotoxic insult of MDMA-analogs is of immense importance for the public health in the world. We synthesized and investigated the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs [4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 2, 6-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA), and N-ethyl-3, 4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDEA)]. The stimulatory or the dopaminergic agonist effects of MDMA and MDMA-analogs were elucidated using the established 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned animal model. Additionally, we also investigated the neurotoxic mechanisms of MDMA and MDMA-analogs on mitochondrial complex-I activity and reactive oxygen species generation. MDMA and MDMA-analogs exhibited stimulatory activity as compared to amphetamines and also induced several behavioral changes in the rodents. MDMA and MDMA-analogs enhanced the reactive oxygen generation and inhibited mitochondrial complex-I activity which can lead to neurodegeneration. Hence the mechanism of neurotoxicity, MDMA and MDMA-analogs can enhance the release of monoamines, alter the monoaminergic neurotransmission, and augment oxidative stress and mitochondrial abnormalities leading to neurotoxicity. Thus, our study will help in developing effective pharmacological and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MDMA and MDMA-analog abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acrylamide neurotoxicity on the cerebrum of weaning rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-min Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity remains controversial. Previous studies have focused on acrylamide-induced toxicity in adult rodents, but neurotoxicity in weaning rats has not been investigated. To explore the neurotoxic effect of acrylamide on the developing brain, weaning rats were gavaged with 0, 5, 15, and 30 mg/kg acrylamide for 4 consecutive weeks. No obvious neurotoxicity was observed in weaning rats in the low-dose acrylamide group (5 mg/kg. However, rats from the moderate- and high-dose acrylamide groups (15 and 30 mg/kg had an abnormal gait. Furthermore, biochemical tests in these rats demonstrated that glutamate concentration was significantly reduced, and γ-aminobutyric acid content was significantly increased and was dependent on acrylamide dose. Immunohistochemical staining showed that in the cerebral cortex, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamic acid decarboxylase and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression increased remarkably in the moderate- and high-dose acrylamide groups. These results indicate that in weaning rats, acrylamide is positively associated with neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, which may correlate with upregulation of γ-aminobutyric acid and subsequent neuronal degeneration after the initial acrylamide exposure.

  1. Fractal dimension and neurotoxicity in rats intoxicated by aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martać Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We used animal model of neurotoxicity in rats, which provided the possibility of studying biological pathophysiological phenomena in vivo and afterwards in vitro conditions. The analysis of electrocortical brain activity using mathematical methods can describe the changes induced by aluminum intoxication in rat as an animal model. In physiological and pathophysiological conditions, on experimental models, mechanisms related to changes in behavior, plasticity and accumulation of aluminum in nervous tissue of the rat brain were observed. Animal models of rats used in the experiments described changes in the group of neuronal activity in the brain of rats in different modes of intoxication aluminum. This study describes ECoG activity in the brain of rats under anesthesia in both the control and aluminum treated animals. Fractal and spectral analysis was used to present qualitative and quantitative changes in the conditions of neurotoxicity. Changes in neurotransmission, as well as the structure and function of the neural network are connected to the molecular-physiological mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Aluminium toxicity was monitored through changes in glutamatergic activity and calcium channel activity. By spectrum analysis neurotoxicity was described through changes in spectral power in the corresponding frequency ranges. By comparing the FD of intoxicated and control individuals there was obtained the range of the change in correlation with the corresponding pathophysiological conditions of intoxication. The shange in FD might be an indication of neurotoxicity.

  2. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Popova

    Full Text Available 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT, that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A. The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: tniidome@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Akaike, Akinori [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  5. The neurotoxic effects of vitamin A and retinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Roberto de

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) and its congeners - the retinoids - participate in a panoply of biological events, as for instance cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, and death, necessary to maintain tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, such molecules may be applied as therapeutic agents in the case of some diseases, including dermatological disturbances, immunodeficiency, and cancer (mainly leukemia). In spite of this, there is a growing body of evidences showing that vitamin A doses exceeding the nutritional requirements may lead to negative consequences, including bioenergetics state dysfunction, redox impairment, altered cellular signaling, and cell death or proliferation, depending on the cell type. Neurotoxicity has long been demonstrated as a possible side effect of inadvertent consumption, or even under medical recommendation of vitamin A and retinoids at moderate to high doses. However, the exact mechanism by which such molecules exert a neurotoxic role is not clear yet. In this review, recent data are discussed regarding the molecular findings associated with the vitamin A-related neurotoxicity.

  6. Inhibitors of Microglial Neurotoxicity: Focus on Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungho Suk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglial cells play a dual role in the central nervous system as they have both neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects. Uncontrolled and excessive activation of microglia often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration. Recently, much attention has been paid to therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting neurotoxic microglial activation. Pharmacological inhibitors of microglial activation are emerging as a result of such endeavors. In this review, natural products-based inhibitors of microglial activation will be reviewed. Potential neuroprotective activity of these compounds will also be discussed. Future works should focus on the discovery of novel drug targets that specifically mediate microglial neurotoxicity rather than neuroprotection. Development of new drugs based on these targets may require a better understanding of microglial biology and neuroinflammation at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels.

  7. Neurotoxicity and risk assessment of brominated and alternative flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used chemicals that prevent or slow the onset and spreading of fire. Unfortunately, many of these compounds pose serious threats for human health and the environment, indicating an urgent need for safe(r) and less persistent alternative flame retardants (AFRs). As previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ, the neurotoxicity of past and present flame retardants is reviewed. First, an overview of the neurotoxicity of BFRs in humans and experimental animals is provided, and some common in vitro neurotoxic mechanisms of action are discussed. The combined epidemiological and toxicological studies clearly underline the need for replacing BFRs. Many potentially suitable AFRs are already in use, despite the absence of a full profile of their environmental behavior and toxicological properties. To prioritize the suitability of some selected halogenated and non-halogenated organophosphorous flame retardants and inorganic halogen-free flame retardants, the available neurotoxic data of these AFRs are discussed. The suitability of the AFRs is rank-ordered and combined with human exposure data (serum concentrations, breast milk concentrations and house dust concentrations) and physicochemical properties (useful to predict e.g. bioavailability and persistence in the environment) for a first semi-quantitative risk assessment of the AFRs. As can be concluded from the reviewed data, several BFRs and AFRs share some neurotoxic effects and modes of action. Moreover, the available neurotoxicity data indicate that some AFRs may be suitable substitutes for BFRs. However, proper risk assessment is hampered by an overall scarcity of data, particularly regarding environmental persistence, human exposure levels, and the formation of breakdown products and possible metabolites as well as their toxicity. Until these data gaps in environmental behavioral and toxicological profiles are filled, large scale use of

  8. Molecular, Behavioral, and Physiological Consequences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity: Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszczynska, Anna; Callan, Sean Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the relationship between the molecular mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity of high-dose methamphetamine (METH) and related clinical manifestations is imperative for providing more effective treatments for human METH users. This article provides an overview of clinical manifestations of METH neurotoxicity to the central nervous system and neurobiology underlying the consequences of administration of neurotoxic METH doses, and discusses implications of METH neurotoxicity for treatment of human abusers of the drug. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Human Adipose Tissue Conditioned Media from Lean Subjects Is Protective against H2O2 Induced Neurotoxicity in Human SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

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    Zhongxiao Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secretes numerous hormone-like factors, which are known as adipokines. Adipokine receptors have been identified in the central nervous system but the potential role of adipokine signaling in neuroprotection is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine (1 Whether adipokines secreted from cultured adipose tissue of lean humans is protective against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and (2 To explore potential signaling pathways involved in these processes. Adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM from healthy lean subjects completely prevented H2O2 induced neurotoxicity, while this effect is lost after heating ATCM. ATCM activated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and Akt at serine 308 in SH-SY5Y cells. PD98059 (25 µM, SP600125 (5 µM and LY29400 (20 µM partially blocked the protective effects of ATCM against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity. Findings demonstrate that heat-sensitive factors secreted from human adipose tissue of lean subjects are protective against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity and ERK1/2, JNK, and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in these processes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates preliminary but encouraging data to further support that adipose tissue secreted factors from lean human subjects might possess neuroprotective properties and unravel the specific roles of ERK1/2, JNK and PI3K in these processes.

  10. Fingerprinting of neurotoxic compounds using a mouse embryonic stem cell dual luminescence reporter assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colaianna, M.; Ilmjärv, S.; Peterson, H.; Ilse Kern, I.; Julien, S.; Baquié, M.; allocca, G.; Bosgra, S.; Sachinidis, A.; Hengstler, J.G.; Leist, M.; Krause, K.H.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of neurotoxic drugs and environmental chemicals is an important challenge. However, only few tools to address this topic are available. The aim of this study was to develop a neurotoxicity/developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) test system, using the pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cell

  11. Gonadal steroids differentially modulate neurotoxicity of HIV and cocaine: testosterone and ICI 182,780 sensitive mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mactutus Charles F

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV Associated Dementia (HAD is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection that erodes the quality of life for patients and burdens health care providers. Intravenous drug use is a major route of HIV transmission, and drug use is associated with increased HAD. Specific proteins released as a consequence of HIV infection (e.g., gp120, the HIV envelope protein and Tat, the nuclear transactivating protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAD. In primary cultures of human fetal brain tissue, subtoxic doses of gp120 and Tat are capable of interacting with a physiologically relevant dose of cocaine, to produce a significant synergistic neurotoxicity. Using this model system, the neuroprotective potential of gonadal steroids was investigated. Results 17β-Estradiol (17β-E2, but not 17α-estradiol (17α-E2, was protective against this combined neurotoxicity. Progesterone (PROG afforded limited neuroprotection, as did dihydrotestosterone (DHT. The efficacy of 5α-testosterone (T-mediated neuroprotection was robust, similar to that provided by 17β-E2. In the presence of the specific estrogen receptor (ER antagonist, ICI-182,780, T's neuroprotection was completely blocked. Thus, T acts through the ER to provide neuroprotection against HIV proteins and cocaine. Interestingly, cholesterol also demonstrated concentration-dependent neuroprotection, possibly attributable to cholesterol's serving as a steroid hormone precursor in neurons. Conclusion Collectively, the present data indicate that cocaine has a robust interaction with the HIV proteins gp120 and Tat that produces severe neurotoxicity, and this toxicity can be blocked through pretreatment with ER agonists.

  12. 3-nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Helle; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Noraberg, Jens

    2002-01-01

    : CA1 > CA3 > fascia dentata. In low glucose much lower concentrations of 3-NP (25 microM) triggered neurotoxicity. One-week-old cultures were less susceptible to 3-NP toxicity than 3-week-old cultures, but the dentate granule cells were relatively more affected in the immature cultures. We found...

  13. Research advances on potential neurotoxicity of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianshu; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Yilu; Tang, Meng

    2016-03-01

    With rapid development of nanotechnology, quantum dots (QDs) as advanced nanotechnology products have been widely used in biological and biomedical studies, including neuroscience, due to their superior optical properties. In recent years, there has been intense concern regarding the toxicity of QDs with a growing number of studies. However, the knowledge of neurotoxic consequences of QDs applied in living organisms is lagging behind their development, while a potential risk of neurotoxicity arises if mass production of QDs leads to increased exposure and distribution in the nervous system. Owing to the quantum size effect of QDs, they are capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier or moving along neural pathways and entering the brain. Nevertheless, the interactions of QDs with cells and tissues in the central nervous system are not well understood. This review highlighted research advances on the neurotoxicity of QDs in the central nervous system, including oxidative stress injury, elevated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels and autophagy to damage in vitro neural cells, and impairments of synaptic transmission and plasticity as well as brain functions in tested animals, with the hope of throwing light on future research directions of QD neurotoxicity, which is a demanding topic that requires further exploration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Protective effect of quercetin on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bupivacaine, possibly through inhibition of T-type calcium channel. This finding implies a novel mechanism for neuroprotective effect of quercetin, and its potential for treating toxicity arising from the use of local anesthetic agents. Keywords: Quercetin, Bupivacaine, Local anaesthetic, Neuroprotection, Neurotoxicity, T-type ...

  15. Trimethyltin (TMT) neurotoxicity in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, J; Gramsbergen, J B; Fonnum, F

    1998-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of trimethyltin (TMT) on the hippocampus have been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the toxicity of TMT to hippocampal neurons could be reproduced in organotypic brain slice cultures in order to test the potential of this model for neurotoxico...

  16. Fractal dimension and neurotoxicity in rats intoxicated by aluminium

    OpenAIRE

    Martać Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    We used animal model of neurotoxicity in rats, which provided the possibility of studying biological pathophysiological phenomena in vivo and afterwards in vitro conditions. The analysis of electrocortical brain activity using mathematical methods can describe the changes induced by aluminum intoxication in rat as an animal model. In physiological and pathophysiological conditions, on experimental models, mechanisms related to changes in behavior, plasticit...

  17. Developmental neurotoxicity after toluene inhalation exposure in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Lund, Søren Peter; Hougaard, Karin Sørig

    1999-01-01

    TG for Developmental Neurotoxicity Study, i.e., physical development, reflex ontogeny, motor function, motor activity, sensory function, and learning and memory. The exposure did not cause maternal toxicity or decreased viability of the offspring. Lower birth weight, delayed ontogeny of reflexes...

  18. Berberine Reduces Neurotoxicity Related to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa A. Ghareeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine is a plant alkaloid that has several pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, antilipidemic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH triggers different aspects of disorders such as impaired endogenous lipid metabolism, hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, and neurotoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which NASH induces neurotoxicity and the protective effect of berberine against both NASH and its associated neurotoxicity. NASH induced rats showed significant impairments in lipid metabolism with increased serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL. The NASH induced group also demonstrated a significant oxidative stress which is characterized by increased TBARs level and decreased antioxidant capacity such as GSH and SOD levels. Moreover, the NASH induction was associated with inflammation which was demonstrated by increased TNFα and nitric oxide levels. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were observed in the NASH induced group. Also, our results showed a significant increase in the expression of the acetylcholine esterase (AChE and amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP. These changes were significantly correlated with decreased insulin degrading enzyme (IDE and beta-amyloid40 (Aβ40 and increased beta-amyloid42 (Aβ42 in the hippocampal region. Daily administration of berberine (50 mg/kg for three weeks ameliorated oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and the observed neurotoxicity.

  19. Intracellular Calcium Plays a Critical Role in the Microcystin-LR-Elicited Neurotoxicity Through PLC/IP3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Fei; Liu, Jue; Li, Cairong; Wang, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity of microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR) has been widely reported. However, the mechanism is not fully understood. Using primary hippocampal neurons, we tested the hypothesis that MCLR-triggered activation in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) induces the death of neurons. Microcystin-leucine-arginine inhibited cell viability at a range of 0.1 to 30 μmol/L and caused a dose-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed in Ca(2+)-free media and blocked by an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor, suggesting intracellular Ca(2+) release. Moreover, pretreatment of hippocampal neurons with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator (O,O'-bis (2-aminophenyl) ethyleneglycol-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetraacetoxy-methyl ester) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) could block both the Ca(2+) mobilization and the neuronal death following MCLR exposure. In contrast, the ryanodine receptor inhibitor (dantrolene) did not ameliorate the effect of MCLR. In conclusion, MCLR disrupts [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis in neurons by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, and this increase in [Ca(2+)](i) may be a key determinant in the mechanism underlying MCLR-induced neurotoxicity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. MDMA-induced neurotoxicity of serotonin neurons involves autophagy and rilmenidine is protective against its pathobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Linda D; Higgins, Gavin C; Lau, Chew L; Lawrence, Andrew J; Beart, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) towards biogenic amine neurons is well documented and in primate brain predominantly affects serotonin (5-HT) neurons. MDMA induces damage of 5-HT axons and nerve fibres and intracytoplasmic inclusions. Whilst its pathobiology involves mitochondrially-mediated oxidative stress, we hypothesised MDMA possessed the capacity to activate autophagy, a proteostatic mechanism for degradation of cellular debris. We established a culture of ventral pons from embryonic murine brain enriched in 5-HT neurons to explore mechanisms of MDMA neurotoxicity and recruitment of autophagy, and evaluated possible neuroprotective actions of the clinically approved agent rilmenidine. MDMA (100 μM-1 mM) reduced cell viability, like rapamycin (RM) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Immunocytochemistry revealed dieback of 5-HT arbour: MDMA-induced injury was slower than for RM and H 2 O 2 , neuritic blebbing occurred at 48 and 72 h and Hoechst labelling revealed nuclear fragmentation with 100 μM MDMA. MDMA effected concentration-dependent inhibition of [ 3 H]5-HT uptake with 500 μM MDMA totally blocking transport. Western immunoblotting for microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) revealed autophagosome formation after treatment with MDMA. Confocal analyses and immunocytochemistry for 5-HT, Hoechst and LC3 confirmed MDMA induced autophagy with abundant LC3-positive puncta within 5-HT neurons. Rilmenidine (1 μM) protected against MDMA-induced injury and image analysis showed full preservation of 5-HT arbours. MDMA had no effect on GABA neurons, indicating specificity of action at 5-HT neurons. MDMA-induced neurotoxicity involves autophagy induction in 5-HT neurons, and rilmenidine via beneficial actions against toxic intracellular events represents a potential treatment for its pathobiology in sustained usage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cnidarian Neurotoxic Peptides Affecting Central Nervous System Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Hernández-Guzmán, Ulises; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Judith; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Natural products from animal venoms have been used widely in the discovery of novel molecules with particular biological activities that enable their use as potential drug candidates. The phylum Cnidaria (jellyfish, sea anemones, corals zoanthids, hydrozoans, etc.) is the most ancient venomous phylum on earth. Its venoms are composed of a complex mixture of peptidic compounds with neurotoxic and cytolitic properties that have shown activity on mammalian systems despite the fact that they are naturally targeted against fish and invertebrate preys, mainly crustaceans. For this reason, cnidarian venoms are an interesting and vast source of molecules with a remarkable activity on central nervous system, targeting mainly voltage-gated ion channels, ASIC channels, and TRPV1 receptors. In this brief review, we list the amino acid sequences of most cnidarian neurotoxic peptides reported to date. Additionally, we propose the inclusion of a new type of voltage-gated sea anemone sodium channel toxins based on the most recent reports.

  2. Functional, Structural, and Neurotoxicity Biomarkers in Integrative Assessment of Concussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A Dambinova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Concussion is a complex, heterogenous process affecting the brain. Accurate assessment and diagnosis and appropriate management of concussion are essential to ensure athletes do not prematurely return to play or others to work or active military duty, risking re-injury. To date, clinical diagnosis relies primarily on evaluating subjects for functional impairment using instruments that include neurocognitive testing, subjective symptom report, and neurobehavioral assessments, such as balance and vestibular-ocular reflex testing. Structural biomarkers, defined as advanced neuroimaging techniques and biomarkers assessing neurotoxicity and immunoexcitotoxicity may complement the use of functional biomarkers. We hypothesize that neurotoxicity AMPA, NMDA, and kainite receptor biomarkers might be utilized as a part of comprehensive approach to concussion evaluations, with the goal of increasing diagnostic accuracy and facilitating treatment planning and prognostic assessment.

  3. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular system...

  4. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Prevents Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, M. Paola; Madeddu, Camilla; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M. Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of c...

  5. Squalestatin alters the intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic prion peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxic peptides derived from the protease-resistant core of the prion protein are used to model the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The current study characterised the ingestion, internalization and intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic peptide containing amino acids 105–132 of the murine prion protein (MoPrP105-132 in neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons. Results Fluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation techniques showed that MoPrP105-132 co-localised with lipid raft markers (cholera toxin and caveolin-1 and trafficked intracellularly within lipid rafts. This trafficking followed a non-classical endosomal pathway delivering peptide to the Golgi and ER, avoiding classical endosomal trafficking via early endosomes to lysosomes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis demonstrated close interactions of MoPrP105-132 with cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1, enzymes implicated in the neurotoxicity of prions. Treatment with squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol levels and caused the redistribution of MoPrP105-132 out of lipid rafts. In squalestatin-treated cells, MoPrP105-132 was rerouted away from the Golgi/ER into degradative lysosomes. Squalestatin treatment also reduced the association between MoPrP105-132 and cPLA2/COX-1. Conclusion As the observed shift in peptide trafficking was accompanied by increased cell survival these studies suggest that the neurotoxicity of this PrP peptide is dependent on trafficking to specific organelles where it activates specific signal transduction pathways.

  6. Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Schneider, Jay S.; Zheng Wei

    2007-01-01

    The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans

  7. The neurotoxicity of environmental aluminum is still an issue

    OpenAIRE

    Bondy, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for the neurotoxicity of extended exposure to low levels of aluminum salts is described using an animal model treated with aluminum at low levels reflecting those found in found in some water supplies. Emphasis is given to the potential role of aluminum in acceleration and promotion of some indices characteristic of brain aging. These hallmarks include the appearance of excess levels of inflammation in specific brain areas. Aluminum salts can increase levels of glial activation, infl...

  8. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannon, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  9. [Neurotoxicity of valacyclovir in a peritoneal dialysis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Akio; Maehana, Takeshi; Kyoda, Yuuki; Yanase, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    The patient was a 67-year-old man with a 2-year history of peritoneal dialysis for end-stage renal disease due to hypertensive nephropathy. He presented to a dermatologist with a complaint of pain in the right femoral region. He was diagnosed as having herpes zoster and valacyclovir, 1,000 mg/day, was prescribed. After 5 days of taking valacyclovir orally, he felt fretful and hallucinations appeared. He was admitted to our hospital and was hospitalized in our urology ward. We diagnosed his condition as neurotoxicity caused by an overdose of valacyclovir. As his general condition was stable, he was treated only by continuation of peritoneal dialysis. After 7 days of hospitalization, the neurotoxicity completely disappeared and he left the hospital. His serum acyclovir concentration at admission was 20.20 μg/l, and was reduced to 0.7 μg/l when he left the hospital. This supported our diagnosis of valacyclovir-induced neurotoxicity. In this case, valacyclovir should have been reduced to 500 mg/day, considering his renal function. Although we could treat the patient only by continuation of peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis seems to be an effective treatment method in the case of unstable general condition or severe adverse effects, because it can eliminate the serum acyclovir.

  10. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury mediated neurotoxicity.

  11. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity.

  12. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F 2 -isoprostanes (F 2 -IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 μM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F 2 -IsoPs and PGE 2 in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  13. Thallium Toxicity: General Issues, Neurological Symptoms, and Neurotoxic Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Rico, Laura; Santamaria, Abel; Galván-Arzate, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Thallium (Tl + ) is a ubiquitous natural trace metal considered as the most toxic among heavy metals. The ionic ratio of Tl + is similar to that of potassium (K + ), therefore accounting for the replacement of the latter during enzymatic reactions. The principal organelle damaged after Tl + exposure is mitochondria. Studies on the mechanisms of Tl + include intrinsic pathways altered and changes in antiapoptotic and proapoptotic proteins, cytochrome c, and caspases. Oxidative damage pathways increase after Tl + exposure to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes in physical properties of the cell membrane caused by lipid peroxidation, and concomitant activation of antioxidant mechanisms. These processes are likely to account for the neurotoxic effects of the metal. In humans, Tl + is absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes and then is widely distributed throughout the body to be accumulated in bones, renal medulla, liver, and the Central Nervous System. Given the growing relevance of Tl + intoxication, in recent years there is a notorious increase in the number of reports attending Tl + pollution in different countries. In this sense, the neurological symptoms produced by Tl + and its neurotoxic effects are gaining attention as they represent a serious health problem all over the world. Through this review, we present an update to general information about Tl + toxicity, making emphasis on some recent data about Tl + neurotoxicity, as a field requiring attention at the clinical and preclinical levels.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  16. Inhibitory effect of curcumin on the Al(III)-induced Aβ₄₂ aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Teng; Zhi, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Yue-Hong; Pan, Luan-Feng; Zhou, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves a key event which changes the morphology of amyloid-β 42 (Aβ)₄₂ peptide from its soluble monomeric form into the fibrillated aggregates in the brain. Aluminum ion, Al(III), is known to act as a pathological chaperone of the Aβ₄₂ in this process; curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, is considered capable of binding Al(III) and Aβ₄₂; nevertheless, little is known about the combined action of curcumin and Al(III) on the Aβ₄₂ fibrillation and neurotoxicity. Here, combinations of circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, Bradford and MTT assays, it is demonstrated that although Al(III) can promote the Aβ₄₂ fibrillation dose-dependently, leading to the high neurotoxicity to PC12 cells, curcumin can inhibit the events. Besides, we found that curcumin is able not only to inhibit the formation of Al(III)-induced Aβ₄₂ fibrillation, but also to form the Al(III)-curcumin complexes which in turn can remold the preformed, mature, ordered Aβ₄₂ fibrils into the low toxic amorphous aggregates. These findings suggest that curcumin could block the binding of Al(III) with Aβ₄₂ and form the Al(III)-curcumin complexes, so as to inhibit the Al(III)-induced Aβ₄₂ fibrillation and neurotoxicity. The Al(III)-curcumin complexes are worth potentially developing as a therapy agent against the neurodegenerative disorders in the future. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the neurotoxical effect of aluminum on the Wistar rat

    OpenAIRE

    Martać L.; Podgorac J.; Sekulić S.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous investigations on an animal model of neurotoxicity show that increased power in the delta range is connected with the neurotoxic effect of aluminum exposure. In this study we used several aluminum-treated animals as a reliable model for the evaluation of the neurotoxic effects of aluminum on neurons, and compared it with a control group. We conclude that spectral analysis and the ratio between the delta and theta ranges might be reliable for a qualitative description of the neuro...

  18. Severe Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity in Primates After a Common Recreational Dose Regimen of MDMA (``Ecstasy'')

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricaurte, George A.; Yuan, Jie; Hatzidimitriou, George; Cord, Branden J.; McCann, Una D.

    2002-09-01

    The prevailing view is that the popular recreational drug (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or ``ecstasy'') is a selective serotonin neurotoxin in animals and possibly in humans. Nonhuman primates exposed to several sequential doses of MDMA, a regimen modeled after one used by humans, developed severe brain dopaminergic neurotoxicity, in addition to less pronounced serotonergic neurotoxicity. MDMA neurotoxicity was associated with increased vulnerability to motor dysfunction secondary to dopamine depletion. These results have implications for mechanisms of MDMA neurotoxicity and suggest that recreational MDMA users may unwittingly be putting themselves at risk, either as young adults or later in life, for developing neuropsychiatric disorders related to brain dopamine and/or serotonin deficiency.

  19. Fingolimod phosphate attenuates oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity via increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Doi

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative processes that underlie Alzheimer's disease are mediated, in part, by soluble oligomeric amyloid β, a neurotoxic protein that inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation, disrupts synaptic plasticity, and induces the production of reactive oxygen species. Here we show that the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor (S1PR agonist fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P-a new oral drug for multiple sclerosis-protects neurons against oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity. We confirmed that primary mouse cortical neurons express all of the S1P receptor subtypes and FTY720-P directly affects the neurons. Treatment with FTY720-P enhanced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurons. Moreover, blocking BDNF-TrkB signaling with a BDNF scavenger, TrkB inhibitor, or ERK1/2 inhibitor almost completely ablated these neuroprotective effects. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of FTY720-P are mediated by upregulated neuronal BDNF levels. Therefore, FTY720-P may be a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Purification and partial characterization of a novel neurotoxic protein from eggs of black widow spiders (Latrodectus tredecimguttatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Yan, Yizhong; Wang, Jirong; Guo, Tianyao; Hu, Weijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2013-07-01

    Up to now, there have been a few reports on the toxic components purified from black widow spider (Latrodectus tredecimguttatus) eggs. In the present study, a novel neurotoxic protein was purified from the eggs by gel filtration combined with ion-exchange chromatography. Its molecular weight was 23.752 kDa determined by electrospray mass spectrometry. The protein could block the neuromuscular transmission in mouse-isolated phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations completely in a reversible manner and activate tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current in rat dorsal root ganglion cells. The N-terminal sequence of the protein was identified by the Edman degradation to be N-S-I-A-D-D-R-Y-R-W-P-G-Y-P-G-A-G-L-I-P-Y-I-I-D-S-. When the sequence was used to search against protein database with a sequence query in Mascot engine there was no matched sequence or protein whereas the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis indicated that no significant similarity was found. These results demonstrated that the protein (named Latroeggtoxin-I) is a novel neurotoxic protein purified from the eggs of black widow spiders. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  2. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, Luciano R. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Doria, Juliana G. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Flávia [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aguiar, Daniele C. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, Fabíola M. [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moraes, Marcio F.D., E-mail: mfdm@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Fabricio A., E-mail: fabriciomoreira@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  3. Mefloquine neurotoxicity is mediated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Yu, Yingchun; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Among several available antimalarial drugs, mefloquine has proven to be effective against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and remains the drug of choice for both therapy and chemoprophylaxis. However, mefloquine is known to cause adverse neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms, which offset its therapeutic advantage. The exact mechanisms leading to the adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are poorly defined. Alterations in neurotransmitter release and calcium homeostasis, the inhibition of cholinesterases and the interaction with adenosine A(2A) receptors have been hypothesized to play prominent roles in mediating the deleterious effects of this drug. Our recent data have established that mefloquine can also trigger oxidative damage and subsequent neurodegeneration in rat cortical primary neurons. Furthermore, we have utilized a system biology-centered approach and have constructed a pathway model of cellular responses to mefloquine, identifying non-receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) as a critical target in mediating mefloquine neurotoxicity. In this study, we sought to establish an experimental validation of Pyk2 using gene-silencing techniques (siRNA). We have examined whether the downregulation of Pyk2 in primary rat cortical neurons alters mefloquine neurotoxicity by evaluating cell viability, apoptosis and oxidative stress. Results from our study have confirmed that mefloquine neurotoxicity is associated with apoptotic response and oxidative injury, and we have demonstrated that mefloquine affects primary rat cortical neurons, at least in part, via Pyk2. The implication of these findings may prove beneficial in suppressing the neurological side effects of mefloquine and developing effective therapeutic modalities to offset its adverse effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotoxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate to hippocampal cells in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Long

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is a ubiquitous pollutant and found in the environment and in biota. The neurotoxicity of PFOS has received much concern among its various toxic effects when given during developing period of brain. However, little is known about the neurotoxic effects and potential mechanisms of PFOS in the mature brain. Our study demonstrated the neurotoxicity and the potential mechanisms of PFOS in the hippocampus of adult mice for the first time. The impairments of spatial learning and memory were observed by water maze studies after exposure to PFOS for three months. Significant apoptosis was found in hippocampal cells after PFOS exposure, accompanied with a increase of glutamate in the hippocampus and decreases of dopamine (DA and 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC in Caudate Putamen in the 10.75 mg/kg PFOS group. By two-dimensional fluorescence difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis, seven related proteins in the hippocampus that responded to PFOS exposure were identified, among which, Mib1 protein (an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, Herc5 (hect domain and RLD 5 isoform 2 and Tyro3 (TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3 were found down-regulated, while Sdha (Succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein subunit, Gzma (Isoform HF1 of Granzyme A precursor, Plau (Urokinase-type plasminogen activator precursor and Lig4 (DNA ligase 4 were found up-regulated in the 10.75 mg/kg PFOS-treated group compare with control group. Furthermore, we also found that (i increased expression of caspase-3 protein and decreased expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin proteins, (ii the increased glutamate release in the hippocampus. All these might contribute to the dysfunction of hippocampus which finally account for the impairments of spatial learning and memory in adult mice.

  5. Rotenone exerts developmental neurotoxicity in a human brain spheroid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamies, David; Block, Katharina; Lau, Pierre; Gribaldo, Laura; Pardo, Carlos A; Barreras, Paula; Smirnova, Lena; Wiersma, Daphne; Zhao, Liang; Harris, Georgina; Hartung, Thomas; Hogberg, Helena T

    2018-02-08

    Growing concern suggests that some chemicals exert (developmental) neurotoxicity (DNT and NT) and are linked to the increase in incidence of autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders. The high cost of routine tests for DNT and NT assessment make it difficult to test the high numbers of existing chemicals. Thus, more cost effective neurodevelopmental models are needed. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) in combination with the emerging human 3D tissue culture platforms, present a novel tool to predict and study human toxicity. By combining these technologies, we generated multicellular brain spheroids (BrainSpheres) from human iPSC. The model has previously shown to be reproducible and recapitulates several neurodevelopmental features. Our results indicate, rotenone's toxic potency varies depending on the differentiation status of the cells, showing higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher mitochondrial dysfunction during early than later differentiation stages. Immuno-fluorescence morphology analysis after rotenone exposure indicated dopaminergic-neuron selective toxicity at non-cytotoxic concentrations (1 μM), while astrocytes and other neuronal cell types were affected at (general) cytotoxic concentrations (25 μM). Omics analysis showed changes in key pathways necessary for brain development, indicating rotenone as a developmental neurotoxicant and show a possible link between previously shown effects on neurite outgrowth and presently observed effects on Ca2+ reabsorption, synaptogenesis and PPAR pathway disruption. In conclusion, our BrainSpheres model has shown to be a reproducible and novel tool to study neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity. Results presented here support the idea that rotenone can potentially be a developmental neurotoxicant. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB 1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB 1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis attenuates

  7. Neurotoxicity from prenatal and postnatal exposure to methylmercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pal; Debes, Frodi

    2014-01-01

    included mercury concentrations in maternal hair at parturition, cord blood, and child blood and hair at the age-7 clinical examination ( N= 923). In regression analyses, the child's current blood-mercury at age 7 ( N= 694) showed only weak associations with the neuropsychological test variables...... exposure appeared to contribute to neurotoxic effects, in particular in regard to visuospatial processing and memory. Thus, addition in the regression analysis of exposure information obtained at a different point in time was not informative and should be avoided. Further studies with better information...

  8. Neurotoxicity of topically applied hexachlorophene in the young rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, R M; Leech, R W; Alvord, E C

    1975-05-01

    Young rats 6 to 22 days of age are extremely susceptible to the neurotoxic effects of hexachlorophene given as a daily bath of undiluted antiseptic detergent containing 3% hexachlorophene (pHiso-Hex). At this age, most rats are clinically and histologically damaged by as few as two daily baths. Younger rats are relatively resistant, probably because they have less myelin to be affected; older rats cannot be poisoned by this route, probably because the more mature liver excretes the drug more effectively. Age-dose-response curves in rats are similar to those in humans. This experimental model is potentially useful in defining other characteristics of this drug.

  9. Functional expression of spider neurotoxic peptide huwentoxin-I in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er Meng

    Full Text Available The coding sequence of huwentoxin-I, a neurotoxic peptide isolated from the venom of the Chinese spider Ornithoctonus huwena, was amplified by PCR using the cDNA library constructed from the spider venom glands. The cloned fragment was inserted into the expression vector pET-40b and transformed into the E. coli strain BL21 (DE3. The expression of a soluble fusion protein, disulfide interchange protein (DsbC-huwentoxin-I, was auto-induced in the periplasm of E. coli in the absence of IPTG. After partial purification using a Ni-NTA column, the expressed fusion protein was digested using enterokinase to release heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I and was further purified using RP-HPLC. The resulting peptide was subjected to gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis. The molecular weight of the heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I was 3750.69, which is identical to that of the natural form of the peptide isolated from spider venom. The physiological properties of the heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I were further analyzed using a whole-cell patch clamp assay. The heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I was able to block currents generated by human Na(v1.7 at an IC₅₀ of 640 nmole/L, similar to that of the natural huwentoxin-I, which is 630 nmole/L.

  10. Functional Expression of Spider Neurotoxic Peptide Huwentoxin-I in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yan-Bo; Peng, Kuan; Liang, Songping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2011-01-01

    The coding sequence of huwentoxin-I, a neurotoxic peptide isolated from the venom of the Chinese spider Ornithoctonus huwena, was amplified by PCR using the cDNA library constructed from the spider venom glands. The cloned fragment was inserted into the expression vector pET-40b and transformed into the E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). The expression of a soluble fusion protein, disulfide interchange protein (DsbC)-huwentoxin-I, was auto-induced in the periplasm of E. coli in the absence of IPTG. After partial purification using a Ni-NTA column, the expressed fusion protein was digested using enterokinase to release heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I and was further purified using RP-HPLC. The resulting peptide was subjected to gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis. The molecular weight of the heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I was 3750.69, which is identical to that of the natural form of the peptide isolated from spider venom. The physiological properties of the heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I were further analyzed using a whole-cell patch clamp assay. The heteroexpressed huwentoxin-I was able to block currents generated by human Nav1.7 at an IC50 of 640 nmole/L, similar to that of the natural huwentoxin-I, which is 630 nmole/L. PMID:21731778

  11. The combined effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and selected substituted methcathinones on measures of neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Nicholas B; O'Callaghan, James P; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    The rise in popularity of substituted methcathinones (aka "bath salts") has increased the focus on their neurotoxic effects. Two commonly abused methcathinones, 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone, MDMC) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), are often concomitantly ingested with the illicit drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). To examine potential neurotoxic effects of these drug combinations, C57BL/6J mice were administered 4 i.p. injection of the drugs, at 2h intervals, either singularly: MDMA 15 or 30mg/kg, methylone 20mg/kg, MDPV 1mg/kg; or in combination: methylone/MDMA 20/15mg/kg, MDPV/MDMA 1/15mg/kg. Drug effects on thermoregulation were characterized and striatal tissue analyzed after 2 or 7days for dopamine (DA) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Two days following drug administration, DA and TH were decreased only in the MDMA 30mg/kg group, whereas GFAP expression was dose-dependently increased by MDMA alone. While the combination of the methcathinones with the lower MDMA dose did not affect DA or TH levels, both blocked the MDMA-induced increase in GFAP expression. Seven days following drug administration, there were no significant differences in DA, TH, or GFAP for any treatment group, indicating that changes in DA, TH, and GFAP were transient. Five of the six drug groups exhibited acute hypothermia followed by gradually increasing temperatures. Animals treated with MDPV did not exhibit these biphasic temperature changes, and resembled the saline group. These results indicate that specific effects of both methylone and MDPV on DA depletion or astrocyte activation in the striatum are not additive with effects of MDMA, but block astrogliosis caused by MDMA alone. Additionally, MDPV modulates thermoregulation through a different mechanism than methylone or MDMA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. IN VITRO ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: USE OF MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TO MEASURE FUNCTIONAL CHANGES IN NEURONAL NETWORK ONTOGENY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because the Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing Battery requires large numbers of animals and is expensive, development of in vitro approaches to screen chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity is a high priority. Many proposed approaches for screening are biochemical,...

  13. In Vitro Assessment of Developmental Neurotoxicity: Use of Microelectrode Arrays to Measure Functional Changes in Neuronal Network Ontogeny*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because the Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing Guidelines require large numbers of animals and is expensive, development of in vitro approaches to screen chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity is a high priority. Many proposed approaches for screening are biochemica...

  14. 3-Nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures is dependent on glucose and glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, J; Kornblit, B T; Zimmer, J

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial inhibition by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) causes striatal degeneration reminiscent of Huntington's disease. We studied 3-NPA neurotoxicity and possible indirect excitotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures. Neurotoxicity was quantified by assay...

  15. [Toxicodynamic properties of liquids used for the cooling of high-power turbines. III. Neurotoxic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, E; Malendowicz, L; Seńczuk, W

    1984-01-01

    Results of neurotoxicity studies indicate that preparations IWiOL -3-n, IWiOL -3-e and OMTI administered intragastrically or intraperitoneally induce neurotoxic effects in hens. Those effects are, however, weaker than those of the standard substance, i.e. triorthocresyl . Yet, they get increased in result of IWiOL -3-e, as compared to IWiOL -3-n administration.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Insecticide Neurotoxicity: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroid insecticides were introduced into widespread use for the control of insect pests and disease vectors more than three decades ago. In addition to their value in controlling agricultural pests, pyrethroids are at the forefront of efforts to combat malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases and are also common ingredients of household insecticide and companion animal ectoparasite control products. The abundance and variety of pyrethroid uses contribute to the risk of exposure and adverse effects in the general population. The insecticidal actions of pyrethroids depend on their ability to bind to and disrupt voltage-gated sodium channels of insect nerves. Sodium channels are also important targets for the neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids in mammals but other targets, particularly voltage-gated calcium and chloride channels, have been implicated as alternative or secondary sites of action for a subset of pyrethroids. This review summarizes information published during the past decade on the action of pyrethroids on voltage-gated sodium channels as well as on voltage-gated calcium and chloride channels and provides a critical re-evaluation of the role of these three targets in pyrethroid neurotoxicity based on this information. PMID:21710279

  17. A neurotoxicity assessment of high flash aromatic naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, J F; McKee, R H; Cagen, S Z; Schmitt, S L; Beatty, P W; Swanson, M S; Schreiner, C A; Ulrich, C E; Cockrell, B Y

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide-boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 Aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent also known as High Flash Aromatic Naphtha (HFAN). A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of HFAN since there may be human exposure, especially in the workplace. The current study was conducted to assess the potential for neurotoxicity in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats of approximately 300 grams body weight, in groups of twenty, were exposed by inhalation to HFAN for 90 days at concentrations of 0, 100, 500, and 1500 ppm. During this period the animals were tested monthly for motor activity and in a functional observation battery. After three months of exposure, for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 10 animals/group/sex were sacrificed and selected nervous system tissue was examined histopathologically. No signs of neurotoxicity were seen in any of the evaluated parameters, nor was there evidence of pathologic changes in any of the examined tissues.

  18. Subchronic organophosphorus ester-induced delayed neurotoxicity in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sileo, L.; Murray, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen-week-old mallard hens received 0, 10, 30, 90, or 270 ppm technical grade EPN (phenylphosphonothioic acid O-ethyl-O-4-nitrophenyl ester) in the diet for 90 days. Ataxia was first observed in the 270-ppm group after 16 days, in the 90-ppm group after 20 days, in the 30-ppm group after 38 days; 10 ppm failed to produce ataxia. By the end of 90 days all 6 birds in the 270-ppm group exhibited ataxia or paralysis whereas 5 of 6 birds in the 90-ppm group and 2 of 6 birds in the 30-ppm group were visibly affected. Treatment with 30 ppm or more resulted in a significant reduction in body weight. Brain neurotoxic esterase activity was inhibited by averages of 16, 69, 73, and 74% in the 10-, 30-, 90-, and 270-ppm groups, respectively. Brain acetylcholinesterase, plasma cholinesterase, and plasma alkaline phosphatase were significantly inhibited as well. Distinct histopathological effects were seen in the 30-, 90-, and 270-ppm groups which included demyelination and degeneration of axons of the spinal cord. Additional ducks were exposed in a similar manner to 60-, 270-, or 540-ppm leptophos (phosphonothioic acid O-4-bromo-2,5-dichlorophenyl-O-methylphenyl ester) which resulted in similar behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological alterations. These findings indicate that adult mallards are probably somewhat less sensitive than chickens to subchronic dietary exposure to organophosphorus insecticides that induce delayed neurotoxicity.

  19. Mothball withdrawal encephalopathy: case report and review of paradichlorobenzene neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Wilson, Robin K; Cortese, Irene C M; Newman-Toker, David E

    2006-12-01

    Paradichlorobenzene (PDB) is a common household deodorant and pesticide found in room deodorizers, toilet bowl fresheners, and some mothballs. Although human exposure to the compound is generally limited and harmless, PDB in larger doses can produce neurotoxic effects, including a chemical "high" similar to that seen with inhalants such as toluene. Although rare, frank addiction to PDB has been reported, and, in such cases, has been associated with gait ataxia, tremor, dysarthria, limb weakness, and bradyphrenia, in various combinations. In such cases, the adverse neurologic consequences have been presumed to result from a direct toxic effect of this small, organic molecule. We report a case of chronic mothball ingestion where profound encephalopathy with cognitive, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, and cerebellar features appears to have been largely the result of PDB withdrawal, rather than direct toxicity. This case raises important questions about the mechanism of PDB neurotoxicity and possible treatment options for PDB-addicted patients. We propose that in cases with clear clinical deterioration after abstinence, readministration and gradual taper of PDB might be considered a therapeutic option.

  20. Lead neurotoxicity: In vitro and in vivo effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowles, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    Neuroglial cells, in particular astroglia, are thought to play a role in the neurotoxicity of lead. Two hypotheses have been proposed as possible cellular mechanism of this neurotoxicity: (1) lead affects intracellular levels of metals which mediate the toxic effects noted, and (2) lead affects intracellular heme biosynthesis which is then toxic to the cells. Zinc was found to have a profound effect on both intracellular lead levels and on cell numbers in lead-treated rat astroglia. A comparison of bovine and rat astroglia in culture indicated that the bovine cell cultures were not more sensitive to lead, even though calves are more sensitive. Lead was also shown to affect intracellular heme biosynthesis by a decrease in 14 C aminolevulinic acid incorporation into extractable heme in lead-treated rat astroglia. Finally, low levels of lead in immature guinea pigs caused changes in tissue levels of lead, iron, copper, and zinc with no change in weight gain or body:brain weight ratios

  1. Sarin (GB, O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) neurotoxicity: critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B.; Siracuse, Briana; Gupta, Natasha; Sokol, Ashly Sobel

    2017-01-01

    Sarin (GB, O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is a potent organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent that inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) irreversibly. The subsequent build-up of acetylcholine (ACh) in the central nervous system (CNS) provokes seizures and, at sufficient doses, centrally-mediated respiratory arrest. Accumulation of ACh at peripheral autonomic synapses leads to peripheral signs of intoxication and overstimulation of the muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, which is described as “cholinergic crisis” (i.e. diarrhea, sweating, salivation, miosis, bronchoconstriction). Exposure to high doses of sarin can result in tremors, seizures, and hypothermia. More seriously, build-up of ACh at neuromuscular junctions also can cause paralysis and ultimately peripherally-mediated respiratory arrest which can lead to death via respiratory failure. In addition to its primary action on the cholinergic system, sarin possesses other indirect effects. These involve the activation of several neurotransmitters including gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and the alteration of other signaling systems such as ion channels, cell adhesion molecules, and inflammatory regulators. Sarin exposure is associated with symptoms of organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) and organophosphate-induced chronic neurotoxicity (OPICN). Moreover, sarin has been involved in toxic and immunotoxic effects as well as organophosphate-induced endocrine disruption (OPIED). The standard treatment for sarin-like nerve agent exposure is post-exposure injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, accompanied by an oxime, an AChE reactivator, and diazepam. PMID:27705071

  2. Developmental neurotoxicity guideline study: issues with methodology, evaluation and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ryozo; Crofton, Kevin M

    2012-09-01

    Recently social concerns have been increasing about the effects of environmental factors on children's health, especially on their nervous systems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have published testing guidelines for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Approximately 110 guideline studies have been conducted to date. Importantly, information from these studies has provided data critical for regulatory decisions for a number of chemicals. However, the DNT guidelines do not always satisfy all stakeholders because of some uncertainties in their methodology, evaluation, and regulation. Methodological issues include incomplete harmonization between EPA and OECD guidelines, criticisms of the methodology for learning and memory testing, and unspecified positive control substances. Potential artifacts in morphometric neuropathological measures, criteria for observation measures, uncertainty of postnatal offspring exposure, especially in feeding studies, and extrapolation of data from rats to humans are major evaluation issues. In addition, there is some uncertainty in the use of an additional safety factor for susceptibility of infants and children. Moreover, the DNT guidelines have extensive time and cost requirements, use large numbers of animals, and there is a limited set of laboratories that can conduct the study. This paper reviews some of these issues and summarizes discussions from the symposium 'Developmental neurotoxicity testing: Scientific approaches towards the next generation to protecting the developing nervous system of children' held at the 2011 annual meeting of the Japanese Teratology Society. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  3. A holistic view of anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clausen NG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Clausen, Tom G Hansen Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Introduction: Animal studies (including in nonhuman primates have shown that most general anesthetics cause enhanced neuroapoptosis in the immature brain with subsequent long-term neurocognitive deficits later in life. Whether human neurons are equally affected is yet unknown, but a final answer to this issue is still pending. To date, most human studies within the field are of observational nature and the results are conflicting. Some studies indicate an association between exposure to anesthesia and surgery while others do not. Objective: This review summarizes results from preclinical and observational studies. Controversies and challenges regarding the interpretation of these results are presented. Crucial aspects of neurocognitive safety during pediatric anesthesia and surgery are highlighted. International initiatives aiming to improve the safe conductance of pediatric anesthesia are introduced. Conclusion: So far, anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in humans remains an area of concern but it cannot be completely excluded. Clinical practice should not be changed until there are definite proofs that anesthetic exposure causes neurocognitive impairment later in life. Withholding necessary and timely surgeries as a consequence of any such concerns could result in worse harm. Focus of current research should also be redirected to include other factors, than merely anesthetics and surgery, that influence the neurocognitive safety of children perioperatively. Keywords: pediatric anesthesia, neurotoxicity, anesthesia safety, neurocognitive development 

  4. Developmental neurotoxic effects of two pesticides: Behavior and biomolecular studies on chlorpyrifos and carbaryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Iwa; Eriksson, Per; Fredriksson, Anders; Buratovic, Sonja; Viberg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, an increased occurrence of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive abnormalities has been recognized. Exposure to pesticides has been suspected to be a possible cause of these disorders, as these compounds target the nervous system of pests. Due to the similarities of brain development and composition, these pesticides may also be neurotoxic to humans. We studied two different pesticides, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl, which specifically inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the nervous system. The aim of the study was to investigate if the pesticides can induce neurotoxic effects, when exposure occurs during a period of rapid brain growth and maturation. The results from the present study show that both compounds can affect protein levels in the developing brain and induce persistent adult behavior and cognitive impairments, in mice neonatally exposed to a single oral dose of chlorpyrifos (0.1, 1.0 or 5 mg/kg body weight) or carbaryl (0.5, 5.0 or 20.0 mg/kg body weight) on postnatal day 10. The results also indicate that the developmental neurotoxic effects induced are not related to the classical mechanism of acute cholinergic hyperstimulation, as the AChE inhibition level (8–12%) remained below the threshold for causing systemic toxicity. The neurotoxic effects are more likely caused by a disturbed neurodevelopment, as similar behavioral neurotoxic effects have been reported in studies with pesticides such as organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids and POPs, when exposed during a critical window of neonatal brain development. - Highlights: • A single neonatal exposure to chlorpyrifos or carbaryl induced developmental neurotoxic effects. • The neurotoxic effects were not caused by acute AChE inhibition. • The neurotoxic effects manifested as altered levels of neuroproteins in the developing brain. • The neurotoxic effects manifested as adult persistent aberrant behavior and cognitive function.

  5. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described. These are the first examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1. Author Affiliations. Adam Korányi1. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA ...

  6. Protection by imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine of glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells through blockade of NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, G; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, N; Paz Regalado, M; Gasull, T; Assumpció Boronat, M; Trullas, R; Villarroel, A; Lerma, J; García-Sevilla, J A

    1999-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential neuroprotective effect of several imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine on glutamate-induced necrosis and on apoptosis induced by low extracellular K+ in cultured cerebellar granule cells. Exposure (30 min) of energy deprived cells to L-glutamate (1-100 microM) caused a concentration-dependent neurotoxicity, as determined 24 h later by a decrease in the ability of the cells to metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) into a reduced formazan product. L-glutamate-induced neurotoxicity (EC50=5 microM) was blocked by the specific NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine). Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully prevented neurotoxicity induced by 20 microM (EC100) L-glutamate with the rank order (EC50 in microM): antazoline (13)>cirazoline (44)>LSL 61122 [2-styryl-2-imidazoline] (54)>LSL 60101 [2-(2-benzofuranyl) imidazole] (75)>idazoxan (90)>LSL 60129 [2-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-yl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole](101)>RX82 1002 (2-methoxy idazoxan) (106)>agmatine (196). No neuroprotective effect of these drugs was observed in a model of apoptotic neuronal cell death (reduction of extracellular K+) which does not involve stimulation of NMDA receptors. Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully inhibited [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding to the phencyclidine site of NMDA receptors in rat brain. The profile of drug potency protecting against L-glutamate neurotoxicity correlated well (r=0.90) with the potency of the same compounds competing against [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding. In HEK-293 cells transfected to express the NR1-1a and NR2C subunits of the NMDA receptor, antazoline and agmatine produced a voltage- and concentration-dependent block of glutamate-induced currents. Analysis of the voltage dependence of the block was consistent with the presence of a binding site for antazoline located within the NMDA channel pore with an IC50 of 10-12 microM at 0 mV. It is concluded that imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine are

  7. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol prevents methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Paola Castelli

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4 × 10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP. Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-19% and -28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -25% and -21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; (ii METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (-50% and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (-53%; (iii METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-34% and -47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -37% and -29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the PFC and CPu. Our

  8. A peptide disrupting the D2R-DAT interaction protects against dopamine neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Liu, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Dopamine reuptake from extracellular space to cytosol leads to accumulation of dopamine, which triggers neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Previous studies have shown that both dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and dopamine transporter (DAT) are involved in dopamine neurotoxicity. However, blockade of either D2R or DAT causes side effects due to antagonism of other physiological functions of these two proteins. We previously found that DAT can form a protein complex with D2R and its cell surface expression is facilitated via D2R-DAT interaction, which regulates dopamine reuptake and intracellular dopamine levels. Here we found that an interfering peptide (DAT-S1) disrupting the D2R-DAT interaction protects neurons against dopamine neurotoxicity, and this effect is mediated by inhibiting DAT cell surface expression and inhibiting both caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage. This study demonstrates the role of the D2R-DAT complex in dopamine neurotoxicity and investigated the potential mechanisms, which might help better understand the mechanisms of dopamine neurotoxicity. The peptide may provide some insights to improve treatments for dopamine neurotoxicity and related diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, as well as methamphetamine- and 3,4-methsylenedioxy methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Striatal Vulnerability in Huntington’s Disease: Neuroprotection Versus Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Morigaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (PolyQ in the huntingtin (Htt protein. In HD, striking neuropathological changes occur in the striatum, including loss of medium spiny neurons and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons accompanied by neurodegeneration of the striosome and matrix compartments, leading to progressive impairment of reasoning, walking and speaking abilities. The precise cause of striatal pathology in HD is still unknown; however, accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests multiple plausible pathophysiological mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration in HD. Here, we review and discuss the characteristic neurodegenerative patterns observed in the striatum of HD patients and consider the role of various huntingtin-related and striatum-enriched proteins in neurotoxicity and neuroprotection.

  10. Effects of vitamin E against aluminum neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedzvetsky, V S; Tuzcu, M; Yasar, A; Tikhomirov, A A; Baydas, G

    2006-03-01

    The present study examined the protective effects of vitamin E against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Wistar rats were given daily aluminum via their drinking water containing 1600 mg/liter aluminum chloride for six weeks. Aluminum induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Furthermore, aluminum caused marked elevation in the levels of the glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B) and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) in both brain areas. Vitamin E treatment reduced the contents of glial markers and cytokines and the levels of LPO. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that vitamin E ameliorates glial activation and reduces release of proinflammatory cytokines induced by aluminum.

  11. The neurotoxicity of environmental aluminum is still an issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Stephen C

    2010-09-01

    Evidence for the neurotoxicity of extended exposure to low levels of aluminum salts is described using an animal model treated with aluminum at low levels reflecting those found in some water supplies. Emphasis is given to the potential role of aluminum in acceleration and promotion of some indices characteristic of brain aging. These hallmarks include the appearance of excess levels of inflammation in specific brain areas. Aluminum salts can increase levels of glial activation, inflammatory cytokines and amyloid precursor protein within the brain. Both normal brain aging and to a greater extent, Alzheimer's disease are associated with elevated basal levels of markers for inflammation. These are not attributable to obvious exogenous stimuli and may reflect the lifespan history of the organism's immune responses. It is possible that aluminum salts can act as a subtle promoter of such apparently unprovoked responses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Changing the Face of Kynurenines and Neurotoxicity: Therapeutic Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Bohár

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenines are the products of tryptophan metabolism. Among them, kynurenine and kynurenic acid are generally thought to have neuroprotective properties, while 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and quinolinic acid are considered neurotoxic. They participate in immunoregulation and inflammation and possess pro- or anti-excitotoxic properties, and their involvement in oxidative stress has also been suggested. Consequently, it is not surprising that kynurenines have been closely related to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. More information about the less-known metabolites, picolinic and cinnabarinic acid, evaluation of new receptorial targets, such as aryl-hydrocarbon receptors, and intensive research on the field of the immunomodulatory function of kynurenines delineated the high importance of this pathway in general homeostasis. Emerging knowledge about the kynurenine pathway provides new target points for the development of therapeutical solutions against neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Neurotoxic effects of levobupivacaine and fentanyl on rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to compare the neurotoxic effects of intrathecally administered levobupivacaine, fentanyl and their mixture on rat spinal cord. METHODS: In experiment, there were four groups with medication and a control group. Rats were injected 15 µL saline or fentanyl 0.0005 µg/15 µL, levobupivacaine 0.25%/15 µL and fentanyl 0.0005 µg + levobupivacaine 0.25%/15 µL intrathecally for four days. Hot plate test was performed to assess neurologic function after each injection at 5th, 30th and 60th min. Five days after last lumbal injection, spinal cord sections between the T5 and T6 vertebral levels were obtained for histologic analysis. A score based on subjective assessment of number of eosinophilic neurons - Red neuron - which means irreversible neuronal degeneration. They reflect the approximate number of degenerating neurons present in the affected neuroanatomic areas as follows: 1, none; 2, 1-20%; 3, 21-40%; 4, 41-60%; and 5, 61-100% dead neurons. An overall neuropathologic score was calculated for each rat by summating the pathologic scores for all spinal cord areas examined. RESULTS: In the results of HPT, comparing the control group, analgesic latency statistically prolonged for all four groups.In neuropathologic investment, the fentanyl and fentanyl + levobupivacaine groups have statistically significant high degenerative neuron counts than control and saline groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that, when administered intrathecally in rats, fentanyl and levobupivacaine behave similar for analgesic action, but fentanyl may be neurotoxic for spinal cord. There was no significant degeneration with levobupivacaine, but fentanyl group has had significant degeneration.

  14. A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Wei, Limin; Shao, Longquan

    2015-08-01

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different experimental parameters, including administration ways, dosage, size, and crystal structure of TiO2 NPs. Therefore, in order to fully understand the potential risks of TiO2 NPs to brain health, figure out research areas where further studies are required, and improve its bio-safety for applications in the near future, how TiO2 NPs interact with the brain is investigated in this review by summarizing the current researches on neurotoxicity induced by TiO2 NPs.

  15. Molecular mechanism of acrylamide neurotoxicity: lessons learned from organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2012-12-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) produces cumulative neurotoxicity in exposed humans and laboratory animals through a direct inhibitory effect on presynaptic function. In this review, we delineate how knowledge of chemistry provided an unprecedented understanding of the ACR neurotoxic mechanism. We also show how application of the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory led to the recognition that the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl structure of ACR is a soft electrophile that preferentially forms covalent bonds with soft nucleophiles. In vivo proteomic and in chemico studies demonstrated that ACR formed covalent adducts with highly nucleophilic cysteine thiolate groups located within active sites of presynaptic proteins. Additional research showed that resulting protein inactivation disrupted nerve terminal processes and impaired neurotransmission. ACR is a type-2 alkene, a chemical class that includes structurally related electrophilic environmental pollutants (e.g., acrolein) and endogenous mediators of cellular oxidative stress (e.g., 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Members of this chemical family produce toxicity via a common molecular mechanism. Although individual environmental concentrations might not be toxicologically relevant, exposure to an ambient mixture of type-2 alkene pollutants could pose a significant risk to human health. Furthermore, environmentally derived type-2 alkenes might act synergistically with endogenously generated unsaturated aldehydes to amplify cellular damage and thereby accelerate human disease/injury processes that involve oxidative stress. These possibilities have substantial implications for environmental risk assessment and were realized through an understanding of ACR adduct chemistry. The approach delineated here can be broadly applied because many toxicants of different chemical classes are electrophiles that produce toxicity by interacting with cellular proteins.

  16. Role of Endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  17. Neurotoxic effects in workers of the clinical thermometer manufacture plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Li, Ying M

    2006-01-01

    Occupational exposure to mercury can induce adverse health effects, and the central nervous system is the major target of its toxic action. This problem especially arises in plants involved in the manufacture of mercury-containing products, where an appropriate protection against mercury exposure is not ensured. The aim of this study was to assess health effects of mercury, especially neurotoxic effects and oral disorders, in workers employed in a clinical thermometer manufacture plant and to determine mercury concentrations in the workplace ambient air. The study population comprised 143 workers, including 51 (35.7%) men and 92 (64.3%) women employed in the plant. Mean age in the whole group was 29 years (range, 18-55 years). It was divided into three groups: control, mercury absorption and mercury poisoning. A questionnaire-based interview was used to collect data on medical history, occupational exposure and employment. For clinical diagnosis, all subjects underwent physical, neurological and oral examinations. Mercury concentrations in the air were recorded by Hg monitoring instrument and mercury levels in collected urine samples were determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Neurasthenic symptoms were found in 51.75% of the subjects, emotional changes in 27.27%, tremors in 11.19%, and inflammations in 21.68%. The case percentage of neurological symptoms in the control and mercury absorption groups did not show significant difference, but it was significantly higher in the mercury poisoning group. The high occupational exposure to mercury, found in the plant and evidenced by urinary Hg concentration > or = 0.05 mg/l, can result in chronic quantitative neurotoxic effects and qualitative health changes. Therefore, constant monitoring of the work environment and checking of workers' health status should be ensured. In addition, appropriate steps should be taken to improve work conditions and promote health among the employees.

  18. Systemic and neurotoxic effects of epidural meloxicam in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracineide da Costa Felipe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess systemic and neurotoxic changes following an epidural administration of meloxicamin to rabbits. Twelve adult rabbits four males and eight females; average mass, 1.9 ± 0.1kg were randomly divided into two groups: a control group (GC, which received a single dose of 0.9% NaCl epidurally in a volume of 0.3mL kg-1and a meloxicam group (GM, which received 0.2mg kg-1 meloxicam epidurally along with 0.9% NaCl in a total volume of 0.3mL kg-1. Heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and neurological abnormalities were assessed prior to administration of anesthesia (H0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24h following epidural puncture (H1, H2, H3, H6, H12, and H24, respectively, and every 24h afterward for 10 days after epidural puncture (D2, D3, D4, D5, D6, D7, D8, D9, and D10. The surface temperature of lumbosacral region was also measured at H0, H1, H6, H12, H24, D5 and D10. Three animals from each group were euthanized on days 15 and 30 after epidural puncture to assess possible spinal injuries. Variances observed in physiological parameters were not suggestive of adverse effects of meloxicam, as all were within the reference standards, and there were no physical or behavioral changes observed. Neurological function was similar between groups, with only difference between baseline values and values 1h after epidural administration in both groups. There were no histopathological changes in the GM group, and only one animal showed discrete lymphocytic infiltrate. Epidural lumbosacral administration of meloxicam at a dose of 0.2mg kg-1 caused no significant systemic or neurotoxic effects in rabbits.

  19. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Marcelo, E-mail: farina@ccb.ufsc.br [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Aschner, Michael [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Rocha, Joao B.T., E-mail: jbtrocha@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  20. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  1. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  2. 31 CFR 595.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 595.301 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked...

  3. Structures and functions of crotoxin-like heterodimers and acidic phospholipases A2 from Gloydius intermedius venom: Insights into the origin of neurotoxic-type rattlesnakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhang-Min; Guo, Qian; Ma, Zhao-Rui; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhe-Zhi; Wang, Xu-Min; Wang, Ying-Ming; Tsai, Inn-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The cDNAs encoding four major phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) were sequenced while the expressed sequence tags of Gloydius intermedius venom glands were constructed. These PLA2s were designated as Gintexin-A precursor, Gintexin-B, Gin-E6a and Gin-E6b, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the former two PLA2s are 80% and 90% identical to those of crotoxin-A-precursor and crotoxin-B1, respectively. We also purified Gintexin-A, Gintexin-B, Gin-E6a and Gin-E6b like PLA2 from the venom. The latter three PLA2s are enzymatically active but not strongly anticoagulant for human plasma. Gin-E6a and E6b-like PLA2s induced mouse platelet aggregation but inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation. The isolated Gintexin, a 1:1 complex of Gintexin-A and Gintexin-B, blocked the twitch of chick biventer cervicis tissue presynaptically. Results of N-terminal sequencing and peptide mass fingerprinting reveal that Gintexin-A undergoes proteolytic processing similar to crotoxin-A. This is the first time heterodimeric β-neurotoxins are found in Asian pitviper venom, and incompatible neurotoxic- and hemorrhagic-type venoms are found to evolve in parallel within the genus Gloydius, like in Crotalus. Thus, G. intermedius probably is the ancestor of rattlesnakes with type-II venom, and characterization of its venomics helps us to understand the evolution of heterodimeric neurotoxic PLA2s and the paedomorphic trend observed in Neotropical rattlesnake venoms. For the first time, a heterodimeric neurotoxic PLA2 (designated as Gintexin) has been isolated from the venom of an Asian pitviper, which shows a characteristic venom gland transcriptome similar to those of the neurotoxic type rattlesnakes. The fact that the venom of G. intermedius is less hemorrhagic than those of other Gloydius species, reveals that incompatible neurotoxic- and hemorrhagic-type venoms have evolved in parallel within the genus Gloydius, like the genus Crotalus. Our findings suggest that G. intermedius is the most

  4. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... shows that no readily available tests with a well-defined substantial eccentricity have been performed. This paper presents theoretical and experimental work leading towards generalized block failure capacity methods. Simple combination of normal force, shear force and moment stress distributions along...

  5. Comparison of neurotoxicity of root canal sealers on spontaneous bioelectrical activity in identified Helix neurones using an intracellular recording technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, S; Janahmadi, M; Khalilkhani, H

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the neurotoxic effects of two endodontic sealers, AH-26 and Roth 801, on firing excitability and action potential configuration of F1 neural cells in the suboesophageal ganglia of Helix aspersa. A conventional intracellular current clamp technique was used to study the blocking effects of AH-26 and Roth 801 on ionic currents underlying the action potential of F1 nerve cells. The sealers were prepared according to the manufacturers' directions and were applied to the bathing media in two ways: invasive (0.05 mL of total mixture of each sealer was applied at a distance of 3 mm from the cell), or gradual (0.05 mL of the extract of each dissolved mixture of sealers in normal Ringers solution was perfused). When applied in an invasive mode, both sealers reduced the duration, the amplitude of action potentials and the amplitude of after-hyperpolarization potentials significantly and led to dramatic changes in action potential configuration. In the gradual mode of application, AH-26 showed a biphasic action; it first increased the excitability and then decreased the action potential parameters, while Roth 801 exhibited solely blocking effects. Both sealers had significant inhibitory effects on excitability of F1 neuronal cells.

  6. Complex impairment of IA muscle proprioceptors following traumatic or neurotoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jacob A; Nardelli, Paul; Gabriel, Hanna M; Deardorff, Adam S; Cope, Timothy C

    2015-08-01

    The health of primary sensory afferents supplying muscle has to be a first consideration in assessing deficits in proprioception and related motor functions. Here we discuss the role of a particular proprioceptor, the IA muscle spindle proprioceptor in causing movement disorders in response to either regeneration of a sectioned peripheral nerve or damage from neurotoxic chemotherapy. For each condition, there is a single preferred and widely repeated explanation for disability of movements associated with proprioceptive function. We present a mix of published and preliminary findings from our laboratory, largely from in vivo electrophysiological study of treated rats to demonstrate newly discovered IA afferent defects that seem likely to make important contributions to movement disorders. First, we argue that reconnection of regenerated IA afferents with inappropriate targets, although often repeated as the reason for lost stretch-reflex contraction, is not a complete explanation. We present evidence that despite successful recovery of stretch-evoked sensory signaling, peripherally regenerated IA afferents retract synapses made with motoneurons in the spinal cord. Second, we point to evidence that movement disability suffered by human subjects months after discontinuation of oxaliplatin (OX) chemotherapy for some is not accompanied by peripheral neuropathy, which is the acknowledged primary cause of disability. Our studies of OX-treated rats suggest a novel additional explanation in showing the loss of sustained repetitive firing of IA afferents during static muscle stretch. Newly extended investigation reproduces this effect in normal rats with drugs that block Na(+) channels apparently involved in encoding static IA afferent firing. Overall, these findings highlight multiplicity in IA afferent deficits that must be taken into account in understanding proprioceptive disability, and that present new avenues and possible advantages for developing effective

  7. Phenotypic screening for developmental neurotoxicity: mechanistic data at the level of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are large numbers of environmental chemicals with little or no available information on their toxicity, including developmental neurotoxicity. Because of the resource-intensive nature of traditional animal tests, high-throughput (HTP) methods that can rapidly evaluate chemi...

  8. Age-related differences in neurotoxicity produced by organophosphorus and N-methyl carbamate pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potential pesticide effects in infants and toddlers have received much attention in the scientific literature and the public media, including the concern for increased response to acute or shortterm exposures. Age-related differences in the acute neurotoxicity of acetylcholinest...

  9. Alternative Test Methods for Developmental Neurotoxicity: A History and Path Forward (OECD EFSA workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to environmental contaminants is well documented to adversely impact the development of the nervous system. However, the time, animal and resource intensive EPA and OECD testing guideline methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) are not a viable solution to characte...

  10. Neurotoxic effect of maneb in rats as studied by neurochemical and immunohistochemical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian Svend; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ladefoged, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations document that workers in agriculture, horticulture and people living near areas with frequent use of pesticides have increased risk of developing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the neurotoxic effect of the fungicide maneb by morphological...

  11. A novel antagonistic role of natural compound icariin on neurotoxicity of amyloid β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The results indicated a novel antagonistic role of icariin in the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42 via inhibiting its aggregation, suggesting that icariin might have potential therapeutic benefits to delay or modify the progression of AD.

  12. Methylmercury and brain development: imprecision and underestimation of developmental neurotoxicity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury is now recognized as an important developmental neurotoxicant, though this insight developed slowly over many decades. Developmental neurotoxicity was first reported in a Swedish case report in 1952, and from a serious outbreak in Minamata, Japan, a few years later. Whereas the infant...... suffered congenital poisoning, the mother was barely harmed, thus reflecting a unique vulnerability of the developing nervous system. Nonetheless, exposure limits for this environmental chemical were based solely on adult toxicity until 50 years after the first report on developmental neurotoxicity. Even...... of adverse effects. These problems delayed the recognition of low-level methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, such problems are not unique, and many other industrial compounds are thought to cause developmental neurotoxicity, mostly with less epidemiological support than methylmercury. The experience...

  13. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans prevent the neurotoxicity of a human prion protein fragment.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, M; Wandosell, F; Colaço, C; Avila, J

    1998-01-01

    Although a number of features distinguish the disease isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) from its normal cellular counterpart (PrPC) in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the neuropathogenesis of these diseases remains an enigma. The amyloid fibrils formed by fragments of human PrP have, however, been shown to be directly neurotoxic in vitro. We show here that sulphated polysaccharides (heparin, keratan and chondroitin) inhibit the neurotoxicity of these amyloid fibrils a...

  14. Target size of neurotoxic esterase and acetylcholinesterase as determined by radiation inactivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrington, C D; Fluke, D J; Abou-Donia, M B

    1985-01-01

    The target size of neurotoxic esterase (NTE), the putative target site for the initiation of organophosphorus-compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from hen brain were examined by determining the rate at which the activities of the esterases were destroyed by ionizing irradiation. Samples of hen brain were prepared by slowly drying a microsomal preparation under vacuum. The dried samples were then irradiated with electrons from a 1 MeV Van de Graaff generator...

  15. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Homogeneous bilateral block shifts. ADAM KORÁNYI. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York,. New York, NY 10016, USA. E-mail: Adam.Koranyi@lehman.cuny.edu. MS received 18 January 2013. Abstract. A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described.

  16. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix.

  17. Selenium protects neonates against neurotoxicity from prenatal exposure to manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn exposure can affect brain development. Whether Selenium (Se can protect neonates against neurotoxicity from Mn exposure remains unclear. We investigated this issue in 933 mother-newborn pairs in Shanghai, China, from 2008 through 2009. Umbilical cord serum concentrations of Mn and Se were measured and Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment (NBNA tests were conducted. The scores <37 were defined as the low NBNA. The median concentrations of cord serum Mn and Se were 4.0 µg/L and 63.1 µg/L, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, the interaction between Se and Mn was observed. Cord blood Mn levels had different effects on NBNA scores stratified by different cord blood Se levels. With Seneurotoxicity from prenatal exposure to Mn. Se supplementation should be considered during pregnancy, especially in areas with low natural Se.

  18. Evaluation of the neurotoxical effect of aluminum on the Wistar rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martać L.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous investigations on an animal model of neurotoxicity show that increased power in the delta range is connected with the neurotoxic effect of aluminum exposure. In this study we used several aluminum-treated animals as a reliable model for the evaluation of the neurotoxic effects of aluminum on neurons, and compared it with a control group. We conclude that spectral analysis and the ratio between the delta and theta ranges might be reliable for a qualitative description of the neurotoxic effect of aluminum, and that the t test might be used to evaluate the change in brain activity between the treated and control groups of animals. The animal model under anesthesia was used to describe the state of brain activity with neurotoxicity with suppressed functional connectivity in the brain structure. We also performed fractal analysis to quantitatively describe neurotoxic effect in different pathophysiological states of animals treated with different doses of aluminum. A decrease in the fractal dimension is an indicator of neurodegeneration in the state of stress. This animal model is suitable for evaluation of the neurodegenerative processes in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease. .

  19. Biomarkers of cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity related to CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Han, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity following chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy can be life-threatening in some cases, and management of those toxicities is still a great challenge for physicians. Researchers hope to understand the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and identify predictive biomarkers that can forecast those toxicities in advance. Some risk factors for severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity including patient and treatment characteristics have been identified in multiple clinical trials of CAR-T cell therapy. Moreover, several groups have identified some predictive biomarkers that are able to determine beforehand which patients may suffer severe CRS and/or neurotoxicity during CAR-T cell therapy, facilitating testing of early intervention strategies for those toxicities. However, further studies are needed to better understand the biology and related risk factors for CRS and/or neurotoxicity, and determine if those identified predictors can be extrapolated to other series. Herein, we review the pathophysiology of CRS and neurotoxicity, and summarize the progress of predictive biomarkers to improve CAR-T cell therapy in cancer.

  20. Control rod blocking monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru.

    1993-01-01

    The number of times for setting up a control rod blocking monitor of a BWR type power plant is remarkably reduced to mitigate operator's burden. In the control rod blocking monitor, trip levels, as a judging standard upon outputting control rod blocking inhibition signals, are set up stepwise depending on the power level around control rods put to blocking control. The present invention comprises an allowance judging means capable of setting up trip levels for each of power levels corresponding to a plurality of control rods at once if the power levels are within the set up allowable range. With such a constitution, the set up allowable range is determined previously in the allowance judging means. Accordingly, when a gang blocking is conducted to control rods, if power levels around the control rods are increased at once into the set up allowable range, the trip levels for each of the control rods are set up at once. (I.S.)

  1. In Vivo 6-([18F]Fluoroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide PET Imaging of Altered Histone Deacetylase Activity in Chemotherapy-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Fukumitsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Histone deacetylases (HDACs regulate gene expression by changing histone deacetylation status. Neurotoxicity is one of the major side effects of cisplatin, which reacts with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA and has excellent antitumor effects. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is an HDAC inhibitor with neuroprotective effects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Purpose. We investigated how cisplatin with and without SAHA pretreatment affects HDAC expression/activity in the brain by using 6-([18F]fluoroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide ([18F]FAHA as a positron emission tomography (PET imaging agent for HDAC IIa. Materials and Methods. [18F]FAHA and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose ([18F]FDG PET studies were done in 24 mice on 2 consecutive days and again 1 week later. The mice were divided into three groups according to drug administration between the first and second imaging sessions (Group A: cisplatin 2 mg/kg, twice; Group B: cisplatin 4 mg/kg, twice; Group C: cisplatin 4 mg/kg, twice, and SAHA 300 mg/kg pretreatment, 4 times. Results. The Ki value of [18F]FAHA was increased and the percentage of injected dose/tissue g (% ID/g of [18F]FDG was decreased in the brains of animals in Groups A and B. The Ki value of [18F]FAHA and % ID/g of [18F]FDG were not significantly different in Group C. Conclusions. [18F]FAHA PET clearly showed increased HDAC activity suggestive of cisplatin neurotoxicity in vivo, which was blocked by SAHA pretreatment.

  2. Nanoparticles and potential neurotoxicity: focus on molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lovisolo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have seen an explosive increase in the development of nanoparticles and in their use in consumer, industrial and medical applications. Their fast diffusion has also raised widespread concern about the potential toxic effects on living organisms, including humans: at the nanoscale, they can interact with subcellular components such as membranes, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, thus inducing unpredicted functional perturbations in cells and tissues. The nervous tissue is a particular sensitive target, because its cellular components (mainly neurons and glial cells are tightly regulated and metabolically exigent biological entities. While the literature on the potential toxicity of nanoparticles has grown in parallel with their utilization, the available data on neurotoxicity are less abundant. In particular, information on the neuronal molecular targets of nanoparticles is still largely incomplete. A better understanding of this issue is highly relevant for the rational and controlled design of nanoparticles, both for their general utilization and more specifically for their use in the promising field of nanoneuromedicine. In this review, we will discuss the available information on the mechanisms involved in the interaction between nanoobjects and cells of the nervous system, focusing on the known molecular actors, both at the plasma membrane and in intracellular compartments.

  3. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: neurotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, James P; Daughtrey, Wayne C; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiplebrain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Trichloropropane and dichlorohydrin associated with painful peripheral neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobing; Yu, Shengyuan

    2013-10-01

    Trichloropropane (TCP) and dichlorohydrin are widely used in industrial production; however, TCP and dichlorohydrin poisoning are rarely encountered in clinical practice. There have been no cases of peripheral neurotoxicity previously reported. A cluster of 23 patients who had been exposed to high levels of TCP and dichlorohydrin presented with painful peripheral neuropathy, and the pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed in all patients. All patients demonstrated symmetrical pin-prick pain in a stocking distribution in the lower limbs, with VAS scores between 3 and 10, with an average score of 6.8. NCS showed a mild mixture of axonal and demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy in 14 of the 23 patients. After administration of standard neuropathic pain medication, pain was relieved in most patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy was the primary symptom observed in our patients, which differs from clinical and animal model reports of TCP or dichlorohydrin poisoning. However, the pathogenesis remains unidentified. TCP may be added to the list of industrial products that are toxic to the peripheral sensory nerves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gender differences in the neurotoxicity of metals in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llop, Sabrina; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Rebagliato, Marisa; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Gender-related differences in susceptibility to chemical exposure to neurotoxicants have not received sufficient attention. Although a significant number of epidemiological studies on the neurodevelopmental effects of metal exposure has been published in the last twenty years, not many of them have considered the possible gender-specific effects of such exposure. This review is focused on studies where the gender differences in pre- and/or postnatal exposure/s to five metals (mercury, lead, manganese, cadmium, and arsenic) and neurodevelopment were evaluated. We conducted a PubMed search in December 2012 and retrieved 20 studies that met the inclusion criteria. A large body of literature on potential neurodevelopment effects in children due to mercury exposure is available, but, a clear pattern regarding gender differences in neurotoxicity is not elucidated. There is also abundant available information on the gender-specific health effects of lead, and exposure to this metal seems to affect boys more than girls. Information regarding gender differences in susceptibility of manganese, cadmium, and arsenic is still too scarce to draw any definite conclusion. More research is highly warranted about this matter. Environmental epidemiological studies should be designed to quantify differential gender-based exposures and outcomes, and this may provide new insights into prevention strategies

  6. Predictability of blocking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, E.; Ruti, P.; Tibaldi, S.; D'Andrea, F.

    1994-01-01

    Tibaldi and Molteni (1990, hereafter referred to as TM) had previously investigated operational blocking predictability by the ECMWF model and the possible relationships between model systematic error and blocking in the winter season of the Northern Hemisphere, using seven years of ECMWF operational archives of analyses and day 1 to 10 forecasts. They showed that fewer blocking episodes than in the real atmosphere were generally simulated by the model, and that this deficiency increased with increasing forecast time. As a consequence of this, a major contribution to the systematic error in the winter season was shown to derive from the inability of the model to properly forecast blocking. In this study, the analysis performed in TM for the first seven winter seasons of the ECMWF operational model is extended to the subsequent five winters, during which model development, reflecting both resolution increases and parametrisation modifications, continued unabated. In addition the objective blocking index developed by TM has been applied to the observed data to study the natural low frequency variability of blocking. The ability to simulate blocking of some climate models has also been tested

  7. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 594.301 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and...

  8. Bundle Branch Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015. Bundle branch block Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the penis. Rarely, small membranes form across the urethra in boys early in pregnancy, and they can block the flow of urine out of the bladder. These membranes are called posterior urethral valves and can have life-threatening consequences ...

  10. Optoelectronics using block copolymers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botiz, I.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2010-05-01

    Block copolymers, either as semiconductors themselves or as structure directors, are emerging as a promising class of materials for understanding and controlling processes associated with both photovoltaic energy conversion and light emitting devices.

  11. Death adder envenoming causes neurotoxicity not reversed by antivenom--Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-16).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher I; O'Leary, Margaret A; Brown, Simon G A; Currie, Bart J; Halkidis, Lambros; Whitaker, Richard; Close, Benjamin; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2012-01-01

    Death adders (Acanthophis spp) are found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and parts of eastern Indonesia. This study aimed to investigate the clinical syndrome of death adder envenoming and response to antivenom treatment. Definite death adder bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project (ASP) as defined by expert identification or detection of death adder venom in blood. Clinical effects and laboratory results were collected prospectively, including the time course of neurotoxicity and response to treatment. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure venom concentrations. Twenty nine patients had definite death adder bites; median age 45 yr (5-74 yr); 25 were male. Envenoming occurred in 14 patients. Two further patients had allergic reactions without envenoming, both snake handlers with previous death adder bites. Of 14 envenomed patients, 12 developed neurotoxicity characterised by ptosis (12), diplopia (9), bulbar weakness (7), intercostal muscle weakness (2) and limb weakness (2). Intubation and mechanical ventilation were required for two patients for 17 and 83 hours. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 4 hours (0.5-15.5 hr). One patient bitten by a northern death adder developed myotoxicity and one patient only developed systemic symptoms without neurotoxicity. No patient developed venom induced consumption coagulopathy. Antivenom was administered to 13 patients, all receiving one vial initially. The median time for resolution of neurotoxicity post-antivenom was 21 hours (5-168). The median peak venom concentration in 13 envenomed patients with blood samples was 22 ng/mL (4.4-245 ng/mL). In eight patients where post-antivenom bloods were available, no venom was detected after one vial of antivenom. Death adder envenoming is characterised by neurotoxicity, which is mild in most cases. One vial of death adder antivenom was sufficient to bind all circulating venom. The persistent neurological effects despite antivenom, suggests that

  12. Death adder envenoming causes neurotoxicity not reversed by antivenom--Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher I Johnston

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death adders (Acanthophis spp are found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and parts of eastern Indonesia. This study aimed to investigate the clinical syndrome of death adder envenoming and response to antivenom treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Definite death adder bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project (ASP as defined by expert identification or detection of death adder venom in blood. Clinical effects and laboratory results were collected prospectively, including the time course of neurotoxicity and response to treatment. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure venom concentrations. Twenty nine patients had definite death adder bites; median age 45 yr (5-74 yr; 25 were male. Envenoming occurred in 14 patients. Two further patients had allergic reactions without envenoming, both snake handlers with previous death adder bites. Of 14 envenomed patients, 12 developed neurotoxicity characterised by ptosis (12, diplopia (9, bulbar weakness (7, intercostal muscle weakness (2 and limb weakness (2. Intubation and mechanical ventilation were required for two patients for 17 and 83 hours. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 4 hours (0.5-15.5 hr. One patient bitten by a northern death adder developed myotoxicity and one patient only developed systemic symptoms without neurotoxicity. No patient developed venom induced consumption coagulopathy. Antivenom was administered to 13 patients, all receiving one vial initially. The median time for resolution of neurotoxicity post-antivenom was 21 hours (5-168. The median peak venom concentration in 13 envenomed patients with blood samples was 22 ng/mL (4.4-245 ng/mL. In eight patients where post-antivenom bloods were available, no venom was detected after one vial of antivenom. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Death adder envenoming is characterised by neurotoxicity, which is mild in most cases. One vial of death adder antivenom was sufficient to bind all circulating venom

  13. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Larry P; Li, Abby A; Minnema, Daniel J; Collier, Richard H; Creek, Moire R; Peffer, Richard C

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood-brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system.

  14. A critical review of neonicotinoid insecticides for developmental neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Larry P.; Li, Abby A.; Minnema, Daniel J.; Collier, Richard H.; Creek, Moire R.; Peffer, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive review of published and previously unpublished studies was performed to evaluate the neonicotinoid insecticides for evidence of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). These insecticides have favorable safety profiles, due to their preferential affinity for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in insects, poor penetration of the mammalian blood–brain barrier, and low application rates. Nevertheless, examination of this issue is warranted, due to their insecticidal mode of action and potential exposure with agricultural and residential uses. This review identified in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiology studies in the literature and studies performed in rats in accordance with GLP standards and EPA guidelines with imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran, which are all the neonicotinoids currently registered in major markets. For the guideline-based studies, treatment was administered via the diet or gavage to primiparous female rats at three dose levels, plus a vehicle control (≥20/dose level), from gestation day 0 or 6 to lactation day 21. F1 males and females were evaluated using measures of motor activity, acoustic startle response, cognition, brain morphometry, and neuropathology. The principal effects in F1 animals were associated with decreased body weight (delayed sexual maturation, decreased brain weight, and morphometric measurements) and acute toxicity (decreased activity during exposure) at high doses, without neuropathology or impaired cognition. No common effects were identified among the neonicotinoids that were consistent with DNT or the neurodevelopmental effects associated with nicotine. Findings at high doses were associated with evidence of systemic toxicity, which indicates that these insecticides do not selectively affect the developing nervous system. PMID:26513508

  15. Adverse outcome pathways: Application to enhance mechanistic understanding of neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Meek, M E Bette

    2017-11-01

    Recent developments have prompted the transition of empirically based testing of late stage toxicity in animals for a range of different endpoints including neurotoxicity to more efficient and predictive mechanistically based approaches with greater emphasis on measurable key events early in the progression of disease. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) has been proposed as a simplified organizational construct to contribute to this transition by linking molecular initiating events and earlier (more predictive) key events at lower levels of biological organization to disease outcomes. As such, AOPs are anticipated to facilitate the compilation of information to increase mechanistic understanding of pathophysiological pathways that are responsible for human disease. In this review, the sequence of key events resulting in adverse outcome (AO) defined as parkinsonian motor impairment and learning and memory deficit in children, triggered by exposure to environmental chemicals has been briefly described using the AOP framework. These AOPs follow convention adopted in an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) AOP development program, publically available, to permit tailored application of AOPs for a range of different purposes. Due to the complexity of disease pathways, including neurodegenerative disorders, a specific symptom of the disease (e.g. parkinsonian motor deficit) is considered as the AO in a developed AOP. Though the description is necessarily limited by the extent of current knowledge, additional characterization of involved pathways through description of related AOPs interlinked into networks for the same disease has potential to contribute to more holistic and mechanistic understanding of the pathophysiological pathways involved, possibly leading to the mechanism-based reclassification of diseases, thus facilitating more personalized treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Manganese dosimetry: species differences and implications for neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschner, Michael; Erikson, Keith M; Dorman, David C

    2005-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential mineral that is found at low levels in food, water, and the air. Under certain high-dose exposure conditions, elevations in tissue manganese levels can occur. Excessive manganese accumulation can result in adverse neurological, reproductive, and respiratory effects in both laboratory animals and humans. In humans, manganese-induced neurotoxicity (manganism) is the overriding concern since affected individuals develop a motor dysfunction syndrome that is recognized as a form of parkinsonism. This review primarily focuses on the essentiality and toxicity of manganese and considers contemporary studies evaluating manganese dosimetry and its transport across the blood-brain barrier, and its distribution within the central nervous system (CNS). These studies have dramatically improved our understanding of the health risks posed by manganese by determining exposure conditions that lead to increased concentrations of this metal within the CNS and other target organs. Most individuals are exposed to manganese by the oral and inhalation routes of exposure; however, parenteral injection and other routes of exposure are important. Interactions between manganese and iron and other divalent elements occur and impact the toxicokinetics of manganese, especially following oral exposure. The oxidation state and solubility of manganese also influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of manganese. Manganese disposition is influenced by the route of exposure. Rodent inhalation studies have shown that manganese deposited within the nose can undergo direct transport to the brain along the olfactory nerve. Species differences in manganese toxicokinetics and response are recognized with nonhuman primates replicating CNS effects observed in humans while rodents do not. Potentially susceptible populations, such as fetuses, neonates, individuals with compromised hepatic function, individuals with suboptimal manganese or iron intake, and

  17. Caloric restriction ameliorates acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Juan; Zhang, Li; Shi, Lan-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Yu-Bin; Ke, Bin; Zhang, Ting-Ying; Qin, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and oxidative damage induced by acrolein is hypothesized to involve in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Calorie restriction (CR) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been verified to retard aging by ameliorating oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of CR on acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. A total of 45 weaned and specific-pathogen-free SD rats (male, weighing 180-220 g) were gavage-fed with acrolein (2.5 mg/kg/day) and fed ab libitum of 10 g/day or 7 g/day (representing 30% CR regimen), or gavage-fed with same volume of tap water and fed al libitum as vehicle control for 12 weeks. After behavioral test conducted by Morris Water Maze, SD rats were sacrificed and brain tissues were prepared for histochemical evaluation and Western blotting to detect alterations in oxidative stress, BDNF/TrkB pathway and key enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism. Treatment with 30% CR in SD rats significantly attenuated acrolein-induced cognitive impairment. Oxidative damage including deletion of glutathione and superoxide dismutase and sharp rise in malondialdehyde were notably improved by 30% CR. Further study suggested that 30% CR showed protective effects against acrolein by modulating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathways. Moreover, 30% CR restored acrolein-induced changes of APP, β-secretase, α-secretase and receptor for advanced glycation end products. These findings suggest that CR may provide a promising approach for the treatment of AD, targeting acrolein. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tricyclic sesquiterpene copaene prevents H2O2-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Turkez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Copaene (COP, a tricyclic sesquiterpene, is present in several essential oils of medicinal and aromatic plants and has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic features. But, very little information is known about the effects of COP on oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. Method: We used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exposure for 6 h to model oxidative stress. Therefore, this experimental design allowed us to explore the neuroprotective potential of COP in H2O2-induced toxicity in rat cerebral cortex cell cultures for the first time. For this purpose, methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release assays were carried out to evaluate cytotoxicity. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS parameters were used to evaluate oxidative changes. In addition to determining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG levels, the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or comet assay was also performed for measuring the resistance of neuronal DNA to H2O2-induced challenge. Result: The results of this study showed that survival and TAC levels of the cells decreased, while TOS, 8-OH-dG levels and the mean values of the total scores of cells showing DNA damage increased in the H2O2 alone treated cultures. But pre-treatment of COP suppressed the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress which were increased by H2O2. Conclusion: It is proposed that COP as a natural product with an antioxidant capacity in mitigating oxidative injuries in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 21-28

  19. Attenuation of arsenic neurotoxicity by curcumin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Rajesh S.; Sankhwar, Madhu Lata; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Chandra, Ramesh; Pant, Aditya B.; Islam, Fakhrul; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2009-01-01

    In view of continued exposure to arsenic and associated human health risk including neurotoxicity, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin, a polyphenolic antioxidant, has been investigated in rats. A significant decrease in locomotor activity, grip strength (26%) and rota-rod performance (82%) was observed in rats treated with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) as compared to controls. The arsenic treated rats also exhibited a decrease in the binding of striatal dopamine receptors (32%) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (19%) in striatum. Increased arsenic levels in corpus striatum (6.5 fold), frontal cortex (6.3 fold) and hippocampus (7.0 fold) associated with enhanced oxidative stress in these brain regions, as evident by an increase in lipid perioxidation, protein carbonyl and a decrease in the levels of glutathione and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase with differential effects were observed in arsenic treated rats compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) caused an increase in locomotor activity and grip strength and improved the rota-rod performance in comparison to arsenic treated rats. Binding of striatal dopamine receptors and TH expression increased while arsenic levels and oxidative stress decreased in these brain regions in co-treated rats as compared to those treated with arsenic alone. No significant effect on any of these parameters was observed in rats treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) alone compared to controls. A significant protection in behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical parameters in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin suggest the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin.

  20. Subchronic inhalation neurotoxicity study of amyl acetate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, M W; Tyler, T R; Beyrouty, P C

    2000-01-01

    An inhalation toxicity study was conducted with rats to examine the potential for amyl acetate vapor to produce alterations in nervous system structure and function following repeated exposure. The study was performed as part of a USEPA Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Section 4e Enforceable Consent Agreement for amyl acetate. Rats (CD) were exposed to amyl acetate vapor at concentrations of 0, 300, 600 or 1200 ppm, 6 h per day, 4 or 5 days per week, for at least 65 exposures. Treatment groups consisted of 15 rats per gender for the control and 1200 ppm groups and 10 rats per gender for the 300 and 600 ppm groups. Evaluations included clinical observations before, during and after each exposure, weekly detailed clinical examinations, weekly body weight and food consumption measurements and monthly functional observational battery and motor activity measurements conducted on non-exposure days. Neuropathology examination of the central and peripheral nervous system was performed at the end of the study. Exposure to amyl acetate did not result in overt clinical signs of toxicity or changes in body weight or food consumption. Transient, subtle decreases in general activity level during the 6-h exposure period were noted for animals in the 600 and 1200 ppm groups during the first 2 weeks of the study. Functional observational battery evaluations, automated motor activity measurements and neuroanatomy were unaffected by exposure. The no observed-effect level for subchronic neurotoxicity for this study was at least 1200 ppm, which is greater than an order of magnitude above the occupational threshold limit value (8-h, time-weighted average) for amyl acetate (100 ppm). Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. [ 3 H]Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay

  2. Sodium Selenite Prevents Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Talise E; Nunes, Mauro E; Menezes, Charlene C; Marins, Aline T; Leitemperger, Jossiele; Gressler, Ana Carolina Lopes; Carvalho, Fabiano B; de Freitas, Catiuscia Molz; Quadros, Vanessa A; Fachinetto, Roselei; Rosemberg, Denis B; Loro, Vania L

    2018-03-01

    Considering the antioxidant properties of sodium selenite (Na 2 SeO 3 ) and the involvement of oxidative stress events in paraquat-induced neurotoxicity, this study investigated the protective effect of dietary Na 2 SeO 3 on biochemical and behavioral parameters of zebrafish exposed to paraquat (PQ). Fish were pretreated with a Na 2 SeO 3 diet for 21 days and then PQ (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally with six injections for 16 days. In the novel tank test, the Na 2 SeO 3 diet prevented the locomotor impairments, as well as the increase in the time spent in the top area of the tank, and the exacerbation of freezing episodes. In the preference for conspecifics and in the mirror-induced aggression (MIA) tasks, Na 2 SeO 3 prevented the increase in the latency to enter the area closer to conspecifics and the agonistic behavior of PQ-treated animals, respectively. Na 2 SeO 3 prevented the increase of carbonylated protein (CP), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, as well as the decrease in non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels. Regarding the antioxidant enzymatic defenses, Na 2 SeO 3 prevented the increase in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities caused by PQ. Altogether, dietary Na 2 SeO 3 improves behavioral and biochemical function impaired by PQ treatment in zebrafish, by modulating not only redox parameters, but also anxiety- and aggressive-like phenotypes in zebrafish.

  3. Neurotoxicity of a methylated analog of MPTP in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkila, R.E.; Youngster, S.K.; Kindt, M.V.; Sonsalla, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    Under conditions in which the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was relatively ineffective, (2 injections per day at 6-hr intervals on 2 successive days; total dose of 0.45 mmoles/kg) a methylated analog of MPTP, namely 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP, produced a marked depletion in the neostriatal content of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, a corresponding reduction of /sup 3/H-DA uptake into neostriatal synaptosomes, and an extensive loss of neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP is oxidized in vitro by monoamine oxidase-B in brain mitochondrial preparations, although at a much faster rate than is MPTP. And like the MPTP metabolite (MPP/sup +/), 1-methyl-4-(2'methylphenyl)pyridinium (2'CH/sub 3/-MPP/sup +/) is an excellent substrate for the DA transport system (as evidenced by its ability to release previously accumulated /sup 3/H-DA from synaptosomes, and the ability of the dopamine uptake inhibitor, mazindol, to prevent this release). In vivo, the pretreatment of mice with DA uptake inhibitors or monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors attenuated the above-mentioned biochemical changes induced by 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP. It appears as if 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP produces neurotoxicity in a manner similar to MPTP. That 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP is oxidized at a faster rate than MPTP likely contributes to the fact that it is more potent than MPTP, although most certainly, other unknown considerations also are relevant.

  4. [Neurotoxic manifestations of black widow spider envenomation in paediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Cruz, N; Gómez-Rivera, N

    2016-05-01

    Envenomation by black widow spiders manifests clinically with signs of neurotoxicity in paediatric patients. Identify typical neurological signs and symptoms in paediatric patients of different ages, and describe treatment and outcomes in a paediatric hospital in northwest Mexico. We reviewed 70 clinical records of patients hospitalised due to black widow spider bite between 1978 and 2014. We divided the total into 2 groups: Group 1, infants and preschool children; and Group 2, school-age children and adolescents. The demographic variables were age, sex, birthplace, place where envenomation occurred, body part(s) affected, degree of envenomation according to signs and symptoms, treatment, clinical outcome, and statistical differences. Boys accounted for 61.4% of all cases, and infants younger than one year old made up 14.2%. Most patients (70%) were bitten by the spider at home; the anatomical areas most frequently affected were the legs, neck, thorax, and abdomen. The neurological signs and symptoms displayed by Group 1 were irritability, constant crying, sialorrhoea, nausea, tachycardia, arrhythmias, fatigue when walking, agitation, muscle spasms paraesthesia, tetany, seizures, and nystagmus. Signs in Group 2 included localized pain, headache, sialorrhoea, paraesthesia, profuse sweating, anxiety, muscle weakness, muscle spasms, and fine tremor. The predominant autonomic sign in Group 1 was sialorrhoea (P<.0001) and in Group 2, paraesthesia (P<.0001). Patients who received Fab antivenom treatment displayed better outcomes and shorter hospital stays than those who did not. No deaths were reported. The neurological signs and symptoms caused by black widow spider bite are predominantly autonomic, and identifying them permits early diagnosis and more effective treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Interrelationships of undernutrition and neurotoxicity: food for thought and research attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Peter S; Palmer, Valerie S

    2012-06-01

    The neurotoxic actions of chemical agents on humans and animals are usually studied with little consideration of the subject's nutritional status. States of protein-calorie, vitamin and/or mineral undernutrition are associated with a range of neurodevelopmental, neurological and psychiatric disorders, commonly with involvement of both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Undernutrition can modify risk for certain chemical-induced neurologic diseases, and in some cases undernutrition may be a prerequisite for neurotoxicity to surface. In addition, neurologic disease associated with undernutrition or neurotoxicity may show similarities in clinical and neuropathological expression, especially in the peripheral nervous system. The combined effects of undernutrition and chemical neurotoxicity are most relevant to people with low incomes who experience chronic hunger, parasitism and infectious disease, monotonous diets of plants with neurotoxic potential (notably cassava), environmental pollution from rapid industrial development, chronic alcohol abuse, or prolonged treatment with certain therapeutic drugs. Undernutrition alone or in combination with chemical exposure is also important in high-income societies in the setting of drug and alcohol abuse, old age, food faddism, post-bariatric surgery, and drug treatment for certain medical conditions, including cancer and tuberculosis. The nutritional demands of pregnancy and lactation increase the risk of fetal and infant undernutrition and chemical interactions therewith. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Protection against MDMA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice by methyllycaconitine: involvement of nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2006-09-01

    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a relatively selective dopaminergic neurotoxin in mice. Previous studies demonstrated the participation of alpha-7 nicotinic receptors (nAChR) in the neurotoxic effect of methamphetamine. The aim of this paper was to study the role of this receptor type in the acute effects and neurotoxicity of MDMA in mice. In vivo, methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific alpha-7 nAChR antagonist, significantly prevented MDMA-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic but not at serotonergic level, without affecting MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Glial activation was also fully prevented by MLA. In vitro, MDMA induced intrasynaptosomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was calcium-, nitric-oxide synthase-, and protein kinase C-dependent. Also, the increase in ROS was prevented by MLA and alpha-bungarotoxin. Experiments with reserpine point to endogenous dopamine (DA) as the main source of MDMA-induced ROS. MLA also brought the MDMA-induced inhibition of [3H]DA uptake down, from 73% to 11%. We demonstrate that a coordinated activation of alpha-7 nAChR, blockade of DA transporter function and displacement of DA from intracellular stores induced by MDMA produces a neurotoxic effect that can be prevented by MLA, suggesting that alpha-7 nAChR have a key role in the MDMA neurotoxicity in mice; however, the involvement of nicotinic receptors containing the beta2 subunit cannot be conclusively ruled out.

  7. GRIN2A polymorphisms and expression levels are associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Wang, Yiqing; Wang, Miaomiao; Sun, Na; Li, Chunping

    2017-04-01

    Lead acts as an antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). GRIN2A encodes an important subunit of NMDARs and may be a critical factor in the mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. Changes in GRIN2A expression levels or gene variants may be mechanisms of lead-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we hypothesized that GRIN2A might contribute to lead-induced neurotoxicity. A preliminary HEK293 cell experiment was performed to analyze the association between GRIN2A expression and lead exposure. In addition, in a population-based study, serum GRIN2A levels were measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To detect further the influence of GRIN2A gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced neurotoxicity, 3 tag SNPs (rs2650429, rs6497540, and rs9302415) were genotyped in a case-control study that included 399 lead-exposed subjects and 398 controls. Lead exposure decreased GRIN2A expression levels in HEK293 cells ( p lead-free cells. Lead-exposed individuals had lower serum GRIN2A levels compared with controls ( p lead level ( p lead poisoning compared with the rs2650429 CC genotype (adjusted odds ratio = 1.42, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-2.00]. Therefore, changes in GRIN2A expression levels and variants may be important mechanisms in the development of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Drug interactions may be important risk factors for methotrexate neurotoxicity, particularly in pediatric leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Victoria J; van Delft, Frederik W; Baird, Susan F; Mair, Shona; Skinner, Roderick; Halsey, Christina

    2016-11-01

    Methotrexate administration is associated with frequent adverse neurological events during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we present evidence to support the role of common drug interactions and low vitamin B 12 levels in potentiating methotrexate neurotoxicity. We review the published evidence and highlight key potential drug interactions as well as present clinical evidence of severe methotrexate neurotoxicity in conjunction with nitrous oxide anesthesia and measurements of vitamin B 12 levels among pediatric leukemia patients during therapy. We describe a very plausible mechanism for methotrexate neurotoxicity in pediatric leukemia patients involving reduction in methionine and consequential disruption of myelin production. We provide evidence that a number of commonly prescribed drugs in pediatric leukemia management interact with the same folate biosynthetic pathways and/or reduce functional vitamin B 12 levels and hence are likely to increase the toxicity of methotrexate in these patients. We also present a brief case study supporting out hypothesis that nitrous oxide contributes to methotrexate neurotoxicity and a nutritional study, showing that vitamin B 12 deficiency is common in pediatric leukemia patients. Use of nitrous oxide in pediatric leukemia patients at the same time as methotrexate use should be avoided especially as many suitable alternative anesthetic agents exist. Clinicians should consider monitoring levels of vitamin B 12 in patients suspected of having methotrexate-induced neurotoxic effects.

  9. Involvement of glial cells in the neurotoxicity of parathion and chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurich, M.-G.; Honegger, P.; Schilter, B.; Costa, L.G.; Monnet-Tschudi, F.

    2004-01-01

    An in vitro model, the aggregating brain cell culture of fetal rat telencephalon, has been used to investigate the influence of glial cells on the neurotoxicity of two organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), chlorpyrifos and parathion. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures were treated continuously for 10 days between DIV 5 and 15. Parathion induced astrogliosis at concentration at which MAP-2 immunostaining, found here to be more sensitive than neuron-specific enzyme activities, was not affected. In contrast, chlorpyrifos induced a comparatively weak gliotic reaction, and only at concentrations at which neurons were already affected. After similar treatments, increased neurotoxicity of parathion and chlorpyrifos was found in aggregate cultures deprived of glial cells. These results suggest that glial cells provide neuroprotection against OPs toxicity. To address the question of the difference in toxicity between parathion and chlorpyrifos, the toxic effects of their leaving groups, p-nitrophenol and trichloropyridinol, were studied in mixed-cell aggregates. General cytotoxicity was more pronounced for trichloropyridinol and both compounds had similar toxic effects on neuron-specific enzyme activities. In contrast, trichloropyridinol induced a much stronger decrease in glutamine synthetase activity, the enzymatic marker of astrocytes. Trichloropyridinol may exert a toxic effect on astrocytes, compromising their neuroprotective function, thus exacerbating the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos. This is in line with the suggestion that glial cells may contribute to OPs neurotoxicity, and with the view that OPs may exert their neurotoxic effects through different mechanisms

  10. The Dynamics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Neurotoxic Compounds and Neurotransmitters Interact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Van de Bor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years concern has risen about the increasing prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. Accumulating evidence shows that exposure to neurotoxic compounds is related to ASD. Neurotransmitters might play a key role, as research has indicated a connection between neurotoxic compounds, neurotransmitters and ASD. In the current review a literature overview with respect to neurotoxic exposure and the effects on neurotransmitter systems is presented. The aim was to identify mechanisms and related factors which together might result in ASD. The literature reported in the current review supports the hypothesis that exposure to neurotoxic compounds can lead to alterations in the GABAergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic system which have been related to ASD in previous work. However, in several studies findings were reported that are not supportive of this hypothesis. Other factors also might be related, possibly altering the mechanisms at work, such as time and length of exposure as well as dose of the compound. Future research should focus on identifying the pathway through which these factors interact with exposure to neurotoxic compounds making use of human studies.

  11. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  12. L-DOPA neurotoxicity is mediated by up-regulation of DMT1-IRE expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity caused by L-DOPA are not yet completely known. Based on recent findings, we speculated that the increased expression of divalent metal transporter 1 without iron-response element (DMT1-IRE induced by L-DOPA might play a critical role in the development of L-DOPA neurotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM and siRNA DMT-IRE on L-DOPA neurotoxicity in cortical neurons. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We demonstrated that neurons treated with L-DOPA have a significant dose-dependent decrease in neuronal viability (MTT Assay and increase in iron content (using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer, DMT1-IRE expression (Western blot analysis and ferrous iron (55Fe(II uptake. Neurons incubated in ACM with or without L-DOPA had no significant differences in their morphology, Hoechst-33342 staining or viability. Also, ACM significantly inhibited the effects of L-DOPA on neuronal iron content as well as DMT1-IRE expression. In addition, we demonstrated that infection of neurons with siRNA DMT-IRE led to a significant decrease in DMT1-IRE expression as well as L-DOPA neurotoxicity. CONCLUSION: The up-regulation of DMT1-IRE and the increase in DMT1-IRE-mediated iron influx play a key role in L-DOPA neurotoxicity in cortical neurons.

  13. Translocation and neurotoxicity of CdTe quantum dots in RMEs motor neurons in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunli; Wang, Xiong; Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yiping; Wang, Dayong, E-mail: dayongw@seu.edu.cn

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We investigated in vivo neurotoxicity of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons in C. elegans. • CdTe QDs in the range of μg/L caused neurotoxicity on RMEs motor neurons. • Bioavailability of CdTe QDs may be the primary inducer for CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. • Both oxidative stress and cell identity regulate the CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. • CdTe QDs were translocated and deposited into RMEs motor neurons. - Abstract: We employed Caenorhabditis elegans assay system to investigate in vivo neurotoxicity of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on RMEs motor neurons, which are involved in controlling foraging behavior, and the underlying mechanism of such neurotoxicity. After prolonged exposure to 0.1–1 μg/L of CdTe QDs, abnormal foraging behavior and deficits in development of RMEs motor neurons were observed. The observed neurotoxicity from CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons might be not due to released Cd{sup 2+}. Overexpression of genes encoding Mn-SODs or unc-30 gene controlling cell identity of RMEs neurons prevented neurotoxic effects of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons, suggesting the crucial roles of oxidative stress and cell identity in regulating CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. In nematodes, CdTe QDs could be translocated through intestinal barrier and be deposited in RMEs motor neurons. In contrast, CdTe@ZnS QDs could not be translocated into RMEs motor neurons and therefore, could only moderately accumulated in intestinal cells, suggesting that ZnS coating might reduce neurotoxicity of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons. Therefore, the combinational effects of oxidative stress, cell identity, and bioavailability may contribute greatly to the mechanism of CdTe QDs neurotoxicity on RMEs motor neurons. Our results provide insights into understanding the potential risks of CdTe QDs on the development and function of nervous systems in animals.

  14. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  15. Neurite outgrowth in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a high-throughput screen for developmental neurotoxicity or neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kristen R; Sirenko, Oksana; Parham, Fred; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Cromwell, Evan F; Tice, Raymond R; Behl, Mamta

    2016-03-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of neurological disorders and the large number of untested compounds in the environment, there is a need to develop reliable and efficient screening tools to identify environmental chemicals that could potentially affect neurological development. Herein, we report on a library of 80 compounds screened for their ability to inhibit neurite outgrowth, a process by which compounds may elicit developmental neurotoxicity, in a high-throughput, high-content assay using human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). The library contains a diverse set of compounds including those that have been known to be associated with developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) and/or neurotoxicity (NT), environmental compounds with unknown neurotoxic potential (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and flame retardants (FRs)), as well as compounds with no documented neurotoxic potential. Neurons were treated for 72h across a 6-point concentration range (∼0.3-100μM) in 384-well plates. Effects on neurite outgrowth were assessed by quantifying total outgrowth, branches, and processes. We also assessed the number ofviable cells per well. Concentration-response profiles were evaluated using a Hill model to derive benchmark concentration (BMC) values. Assay performance was evaluated using positive and negative controls and test replicates. Compounds were ranked by activity and selectivity (i.e., specific effects on neurite outgrowth in the absence of concomitant cytotoxicity) and repeat studies were conducted to confirm selectivity. Among the 80 compounds tested, 38 compounds were active, of which 16 selectively inhibited neurite outgrowth. Of these 16 compounds, 12 were known to cause DNT/NT and the remaining 4 compounds included 3 PAHs and 1 FR. In independent repeat studies, 14/16 selective compounds were reproducibly active in the assay, of which only 6 were selective for inhibition of neurite outgrowth. These 6 compounds were

  16. Fipronil insecticide: novel photochemical desulfinylation with retention of neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainzl, D.; Casida, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fipronil is an outstanding new insecticide for crop protection with good selectivity between insects and mammals. The insecticidal action involves blocking the gamma-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel with much greater sensitivity of this target in insects than in mammals. Fipronil contains a trifluoromethylsulfinyl moiety that is unique among the agrochemicals and therefore presumably important in its outstanding performance. We find that this substituent unexpectedly undergoes a novel and facile photoextrusion reaction on plants upon exposure to sunlight, yielding the corresponding trifluoromethylpyrazole, i.e., the desulfinyl derivative. The persistence of this photoproduct and its high neuroactivity, resulting from blocking the gamma-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel, suggest that it may be a significant contributor to the effectiveness of fipronil. In addition, desulfinylfipronil is not a metabolite in mammals, so the safety evaluations must take into account not only the parent compound but also this completely new environmental product

  17. Prior stimulation of the endocannabinoid system prevents methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the striatum through activation of CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Joëlle; Rapino, Cinzia; Gennequin, Benjamin; Chavant, Francois; Francheteau, Maureen; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Duranti, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; Solinas, Marcello; Thiriet, Nathalie

    2014-12-01

    Methamphetamine toxicity is associated with cell death and loss of dopamine neuron terminals in the striatum similar to what is found in some neurodegenerative diseases. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been suggested to be neuroprotective in the brain, and new pharmacological tools have been developed to increase their endogenous tone. In this study, we evaluated whether ECS stimulation could reduce the neurotoxicity of high doses of methamphetamine on the dopamine system. We found that methamphetamine alters the levels of the major endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) in the striatum, suggesting that the ECS participates in the brain responses to methamphetamine. Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabis-derived agonist of both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, or inhibitors of the main enzymes responsible for the degradation of AEA and 2-AG (URB597 and JZL184, respectively), blunted the decrease in striatal protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase induced by methamphetamine. In addition, antagonists of CB2, but not of CB1, blocked the preventive effects of URB597 and JZL184, suggesting that only the former receptor subtype is engaged in neuroprotection exerted by ECS stimulation. Finally, we found that methamphetamine increases striatal levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha, an effect that was blocked by ECS stimulation. Altogether, our results indicate that stimulation of ECS prior to the administration of an overdose of methamphetamine considerably reduces the neurotoxicity of the drug through CB2 receptor activation and highlight a protective function for the ECS against the toxicity induced by drugs and other external insults to the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The investigation of correlation between Iminoral concentration and neurotoxic levels after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tolou-Ghamari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurotoxicity side effects related to cyclosporine kinetics could lead to dysfunction of kidney graft and patient outcome after transplantation. The aim of this study was evidence-based pharmacotherapy of kidney transplant recipients and to investigate neurotoxic levels of Iminoral. Materials and Methods: The results of 2239 cyclosporine trough levels obtained from 743 patients were studied. Seventy-five adult kidney recipients who received Iminoral were studied for neurotoxicity symptoms. Demographic, clinical, hematology and biochemical data were recorded in d-base and analyzed using SPSS application for windows. Results: The mean value related to cyclosporine C 0 was 246.3 μg/l. In the 48% the signs of neurotoxicity such as tremor and headache were noted, but only in 9% the levels of cyclosporine C 0 were >400 μg/l. Further studies on 75 patients showed that the incidence of neurotoxic side effects were as follows: Tremor in 35, headache in 24 and anxiety in 34 recipients of kidney. The prescribed drug regimens from the day of transplant in most patients were based on mycophenolic acid or cellcept, pulse therapy using methylprednisolone (daily from kidney transplant up to 3 days after transplant, cyclosporine or Iminoral plus other drugs related to each individual. Administrations of ganciclovir, thymoglobulin, clotrimazol and prednisolone were also distinguished with immunosuppressant-based therapy simultaneously. Conclusion: Evidence-based study related to pharmacotherapy of Iminoral showed that clinical presentation related to neurotoxic side effects such as tremor, headache and anxiety might be due to many factors such as polypharmacy. Planning immunosuppression to individual patients based on programmed therapeutic Iminoral monitoring, avoiding polypharmacy in terms of removal or drug minimization and focusing on first week after transplant seem to be a realistic option.

  19. E-Block: A Tangible Programming Tool with Graphical Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Danli Wang; Yang Zhang; Shengyong Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper designs a tangible programming tool, E-Block, for children aged 5 to 9 to experience the preliminary understanding of programming by building blocks. With embedded artificial intelligence, the tool defines the programming blocks with the sensors as the input and enables children to write programs to complete the tasks in the computer. The symbol on the programming block's surface is used to help children understanding the function of each block. The sequence information is transfer...

  20. Neurotoxicity in breast cancer survivors a parts per thousand yen10 years post-treatment is dependent on treatment type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten-Kemperman, Myrle M.; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Koppelmans, Vincent; Boogerd, Willem; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schagen, Sanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) for breast cancer (BC) is associated with very late side-effects on brain function and structure. However, little is known about neurotoxicity of specific treatment regimens. To compare neurotoxicity profiles after different treatment strategies, we used neurocognitive

  1. TRANSFORMATION OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY DATA INTO STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE TOXML DATABASE IN SUPPORT OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP (SAR) WORKFLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early hazard identification of new chemicals is often difficult due to lack of data on the novel material for toxicity endpoints, including neurotoxicity. At present, there are no structure searchable neurotoxicity databases. A working group was formed to construct a database to...

  2. Quality of life (QoL) and neurotoxicity in germ-cell cancer survivors (GCCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, J.; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    , divided into 4 subscales (neuropathy, ototoxicity, motor impairment, and dysfunction). Patients were divided into treatment groups; surveillance only (reference), n = 1092, radiotherapy (RT), n = 299, BEP chemotherapy (CT), n = 790, and more than one line of treatment (MTOL), n = 82. Outcomes were......L and treatment disappeared except dyspnea and impaired social function in the MTOL-group. Neurotoxicity was associated with all EORTC-subscales (p BEP and MTOL were associated with several QoL subscales in GCCS. However, when adjusting for neurotoxicity the associations...

  3. The role of intestinal endotoxemia in a rat model of aluminum neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Feng; Guo, Rui-Xia; Li, Wen-Xing; Yu, Bao-Feng; Han, Bai; Liu, Li-Xin; Han, De-Wu

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) in a rat model of aluminum neurotoxicity established by D-galactose and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3). Adult Wistar rats were administered D-galactose and AlCl3 to create the aluminum neurotoxicity model. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were subsequently observed using a Morris water maze test and the serum levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, diam...

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity in hippocampal slices: protection by aniracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, M; Consolandi, O; Memo, M; Spano, P

    1995-03-14

    Aniracetam, a drug known to elicit cognition enhancing properties in both animals and humans, was found to counteract the neurotoxicity induced by excitatory amino acids in primary cultures of cerebellar neurons. We report here that aniracetam prevents the neurotoxic effect induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in rat hippocampal slices. Time-course experiments showed that the aniracetam-induced neuroprotection does not require preincubation of the slices with the drug. Maximal effective concentration of aniracetam was 10 microM. Since the NMDA-mediated cell death in hippocampal slices is considered a valuable experimental model of ischemia, these results suggest a possible novel therapeutic application for aniracetam.

  5. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In

  6. Making Block Grants Accountable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelimsky, Eleanor

    Methods of accountability are presented in considering the Reagan administration plan to consolidate 84 federal health, education and social service grants into six block grant areas and to cut overall funding. After matching aspects of public criticism with proposal objectives, a rationale is developed for building elements of accountability into…

  7. Linoleum Block Printing Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetelat, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses practical considerations of teaching linoleum block printing in the elementary grades (tool use, materials, motivation) and outlines a sequence of design concepts in this area for the primary, intermediate and junior high grades. A short list of books and audiovisual aids is appended. (SJL)

  8. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  9. Coding with Blockly

    CERN Document Server

    Lovett, Amber

    2017-01-01

    "Blockly is a fun, graphical programming language designed to get kids interested in creating their own computer programs. Through simple text written to foster creativity and problem solving, students will the art of innovation. Large, colorful images show students how to complete activities. Additional tools, including a glossary and an index, help students learn new vocabulary and locate information."-- Provided by publisher.

  10. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆.

  11. Neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine-heroin combination in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiang; Ru, Qin; Xiong, Qi; Yue, Kai; Chen, Lin; Ma, Baomiao; Gan, Weimin; Si, Yuanren; Xiao, Huqiao; Li, Chaoying

    2017-04-24

    Simultaneous administration of psychostimulants and opioids is a major drug abuse problem worldwide. The combination of psychostimulants and opioids produces more serious effects than either drug alone and is responsible for numerous deaths. In recent years, owing to its increased use, methamphetamine (METH), a psychostimulant, has become a popular choice for use in combination with opioids, especially heroin. However, little is known about the neurotoxicity of METH/heroin combination. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether METH/heroin combination was more neurotoxic than either drug alone and analyze the possible neurotoxic mechanisms using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our data showed that METH/heroin combination exhibited a significant decrease in cell viability than either drug alone, and the coefficient of drug interaction (CDI) indicated that the combination appeared to produce synergistic effects. Further studies showed that METH/heroin combination induced apoptosis and decreased the mitochondrial potential significantly, compared to either drug alone. This was demonstrated by a significant decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and an increase in expression of Bax, accompanied by increase in the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9. These results suggest that the combination of METH and heroin is more neurotoxic than either drug alone, and it induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain Localization and Neurotoxicity Evaluation of Polysorbate 80-Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Yue Yuan

    Full Text Available The toxicity evaluation of inorganic nanoparticles has been reported by an increasing number of studies, but toxicity studies concerned with biodegradable nanoparticles, especially the neurotoxicity evaluation, are still limited. For example, the potential neurotoxicity of Polysorbate 80-modified chitosan nanoparticles (Tween 80-modified chitosan nanoparticles, TmCS-NPs, one of the most widely used brain targeting vehicles, remains unknown. In the present study, TmCS-NPs with a particle size of 240 nm were firstly prepared by ionic cross-linking of chitosan with tripolyphosphate. Then, these TmCS-NPs were demonstrated to be entered into the brain and specially deposited in the frontal cortex and cerebellum after systemic injection. Moreover, the concentration of TmCS-NPs in these two regions was found to decrease over time. Although no obvious changes were observed for oxidative stress in the in vivo rat model, the body weight was found to remarkably decreased in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to TmCS-NPs for seven days. Besides, apoptosis and necrosis of neurons, slight inflammatory response in the frontal cortex, and decrease of GFAP expression in the cerebellum were also detected in mouse injected with TmCS-NPs. This study is the first report on the sub-brain biodistribution and neurotoxicity studies of TmCS-NPs. Our results provide new insights into the toxicity evaluation of nanoparticles and our findings would help contribute to a better understanding of the neurotoxicity of biodegradable nanomaterials used in pharmaceutics.

  13. Recommendations for Developing Alternative Test Methods for Screening and Prioritization of Chemicals for Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternative methods to current animal testing protocols and gUidelines. An immediate goal is to develop test methods that are capable of screening large numbers of chemic...

  14. TIME-COURSE OF ACUTE NEUROTOXICITY PRODUCED BY N-METHYL CARBAMATES IN PREWEANLING RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N-methyl carbamate insecticides are reversible inhibitors of central and peripheral acetylcholinesterease (ChE). Despite their widespread and long-term use, we could find no studies of a systematic comparison of neurotoxicity in young animals across this group of chemicals. To ...

  15. Brain Localization and Neurotoxicity Evaluation of Polysorbate 80-Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhong-Yue; Hu, Yu-Lan; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity evaluation of inorganic nanoparticles has been reported by an increasing number of studies, but toxicity studies concerned with biodegradable nanoparticles, especially the neurotoxicity evaluation, are still limited. For example, the potential neurotoxicity of Polysorbate 80-modified chitosan nanoparticles (Tween 80-modified chitosan nanoparticles, TmCS-NPs), one of the most widely used brain targeting vehicles, remains unknown. In the present study, TmCS-NPs with a particle size of 240 nm were firstly prepared by ionic cross-linking of chitosan with tripolyphosphate. Then, these TmCS-NPs were demonstrated to be entered into the brain and specially deposited in the frontal cortex and cerebellum after systemic injection. Moreover, the concentration of TmCS-NPs in these two regions was found to decrease over time. Although no obvious changes were observed for oxidative stress in the in vivo rat model, the body weight was found to remarkably decreased in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to TmCS-NPs for seven days. Besides, apoptosis and necrosis of neurons, slight inflammatory response in the frontal cortex, and decrease of GFAP expression in the cerebellum were also detected in mouse injected with TmCS-NPs. This study is the first report on the sub-brain biodistribution and neurotoxicity studies of TmCS-NPs. Our results provide new insights into the toxicity evaluation of nanoparticles and our findings would help contribute to a better understanding of the neurotoxicity of biodegradable nanomaterials used in pharmaceutics.

  16. The influence of adjuvants used in regional anesthesia on lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werdehausen, Robert; Braun, Sebastian; Hermanns, Henning; Kremer, David; Küry, Patrick; Hollmann, Markus W.; Bauer, Inge; Stevens, Markus F.

    2011-01-01

    Neurotoxic properties of local anesthetics can rarely lead to irreversible neuronal damage as in cauda equina syndrome. Clinically, local anesthetics are often combined with adjuvants to improve or prolong the anesthetic effect, whereas the impact of such adjuvants on lidocaine-induced apoptosis is

  17. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Cao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria.

  18. Evaluation of potential neurotoxic effects of occupational exposure to (L)-Lactates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clary, J.J.; Feron, V.J.; Velthuijsen, J.A. van

    2001-01-01

    Organo psycho syndrome (OPS) or chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurotoxic condition reported following long-term exposure to paints containing organic solvent and to other solvents. Lactate esters are finding wider use as solvents. Lactate esters have been well studied in standard toxicity

  19. Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Costa, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Bal-Price AK, Coecke S, Costa L, Crofton KM, Fritsche E, Goldberg A, Grandjean P, Lein PJ, Li A, Lucchini R, Mundy WR, Padilla S, Persico A, Seiler AEM, Kreysa J. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation. Altex 2012: 29: 20...

  20. Assessing the Developmental Neurotoxicity of 27 Organophosphorus Pesticides Using a Zebrafish Behavioral Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing the Developmental Neurotoxicity of 27 Organophosphorus Pesticides Using a Zebrafish Behavioral Assay, Waalkes, M., Hunter, D.L., Jarema, K., Mundy, W., and S. Padilla. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize organophosphor...

  1. Neurotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Venom from Different Populations of the Egyptian Scorpio Maurus Palmatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurotoxic and cytotoxic effects of venoms from Scorpio maurus palmatus taken from different populations were assessed for geographic based variability in toxicity and to evaluate their insecticidal potency. Scorpions were collected from four regions. Three locations were mutually isolated pockets i...

  2. Unraveling the neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: focusing on molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Song

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs possess unique characteristics and are widely used in many fields. Numerous in vivo studies, exposing experimental animals to these NPs through systematic administration, have suggested that TiO2 NPs can accumulate in the brain and induce brain dysfunction. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs remain unclear. However, we have concluded from previous studies that these mechanisms mainly consist of oxidative stress (OS, apoptosis, inflammatory response, genotoxicity, and direct impairment of cell components. Meanwhile, other factors such as disturbed distributions of trace elements, disrupted signaling pathways, dysregulated neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity have also been shown to contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Recently, studies on autophagy and DNA methylation have shed some light on possible mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Therefore, we offer a new perspective that autophagy and DNA methylation could contribute to neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs. Undoubtedly, more studies are needed to test this idea in the future. In short, to fully understand the health threats posed by TiO2 NPs and to improve the bio-safety of TiO2 NPs-based products, the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs must be investigated comprehensively through studying every possible molecular mechanism.

  3. LEARNING AND MEMORY TESTS IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING: A CROSS-LABORATORY COMPARISON OF CONTROL DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Study Test Guideline (OPPTS 870.6300) calls for functional tests to assess the impact of chemicals on cognitive function in offspring following maternal exposure. A test of associative learning and memory is to be conducted around th...

  4. EEG with extreme delta brush in young female with methotrexate neurotoxicity supports NMDA receptor involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Kjær, Troels W; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Sub-acute neurotoxicity is a well-known complication to high-dose and intrathecal methotrexate (MTX) treatment of children with leukemia. Symptoms can be treated safely by dextromethorphan, a non-competitive antagonist to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR). In a female with subacute MTX...

  5. Multiple sclerosis, brain radiotherapy, and risk of neurotoxicity: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Brown, Paul D.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was a retrospective assessment of neurotoxicity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the brain. Methods and Materials: We studied 15 consecutively treated patients with MS who received brain EBRT. Neurologic toxicity was assessed with the Common Toxicity Criteria v.3.0. Results: Median follow-up for the 5 living patients was 6.0 years (range, 3.3-27.4 years). No exacerbation of MS occurred in any patient during EBRT. Five patients had Grade 4 neurologic toxicity and 1 had possible Grade 5 toxicity. Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of neurotoxicity greater than Grade 4 at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 27%-82%). Toxicity occurred at 37.5 to 54.0 Gy at a median of 1.0 year (range, 0.2-4.3 years) after EBRT. Univariate analysis showed an association between opposed-field irradiation of the temporal lobes, central white matter, and brainstem and increased risk of neurotoxicity (p < 0.04). Three of 6 cases of toxicity occurred in patients treated before 1986. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy of the brain in patients with MS may be associated with an increased risk of neurotoxicity compared with patients without demyelinating illnesses. However, this risk is associated with treatment techniques that may not be comparable to modern, conformal radiotherapy

  6. Neurotoxic complications of chemotherapy in patients with cancer: clinical signs and optimal management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, C.C.P.; Heimans, J.J.; Hoekman, K.; Postma, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Neurotoxic side effects of chemotherapy occur frequently and are often a reason to limit the dose of chemotherapy. Since bone marrow toxicity, as the major limiting factor in most chemotherapeutic regimens, can be overcome with growth factors or bone marrow transplantation, the use of higher doses

  7. Involvement of Programmed Cell Death in Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jia; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-11-01

    The widespread application of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) or NP-based products has increased the risk of exposure to NPs in humans. The brain is an important organ that is more susceptible to exogenous stimuli. Moreover, any impairment to the brain is irreversible. Recently, several in vivo studies have found that metallic NPs can be absorbed into the animal body and then translocated into the brain, mainly through the blood-brain barrier and olfactory pathway after systemic administration. Furthermore, metallic NPs can cross the placental barrier to accumulate in the fetal brain, causing developmental neurotoxicity on exposure during pregnancy. Therefore, metallic NPs become a big threat to the brain. However, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs remain unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), which is different from necrosis, is defined as active cell death and is regulated by certain genes. PCD can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. It is involved in brain development, neurodegenerative disorders, psychiatric disorders, and brain injury. Given the pivotal role of PCD in neurological functions, we reviewed relevant articles and tried to summarize the recent advances and future perspectives of PCD involvement in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, with the purpose of comprehensively understanding the neurotoxic mechanisms of NPs.

  8. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  9. Change Around the Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Joey

    2017-04-01

    Proponents of a block grant or per-capita cap trumpet them as vehicles for the federal government to give the states a capped amount of funding for Medicaid that legislatures would effectively distribute how they see fit. Questions abound as to what capped Medicaid funding would look like, and what effect it would have on the current Medicaid-eligible population, covered services, and physician payments.

  10. Managing access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  11. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Botanical Polyphenols Mitigate Microglial Activation and Microglia-Induced Neurotoxicity: Role of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Dennis Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Cui, Jiankun; Lubahn, Dennis B; Gu, Zezong; Sun, Grace Y

    2016-09-01

    Microglia play a significant role in the generation and propagation of oxidative/nitrosative stress, and are the basis of neuroinflammatory responses in the central nervous system. Upon stimulation by endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), these cells release pro-inflammatory factors which can exert harmful effects on surrounding neurons, leading to secondary neuronal damage and cell death. Our previous studies demonstrated the effects of botanical polyphenols to mitigate inflammatory responses induced by LPS, and highlighted an important role for cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) upstream of the pro-inflammatory pathways (Chuang et al. in J Neuroinflammation 12(1):199, 2015. doi: 10.1186/s12974-015-0419-0 ). In this study, we investigate the action of botanical compounds and assess whether suppression of cPLA2 in microglia is involved in the neurotoxic effects on neurons. Differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were used to test the neurotoxicity of conditioned medium from stimulated microglial cells, and WST-1 assay was used to assess for the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells. Botanicals such as quercetin and honokiol (but not cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, 3CG) were effective in inhibiting LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and phosphorylation of cPLA2. Conditioned medium from BV-2 cells stimulated with LPS or IFNγ caused neurotoxicity to SH-SY5Y cells. Decrease in cell viability could be ameliorated by pharmacological inhibitors for cPLA2 as well as by down-regulating cPLA2 with siRNA. Botanicals effective in inhibition of LPS-induced NO and cPLA2 phosphorylation were also effective in ameliorating microglial-induced neurotoxicity. Results demonstrated cytotoxic factors from activated microglial cells to cause damaging effects to neurons and potential use of botanical polyphenols to ameliorate the neurotoxic effects.

  13. Age dependence of organophosphate and carbamate neurotoxicity in the postnatal rat: extrapolation to the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidair, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    One important aspect of risk assessment for the organophosphate and carbamate pesticides is to determine whether their neurotoxicity occurs at lower dose levels in human infants compared to adults. Because these compounds probably exert their neurotoxic effects through the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the above question can be narrowed to whether the cholinesterase inhibition and neurotoxicity they produce is age-dependent, both in terms of the effects produced and potency. The rat is the animal model system most commonly used to address these issues. This paper first discusses the adequacy of the postnatal rat to serve as a model for neurodevelopment in the postnatal human, concluding that the two species share numerous pathways of postnatal neurodevelopment, and that the rat in the third postnatal week is the neurodevelopmental equivalent of the newborn human. Then, studies are discussed in which young and adult rats were dosed by identical routes with organophosphates or carbamates. Four pesticides were tested in rat pups in their third postnatal week: aldicarb, chlorpyrifos, malathion, and methamidophos. The first three, but not methamidophos, caused neurotoxicity at dose levels that ranged from 1.8- to 5.1-fold lower (mean 2.6-fold lower) in the 2- to 3-week-old rat compared to the adult. This estimate in the rat, based on a limited data set of three organophosphates and a single carbamate, probably represents the minimum difference in the neurotoxicity of an untested cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticide that should be expected between the human neonate and adult. For the organophosphates, the greater sensitivity of postnatal rats, and, by analogy, that expected for human neonates, is correlated with generally lower levels of the enzymes involved in organophosphate deactivation

  14. In vitro neurotoxic hazard characterization of different tricresyl phosphate (TCP) isomers and mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Daniel J; Rutten, Joost M M; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to tricresyl phosphates (TCPs), via for example contaminated cabin air, has been associated with health effects including the so-called aerotoxic syndrome. While TCP neurotoxicity is mainly attributed to ortho-isomers like tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (ToCP), recent exposure and risk assessments indicate that ToCP levels in cabin air are very low. However, the neurotoxic potential of non-ortho TCP isomers and TCP mixtures is largely unknown. We therefore measured effects of exposure (up to 48h) to different TCP isomers, mixtures and the metabolite of ToCP (CBDP: cresyl saligenin phosphate) on cell viability and mitochondrial activity, spontaneous neuronal electrical activity, and neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons. The results demonstrate that exposure to TCPs (24-48h, up to 10μM) increases mitochondrial activity, without affecting cell viability. Effects of acute TCP exposure (30min) on neuronal electrical activity are limited. However, electrical activity is markedly decreased for the majority of TCPs (10μM) following 48h exposure. Additional preliminary data indicate that exposure to TCPs (48h, 10μM) did not affect the number of neurites per cell or average neurite length, except for TmCP and the analytical TCP mixture (Sigma) that induced a reduction of average neurite length. The combined neurotoxicity data demonstrate that the different TCPs, including ToCP, are roughly equipotent and a clear structure-activity relation is not apparent for the studied endpoints. The no-observed-effect-concentrations (1μM) are well above current exposure levels indicating limited neurotoxic health risk, although exposures may have been higher in the past. Moreover, prolonged and/or repeated exposure to TCPs may exacerbate the observed neurotoxic effects, which argues for additional research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m 3 ; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks

  16. Paving block study : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-10-01

    The Louisiana Department of Highways has conducted field tests with an experimental revetment consisting of cellular concrete revetment blocks used in conjunction with plastic filter cloth and/or vegetation such as grass or vines. The precast blocks ...

  17. Habitat Blocks and Wildlife Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Habitat blocks are areas of contiguous forest and other natural habitats that are unfragmented by roads, development, or agriculture. Vermonts habitat blocks are...

  18. Demographic Data - MDC_Block

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade Census 2000 Blocks. Census blocks are areas bounded on all sides by visible and/or invisible features shown on a map prepared...

  19. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autzen, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how...... the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star....

  20. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  1. Block Scheduling in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmsher, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Block Scheduling has been considered a cure for a lengthy list of educational problems. This report reviews the literature on block schedules and describes some Oregon high schools that have integrated block scheduling. Major disadvantages included resistance to change and requirements that teachers change their teaching strategies. There is…

  2. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.  Rec...

  3. Program structure-based blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolli, Carlo; Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; O'Brien, John K.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2017-09-26

    Embodiments relate to program structure-based blocking. An aspect includes receiving source code corresponding to a computer program by a compiler of a computer system. Another aspect includes determining a prefetching section in the source code by a marking module of the compiler. Yet another aspect includes performing, by a blocking module of the compiler, blocking of instructions located in the prefetching section into instruction blocks, such that the instruction blocks of the prefetching section only contain instructions that are located in the prefetching section.

  4. Neurotoxic reactive astrocytes are induced by activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddelow, Shane A; Guttenplan, Kevin A; Clarke, Laura E; Bennett, Frederick C; Bohlen, Christopher J; Schirmer, Lucas; Bennett, Mariko L; Münch, Alexandra E; Chung, Won-Suk; Peterson, Todd C; Wilton, Daniel K; Frouin, Arnaud; Napier, Brooke A; Panicker, Nikhil; Kumar, Manoj; Buckwalter, Marion S; Rowitch, David H; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Stevens, Beth; Barres, Ben A

    2017-01-26

    Reactive astrocytes are strongly induced by central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease, but their role is poorly understood. Here we show that a subtype of reactive astrocytes, which we termed A1, is induced by classically activated neuroinflammatory microglia. We show that activated microglia induce A1 astrocytes by secreting Il-1α, TNF and C1q, and that these cytokines together are necessary and sufficient to induce A1 astrocytes. A1 astrocytes lose the ability to promote neuronal survival, outgrowth, synaptogenesis and phagocytosis, and induce the death of neurons and oligodendrocytes. Death of axotomized CNS neurons in vivo is prevented when the formation of A1 astrocytes is blocked. Finally, we show that A1 astrocytes are abundant in various human neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. Taken together these findings help to explain why CNS neurons die after axotomy, strongly suggest that A1 astrocytes contribute to the death of neurons and oligodendrocytes in neurodegenerative disorders, and provide opportunities for the development of new treatments for these diseases.

  5. Roles of autophagy in MPP+-induced neurotoxicity in vivo: the involvement of mitochondria and α-synuclein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chih Hung

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy (also known as autophagy is an intracellular self-eating mechanism and has been proposed as both neuroprotective and neurodestructive in the central nervous system (CNS neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the role of autophagy involving mitochondria and α-synuclein was investigated in MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced oxidative injury in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats in vivo. The oxidative mechanism underlying MPP+-induced neurotoxicity was identified by elevated lipid peroxidation and heme oxygenase-1 levels, a redox-regulated protein in MPP+-infused substantia nigra (SN. At the same time, MPP+ significantly increased LC3-II levels, a hallmark protein of autophagy. To block MPP+-induced autophagy in rat brain, Atg7siRNA was intranigrally infused 4 d prior to MPP+ infusion. Western blot assay showed that in vivo Atg7siRNA transfection not only reduced Atg7 levels in the MPP+-infused SN but attenuated MPP+-induced elevation in LC3-II levels, activation of caspase 9 and reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, indicating that autophagy is pro-death. The immunostaining study demonstrated co-localization of LC3 and succinate dehydrogenase (a mitochondrial complex II as well as LC3 and α-synuclein, suggesting that autophagy may engulf mitochondria and α-synuclein. Indeed, in vivo Atg7siRNA transfection mitigated MPP+-induced reduction in cytochrome c oxidase. In addition, MPP+-induced autophagy differentially altered the α-synuclein aggregates in the infused SN. In conclusion, autophagy plays a prodeath role in the MPP+-induced oxidative injury by sequestering mitochondria in the rat brain. Moreover, our data suggest that the benefits of autophagy depend on the levels of α-synuclein aggregates in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of the rat brain.

  6. Quinolinic acid neurotoxicity: Differential roles of astrocytes and microglia via FGF-2-mediated signaling in redox-linked cytoskeletal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Biasibetti, Helena; Schmitz, Felipe; Ávila, Helena; Parisi, Mariana M; Barbe-Tuana, Florencia; Wyse, Angela T S; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2016-12-01

    QUIN is a glutamate agonist playing a role in the misregulation of the cytoskeleton, which is associated with neurodegeneration in rats. In this study, we focused on microglial activation, FGF2/Erk signaling, gap junctions (GJs), inflammatory parameters and redox imbalance acting on cytoskeletal dynamics of the in QUIN-treated neural cells of rat striatum. FGF-2/Erk signaling was not altered in QUIN-treated primary astrocytes or neurons, however cytoskeleton was disrupted. In co-cultured astrocytes and neurons, QUIN-activated FGF2/Erk signaling prevented the cytoskeleton from remodeling. In mixed cultures (astrocyte, neuron, microglia), QUIN-induced FGF-2 increased level failed to activate Erk and promoted cytoskeletal destabilization. The effects of QUIN in mixed cultures involved redox imbalance upstream of Erk activation. Decreased connexin 43 (Cx43) immunocontent and functional GJs, was also coincident with disruption of the cytoskeleton in primary astrocytes and mixed cultures. We postulate that in interacting astrocytes and neurons the cytoskeleton is preserved against the insult of QUIN by activation of FGF-2/Erk signaling and proper cell-cell interaction through GJs. In mixed cultures, the FGF-2/Erk signaling is blocked by the redox imbalance associated with microglial activation and disturbed cell communication, disrupting the cytoskeleton. Thus, QUIN signal activates differential mechanisms that could stabilize or destabilize the cytoskeleton of striatal astrocytes and neurons in culture, and glial cells play a pivotal role in these responses preserving or disrupting a combination of signaling pathways and cell-cell interactions. Taken together, our findings shed light into the complex role of the active interaction of astrocytes, neurons and microglia in the neurotoxicity of QUIN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Block copolymer investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  8. Ginkgolide B inhibits the neurotoxicity of prions or amyloid-β1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal loss in Alzheimer's or prion diseases is preceded by the accumulation of fibrillar aggregates of toxic proteins (amyloid-β1-42 or the prion protein. Since some epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the EGb 761 extract, from the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree, has a beneficial effect on Alzheimer's disease, the effect of some of the major components of the EGb 761 extract on neuronal responses to amyloid-β1-42, or to a synthetic miniprion (sPrP106, were investigated. Methods Components of the EGb 761 extract were tested in 2 models of neurodegeneration. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were pre-treated with ginkgolides A or B, quercetin or myricetin, and incubated with amyloid-β1-42, sPrP106, or other neurotoxins. After 24 hours neuronal survival and the production of prostaglandin E2 that is closely associated with neuronal death was measured. In primary cortical neurons apoptosis (caspase-3 in response to amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106 was measured, and in co-cultures the effects of the ginkgolides on the killing of amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106 damaged neurons by microglia was tested. Results Neurons treated with ginkgolides A or B were resistant to amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106. Ginkgolide-treated cells were also resistant to platelet activating factor or arachidonic acid, but remained susceptible to hydrogen peroxide or staurosporine. The ginkgolides reduced the production of prostaglandin E2 in response to amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106. In primary cortical neurons, the ginkgolides reduced caspase-3 responses to amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106, and in co-culture studies the ginkgolides reduced the killing of amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106 damaged neurons by microglia. Conclusion Nanomolar concentrations of the ginkgolides protect neurons against the otherwise toxic effects of amyloid-β1-42 or sPrP106. The ginkgolides also prevented the neurotoxicity of platelet activating factor and reduced the production of prostaglandin E2 in

  9. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  10. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...... it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...

  11. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  12. Celiac ganglia block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Akhan, Okan

    2005-01-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation

  13. Accelerated oxygen consumption by catecholamines in the presence of aromatic nitro and nitroso compounds. Implications and neurotoxicity of nitro compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, K.

    1981-01-01

    The interactions of catecholamines with nitro and nitroso compounds are studied in view of the possible involvement of catecholamine type neurotransmitters in neurotoxicity caused by hypoxic cell sensitizers. The data reported suggest that neurotoxicity of nitro compounds may be due to depletion of oxygen, catecholamines and ascorbate in nerve tissue with concomitant generation of toxic species such as hydroxyl, hydronitroxyl and superoxide free radicals as well as nitroso and quinonoid derivatives. 5 references, 1 figure

  14. The Neurotoxicity of Nitrous Oxide: The Facts and “Putative” Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sinead; Ma, Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is a widely used analgesic agent, used also in combination with anaesthetics during surgery. Recent research has raised concerns about possible neurotoxicity of nitrous oxide, particularly in the developing brain. Nitrous oxide is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist drug, similar in nature to ketamine, another anaesthetic agent. It has been linked to post-operative cardiovascular problems in clinical studies. It is also widely known that exposure to nitrous oxide during surgery results in elevated homocysteine levels in many patients, but very little work has investigated the long term effect of these increased homocysteine levels. Now research in rodent models has found that homocysteine can be linked to neuronal death and possibly even cognitive deficits. This review aims to examine the current knowledge of mechanisms of action of nitrous oxide, and to describe some pathways by which it may have neurotoxic effects. PMID:24961701

  15. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

  16. The Protective Effects of Nigella sativa and Its Constituents on Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khazdair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa (N. sativa is an annual plant and widely used as medicinal plant throughout the world. The seeds of the plant have been used traditionally in various disorders and as a spice to ranges of Persian foods. N. sativa has therapeutic effects on tracheal responsiveness (TR and lung inflammation on induced toxicity by Sulfur mustard. N. sativa has been widely used in treatment of various nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, and neurotoxicity. Most of the therapeutic properties of this plant are due to the presence of some phenolic compounds especially thymoquinone (TQ, which is major bioactive component of the essential oil. The present review is an effort to provide a comprehensive study of the literature on scientific researches of pharmacological activities of the seeds of this plant on induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans prevent the neurotoxicity of a human prion protein fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M; Wandosell, F; Colaço, C; Avila, J

    1998-10-15

    Although a number of features distinguish the disease isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) from its normal cellular counterpart (PrPC) in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the neuropathogenesis of these diseases remains an enigma. The amyloid fibrils formed by fragments of human PrP have, however, been shown to be directly neurotoxic in vitro. We show here that sulphated polysaccharides (heparin, keratan and chondroitin) inhibit the neurotoxicity of these amyloid fibrils and this appears to be mediated via inhibition of the polymerization of the PrP peptide into fibrils. This provides a rationale for the therapeutic effects of sulphated polysaccharides and suggests a rapid in vitro functional screen for TSE therapeutics.

  18. Severe neurotoxicity associated to the intrathecal of metotreaxate and cytanobina in patients with tenkenic or lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Tena, J.; Lopez Andreu, J.A.; Verdeguer, A.; Menor, F.; Mulas, F.; Ferris, J.

    1995-01-01

    The prophylaxis and treatment of central nervous system leukemia and lymphoma with intrathecal chemotherapy have been related to severe neurotoxicity. At least 35 cases of subacute myeloencepthalopathy with transient a permanent paraplegia/quadriplegia have been reported. A comprehensive view of the literature and a description of a new case of intrathecal chemotherapy-related neurotoxicity is made. Among the cases reported in the literature, complete recovery was observed in 9 patients, partial recovery with variable sequelae in 6, no recovery in 8 and 13 patients died. Early cerebrospinal fluid exchange seems to be the only potentially effective approach although not universally accepted. The rarity of this toxicity and the proved efficacy of the intrathecal chemotherapy justify its use

  19. Insights into cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity after CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Jordan; Turtle, Cameron J

    2018-04-03

    T-cells engineered to express CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CD19 CAR-T cells) can achieve high response rates in patients with refractory/relapsed (R/R) CD19+ hematologic malignancies. Nonetheless, the efficacy of CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy can be offset by significant toxicities, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. In this report of our presentation at the 2018 Second French International Symposium on CAR-T cells (CAR-T day), we describe the clinical presentations of CRS and neurotoxicity in a cohort of 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and provide insights into the mechanisms contributing to these toxicities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Scoping review: Awareness of neurotoxicity from anesthesia in children in otolaryngology literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Marisa A; Pham, Liem T; April, Max M

    2017-08-01

    Review otolaryngology literature for awareness of neurotoxicity from general anesthesia in children. Recently, there has been increasing focus in anesthesia literature on the long-term effects of general anesthesia on neurodevelopment. Multiple animal models have demonstrated evidence of neurotoxicity from both inhalational and intravenous anesthetics. Cohort studies also have revealed modestly increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children exposed to a single episode of general anesthesia prior to 3 to 4 years of age, with stronger evidence for multiple exposures in this age range. Otolaryngologists may subject children to general anesthesia via procedures or tests, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and auditory brainstem response. PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science Review. A scoping review using the above databases was performed limited to January 2005 through December 2015. Articles were screened and reviewed based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Initial search generated 3,909 articles. After 72 full text articles were reviewed, only seven articles mentioned neurotoxicity as a risk of general anesthesia in pediatric patients. Despite the high volume of pediatric otolaryngologic procedures performed annually, there remains limited awareness in our literature discussing neurotoxicity as an outcome. Prospective data from anesthesia literature is still pending; therefore, specific recommendations cannot be made at this time. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the concerns and work toward defining elective procedures, combining surgical procedures with other procedures or imaging, and reassessing the timing and frequency of various interventions under general anesthesia in young children. Laryngoscope, 127:1930-1937, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. The role of intestinal endotoxemia in a rat model of aluminum neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Guo, Rui-Xia; Li, Wen-Xing; Yu, Bao-Feng; Han, Bai; Liu, Li-Xin; Han, De-Wu

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) in a rat model of aluminum neurotoxicity established by D-galactose and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3). Adult Wistar rats were administered D‑galactose and AlCl3 to create the aluminum neurotoxicity model. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were subsequently observed using a Morris water maze test and the serum levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1, diamine oxidase (DAO), glutamine (Gln) and glutaminase were measured. The expression of S‑100β in the serum was detected using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The expression levels of the amyloid β‑protein (Aβ) precursor (APP), presenilin 1 (PS1), β‑site APP‑cleaving enzyme (BACE), zona occludens protein (ZO)‑1 and Aβ 1‑40 in the brain of rats were detected via reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The levels of LPS, TNF‑α, IL‑1, DAO, Gln and S‑100β in serum and the mRNA and protein expression levels of APP, PS1, BACE and Aβ1‑40 in the brain were markedly increased in the model rats compared with controls. The level of glutaminase in the serum and the expression of ZO‑1 in the brain were decreased in the model rats compared with controls. IETM was present in the rat model of aluminum neurotoxicity established by D‑galactose and AlCl3 and may be important in the development of this neurotoxicity.

  2. Protective effect of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) against neurotoxicity induced by aluminum chloride in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E Elhadidy; Hussein G Sawie; Nagwa A Meguid; Yasser A Khadrawy

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ashwagandha extract against aluminum chloride-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Methods: Rats were divided into control, aluminum-intoxicated rats treated daily with aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) (100 mg/kg, orally) for 30 d and aluminum-intoxicated animals protected by receiving daily ashwagandha extract (200 mg/kg, orally) one hour before AlCl3 administration for 30 d. Levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione and tumor ...

  3. Neurotoxicity of drugs of abuse - the case of methylenedioxy amphetamines (MDMA, ecstasy ), and amphetamines

    OpenAIRE

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA, 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) and the stimulants methamphetamine (METH, speed) and amphetamine are popular drugs among young people, particularly in the dance scene. When given in high doses both MDMA and the stimulant amphetamines are clearly neurotoxic in laboratory animals. MDMA causes selective and persistent lesions of central serotonergic nerve terminals, whereas amphetamines damage both the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. In recent years, the question of ecsta...

  4. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor inhibits neurotoxicity of LPS-activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persidsky Yuri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, can activate immune cells including macrophages. Activation of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS contributes to neuronal injury. Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI, a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether BBI has the ability to inhibit LPS-mediated macrophage activation, reducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and subsequent neurotoxicity in primary cortical neural cultures. Methods Mixed cortical neural cultures from rat were used as target cells for testing neurotoxicity induced by LPS-treated macrophage supernatant. Neuronal survival was measured using a cell-based ELISA method for expression of the neuronal marker MAP-2. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production in macrophages was measured via 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH2DA oxidation. Cytokine expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and of ROS. In contrast, BBI pretreatment (1-100 μg/ml of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines and ROS. Further, supernatant from BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. BBI, when directly added to the neuronal cultures (1-100 μg/ml, had no protective effect on neurons with or without LPS-activated macrophage supernatant treatment. In addition, BBI (100 μg/ml had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that BBI, through its anti-inflammatory properties, protects neurons from neurotoxicity mediated by activated macrophages.

  5. P1-11: Visual Function and Neurotoxic Symptoms Related to Exposure to Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Jimenez Barbosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Exposure to Perchloroethylene (PERC, a solvent used in dry-cleaning, is associated with neurotoxicity and changes in colour vision (CV and contrast sensitivity (CS. However, PERCs' impact on other aspects of visual function (VF such as chromatic contrast sensitivity (CCS, glass pattern detection (GPP, visual search (VS, and global motion sensitivity (GMS remains unclear. This study compared VF and neurotoxicity in two populations at risk, dry-cleaners (cases from Colombia and Australia. Control groups of people with community levels of exposure to PERC were also assessed. Methods: A case-control study of VF in people who are working in the dry-cleaning industry for at least 1 year (n = 40 Colombia; n= 34 Australia with controls (n = 35 each site. VF measures assessed were CSF, CCS, the FM Hue 100 test, VS, GPP, and GMS. Neurotoxic symptoms were assessed using the Q16 modified version questionnaire. Results: Cases had poorer CCS, hue discrimination, GPP, GMS, and higher Q16 scores than controls (p < .05. There was no effect of country. CS function was poorer than controls (p < .05 for spatial frequencies≥0.50 cpd for Australian cases but for ≥1.0 cpd for Colombian cases. There were no significant differences between cases and controls for serial and parallel VS. Conclusion: Our CSF and CV findings indicate that the CS deficit extends to lower spatial frequencies. Furthermore we report a reduction in the detection of form, motion, and CCS. These deficits were associated with neurotoxic symptoms. Because VS was unaffected, it suggests that PERC affects lower order visual functions more severely than higher level cognition.

  6. Prion infections and anti-PrP antibodies trigger converging neurotoxic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli S Herrmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Prions induce lethal neurodegeneration and consist of PrPSc, an aggregated conformer of the cellular prion protein PrPC. Antibody-derived ligands to the globular domain of PrPC (collectively termed GDL are also neurotoxic. Here we show that GDL and prion infections activate the same pathways. Firstly, both GDL and prion infection of cerebellar organotypic cultured slices (COCS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accordingly, ROS scavenging, which counteracts GDL toxicity in vitro and in vivo, prolonged the lifespan of prion-infected mice and protected prion-infected COCS from neurodegeneration. Instead, neither glutamate receptor antagonists nor inhibitors of endoplasmic reticulum calcium channels abolished neurotoxicity in either model. Secondly, antibodies against the flexible tail (FT of PrPC reduced neurotoxicity in both GDL-exposed and prion-infected COCS, suggesting that the FT executes toxicity in both paradigms. Thirdly, the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response was activated in both models. Finally, 80% of transcriptionally downregulated genes overlapped between prion-infected and GDL-treated COCS. We conclude that GDL mimic the interaction of PrPSc with PrPC, thereby triggering the downstream events characteristic of prion infection.

  7. Ellagic acid promotes Aβ42 fibrillization and inhibits Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Ying; Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min; Sun, Gui-yuan; Liu, Rui-tian

    2009-01-01

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of β-amyloid (Aβ) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of Aβ oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against Aβ neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on Aβ42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted Aβ fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited Aβ aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in Aβ42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic Aβ aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  8. Developmental neurotoxic effects of two pesticides: Behavior and neuroprotein studies on endosulfan and cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iwa; Eriksson, Per; Fredriksson, Anders; Buratovic, Sonja; Viberg, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals have been of growing interest in recent years due to the increasing reports of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. Exposure to these substances during early development may lead to adverse behavior effects manifested at a later phase of life. Pesticides are a wide group of chemicals which are still actively used and residues are found in the environment and in food products. The present study investigated the potential developmental neurotoxic effects of two different types of pesticides, endosulfan and cypermethrin, after a single neonatal exposure during a critical period of brain development. Ten-day-old male NMRI mice were administrated an oral dose of endosulfan or cypermethrin (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg body weight, respectively). Levels of proteins were measured in the neonatal and adult brain, and adult behavioral testing was performed. The results indicate that both pesticides may induce altered levels of neuroproteins, important for normal brain development, and neurobehavioral abnormalities manifested as altered adult spontaneous behavior and ability to habituate to a novel home environment. The neurotoxic behavioral effects were also presentseveral months after the initial testing, indicating long-lasting or even persistent irreversible effects. Also, the present study suggests a possible link between the altered levels of neuroprotein and changes in behavior when exposed during a critical period of brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The preventive effect of oxytocin to Cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity: an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Tulay; Akman, Levent; Erbas, Oytun; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Taskiran, Dilek; Ozsaran, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neurotoxicity is a frequent dose-limiting side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. This study was conducted to investigate the preventive effect of oxytocin (OT) on cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Forty-four adult female rats were included in the study. Thirty-six rats were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) single dose cisplatin 10 mg/kg and divided in to 3 groups. The first group (n=12) received saline i.p., whereas the second group (n=12) and the third group (n=12) were injected with 80 µg/kg and 160 µg/kg OT, respectively, for 10 days. The remaining 8 rats served as the control group. Electromyography (EMG) studies were recorded and blood samples were collected for the measurement of plasma lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde; MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and glutathione (GSH) levels. EMG findings revealed that compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly decreased and distal latency was prolonged in the nontreated cisplatin-injected rats compared with the control group (P<0.005). Also, nontreated cisplatin-injected rats showed significantly higher TNF-α and MDA levels and lower GSH level than control group. The administration of OT significantly ameliorated the EMG alterations, suppressed oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters, and increased antioxidative capacity. We suggest that oxytocin may have beneficial effects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. The Preventive Effect of Oxytocin to Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity: An Experimental Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Akman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neurotoxicity is a frequent dose-limiting side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. This study was conducted to investigate the preventive effect of oxytocin (OT on cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Forty-four adult female rats were included in the study. Thirty-six rats were administered intraperitoneally (i.p. single dose cisplatin 10 mg/kg and divided in to 3 groups. The first group (n=12 received saline i.p., whereas the second group (n=12 and the third group (n=12 were injected with 80 µg/kg and 160 µg/kg OT, respectively, for 10 days. The remaining 8 rats served as the control group. Electromyography (EMG studies were recorded and blood samples were collected for the measurement of plasma lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde; MDA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and glutathione (GSH levels. EMG findings revealed that compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly decreased and distal latency was prolonged in the nontreated cisplatin-injected rats compared with the control group (P<0.005. Also, nontreated cisplatin-injected rats showed significantly higher TNF-α and MDA levels and lower GSH level than control group. The administration of OT significantly ameliorated the EMG alterations, suppressed oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters, and increased antioxidative capacity. We suggest that oxytocin may have beneficial effects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Neuro-protective effect of rutin against Cisplatin-induced neurotoxic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Mashal M; Alanazi, Wael A; Alshammari, Musaad A; Alotaibi, Moureq Rashed; Alhoshani, Ali R; Al-Rejaie, Salim Salah; Hafez, Mohamed M; Al-Shabanah, Othman A

    2017-09-29

    Cisplatin is widely used chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment with limited uses due to its neurotoxic side effect. The aim of this study was to determine the potential preventive effects of rutin on the brain of cisplatin- neurotoxic rat model. Forty rats were divided into four groups. Group-1 (control group) was intra-peritoneal (IP) injected with 2.5 ml/kg saline. Group-2 (rutin group) was orally administrated 30 mg/kg rutin dissolved in water for 14 days. Group-3 (cisplatin group) was IP received 5 mg/kg cisplatin single dose. Group-4 (rutin and cisplatin group) was orally administrated 30 mg/kg rutin dissolved in water for 14 days with a single dose of 5 mg/kg cisplatin IP on day ten. Brain tissues from frontal cortex was used to extract RNA, the gene expression levels of paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), PON-2, PON-3, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR-δ), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was investigated by Real-time PCR. Cisplatin significantly decreased the expression levels of PON-1, PON-3, PPAR-δ and GPX whereas significantly increased PON-2 expression levels. Co-administration of Rutin prevented the cisplatin-induced toxicity by restoring the alteration in the studied genes to normal values as in the control group. This study showed that Rutin has neuroprotective effect and reduces cisplatin- neurotoxicity with possible mechanism via the antioxidant pathway.

  12. Aluminum-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in grass carp (Cyprinidae--Ctenopharingodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Dávila, María Lourdes; Razo-Estrada, Amparo Celene; García-Medina, Sandra; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Piñón-López, Manuel Jesús; Ibarra, Rocio Guzmán; Galar-Martínez, Marcela

    2012-02-01

    Aluminum is used in a large number of anthropogenic processes, leading to aquatic ecosystems pollution. Diverse studies show that in mammals this metal may produce oxidative stress, is neurotoxic, and is involved in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzhaimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nevertheless, there are only few studies with respect to Al-induced neurotoxicity on aquatic fauna, particularly on fishes of economical interest, such as the grass carp (Ctenopharingodon idella). This study evaluates Al-induced toxicity on the grass carp C. idella. Specimens were exposed to the maximum concentration allowed in order to protect aquatic life (0.1 mg L⁻¹), for 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. After the exposure time, lipid peroxidation degree, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, as well as dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline levels were evaluated. Al concentration in organisms and water was also measured, in order to determine the bioconcentration factor. Results show that Al bioconcentrates in grass carp inducing oxidative stress (increment of 300 and 455 percent on lipid peroxidation degree and SOD activity, and decrement of 49 percent on CAT activity) and neurotoxicity (increment of 55 and 155 percent on dopamine and adrenaline levels and decrement of 93 percent on noradrenaline level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2003-11-01

    The alpha(7)-selective nicotinic partial agonist 3-[2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene]anabaseine (DMXB) was examined for its ability to modulate ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat neurons. Primary cultures of hippocampal neurons were established from Long-Evans, embryonic day (E)-18 rat fetuses and maintained for 7 days. Ethanol (0-150 mM), DMXB (0-56 microM), or both were subsequently co-applied to cultures. Ethanol was added two additional times to the cultures to compensate for evaporation. After 5 days, neuronal viability was assessed with the MTT cell proliferation assay. Results demonstrated that ethanol reduces neuronal viability in a concentration-dependent fashion and that DMXB protects against this ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, also in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results support the suggestion that nicotinic partial agonists may be useful in treating binge drinking-induced neurotoxicity and may provide clues as to why heavy drinkers are usually smokers.

  14. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Amphetamine-Induced Oxidative Damage and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Escubedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphetamine derivatives such as methamphetamine (METH and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy” are widely abused drugs in a recreational context. This has led to concern because of the evidence that they are neurotoxic in animal models and cognitive impairments have been described in heavy abusers. The main targets of these drugs are plasmalemmal and vesicular monoamine transporters, leading to reverse transport and increased monoamine efflux to the synapse. As far as neurotoxicity is concerned, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production seems to be one of the main causes. Recent research has demonstrated that blockade of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR inhibits METH- and MDMA-induced ROS production in striatal synaptosomes which is dependent on calcium and on NO-synthase activation. Moreover, a7 nAChR antagonists (methyllycaconitine and memantine attenuated in vivo the neurotoxicity induced by METH and MDMA, and memantine prevented the cognitive impairment induced by these drugs. Radioligand binding experiments demonstrated that both drugs have affinity to a7 and heteromeric nAChR, with MDMA showing lower Ki values, while fluorescence calcium experiments indicated that MDMA behaves as a partial agonist on a7 and as an antagonist on heteromeric nAChR. Sustained Ca increase led to calpain and caspase-3 activation. In addition, modulatory effects of MDMA on a7 and heteromeric nAChR populations have been found.

  16. Neurotoxic effect of active ingredients in sunscreen products, a contemporary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna A. Ruszkiewicz

    Full Text Available Sunscreen application is the main strategy used to prevent the maladies inflicted by ultraviolet (UV radiation. Despite the continuously increasing frequency of sunscreen use worldwide, the prevalence of certain sun exposure-related pathologies, mainly malignant melanoma, is also on the rise. In the past century, a variety of protective agents against UV exposure have been developed. Physical filters scatter and reflect UV rays and chemical filters absorb those rays. Alongside the evidence for increasing levels of these agents in the environment, which leads to indirect exposure of wildlife and humans, recent studies suggest a toxicological nature for some of these agents. Reviews on the role of these agents in developmental and endocrine impairments (both pathology and related mechanisms are based on both animal and human studies, yet information regarding the potential neurotoxicity of these agents is scant. In this review, data regarding the neurotoxicity of several organic filters: octyl methoxycinnamate, benzophenone-3 and −4, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 3-benzylidene camphor and octocrylene, and two allowed inorganic filters: zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, is presented and discussed. Taken together, this review advocates revisiting the current safety and regulation of specific sunscreens and investing in alternative UV protection technologies. Keywords: Neurotoxicity, Sunscreen, Zinc oxide, Titanium dioxide, Octyl methoxycinnamate, Benzophenone-3, 4-Methylbenzylidene camphor, Octocrylene

  17. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ying [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun, Gui-yuan, E-mail: sungy2004@sohu.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Rui-tian, E-mail: rtliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  18. Mercury-induced motor and sensory neurotoxicity: systematic review of workers currently exposed to mercury vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl A; Borak, Jonathan; Louis, Elan D

    2017-11-01

    The neurotoxicity of elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) is well-recognized, but it is uncertain whether and for how long neurotoxicity persists; among studies that evaluated previously exposed workers, only one examined workers during and also years after exposure ceased. The aim of this review is to document the type, frequency, and dose-relatedness of objective neurological effects in currently exposed mercury workers and thereby provide first approximations of the effects one would have expected in previously exposed workers evaluated during exposure. We systematically reviewed studies of neurotoxicity in currently exposed mercury workers identified by searching MEDLINE (1950-2015), government reports, textbook chapters, and references cited therein; dental cohorts were not included. Outcomes on physical examination (PE), neurobehavioral (NB) tests, and electrophysiological studies were extracted and evaluated for consistency and dose-relatedness. Forty-five eligible studies were identified, comprising over 3000 workers chronically exposed to a range of Hg 0 concentrations (0.002-1.7 mg/m 3 ). Effects that demonstrated consistency across studies and increased frequency across urine mercury levels (200 μg/L, while NB testing is more appropriate for those with lower U Hg levels. They also provide benchmarks to which findings in workers with historical exposure can be compared.

  19. Blood Plasma of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Increases Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD is formation of Lewy bodies in neurons of the brain. This has been attributed to the spread of α-synuclein (α-syn aggregates, which involves release of α-syn from a neuron and its reuptake by a neighboring neuron. We found that treatment with plasma from PD patients induced more α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization than plasma from normal subjects (NS. Compared with NS plasma, PD plasma added to primary neuron cultures caused more cell death in the presence of extracellular α-syn. This was supported by the observations that phosphorylated α-syn oligomers entered neurons, rapidly increased accumulated thioflavin S-positive inclusions, and induced a series of metabolic changes that included activation of polo-like kinase 2, inhibition of glucocerebrosidase and protein phosphatase 2A, and reduction of ceramide levels, all of which have been shown to promote α-syn phosphorylation and aggregation. We also analyzed neurotoxicity of α-syn oligomers relative to plasma from different patients. Neurotoxicity was not related to age or gender of the patients. However, neurotoxicity was positively correlated with H&Y staging score. The modification in the plasma may promote spreading of α-syn aggregates via an alternative pathway and accelerate progression of PD.

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates human astrocyte neurotoxicity induced by interferon-γ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashioka Sadayuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Increasing evidence shows that the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. It is tempting to evaluate the potential of SAHA as a therapeutic agent in various neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Methods We examined the effects of SAHA on interferon (IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes and on IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 in human astrocytes. We also studied the effects of SAHA on the astrocytic production of two representative IFN-γ-inducible inflammatory molecules, namely IFN-γ-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Results SAHA significantly attenuated the toxicity of astrocytes activated by IFN-γ towards SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells. In the IFN-γ-activated astrocytes, SAHA reduced the STAT3 phosphorylation. SAHA also inhibited the IFN-γ-induced astrocytic production of I-TAC, but not ICAM-1. These results indicate that SAHA suppresses IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Conclusion Due to its anti-neurotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties, SAHA appears to have the therapeutic or preventive potential for a wide range of neuroinflammatory disorders associated with activated astrocytes.

  1. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A J; Agraz, D; Ahmad, I M; Zimmerman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity.

  2. Neurotoxicity in long-term survivors of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.S.; Umsawasdi, T.; Lee, Y.Y.; Barkley, H.T. Jr.; Murphy, W.K.; Welch, S.; Valdivieso, M.

    1986-01-01

    Chronic central nervous system neurotoxicity was studied in 38 long-term survivors (greater than or equal to 3 years) of small cell lung cancer who were treated at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1971 and 1980. All but one patient received combination chemotherapy with or without chest irradiation. Twenty-four patients received whole brain irradiation (Group I), 22 for elective and two for therapeutic purposes, while 14 did not (Group II). Abnormalities in computed tomographic (CT) scans of the brain were more frequently observed in Group I than in Group II (70% vs. 0%, p less than 0.01). Clinical central nervous system neurotoxicity developed in three patients in Group I, while none developed in patients in Group II (p less than 0.05). Patients who received methotrexate and procarbazine after whole brain irradiation were at a higher risk for clinical central nervous system neurotoxicity (p less than 0.05), and for development of periventricular white matter changes in CT brain scans (p less than 0.05) than were patients in Group II. Impaired methylation of the myelin sheath is proposed as a possible underlying pathogenic mechanism

  3. Dimensional reduction for conformal blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs

    2016-09-01

    We consider the dimensional reduction of a CFT, breaking multiplets of the d-dimensional conformal group SO( d + 1 , 1) up into multiplets of SO( d, 1). This leads to an expansion of d-dimensional conformal blocks in terms of blocks in d - 1 dimensions. In particular, we obtain a formula for 3 d conformal blocks as an infinite sum over 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions with closed-form coefficients.

  4. Learning Potentials in Number Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Misfeldt, Morten; Nielsen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    . The tool is called Number Blocks and it combines physical interaction, learning, and immediate feedback. Number Blocks supports the children's understanding of place value in the sense that it allows them to experiment with creating large numbers. We found the blocks contributed to the learning process...... in several ways. The blocks combined mathematics and play, and they included and supported children at different academic levels. The auditory representation, especially the enhanced rhythmic effects due to using speech synthesis, and the rhythm helped the children to pronounce large numbers. This creates...

  5. Common blocks for ASQS(12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Milazzo

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available An ASQS(v is a particular Steiner system featuring a set of v vertices and two separate families of blocks, B and G, whose elements have a respective cardinality of 4 and 6. It has the property that any three vertices of X belong either to a B-block or to a G-block. The parameter cb is the number of common blocks in two separate ASQSs, both defined on the same set of vertices X . In this paper it is shown that cb ≤ 29 for any pair of ASQSs(12.

  6. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN) SANCTIONS... name of the Taliban or persons whose property or interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 545.201, or in which the Taliban or persons whose property or interests in property are blocked pursuant...

  7. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  8. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.). IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v.) prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical) given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. PMID:22114930

  9. Endothelial Activation and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Neurotoxicity after Adoptive Immunotherapy with CD19 CAR-T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Juliane; Hay, Kevin A; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Li, Daniel; Myerson, David; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Yeung, Cecilia; Liles, W Conrad; Wurfel, Mark; Lopez, Jose A; Chen, Junmei; Chung, Dominic; Harju-Baker, Susanna; Özpolat, Tahsin; Fink, Kathleen R; Riddell, Stanley R; Maloney, David G; Turtle, Cameron J

    2017-12-01

    Lymphodepletion chemotherapy followed by infusion of CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells can be complicated by neurologic adverse events (AE) in patients with refractory B-cell malignancies. In 133 adults treated with CD19 CAR-T cells, we found that acute lymphoblastic leukemia, high CD19 + cells in bone marrow, high CAR-T cell dose, cytokine release syndrome, and preexisting neurologic comorbidities were associated with increased risk of neurologic AEs. Patients with severe neurotoxicity demonstrated evidence of endothelial activation, including disseminated intravascular coagulation, capillary leak, and increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The permeable BBB failed to protect the cerebrospinal fluid from high concentrations of systemic cytokines, including IFNγ, which induced brain vascular pericyte stress and their secretion of endothelium-activating cytokines. Endothelial activation and multifocal vascular disruption were found in the brain of a patient with fatal neurotoxicity. Biomarkers of endothelial activation were higher before treatment in patients who subsequently developed grade ≥4 neurotoxicity. Significance: We provide a detailed clinical, radiologic, and pathologic characterization of neurotoxicity after CD19 CAR-T cells, and identify risk factors for neurotoxicity. We show endothelial dysfunction and increased BBB permeability in neurotoxicity and find that patients with evidence of endothelial activation before lymphodepletion may be at increased risk of neurotoxicity. Cancer Discov; 7(12); 1404-19. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Mackall and Miklos, p. 1371 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1355 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  11. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong [Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University,Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-30

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  12. Four-block beam collimator

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows a four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with the secondary beams, the collimators operated in vacuum conditions. The blocks were made of steel and had a standard length of 1 m. The maximum aperture had a square coss-section of 144 cm2. (See Annual Report 1976.)

  13. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  14. Writing Blocks and Tacit Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A review of the literature on writing block looks at two kinds: inability to write in a timely, fluent fashion, and reluctance by academicians to assist others in writing. Obstacles to fluent writing are outlined, four historical trends in treating blocks are discussed, and implications are examined. (MSE)

  15. Block storage subsystem performance analysis

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    You feel that your service is slow because of the storage subsystem? But there are too many abstraction layers between your software and the raw block device for you to debug all this pile... Let's dive on the platters and check out how the block storage sees your I/Os! We can even figure out what those patterns are meaning.

  16. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  17. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  18. iTRAQ proteomics analysis reveals that PI3K is highly associated with bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhongjie; Yu, Xujiao; Lai, Luying; Li, Haobo; Liu, Zipeng; Li, Le; Jiang, Shan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Bupivacaine, a commonly used local anesthetic, has potential neurotoxicity through diverse signaling pathways. However, the key mechanism of bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Cultured human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated (bupivacaine) or untreated (control) with bupivacaine for 24 h. Compared to the control group, bupivacaine significantly increased cyto-inhibition, cellular reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, mitochondrial injury, apoptosis (increased TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase 3, and Bcl-2/Bax), and activated autophagy (enhanced LC3II/LC3I ratio). To explore changes in protein expression and intercommunication among the pathways involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, an 8-plex iTRAQ proteomic technique and bioinformatics analysis were performed. Compared to the control group, 241 differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, 145 were up-regulated and 96 were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis of the cross-talk between the significant proteins with altered expression in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity indicated that phosphatidyl-3-kinase (PI3K) was the most frequently targeted protein in each of the interactions. We further confirmed these results by determining the downstream targets of the identified signaling pathways (PI3K, Akt, FoxO1, Erk, and JNK). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that PI3K may play a central role in contacting and regulating the signaling pathways that contribute to bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. α7 nicotinic receptor agonism mitigates phencyclidine-induced changes in synaptophysin and Arc gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration in mice reproduces several histopathological features of schizophrenia, such as reduced synaptophysin and parvalbumin mRNA expression in the frontal cortex. These changes can be prevented by co-administering the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (n......AChR) agonist SSR180711 with PCP, but it is not known to what extent PCP-induced changes can be normalized once they have already occurred. Here we use semi-quantitative in situ hybridization to show that repeated administration of SSR180711 (3 mg/kg b.i.d. for 5 days) subsequent to repeated PCP administration......-induced increase in Arc mRNA expression in the same regions. In contrast, subsequent administration of SSR180711 does not affect PCP-induced decreases in parvalbumin mRNA in the mPFC, and glutamate decarboxylase 67 mRNA in the mPFC or VLO. These data demonstrate that it is possible to restore some, but not all...

  20. a7 nicotinic receptor agonism mitigates phencyclidine-induced changes in synaptophysin and Arc gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration in mice reproduces several histopathological features of schizophrenia, such as reduced synaptophysin and parvalbumin mRNA expression in the frontal cortex. These changes can be prevented by co-administering the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (n......AChR) agonist SSR180711 with PCP, but it is not known to what extent PCP-induced changes can be normalized once they have already occurred. Here we use semi-quantitative in situ hybridization to show that repeated administration of SSR180711 (3 mg/kg b.i.d. for 5 days) subsequent to repeated PCP administration......-induced increase in Arc mRNA expression in the same regions. In contrast, subsequent administration of SSR180711 does not affect PCP-induced decreases in parvalbumin mRNA in the mPFC, and glutamate decarboxylase 67 mRNA in the mPFC or VLO. These data demonstrate that it is possible to restore some, but not all...

  1. Decrease in parvalbumin-expressing neurons in the hippocampus and increased phencyclidine-induced locomotor activity in the rat methylazoxymethanol (MAM) model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penschuck, Silke; Flagstad, Peter; Didriksen, Michael; Leist, Marcel; Michael-Titus, Adina T

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of rats with methylazoxymethanol (MAM) on gestational day (GD)17 disrupts corticolimbic development in the offspring (MAM-GD17 rats) and leads to abnormalities in adult MAM-GD17 rats resembling those described in schizophrenic patients. The underlying changes in specific cortical and limbic cell populations remain to be characterised. In schizophrenia, decreases in inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing interneurons that express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin have been reported in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. In this study we analysed the expression of parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and calbindin (CB) in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of MAM-GD17 rats. Exposure in utero to MAM led to a significant decrease in the number of neurons expressing PV in the hippocampus, but not the prefrontal cortex. Neurons expressing CR or CB were not affected in either structure. The neurochemical changes in MAM-GD17 rats were accompagnied by increased hyperlocomotion after administration of phencyclidine (PCP), analogous to the hypersensitivity of schizophrenic patients to PCP. Therefore, the developmental MAM-GD17 model reproduces key neurochemical and behavioural features that reflect cortical and subcortical dysfunction in schizophrenia, and could be a useful tool in the development of new antipsychotic drugs.

  2. a7 nicotinic receptor agonism mitigates phencyclidine-induced changes in synaptophysin and Arc gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    (10 mg/kg/day for 10 days) is able to mitigate the reduction of synaptophysin mRNA expression induced by PCP in two prefrontal cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventrolateral orbitofrontal cortex (VLO). This effect is accompanied by a normalization of the PCP......Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration in mice reproduces several histopathological features of schizophrenia, such as reduced synaptophysin and parvalbumin mRNA expression in the frontal cortex. These changes can be prevented by co-administering the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (n...... of synaptophysin and/or Arc levels in the frontal cortex. These data lend support to the potential for development of a7 nAChR agonists for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia....

  3. Dietary Intake of Sulforaphane-Rich Broccoli Sprout Extracts during Juvenile and Adolescence Can Prevent Phencyclidine-Induced Cognitive Deficits at Adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Shirai

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play a role in cognitive impairment, which is a core symptom of schizophrenia. Furthermore, a hallmark of the pathophysiology of this disease is the dysfunction of cortical inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV, which is also involved in cognitive impairment. Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate derived from broccoli, is a potent activator of the transcription factor Nrf2, which plays a central role in the inducible expressions of many cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. Keap1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the regulation of Nrf2 activity. Here, we found that pretreatment with SFN attenuated cognitive deficits, the increase in 8-oxo-dG-positive cells, and the decrease in PV-positive cells in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus after repeated administration of phencyclidine (PCP. Furthermore, PCP-induced cognitive deficits were improved by the subsequent subchronic administration of SFN. Interestingly, the dietary intake of glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate precursor of SFN during the juvenile and adolescence prevented the onset of PCP-induced cognitive deficits as well as the increase in 8-oxo-dG-positive cells and the decrease in PV-positive cells in the brain at adulthood. Moreover, the NRF2 gene and the KEAP1 gene had an epistatic effect on cognitive impairment (e.g., working memory and processing speed in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that SFN may have prophylactic and therapeutic effects on cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Therefore, the dietary intake of SFN-rich broccoli sprouts during the juvenile and adolescence may prevent the onset of psychosis at adulthood.

  4. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  5. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand, MS-377 on apomorphine- or phencyclidine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S; Yamauchi, K; Hisatomi, S; Annoh, N; Tanaka, M

    2000-08-25

    To evaluate the antipsychotic property of a sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-¿4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl¿ methyl-2-pyrrolidinone-L-tartrate (MS-377), an antagonistic effect of MS-377 on the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle by apomorphine or phencyclidine (PCP) was investigated in rats. MS-377 antagonized the PCP-induced disruption of PPI. The ED(50) value of MS-377 for this effect was 0.66 mg/kg. In contrast, apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI was not attenuated by MS-377. These data indicate that the PCP-induced disruption of PPI in rats would be, at least partially, mediated by sigma receptors and MS-377 could be a novel anti-psychotic agent with clinical efficacy for the sensorimotor-gating deficit in schizophrenia.

  6. Block by Block: Civic Action in the Battle of Baghdad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    bedding, and latrine facilities. Additionally, provide milk , baby formula, diapers, 7 Bogart: Block by Block and infant/family care items such as...viable agricultural businesses. The cattle are a cross breed of a “regular” Iraqi cow and a water buffalo. Chicken farms are mostly egg farms, and...a problem. Contractors did not want to work for fear of being shot or kid - napped. For example, four contractors were shot over the duration of

  7. A Panel of Autoantibodies Against Neural Proteins as Peripheral Biomarker for Pesticide-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rahman, Heba Allah Abd; Salama, Mohamed; Gad El-Hak, Seham A; El-Harouny, Mona A; ElKafrawy, Passent; Abou-Donia, Mohamed B

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we screened the sera of subjects chronically exposed to mixtures of pesticides (composed mainly of organophosphorus compounds (OPs) and others) and developed neurological symptoms for the presence of autoantibodies against cytoskeletal neural proteins. OPs have a well-characterized clinical profile resulting from acute cholinergic crisis. However, some of these compounds cause neuronal degeneration and demyelination known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) and/or organophosphorus compound-induced chronic neurotoxicity (OPICN). Studies from our group have demonstrated the presence of autoantibodies to essential neuronal and glial proteins against cytoskeletal neural proteins in patients with chemical-induced brain injury. In this study, we screened the serum of 50 pesticide-exposed subjects and 25 non-exposed controls, using Western blot analysis against the following proteins: neurofilament triplet proteins (NFPs), tubulin, microtubule-associated tau proteins (Tau), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium-calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), glial S100-B protein, and alpha-synuclein (SNCA). Serum reactivity was measured as arbitrary chemiluminescence units. As a group, exposed subjects had significantly higher levels of autoantibody reactivity in all cases examined. The folds of increase in of autoantibodies against neural proteins of the subjects compared to healthy humans in descending order were as follows: MBP, 7.67, MAG 5.89, CaMKII 5.50, GFAP 5.1, TAU 4.96, MAP2 4.83, SNCA 4.55, NFP 4.55, S-100B 2.43, and tubulin 1.78. This study has demonstrated the presence of serum autoantibodies to central nervous system-specific proteins in a group of farmers chronically exposed to pesticides who developed neurological signs and symptoms of neural injury. These autoantibodies can be used as future diagnostic

  8. Glutamic acid not beneficial for the prevention of vincristine neurotoxicity in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradfield, Scott M; Sandler, Eric; Geller, Thomas; Tamura, Roy N; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Vincristine causes known side effects of peripheral sensory, motor, autonomic and cranial neuropathies. No preventive interventions are known. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of oral glutamic acid as a preventive agent in pediatric patients with cancer who would be receiving vincristine therapy for at least 9 consecutive weeks (Stratum 1 = Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma) or 4 consecutive weeks in conjunction with steroids (Stratum 2 = Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma). At designated time points, a scored neurologic exam using the Modified Balis Pediatric Scale of Peripheral Neuropathies was performed to document neurologic toxicity. Between 2007 and 2012, 250 patients were enrolled (Stratum 1 = 50, Stratum 2 = 200). The glutamic acid treated group did not have a significantly lower percentage of neurotoxicity compared to placebo treated group either overall or within stratum or age subgroups. The only subgroup which was suggestive of treatment effect was for age. Patients 13 years or older showed a larger benefit in favor of glutamic acid (P = 0.055) compared to patients less than 13 years (P = 1.00). Constipation was the most frequently reported (14%) Grade II or higher neurotoxicity. Vincristine-associated neurotoxicity in pediatric oncology remains a frequent complication of chemotherapy for multiple diagnoses with an approximate 30% of patients affected. Glutamic acid is not effective for prevention in pre-adolescents. There is a suggestion of benefit in patients 13 years or older, but the study was not designed to provide adequate power to test the treatment effect within this age group alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A novel antibody-based biomarker for chronic algal toxin exposure and sub-acute neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Kathi A.; Frame, Elizabeth R.; Gulland, Frances; Hansen, John D.; Kendrick, Preston S.; Beyer, Richard P.; Bammler, Theo K.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hiolski, Emma M.; Smith, Donald R.; Marcinek, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid, domoic acid (DA), is naturally produced by marine phytoplankton and presents a significant threat to the health of marine mammals, seabirds and humans via transfer of the toxin through the foodweb. In humans, acute exposure causes a neurotoxic illness known as amnesic shellfish poisoning characterized by seizures, memory loss, coma and death. Regular monitoring for high DA levels in edible shellfish tissues has been effective in protecting human consumers from acute DA exposure. However, chronic low-level DA exposure remains a concern, particularly in coastal and tribal communities that subsistence harvest shellfish known to contain low levels of the toxin. Domoic acid exposure via consumption of planktivorous fish also has a profound health impact on California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) affecting hundreds of animals yearly. Due to increasing algal toxin exposure threats globally, there is a critical need for reliable diagnostic tests for assessing chronic DA exposure in humans and wildlife. Here we report the discovery of a novel DA-specific antibody response that is a signature of chronic low-level exposure identified initially in a zebrafish exposure model and confirmed in naturally exposed wild sea lions. Additionally, we found that chronic exposure in zebrafish caused increased neurologic sensitivity to DA, revealing that repetitive exposure to DA well below the threshold for acute behavioral toxicity has underlying neurotoxic consequences. The discovery that chronic exposure to low levels of a small, water-soluble single amino acid triggers a detectable antibody response is surprising and has profound implications for the development of diagnostic tests for exposure to other pervasive environmental toxins.

  10. Developmental neurotoxicity of different pesticides in PC-12 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Verena; Rusconi, Manuel; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2017-06-15

    The detection of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) of chemicals has high relevance for protection of human health. However, DNT of many pesticides is only little known. Furthermore, validated in vitro systems for assessment of DNT are not well established. Here we employed the rat phaeochromocytoma cell line PC-12 to evaluate DNT of 18 frequently used pesticides of different classes, including neonicotinoids, pyrethroids, organophosphates, organochlorines, as well as quaternary ammonium compounds, the organic compound used in pesticides, piperonyl butoxide, as well as the insect repellent diethyltoluamide (DEET). We determined the outgrowth of neurites in PC-12 cells co-treated with nerve growth factor and different concentrations of biocides for 5days. Furthermore, we determined transcriptional alterations of selected genes that may be associated with DNT, such as camk2α and camk2β, gap-43, neurofilament-h, tubulin-α and tubulin-β. Strong and dose- dependent inhibition of neurite outgrowth was induced by azamethiphos and chlorpyrifos, and dieldrin and heptachlor, which was correlated with up-regulation of gap-43. No or only weak effects on neurite outgrowth and transcriptional alterations occurred for neonicotinoids acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, the pyrethroids λ-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, and permethrin, the biocidal disinfectants C12-C14-alkyl(ethylbenzyl)dimethylammonium (BAC), benzalkonium chloride and barquat (dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride), and piperonyl butoxide and DEET. Our study confirms potential developmental neurotoxicity of some pesticides and provides first evidence that azamethiphos has the potential to act as a developmental neurotoxic compound. We also demonstrate that inhibition of neurite outgrowth and transcriptional alterations of gap-43 expression correlate, which suggests the employment of gap-43 expression as a biomarker for detection and initial evaluation of potential DNT of chemicals

  11. Feasibility assessment of Micro electrode chip assay (MEA as a method of detecting neurotoxicity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eDefranchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection and characterization of chemically-induced toxic effects in the nervous system represent a challenge for the hazard assessment of chemicals. In vivo, neurotoxicological assessments exploit the fact that the activity of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system has functional consequences. And so far, no in vitro method for evaluating the neurotoxic hazard has yet been validated and accepted for regulatory purpose.The microelectrode array (MEA assay consists of a culture chamber into which an integrated array of microelectrodes is capable of measuring extracellular electrophysiology (spikes and bursts from electro-active tissues. A wide variety of electrically excitable biological tissues may be placed onto the chips including primary cultures of nervous system tissue. Recordings from this type of in vitro cultured system are non invasive, give label free evaluations and provide a higher throughput than conventional electrophysiological techniques. In this paper, twenty substances were tested in a blinded study for their toxicity and dose-response curves were obtained from foetal rat cortical neuronal networks coupled to MEAs. The experimental procedure consisted of evaluating the firing activity (spiking rate and modification/reduction in response to chemical administration. Native/reference activity, 30 minutes of activity recording per dilution, plus the recovery points (after 24 hours were recorded. The preliminary data, using a set of chemicals with different mode-of-actions (13 known to be neurotoxic, 2 non-neuroactive and not toxic and 5 non-neuroactive but toxic show good predictivity (sensitivity: 0.77; specificity: 0.86; accuracy: 0.85. Thus, the MEA with a neuronal network has the potency to become an effective tool to evaluate the neurotoxicity of substances in vitro.

  12. Modulation of experimental herpes encephalitis-associated neurotoxicity through sulforaphane treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Schachtele

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by brain-infiltrating macrophages and neutrophils, as well as resident microglia, are pivotal to pathogen clearance during viral brain infection. However, unchecked free radical generation is also responsible for damage to and cytotoxicity of critical host tissue bystander to primary infection. These unwanted effects of excessive ROS are combated by local cellular production of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1. In this study, we showed that experimental murine herpes encephalitis triggered robust ROS production, as well as an opposing upregulation of the antioxidants HO-1 and Gpx1. This antioxidant response was insufficient to prevent tissue damage, neurotoxicity, and mortality associated with viral brain infection. Previous studies corroborate our data supporting astrocytes as the major antioxidant producer in brain cell cultures exposed to HSV-1 stimulated microglia. We hypothesized that stimulating opposing antioxidative responses in astrocytes, as well as neurons, would mitigate the effects of ROS-mediated neurotoxicity both in vitro and during viral brain infection in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of sulforaphane, a potent stimulator of antioxidant responses, enhanced HO-1 and Gpx1 expression in astrocytes through the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. Additionally, sulforaphane treatment was found to be effective in reducing neurotoxicity associated with HSV-stimulated microglial ROS production. Finally, intraperitoneal injections of sulforaphane into mice during active HSV infection reduced neuroinflammation via a decrease in brain-infiltrating leukocytes, macrophage- and neutrophil-produced ROS, and MHCII-positive, activated microglia. These data support a key role for astrocyte-produced antioxidants in modulating oxidative stress and neuronal damage in response to viral infection.

  13. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [DESY Hamburg, Theory Group,Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sobko, Evgeny [Nordita and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-03-15

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  14. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Sobko, Evgeny [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    2016-12-07

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  15. Remission roles of the herbal formula B401 in mice with manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu CH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hsiang Hsu,1 Sheue-Er Wang,2 Ching-Lung Lin,1 Shuenn-Jyi Sheu,3 Chung-Hsin Wu1 1Department of Life Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei City, 2Department of Pathological Inspection, Saint Paul’s Hospital, Taoyuan City, 3Brion Research Institute of Taiwan, New Taipei City, Taiwan Abstract: Excessive exposure to manganese (Mn, mainly by occupational inhalation, may cause brain and motor defects that are known as manganism. There are a few pharmacological studies aimed at treating the symptoms of manganism. The herbal formula B401 may serve as a new lead in ameliorating Mn-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible protective mechanisms of the herbal formula B401 against Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-two ICR mice were divided into four groups that were administered sham treatment, B401 treatment, Mn treatment, and B401 plus Mn treatment, respectively (n=8 for each group. Rotarod performance was used in these mice to compare their motor coordination. In addition, chemiluminescence analysis was used to examine the reactive oxygen species in their blood. Furthermore, immunostaining and Western blotting techniques were used to examine the expression of dopaminergic receptors, dopamine, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and oxidative stress and apoptosis-related protein markers in their brain tissue. We found that the mice given Mn treatment showed brain and motor defects in comparison to the mice undergoing sham treatment. Immunostaining and Western blotting revealed that the mice given Mn treatment had reduced dopaminergic and BDNF expressions, but enhanced oxidative stress and apoptosis-related protein markers in their brain tissue. While the mice administered B401 plus Mn treatment had significantly improved motor coordination and enhanced dopaminergic and BDNF expressions, they showed reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis-related protein markers in their brain tissue in comparison

  16. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics: needle lesion or neurotoxicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry METHODS: The study included data sets of annual sales of local...... of three of the four drugs in both national registry data and clinical data. These findings indicate that the main cause of injury was neurotoxicity resulting from administration of the local anesthetic rather than the needle penetration. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Clinicians may consider avoiding use of high...

  17. Parkin-deficient mice are not more sensitive to 6-hydroxydopamine or methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiter Richard D

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP is caused by mutations in the parkin gene which encodes an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Parkin is thought to be critical for protecting dopaminergic neurons from toxic insults by targeting misfolded or oxidatively damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation. Surprisingly, mice with targeted deletions of parkin do not recapitulate robust behavioral or pathological signs of parkinsonism. Since Parkin is thought to protect against neurotoxic insults, we hypothesized that the reason Parkin-deficient mice do not develop parkinsonism is because they are not exposed to appropriate environmental triggers. To test this possibility, we challenged Parkin-deficient mice with neurotoxic regimens of either methamphetamine (METH or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. Because Parkin function has been linked to many of the pathways involved in METH and 6-OHDA toxicity, we predicted that Parkin-deficient mice would be more sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of these agents. Results We found no signs consistent with oxidative stress, ubiquitin dysfunction, or degeneration of striatal dopamine neuron terminals in aged Parkin-deficient mice. Moreover, results from behavioral, neurochemical, and immunoblot analyses indicate that Parkin-deficient mice are not more sensitive to dopaminergic neurotoxicity following treatment with METH or 6-OHDA. Conclusion Our results suggest that the absence of a robust parkinsonian phenotype in Parkin-deficient mice is not due to the lack of exposure to environmental triggers with mechanisms of action similar to METH or 6-OHDA. Nevertheless, Parkin-deficient mice could be more sensitive to other neurotoxins, such as rotenone or MPTP, which have different mechanisms of action; therefore, identifying conditions that precipitate parkinsonism specifically in Parkin-deficient mice would increase the utility of this model and could provide insight into the mechanism of AR

  18. cDNA and deduced primary structure of basic phospholipase A2 with neurotoxic activity from the venom secretion of the Crotalus durissus collilineatus rattlesnake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.R. Fagundes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To illustrate the construction of precursor complementary DNAs, we isolated mRNAs from whole venom samples. After reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we amplified the cDNA coding for a neurotoxic protein, phospholipase A2 D49 (PLA2 D49, from the venom of Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc PLA2. The cDNA encoding Cdc PLA2 from whole venom was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA has high overall sequence identity with the group II PLA2 protein family. Cdc PLA2 has 14 cysteine residues capable of forming seven disulfide bonds that characterize this group of PLA2 enzymes. Cdc PLA2 was isolated using conventional Sephadex G75 column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The molecular mass was estimated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We tested the neuromuscular blocking activities on chick biventer cervicis neuromuscular tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of Cdc PLA2 showed the existence of two lines of N6-PLA2, denominated F24 and S24. Apparently, the sequences of the New World’s N6-F24-PLA2 are similar to those of the agkistrodotoxin from the Asian genus Gloydius. The sequences of N6-S24-PLA2 are similar to the sequence of trimucrotoxin from the genus Protobothrops, found in the Old World.

  19. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  20. The wild tapered block bootstrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounyo, Ulrich

    -based method in terms of asymptotic accuracy of variance estimation and distribution approximation. For stationary time series, the asymptotic validity, and the favorable bias properties of the new bootstrap method are shown in two important cases: smooth functions of means, and M-estimators. The first......-order asymptotic validity of the tapered block bootstrap as well as the wild tapered block bootstrap approximation to the actual distribution of the sample mean is also established when data are assumed to satisfy a near epoch dependent condition. The consistency of the bootstrap variance estimator for the sample......In this paper, a new resampling procedure, called the wild tapered block bootstrap, is introduced as a means of calculating standard errors of estimators and constructing confidence regions for parameters based on dependent heterogeneous data. The method consists in tapering each overlapping block...

  1. Recursion Relations for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Penedones, João; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-12

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension $\\Delta$ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in 1307.6856 for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  2. Defying gravity using Jenga™ blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yin-Soo; Yap, Kueh-Chin

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes how Jenga™ blocks can be used to demonstrate the physics of an overhanging tower that appears to defy gravity. We also propose ideas for how this demonstration can be adapted for the A-level physics curriculum.

  3. Arecoline Induces Neurotoxicity to PC12 Cells: Involvement in ER Stress and Disturbance of Endogenous H2S Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jia-Mei; Wang, Li; Gu, Hong-Feng; Wu, Keng; Xiao, Fan; Chen, Ying; Guo, Run-Min; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Arecoline is a major alkaloid of areca nut and has been effect on central nervous system. Although arecoline-induced neurotoxicity has been reported, the possible underlying neurotoxic mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Increasing evidences have shown that both excessive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and disturbance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Here, the purpose of present study was to verify whether ER stress and the disturbance of endogenous H2S generation are also involved in arecoline-caused neurotoxicity. We found that treatment of PC12 cells with arecoline induced the down-regulation of cells viability and up-regulation of apoptosis and the activity of caspase-3, indicating the neurotoxic role of arecoline to PC12 cells. In addition, arecoline also increased the expression of Bax (pro-apoptotic protein) and attenuated the expression of Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic protein) in PC12 cells. Simultaneously, arecoline caused excessive ER stress in PC12 cells, as evidenced by the up-regulations of Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and Cleaved caspase-12 expressions. Notably, the level of H2S in the culture supernatant and the expressions of cystathionine β-synthase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (two major enzymes for endogenous H2S generation in PC12 cells) were also reduced by arecoline treatment. These results indicate that arecoline-caused neurotoxicity to PC12 cells is involved in ER stress and disturbance of endogenous H2S generation and suggest that the modulation of ER stress and endogenous H2S generation may be potential therapeutic approach in treatment of arecoline-caused neurotoxicity.

  4. Effect of crowding, temperature and age on glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Lucia; Simola, Nicola; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Morelli, Micaela

    2016-09-01

    3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"), a recreational drug of abuse, can induce glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Since MDMA is often consumed in crowded environments featuring high temperatures, we studied how these factors influenced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. C57BL/6J adolescent (4 weeks old) and adult (12 weeks old) mice received MDMA (4×20mg/kg) in different conditions: 1) while kept 1, 5, or 10×cage at room temperature (21°C); 2) while kept 5×cage at either room (21°C) or high (27°C) temperature. After the last MDMA administration, immunohistochemistry was performed in the caudate-putamen for CD11b and GFAP, to mark microglia and astroglia, and in the substantia nigra pars compacta for tyrosine hydroxylase, to mark dopaminergic neurons. MDMA induced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, compared with vehicle administration. Crowding (5 or 10 mice×cage) amplified MDMA-induced glia activation (in adult and adolescent mice) and dopaminergic neurotoxicity (in adolescent mice). Conversely, exposure to a high environmental temperature (27°C) potentiated MDMA-induced glia activation in adult and adolescent mice kept 5×cage, but not dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Crowding and exposure to a high environmental temperature amplified MDMA-induced hyperthermia, and a positive correlation between body temperature and activation of either microglia or astroglia was found in adult and adolescent mice. These results provide further evidence that the administration setting influences the noxious effects of MDMA in the mouse brain. However, while crowding amplifies both glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a high environmental temperature exacerbates glia activation only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidation reduces the fibrillation but not the neurotoxicity of the prion peptide PrP106-126

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm, Linda Alice; Chabry, J.; Bastholm, L.

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that soluble oligomers of misfolded protein may play a role in the pathogenesis of protein misfolding diseases including the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) where the protein involved is the prion protein, PrP. The effect of oxidation on fibrillation...... tendency and neurotoxicity of different molecular variants of the prion peptide PrP106-126 was investigated. It was found that methionine oxidation significantly reduced amyloid fibril formation and proteinase K resistance, but it did not reduce (but rather increase slightly) the neurotoxicity...

  6. Neurotoxic Antibodies against the Prion Protein Do Not Trigger Prion Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Frontzek

    Full Text Available Prions are the infectious agents causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE, progressive, inexorably lethal neurological diseases. Antibodies targeting the globular domain (GD of the cellular prion protein PrPC trigger a neurotoxic syndrome morphologically and molecularly similar to prion disease. This phenomenon raises the question whether such antibodies induce infectious prions de novo. Here we exposed cerebellar organotypic cultured slices (COCS to the neurotoxic antibody, POM1. We then inoculated COCS homogenates into tga20 mice, which overexpress PrPC and are commonly utilized as sensitive indicators of prion infectivity. None of the mice inoculated with COCS-derived lysates developed any signs of disease, and all mice survived for at least 200 days post-inoculation. In contrast, all mice inoculated with bona fide prions succumbed to TSE after 55-95 days. Post-mortem analyses did not reveal any signs of prion pathology in mice inoculated with POM1-COCS lysates. Also, lysates from POM1-exposed COCS were unable to convert PrP by quaking. Hence, anti-GD antibodies do not catalyze the generation of prion infectivity. These data indicate that prion replication can be separated from prion toxicity, and suggest that anti-GD antibodies exert toxicity by acting downstream of prion replication.

  7. In vitro neurotoxic effects of 1 GeV/n iron particles assessed in retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M E; Kirk, E

    2000-01-01

    The heavy ion component of the cosmic radiation remains problematic to the assessment of risk in manned space flight. The biological effectiveness of HZE particles has yet to be established, particularly with regard to nervous tissue. Using heavy ions accelerated at the AGS of Brookhaven National Laboratory, we study the neurotoxic effects of iron particles. We exposed retinal explants, taken from chick embryos, to determine the dose response relationships for neurite outgrowth. Morphometric techniques were used to evaluate the in vitro effects of 1 GeV/a iron particles (LET 148 keV/micrometer). Iron particles produced a dose-dependent reduction of neurite outgrowth with a maximal effect achieved with a dose of 100 cGy. Doses as low as 10-50 cGy were able to induce reductions of the neurite outgrowth as compared to the control group. Neurite generation is a more sensitive parameter than neurite elongation, suggesting different mechanism of radiation damage in our model. These results showed that low doses/fluences of iron particles could impair the retinal ganglion cells' capacity to generate neurites indicating the highly neurotoxic capability of this heavy charged particle.

  8. Impairments in timing, temporal memory, and reversal learning linked to neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Etchegaray, Mikel; Meck, Warren H

    2007-12-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication has long-term consequences on dopaminergic function and corticostriatal-mediated behaviors in humans and other animals. In order to determine the potential impact on timing and temporal memory, we examined methamphetamine dose regimens that have been linked to neurotoxicity in adult (8 months) male rats. Rats that were given repetitive, high-dose methamphetamine (3.0 mg/kg ip x 4 injections/2 h) or saline injections were trained on a 2-s vs 8-s bisection procedure using auditory and visual signal durations. Following the high-dose regimen, baseline timing performance was reestablished prior to the rats' receiving reversal training in which the spatial/temporal mapping of the anchor durations (2 s and 8 s) to response options (left or right lever) was reversed. Low-dose methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg ip) or saline injections were subsequently used to evaluate the effectiveness of the neurotoxic doses in terms of modifying the horizontal leftward shifts associated with increases in clock speed. Overall, the results indicate that MAP intoxication leads to reduced auditory/visual differences in clock speed, deficits in reversal learning, distortions in temporal memory, and lowered dopaminergic regulation of clock speed consistent with damage to prefrontal cortex and corticostriatal circuitry.

  9. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Heba M. Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140–145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities.

  10. Developmental neurotoxicity of monocrotophos and lead is linked to thyroid disruption

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    B. Kala Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A role of thyroid disruption in developmental neurotoxicity of monocrotophos (MCP and lead is studied. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 female rats after conception were randomized into four groups of six each and treated as follows: Group I - Sham was administered distilled water orally. Group II - A positive control was administered methyl methimazole at 0.02% orally in drinking water. Group III - MCP orally at 0.3 mg/kg and Group IV - Lead acetate at 0.2% orally in drinking water. The drug was administered from gestation day 3 through post-natal day 21 in all the groups. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, thyroid profile (thyroid stimulating hormone, T3 and T4, neurodevelopment (brain wet weights, DNA, RNA and protein, and neurobehavioral (elevated plus maze, photoactometry, and Morris water maze parameters were assessed in pups. A histopathology of thyroid of dams and brain of progeny was conducted. Results: Inhibition of AChE was <20%. Thyroid profile decreased in the treatment groups. Neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral parameters did not reveal any significant changes. Thyroid architecture was affected significantly with MCP and lead. Cortical layers too were affected. The three layers of cerebellum either had abnormal arrangement or decreased cellularity in all treated groups relating to thyroid disruption. Conclusion: MCP and lead might have affected the development of cerebrum and cerebellum via thyroid disruption leading to developmental neurotoxicity.

  11. Comparison between EEG and observation of rabbit behaviour in evaluation of subarachnoid neurotoxicity of metrizamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maly, P.; Elmqvist, D.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Lund Univ. Hospital; Nyegaard and Co. A/S, Oslo

    1986-01-01

    The non-ionic contrast medium metrizamide (370 mg I/ml) was injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits at 2 dose levels (0.1 ml/kg and 0.5 ml/kg) to investigate whether visually evaluated EEG can detect neutrotoxicity at a lower dose level than a method based on observation and ranking of signs of excitation and depression in animal behaviour. Half of the metrizamide injections were made without anaesthesia, whereas the remaining injections were made during a short alphadolon/alphaxolon anaesthesia. EEG and animal behaviour were followed for 24 h after the injection of metrizamide. At the low 'clinical' dose, EEG could not detect statistically significant neurotoxicity, neither in anaesthetized nor in non-anaesthetized rabbits. Observation of animal behaviour, however, could detect statistically significant signs of depression in animals that had been anaesthetized. At the high dose level, both methods could detect significantly more serious symptoms of neurotoxicity than at the low dose level. (orig.)

  12. Differential protective effects of connective tissue growth factor against Aβ neurotoxicity on neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Ning; Wu, Min-Fang; Liu, Chung-Chih; Jung, Wei-Hung; Chang, Yu-Chin; Lee, Wang-Pao; Shiao, Young-Ji; Wu, Chia-Lin; Liou, Horng-Huei; Lin, Sze-Kwan; Chan, Chih-Chiang

    2017-10-15

    Impaired clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) leads to abnormal extracellular accumulation of this neurotoxic protein that drives neurodegeneration in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression is elevated in plaque-surrounding astrocytes in AD patients. However, the role of CTGF in AD pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we characterized the neuroprotective activity of CTGF. We found that CTGF facilitated Aβ uptake and subsequent degradation within primary glia and neuroblastoma cells. CTGF enhanced extracellular Aβ degradation via membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) in glia and extracellular MMP13 in neurons. In the brain of a Drosophila AD model, glial-expression of CTGF reduced Aβ deposits, improved locomotor function, and rescued memory deficits. Neuroprotective potential of CTGF against Aβ42-induced photoreceptor degeneration was disrupted through silencing MMPs. Therefore, CTGF may represent a node for potential AD therapeutics as it intervenes in glia-neuron communication via specific MMPs to alleviate Aβ neurotoxicity in the central nervous system. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Developmental neurotoxicity: methylmercury and prenatal exposure protection in the context of the Minamata Convention

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    Ana Boischio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a global pollutant of public environmental health concern due to its long-range atmospheric distribution, environmental distribution, and neurotoxic effects. Following biological methylation, methylmercury (MeHg can be un-evenly bioaccumulated within aquatic food chains. Fish consumption can be a significant route of human exposure to MeHg. MeHg exposure in the prenatal stage, at relatively low levels, has recently been established as harmful during neurological development, potentially leading to intellectual disability. The Minamata Convention on Mercury is a global agreement, currently under ratification, to protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury and mercury compounds. The resolution regarding the role of the World Health Organization and ministries of health in the implementation of the Convention includes protection of human health from critical exposures to MeHg. Riverside populations living in areas with artisanal small-scale gold mining, and relying heavily on fish consumption, have been identified as the most vulnerable population in terms of MeHg exposure and developmental neurotoxicity. This article focuses on the proper design and dissemination of fish advisories within the context of implementation of the Convention.

  14. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

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    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  15. Protective effects of alpha lipoic acid on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Rezvan; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Hosseini, Asieh

    2015-06-01

    Hyperglycemia plays an important role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) against high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells as a suitable in vitro model for studying neuronal functions. PC12 cells were treated with high glucose (25 mg/ml for 24 h) in the absence and presence of ALA (100 μM for 24 h). The viability of PC12 cells was estimated by using MTT assay. The expression of pro- apoptotic Bax, anti- apoptotic Bcl-2 and caspase 3 protein were evaluated by western blotting. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were determined with 2,7-dichlorodihydro- fluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA). Biochemical markers of oxidative stress were assessed by using the total antioxidant power (TAP), lipid peroxidation (LPO), ADP/ATP ratio, activity of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pretreatment of PC12 cells with ALA, significantly improved high glucose-induced toxicity by increasing activity of antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD in the PC12 cell. It also increased the concentrations of TAP. An elevated level of cell death and ROS in high glucose conditions, diminished with ALA treatment. Over expression of Bax and caspase 3 protein, elevation of ADP/ATP ratio and LPO level in high glucose- treated PC12 cells, were significantly reduced by ALA. It was concluded that ALA attenuates neurotoxicity induced by high glucose in PC12 cells.

  16. Neurotoxic effect of linamarin in rats associated with cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadeneyra-Domínguez, Eduardo; Vázquez-Luna, Alma; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Díaz-Sobac, Rafael

    2013-09-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a plant widely used for food consumption in different processed products in rural areas of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Cassava is a good source of carbohydrates and micronutrients. However, if it is not adequately processed or the consumer has nutritional deficiencies, then its cyanogenic glycoside (i.e., linamarin and lotaustralin) content makes it potentially neurotoxic. In the present study, the neurotoxic effects of different concentrations of linamarin (0.075, 0.15, 0.22, and 0.30 mg/kg) contained in cassava juice were evaluated in the open field and swim tests to identify locomotor alterations in adult male Wistar rats. The linamarin concentration in cassava juice was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the juice was administered intraesophageally for 28 days. The results suggested that the consumption of linamarin in cassava juice increased the number of crossings and rearings in the open field test and caused behavioral deficiency, reflected by lateral swimming, in the swim test on days 21 and 28 of treatment. These alterations are possibly related to neuronal damage caused by linamarin in cassava juice in structures of the central nervous system involved in motor processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroprotective Role of a Novel Copper Chelator against Aβ42 Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Sandeep Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and associated with the extracellular deposits of amyloid-β peptide in hippocampus region. Metal ions like Cu, Fe and Zn are known to associate with the amyloid beta (Aβ at high concentration and interaction of these ions with soluble and aggregated forms of Aβ peptide help in development of AD. Here we showed Cu mediated neurotoxicity in the eye tissues of transgenic Drosophila expressing human amyloid β and its rescue through a novel Cu chelator. In this context, we have synthesised and characterized the compound L 2,6-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-bis[2-[(4-carboxyphenyl methylene] hydrazide] by Mass spectra (MS and Elemental analysis (EA. The Cu chelation potential of the compound L is tested in vivo in Drosophila. Oral administration of Copper to the transgenic larvae resulted in severe degeneration in eye tissues, which was rescued by the supplementation of compound L. The levels of anti-oxidant markers like SOD and MDA were measured in compound L treated flies and found a significant rescue (P<0.001. Further rescue of the eye degeneration phenotypes as revealed by SEM affirm the role of copper in Aβ toxicity. Hence, use of compound L, an amidoamine derivative, could be a possible therapeutic measure for Aβ induced neurotoxicity.

  18. Malaria Prevention, Mefloquine Neurotoxicity, Neuropsychiatric Illness, and Risk-Benefit Analysis in the Australian Defence Force

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    Stuart McCarthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Defence Force (ADF has used mefloquine for malaria chemoprophylaxis since 1990. Mefloquine has been found to be a plausible cause of a chronic central nervous system toxicity syndrome and a confounding factor in the diagnosis of existing neuropsychiatric illnesses prevalent in the ADF such as posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Overall health risks appear to have been mitigated by restricting the drug’s use; however serious risks were realised when significant numbers of ADF personnel were subjected to clinical trials involving the drug. The full extent of the exposure, health impacts for affected individuals, and consequences for ADF health management including mental health are not yet known, but mefloquine may have caused or aggravated neuropsychiatric illness in large numbers of patients who were subsequently misdiagnosed and mistreated or otherwise failed to receive proper care. Findings in relation to chronic mefloquine neurotoxicity were foreseeable, but this eventuality appears not to have been considered during risk-benefit analyses. Thorough analysis by the ADF would have identified this long-term risk as well as other qualitative risk factors. Historical exposure of ADF personnel to mefloquine neurotoxicity now also necessitates ongoing risk monitoring and management in the overall context of broader health policies.

  19. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  20. Protective effect of arctigenin against MPP+ and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongwei; Liu, Qingping; Jia, Dong; Dou, Deqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Kang, Tingguo

    2014-01-01

    The potential protective effects of arctigenin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyride-induced neurotoxicity were examined, and the results indicated that arctigenin could improve the movement behaviors and upregulate dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid levels in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyride-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. A further in vitro experiment showed that the pretreatment with arctigenin on cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells could obviously attenuate the decrease of cell survival rates caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion by way of acting against cell apoptosis through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3, and by antioxidative action through reduction of the surplus reactive oxygen species production and downregulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. It is for the first time that a neuroprotective activity of arctigenin in both in vitro and in vivo experiments was reported, enlightening that arctigenin could be useful as a potential therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Protective effect of arctigenin on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Xiao, Lan; Wei, Jing-Xiang; Shu, Ya-Hai; Fang, Shi-Qi; Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min

    2017-04-01

    As a neurotropic substance, ethanol can damage nerve cells through an increase in the production of free radicals, interference of neurotrophic factor signaling pathways, activation of endogenous apoptotic signals and other molecular mechanisms. Previous studies have revealed that a number of natural drugs extracted from plants offer protection of nerve cells from damage. Among these, arctigenin (ATG) is a lignine extracted from Arctium lappa (L.), which has been found to exert a neuroprotective effect on scopolamine‑induced memory deficits in mice with Alzheimer's disease and glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary neurons. As a result, it may offer beneficial effects on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. However, the effects of ATG on ethanol‑induced nerve damage remain to be elucidated. To address this issue, the present study used rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ATG on ethanol-induced cell damage by performing an MTT reduction assay, cell cycle analysis, Hoechst33342/propidium iodide fluorescence staining and flow cytometry to examine apoptosis. The results showed that 10 µM ATG effectively promoted the proliferation of damaged cells, and increased the distribution ratio of the cells at the G2/M and S phases (P<0.05). In addition, the apoptosis and necrosis of the PC12 cells were significantly decreased following treatment with ATG. Therefore, it was concluded that 10 µM ATG had a protective effect on ethanol‑induced injury in PC12 cells.

  2. Assessment of the cerebellar neurotoxic effects of nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Majrashi, Mohammed; Ramesh, Sindhu; Govindarajulu, Manoj; Bloemer, Jenna; Fujihashi, Ayaka; Crump, Bailee-Ryan; Hightower, Harrison; Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Moore, Timothy; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The adverse effects of prenatal nicotine and alcohol exposure on human reproductive outcomes are a major scientific and public health concern. In the United States, substantial percentage of women (20-25%) of childbearing age currently smoke cigarettes and consume alcohol, and only a small percentage of these individuals quit after learning of their pregnancy. However, there are very few scientific reports on the effect of nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum of the offspring. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the cerebellar neurotoxic effects of nicotine in a rodent model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). In this study, we evaluated the behavioral changes, biochemical markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis, mitochondrial functions and the molecular mechanisms associated with nicotine in prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum. Prenatal nicotine and alcohol exposure induced oxidative stress, did not affect the mitochondrial functions, increased the monoamine oxidase activity, increased caspase expression and decreased ILK, PSD-95 and GLUR1 expression without affecting the GSK-3β. Thus, our current study of prenatal alcohol and nicotine exposure on cerebellar neurotoxicity may lead to new scientific perceptions and novel and suitable therapeutic actions in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Neurotoxic effects of bisphenol AF on calcium-induced ROS and MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Yoo Kyeong; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF), a newly introduced chemical structurally related to bisphenol A, is used extensively in fluoroelastomers and polyesters, and has been known to induce estrogen-dependent responses. However, the toxicity of BPAF is largely unknown except for its endocrine-related effects. In this study, we investigated the neurotoxicity of BPAF and underlying mechanisms of action using hippocampal cell line (HT-22) and mouse primary neuronal cells. We found that BPAF induced apoptosis in both HT-22 and primary neuronal cells. In order to clarify the underlying mechanisms of BPAF-induced apoptosis, various signaling molecules were evaluated. BPAF increased the level of intracellular calcium, followed by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). BPAF upregulated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB. Using specific inhibitors, we confirmed that calcium, ROS, p38, and JNK mediated the BPAF-induced apoptosis. In addition, BPAF inhibited microglial activation in a microglia/neuroblastoma coculture model by the reduction of nitric oxide production. We found that BPAF interrupted the normal physiologic functions of microglia at non-toxic levels. Taken together, our results suggest that BPAF, the substitute of BPA, also have neurotoxic properties.

  4. Ultraviolet photolysis of chlorpyrifos: developmental neurotoxicity modeled in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J; Wu, Changlong; MacKillop, Emiko A; Linden, Karl G

    2009-03-01

    Ultraviolet photodegradation products from pesticides form both in the field and during water treatment. We evaluated the photolytic breakdown of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) in terms of both the chemical entities generated by low-pressure ultraviolet C irradiation and their potential as developmental neurotoxicants. We separated by-products using high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized them by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We assessed neurotoxicity in neuronotypic PC12 cells, both in the undifferentiated state and during differentiation. Photodegradation of CPF in methanol solution generated CPF oxon and trichloropyridinol, products known to retain developmental neurotoxicant actions, as well as a series of related organophosphate and phosphorothionate derivatives. Exposure conditions that led to 50% degradation of CPF thus did not reduce developmental neurotoxicity. The degradation mixture inhibited DNA synthesis in undifferentiated cells to the same extent as native CPF. In differentiating cells, the products likewise retained the full ability to elicit shortfalls in cell number and corresponding effects on cell growth and neurite formation. When the exposure was prolonged to the point where 70% of the CPF was degraded, the adverse effects on PC12 cells were no longer evident; however, these conditions were sufficiently severe to generate toxic products from the methanol vehicle. Our results indicate that field conditions or remediation treatments that degrade a significant proportion of the CPF do not necessarily produce inactive products and, indeed, may elicit formation of even more toxic chemicals that are more water soluble and thus have greater field mobility than CPF itself.

  5. Exercise does not protect against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in BDNF haploinsufficient mice.

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    Kim M Gerecke

    Full Text Available Exercise has been demonstrated to potently protect substantia nigra pars compacta (SN dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. One mechanism proposed to account for this neuroprotection is the upregulation of neurotrophic factors. Several neurotrophic factors, including Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, have been shown to upregulate in response to exercise. In order to determine if exercise-induced neuroprotection is dependent upon BDNF, we compared the neuroprotective effects of voluntary exercise in mice heterozygous for the BDNF gene (BDNF+/- with strain-matched wild-type (WT mice. Stereological estimates of SNpc DA neurons from WT mice allowed 90 days exercise via unrestricted running demonstrated complete protection against the MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. However, BDNF+/- mice allowed 90 days of unrestricted exercise were not protected from MPTP-induced SNpc DA neuron loss. Proteomic analysis comparing SN and striatum from 90 day exercised WT and BDNF+/- mice showed differential expression of proteins related to energy regulation, intracellular signaling and trafficking. These results suggest that a full genetic complement of BDNF is critical for the exercise-induced neuroprotection of SNpc DA neurons.

  6. Neuroprotective role of Convolvulus pluricaulis on aluminium induced neurotoxicity in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihaqi, Syed Waseem; Sharma, Meenakshi; Singh, Avninder Pal; Tiwari, Manisha

    2009-07-30

    Convolvulus pluricaulis (Convolvulaceae) has long been used as traditional herbal medicine in India as nerve tonic. We investigated neuroprotective effects of aqueous extract from Convolvulus pluricaulis (CP) against aluminium chloride induced neurotoxicity in rat cerebral cortex. Daily administration of CP (150 mg/kg) for 3 months along with aluminium chloride (50 mg/kg) decreased the elevated enzymatic activity of acetylcholine esterase and also inhibited the decline in Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity which resulted from aluminium intake. Beside, preventing accumulation of lipid and protein damage, changes in the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes associated with aluminium administration were also rectified. Oral administration of CP preserved the mRNA levels of muscarinic receptor 1 (M1 receptor), choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) and Nerve Growth Factor-Tyrosine kinase A receptor (NGF-TrkA). It also ameliorated the upregulated protein expression of cyclin dependent kinase5 (Cdk5) induced by aluminium. The potential of CPE to inhibit aluminium induced toxicity was compared with rivastigmine tartrate (1mg/kg), which was taken as standard. The potential of the extract to prevent aluminium-induced neurotoxicity was also reflected at the microscopic level, indicative of its neuroprotective effects. Convolvulus pluricaulis possesses neuroprotective potential, thus validating its use in alleviating toxic effects of aluminium.

  7. Developmental neurotoxicity of organophosphate flame retardants in early life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liwei; Tan, Hana; Peng, Tao; Wang, Sisi; Xu, Wenbin; Qian, Haifeng; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-12-01

    Because brominated flame retardants are being banned or phased out worldwide, organophosphate flame retardants have been used as alternatives on a large scale and have thus become ubiquitous environmental contaminants; this raises great concerns about their environmental health risk and toxicity. Considering that previous research has identified the nervous system as a sensitive target, Japanese medaka were used as an aquatic organism model to evaluate the developmental neurotoxicity of 4 organophosphate flame retardants: triphenyl phosphate, tri-n-butyl phosphate, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP). The embryo toxicity test showed that organophosphate flame retardant exposure could decrease hatchability, delay time to hatching, increase the occurrence of malformations, reduce body length, and slow heart rate. Regarding locomotor behavior, exposure to the tested organophosphate flame retardants (except TCEP) for 96 h resulted in hypoactivity for medaka larvae in both the free-swimming and the dark-to-light photoperiod stimulation test. Changes of acetylcholinesterase activity and transcriptional responses of genes related to the nervous system likely provide a reasonable explanation for the neurobehavioral disruption. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrates the developmental neurotoxicity of various organophosphate flame retardants with very different potency and contribute to the determination of which organophosphate flame retardants are appropriate substitutes, as well as the consideration of whether regulations are reasonable and required. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2931-2940. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Linalool as a neuroprotective agent against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, Soghra; Meshki, Mohammad Ali; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a water-soluble monomer which has broad application in different industries and also can form in food during heating process. This monomer is a potent neurotoxic and damages the central and the peripheral nervous system in human and animals. Oxidative stress has been mentioned as an important pathway in ACR neurotoxicity, therefore the purpose of the current study was evaluation of possible effects of linalool which is a naturally enantiomer monoterpene compound. Linalool has shown antioxidant properties in several studies. Male Wistar rats were treated with ACR (50 mg/kg ip) alone or with linalool (12.5, 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg ip) for 11 days. In another 2 groups rats were treated with linalool (12.5 mg/kg ip) 3 days after and before ACR administration. Then behavior index (gait score) was examined for rats. After that, rats were sacrified and molondialdehyde (MDA) as a marker of lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) content were determined in brain tissue. Exposure to ACR led to severe gait abnormalities and treatment with linalool significantly reduced abnormalities. ACR reduced GSH content and increased level of MDA in cerebral cortex. Linalool increased GSH content while decreased ACR-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain tissue and the best protocols were initiation of supplementation before or simultaneous with ACR administration.

  9. Developmental Neurotoxicity of Traffic-Related Air Pollution: Focus on Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lucio G; Chang, Yu-Chi; Cole, Toby B

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that air pollution may negatively affect the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to CNS diseases. Traffic-related air pollution is a major contributor to global air pollution, and diesel exhaust (DE) is its most important component. Several studies suggest that young individuals may be particularly susceptible to air pollution-induced neurotoxicity and that perinatal exposure may cause or contribute to developmental disabilities and behavioral abnormalities. In particular, a number of recent studies have found associations between exposures to traffic-related air pollution and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which are characterized by impairment in socialization and in communication and by the presence of repetitive and unusual behaviors. The cause(s) of ASD are unknown, and while it may have a hereditary component, environmental factors are increasingly suspected as playing a pivotal role in its etiology, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. Autistic children present higher levels of neuroinflammation and systemic inflammation, which are also hallmarks of exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Gene-environment interactions may play a relevant role in determining individual susceptibility to air pollution developmental neurotoxicity. Given the worldwide presence of elevated air pollution, studies on its effects and mechanisms on the developing brain, genetic susceptibility, role in neurodevelopmental disorders, and possible therapeutic interventions are certainly warranted.

  10. Optimal dose of zinc supplementation for preventing aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Hu, Jianyang; Li, Jing; Pang, Wei; Hu, Yandan; Yang, Hongpeng; Li, Wenjie; Huang, Chengyu; Zhang, Mingman; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-10-15

    Zinc supplementation can help maintain learning and memory function in rodents. In this study, we hypothesized that zinc supplementation could antagonize the neurotoxicity induced by aluminum in rats. Animals were fed a diet containing different doses of zinc (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) for 9 weeks, and orally administered aluminum chloride (300 mg/kg daily) from the third week for 7 consecutive weeks. Open-field behavioral test results showed that the number of rearings in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement was significantly increased compared with the group given the 50 mg/kg zinc supplement. Malondialdehyde content in the cerebrum was significantly decreased, while dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels were increased in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc, compared with the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc. The acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrum was significantly decreased in the group given the 100 mg/kg zinc supplement. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed evident pathological damage in the hippocampus of rats in the group given the diet supplemented with 50 mg/kg zinc, but the damage was attenuated in the groups given the diet supplemented with 100 and 200 mg/kg zinc. Our findings suggest that zinc is a potential neuroprotective agent against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats, and the optimal dosages are 100 and 200 mg/kg.

  11. Antioxidant potential properties of mushroom extract (Agaricus bisporus) against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Guizani, Nejib

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an environmental toxin that induces oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Mushroom cultivar extract (MCE) acted as a potent antioxidant agent and protects against cellular oxidative stress in human cultured neuronal cells. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MCE against Al-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 rats per group), control group, MCE-fed group, Al-administered group and MCE/Al-treated group. Animals were continuously fed ad-libitum their specific diets for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiment, all rats were sacrificed and the brain tissues were homogenized and examined for biochemical measurements of neurocellular oxidative stress indices [glutathione (GSH), Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes and oxidized dichlorofluorescein (DCF)]. Al-administration caused inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and a significant decrease in GSH and TAC levels, meanwhile it positively increased cellular oxidized DCF level, as well as Al concentration in brain tissues. Feeding animals with MCE had completely offset the Al-induced oxidative stress and significantly restrict the Al accumulation in brain tissues of Al-administered rats. The results obtained suggest that MCE acted as a potent dietary antioxidant and protects against Al-mediated neurotoxicity, by abrogating neuronal oxidative stress.

  12. Target size of neurotoxic esterase and acetylcholinesterase as determined by radiation inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, C D; Fluke, D J; Abou-Donia, M B

    1985-11-01

    The target size of neurotoxic esterase (NTE), the putative target site for the initiation of organophosphorus-compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from hen brain were examined by determining the rate at which the activities of the esterases were destroyed by ionizing irradiation. Samples of hen brain were prepared by slowly drying a microsomal preparation under vacuum. The dried samples were then irradiated with electrons from a 1 MeV Van de Graaff generator. The doses ranged from 0 to 28 Mrad. The radiation doses were calibrated by the rate of inactivation of T1-bacteriophage plaque induction. Following the irradiation procedure, the samples were resuspended in buffer and enzymic activity was measured. The target size of NTE from hen brain was determined to be about 105 kDa, whereas hen brain AChE was found to have a target size of about 53 kDa. The target size of NTE was found to be similar in experiments with rat brain and cat brain. In addition, commercial preparations of electric-eel electric-organ AChE and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase were found to have target sizes that were identical with each other, and also were very similar to that of AChE from hen brain.

  13. Influence of the green tea leaf extract on neurotoxicity of aluminium chloride in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenković, Ankica; Jovanović, Marina D; Stevanović, Ivana; Petronijević, Nataša; Bokonjić, Dubravko; Zivković, Jelena; Igić, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium may have an important role in the aetiology/pathogenesis/precipitation of Alzheimer's disease. Because green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) reportedly has health-promoting effects in the central nervous system, we evaluated the effects of green tea leaf extract (GTLE) on aluminium chloride (AlCl3 ) neurotoxicity in rats. All solutions were injected into the cornu ammonis region 1 hippocampal region. We measured the performance of active avoidance (AA) tasks, various enzyme activities and total glutathione content (TGC) in the forebrain cortex (FbC), striatum, basal forebrain (BFb), hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum. AlCl3 markedly reduced AA performance and activities of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in all regions. It decreased TGC in the FbC, striatum, BFb, hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum, and increased superoxide dismutase activity in the FbC, cerebellum and BFb. GTLE pretreatment completely reversed the damaging effects of AlCl3 on AA and superoxide dismutase activity, markedly corrected COX and AChE activities, and moderately improved TGC. GTLE alone increased COX and AChE activities in almost all regions. GTLE reduces AlCl3 neurotoxicity probably via antioxidative effects and improves mitochondrial and cholinergic synaptic functions through the actions of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and (-)-epicatechin, compounds most abundantly found in GTLE. Our results suggest that green tea might be beneficial in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of Allium cepa L. in aluminium chloride induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanveer; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The present study was envisaged to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Allium cepa (A. cepa) in aluminium chloride induced neurotoxicity. Aluminium chloride (50 mg/kg/day) was administered orally in mice supplemented with different doses of A. cepa hydroethanolic extract for a period of 60 days. Various behavioural, biochemical and histopathological parameters were estimated in aluminium exposed animals. Chronic aluminium administration resulted in significant motor incoordination and memory deficits, which were also endorsed biochemically as there was increased oxidative stress as well as elevated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and aluminium levels in the brain. Supplementation with A. cepa in aluminium exposed animals significantly improved muscle coordination and memory deficits as well as reduced oxidative stress, AChE and decreased abnormal aluminium deposition in the brain. Histopathologically, there was marked deterioration visualized as decreased vacuolated cytoplasm as well as decreased pyramidal cells in the hippocampal area of mice brain which were found to be reversed with A. cepa supplementation. Administration of BADGE (PPARγ antagonist) in aluminium exposed animals reversed the neuroprotective potential of A. cepa as assessed with various behavioural, biochemical, neurochemical and histopathological estimations. In conclusion, finding of this study suggested significant neuroprotective potential of A. cepa in aluminium induced neurotoxicity. Further, the role of PPARγ receptor agonism has also been suggested as a putative neuroprotective mechanism of A. cepa, which needs further studies for confirmation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxaliplatin-induced lhermitte's phenomenon as a manifestation of severe generalized neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna B; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Krishnan, Arun V; Goldstein, David; Friedlander, Michael L; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Lhermitte's phenomenon, characterized by 'electric-shock' sensations precipitated by neck flexion, may develop during oxaliplatin treatment. Limited cases have been described previously and the pathophysiology underlying Lhermitte's phenomenon in oxaliplatin-treated patients has not been established. Patients who developed Lhermitte's phenomenon during oxaliplatin therapy were investigated by neurological examination, neurotoxicity grading and conventional nerve conduction studies (NCS). Structural (magnetic resonance imaging) and functional (somatosensory evoked potentials) spinal assessment was also undertaken. Sensory nerve excitability recordings were performed longitudinally across treatment to investigate ion channel function. Five oxaliplatin-treated patients reported Lhermitte's phenomenon, with a mean cumulative dose of 861 +/- 84 mg/m(2) oxaliplatin (range 574-1,100 mg/m(2)). NCS revealed severe sensory neuropathy in all patients. There was no evidence of structural or functional spinal cord damage. Nerve excitability studies revealed progressive alterations in sensory excitability throughout treatment, consistent with oxaliplatin-induced nerve dysfunction. In patients with Lhermitte's phenomenon, refractoriness was reduced to -14.4% (confidence interval, CI: -20.5 to -8.4%) by late treatment, a significantly greater reduction than in oxaliplatin-treated patients who did not develop Lhermitte's phenomenon (-2.7%; CI: -7.6 to 2.2; p = 0.013). Lhermitte's phenomenon represents a severe presentation of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, associated with generalized nerve dysfunction in the absence of structural spinal abnormalities. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The influence of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity on psychological distress and sleep disturbance in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J S; Tian, J; Wu, L H

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (cipn) on psychological distress and sleep quality in cancer patients. A total of 706 cancer patients were interviewed for the study. In the 4th week of treatment, patient cipn was measured using the Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (pnq). The sleep quality and psychological distress of patients were measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (psqi), the Distress Thermometer (dt), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (hads). Multiple logistic regression was applied to determine the independent effects of cipn on psychological distress and sleep disturbance in the patients. THESE CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS WERE OBTAINED: 0.387 (p sleep quality in the five pnq grades were statistically significantly different (p grades were found to be associated with depression (p sleep quality (p sleep quality in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. High pnq grades were significantly associated with poor psychological status and sleep quality. Our results emphasize the importance of assessing peripheral neuropathies during chemotherapy and of adjusting treatment plans based on assessment results.

  17. Neurotoxic effect of active ingredients in sunscreen products, a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna A; Pinkas, Adi; Ferrer, Beatriz; Peres, Tanara V; Tsatsakis, Aristides; Aschner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sunscreen application is the main strategy used to prevent the maladies inflicted by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Despite the continuously increasing frequency of sunscreen use worldwide, the prevalence of certain sun exposure-related pathologies, mainly malignant melanoma, is also on the rise. In the past century, a variety of protective agents against UV exposure have been developed. Physical filters scatter and reflect UV rays and chemical filters absorb those rays. Alongside the evidence for increasing levels of these agents in the environment, which leads to indirect exposure of wildlife and humans, recent studies suggest a toxicological nature for some of these agents. Reviews on the role of these agents in developmental and endocrine impairments (both pathology and related mechanisms) are based on both animal and human studies, yet information regarding the potential neurotoxicity of these agents is scant. In this review, data regarding the neurotoxicity of several organic filters: octyl methoxycinnamate, benzophenone-3 and -4, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 3-benzylidene camphor and octocrylene, and two allowed inorganic filters: zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, is presented and discussed. Taken together, this review advocates revisiting the current safety and regulation of specific sunscreens and investing in alternative UV protection technologies.

  18. Short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic to the immature brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the long-term use of antiepileptic drugs can cause nervous system damage. However, short-term antiepileptic drug treatment is frequently given to infants, especially neonates, to control seizure. Whether the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs is neurotoxic remains unclear. In the present study, immature rats, 3-21 days of age, were intraperitoneally injected with phenobarbital and/or topiramate for 3 consecutive days. Hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining revealed that phenobarbital and topiramate, individually or in combination, were cytotoxic to hippocampal CA1 neurons and inhibited the expression of GluR1 and NR2B, excitatory glutamate receptor subunits. Furthermore, the combination of the two drugs caused greater damage than either drug alone. The results demonstrate that the short-term use of antiepileptic drugs damages neurons in the immature brain and that the combined use of antiepileptic drugs exacerbates damage. Our findings suggest that clinicians should consider the potential neurotoxic risk associated with the combined use of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of seizure.

  19. Neurotoxicity of the Cyanotoxin BMAA Through Axonal Degeneration and Intercellular Spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vanessa X; Lassus, Benjamin; Lim, Chai K; Tixador, Philippe; Courte, Josquin; Bessede, Alban; Guillemin, Gilles J; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in neurodegeneration and neurotoxicity, particularly in ALS-Parkinson Dementia Complex. Neurotoxic properties of BMAA have been partly elucidated, while its transcellular spreading capacity has not been examined. Using reconstructed neuronal networks in microfluidic chips, separating neuronal cells into two subcompartments-(1) the proximal, containing first-order neuronal soma and dendrites, and (2) a distal compartment, containing either only axons originating from first-order neurons or second-order striatal neurons-creates a cortico-striatal network. Using this system, we investigated the toxicity and spreading of BMAA in murine primary neurons. We used a newly developed antibody to detect BMAA in cells. After treatment with 10 μM BMAA, the cyanotoxin was incorporated in first-degree neurons. We also observed a rapid trans-neuronal spread of BMAA to unexposed second-degree neurons in 48 h, followed by axonal degeneration, with limited somatic death. This in vitro study demonstrates BMAA axonal toxicity at sublethal concentrations and, for the first time, the transcellular spreading abilities of BMAA. This neuronal dying forward spread that could possibly be associated with progression of some neurodegenerative diseases especially amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  20. Protective effects of humanin on okadaic Acid-induced neurotoxicities in cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Wang, Dan; Li, Lingmin; Zhao, Wenhui; Zhang, Ce

    2014-11-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are mostly composed of hyperphosphorylated tau and directly correlate with dementia in AD patients. Okadaic acid (OA), a toxin extracted from marine life, can specifically inhibit protein phosphatases (PPs), including PP1 and Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in tau hyperphosphorylation. Humanin (HN), a peptide of 24 amino acids, was initially reported to protect neurons from AD-related cell toxicities. The present study was designed to test if HN could attenuate OA-induced neurotoxicities, including neural insults, apoptosis, autophagy, and tau hyperphosphorylation. We found that administration of OA for 24 h induced neuronal insults, including lactate dehydrogenase released, decreased of cell viability and numbers of living cells, neuronal apoptosis, cells autophagy and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. Pretreatment of cells with HN produced significant protective effects against OA-induced neural insults, apoptosis, autophagy and tau hyperphosphorylation. We also found that OA treatment inhibited PP2A activity and HN pretreatment significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of OA. This study demonstrated for the first time that HN protected cortical neurons against OA-induced neurotoxicities, including neuronal insults, apoptosis, autophagy, and tau hyperphosphorylation. The mechanisms underlying the protections of HN may involve restoration of PP2A activity.

  1. A 7-day intravenous toxicity study and neurotoxicity assessment of pyridorin in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D W; Peterson, R C; Mujer, C V; Gad, S C

    2017-07-01

    Pyridorin ® , a naturally occurring metabolite of vitamin B6 that inhibits and scavenges reactive oxygen species, is being developed as a potential therapeutic for acute kidney injury. An investigational new drug application (IND) was opened for Pyridorin in support of its ongoing oral drug clinical development program. Currently, a Pyridorin intravenous (IV) formulation is being developed for use in surgical patients. To support the IND for Pyridorin, a full battery of nonclinical Good Laboratory Practice compliant studies was performed with no neurological or behavioral signs of toxicity seen following oral or IV administration of pyridoxine dihydrochloride (the active ingredient in Pyridorin). However, excessive ingestion of vitamin B6 has been reported to cause neurotoxic syndrome in humans. Therefore, under Food and Drug Administration recommendation, a 7-day IV study in rats was conducted to further evaluate the drug's potential to cause neurotoxicity. Blood plasma samples indicated that exposure to pyridoxamine dihydrochloride and its metabolites, pyridoxal, pyridoxine, and 4-pyridoxic acid was linearly dose proportional and independent of gender. At doses of up to 200 mg/kg/day pyridoxine dihydrochloride, no treatment-related effects were seen in rats, providing further evidence for the absence of pyridoxine dihydrochloride-related changes in the nervous system. A no observed adverse effect level of 200 mg/kg/day was identified for this study.

  2. Potential Health Risks Posed by Plant-Derived Cumulative Neurotoxic Bufadienolides in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Botha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bufadienolide-type cardiac glycosides have a worldwide distribution and are mainly synthesized by plants, but there are also animal sources. In South Africa, members of three genera of the Crassulaceae (Cotyledon, Tylecodon and Kalanchoe cause a unique chronic form of cardiac glycoside poisoning, predominantly in small stock. This paretic/paralytic condition is referred to as “krimpsiekte”, cotyledonosis or “nenta”. “Krimpsiekte” is a plant poisoning only reported from South Africa and is regarded as the most important plant poisoning of small stock in the semi-arid Little Karoo and southern fringes of the Great Karoo. The toxicosis is caused by cumulative bufadienolides which have neurotoxic properties. Four types of cumulative neurotoxic bufadienolides, namely cotyledoside, and the tyledosides, orbicusides and lanceotoxins, have been isolated. Based on the structure activity relationships and certain toxicokinetic parameters possible reasons for their accumulation are presented. Consumption of edible tissues from animals that have ingested these plants poses a potential risk to humans.

  3. Paclitaxel-induced epithelial damage and ectopic MMP-13 expression promotes neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Middleton, Leah J; Pellegrini, Adriana D; Martin, Paige B; Spaulding, Emily L; Lopes, Olivia; Brochu, Elizabeth A; Carter, Erin V; Waldron, Ashley; Rieger, Sandra

    2016-04-12

    Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizing chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used in cancer treatment and in a number of curative and palliative regimens. Despite its beneficial effects on cancer, paclitaxel also damages healthy tissues, most prominently the peripheral sensory nervous system. The mechanisms leading to paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy remain elusive, and therapies that prevent or alleviate this condition are not available. We established a zebrafish in vivo model to study the underlying mechanisms and to identify pharmacological agents that may be developed into therapeutics. Both adult and larval zebrafish displayed signs of paclitaxel neurotoxicity, including sensory axon degeneration and the loss of touch response in the distal caudal fin. Intriguingly, studies in zebrafish larvae showed that paclitaxel rapidly promotes epithelial damage and decreased mechanical stress resistance of the skin before induction of axon degeneration. Moreover, injured paclitaxel-treated zebrafish skin and scratch-wounded human keratinocytes (HEK001) display reduced healing capacity. Epithelial damage correlated with rapid accumulation of fluorescein-conjugated paclitaxel in epidermal basal keratinocytes, but not axons, and up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, collagenase 3) in the skin. Pharmacological inhibition of MMP-13, in contrast, largely rescued paclitaxel-induced epithelial damage and neurotoxicity, whereas MMP-13 overexpression in zebrafish embryos rendered the skin vulnerable to injury under mechanical stress conditions. Thus, our studies provide evidence that the epidermis plays a critical role in this condition, and we provide a previously unidentified candidate for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Acute Toxicity and Neurotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos in Black Tiger Shrimp, Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassanee Eamkamon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute toxicity and neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos were determined in black tiger shrimp, P. monodon. LC50 values after 24 to 96 h of exposure were between 149.55 and 59.16 nmol/L. To determine the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was monitored in the gill of the shrimps exposed to lethal (0.019, 0.194, and 1.942 µmol/L and sub-lethal (0.019, 0.194, and 1.942 nmol/L concentrations of chlorpyrifos. In lethal dose exposure, the AChE activities observed in shrimp exposed to 0.194, and 1.942 µmol/L of chlorpyrifos were significantly lower (1.7 and 3.3 times than that of control shrimp after 30 min of exposure (p<0.05. In sub-lethal exposure tests, the AChE activity of shrimp was significantly lower (1.9 times than that of control shrimp after exposure to 1.942 nmol/L of chlorpyrifos for 72 h (p<0.05. The sensitive reduction of AChE activity at the sub-lethal concentration, which was 30 times lower than 96 h LC50 value found in this study, indicates the potential use as a biomarker of chlorpyrifos exposure.

  5. Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Produces Neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-Induced Dopamine Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD was one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases with a slow and progressive loss of dopamine (DA neurons in the midbrain substantia nigra (SN. Neuroinflammation was identified to be an important contributor to PD pathogenesis with the hallmark of microglia activation. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG was the main active component extracted from Polygonum multiflorum and held amounts of pharmacological activities including antioxidant, free radical-scavenging, anti-inflammation, and cardioprotective properties. Recent studies demonstrated that TSG exerted neuroprotection from several neurodegenerative disease models. However, the underlying mechanisms were not completely elucidated. In the present study, rat nigral stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA- elicited DA neuronal injury was performed to investigate TSG-mediated neuroprotection on DA neurons. In addition, primary rat midbrain neuron-glia cocultures were applied to explore the mechanisms underlying TSG-exerted neuroprotection. Results showed that daily intraperitoneal injection of TSG for 14 consecutive days significantly protected DA neurons from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity and suppressed microglia activation. Similar neuroprotection was shown in primary neuron-glia cocultures. In vitro studies further demonstrated that TSG inhibited microglia activation and subsequent release of proinflammatory factors. Moreover, TSG-mediated neuroprotection was closely related with the inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. Together, TSG protects DA neurons from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity via the inhibition of microglia-elicited neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that TSG might hold potential therapeutic effects on PD.

  6. Dose and time-dependent selective neurotoxicity induced by mephedrone in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez-Clemente

    Full Text Available Mephedrone is a drug of abuse marketed as 'bath salts". There are discrepancies concerning its long-term effects. We have investigated the neurotoxicity of mephedrone in mice following different exposition schedules. Schedule 1: four doses of 50 mg/kg. Schedule 2: four doses of 25 mg/kg. Schedule 3: three daily doses of 25 mg/kg, for two consecutive days. All schedules induced, in some animals, an aggressive behavior and hyperthermia as well as a decrease in weight gain. Mephedrone (schedule 1 induced dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotoxicity that persisted 7 days after exposition. At a lower dose (schedule 2 only a transient dopaminergic injury was found. In the weekend consumption pattern (schedule 3, mephedrone induced dopamine and serotonin transporter loss that was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression one week after exposition. Also, mephedrone induced a depressive-like behavior, as well as a reduction in striatal D2 density, suggesting higher susceptibility to addictive drugs. In cultured cortical neurons, mephedrone induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect. Using repeated doses for 2 days in an elevated ambient temperature we evidenced a loss of frontal cortex dopaminergic and hippocampal serotoninergic neuronal markers that suggest injuries at nerve endings.

  7. Neuroprotective Activity of Pongamia pinnata in Monosodium Glutamate-induced Neurotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, A H M Viswanatha; Patel, N L; Gadad, P C; Koti, B C; Patel, U M; Thippeswamy, A H M; Manjula, D V

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark in monosodium glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Neurotoxicity was induced by intraperitoneal injection of monosodium glutamate 2 g per kg body weight daily for 7 days. Ethanol extract of Pongamia pinnata stem bark (200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered orally after 1 h of monosodium glutamate treatment. Dextromethorphan (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as standard drug for the comparison. The degree of protection was determined by various behavioural, locomotor, muscle grip activity, lipid peroxidation and measurement of antioxidant status of glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Estimation of calcium, sodium and potassium ions in brain tissue and gamma aminobutyric acid level in serum was carried out. The histopathological study of brain tissue was also carried out. Treatment with Pongamia pinnata significantly improved monosodium glutamate-induced alteration in behavioural and locomotor activity and muscle strength. Significant decrease in lipid peroxidation and increase in glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase was observed in Pongamia pinnata treated group. Further, Pongamia pinnata also significantly reduced the monosodium glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by decreasing the level of Ca(+2) and Na(+) with concomitant increase in the level of K(+). Serum gamma aminobutyric acid level was also increased in Pongamia pinnata treated animals. Further, the histopathological evidence supports the neuroprotective activity of Pongamia pinnata. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the ethanol extract of stem bark of Pongamia pinnata possesses significant neuroprotective activity in albino rats.

  8. Lithium neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraya, Y; Yoong, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Inspite of the advent of newer antimanic drugs, lithium carbonate remains widely used in the treatment and prevention of manic-depressive illness. However care has to be exercised due to its low therapeutic index. The central nervous system and renal system are predominantly affected in acute lithium intoxication and is potentially lethal. The more common side effect involves the central nervous system. It occurs early and is preventable. We describe three cases of lithium toxicity admitted to Johor Bahru Hospital, with emphasis on its neurological preponderance.

  9. Analysis of Separated Flow over Blocked Surface

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    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the separated flow over flat and blocked surfaces was investigated experimentally. Velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were carried out by a constanttemperature hot wire anemometer and static pressure measurements by a micro-manometer. The flow separations and reattachments were occurred before the first block, on the first block, between blocks and after the last block, and the presence of the blocks significantly increased the turbulent intensity

  10. Various semiclassical limits of torus conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of General and Applied Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Institutskiy per. 7, Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Geiko, Roman [Mathematics Department, National Research University Higher School of Economics,Usacheva str. 6, Moscow, 119048 (Russian Federation); Rappoport, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, Moscow, 127994 (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-12

    We study four types of one-point torus blocks arising in the large central charge regime. There are the global block, the light block, the heavy-light block, and the linearized classical block, according to different regimes of conformal dimensions. It is shown that the blocks are not independent being connected to each other by various links. We find that the global, light, and heavy-light blocks correspond to three different contractions of the Virasoro algebra. Also, we formulate the c-recursive representation of the one-point torus blocks which is relevant in the semiclassical approximation.

  11. Radial Coordinates for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hogervorst, Matthijs

    2013-01-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFT_d expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting "rho-series" and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  12. Diversity Gain through Antenna Blocking

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    V. Dehghanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the typical usage mode, interaction between a handheld receiver antenna and the operator's RF absorbing body and nearby objects is known to generate variability in antenna radiation characteristics through blocking and pattern changes. It is counterintuitive that random variations in blocking can result in diversity gain of practical applicability. This diversity gain is quantified from a theoretical and experimental perspective. Measurements carried out at 1947.5 MHz verify the theoretical predictions, and a diversity gain of 3.1 dB was measured through antenna blocking and based on the utilized measurement setup. The diversity gain can be exploited to enhance signal detectability of handheld receivers based on a single antenna in indoor multipath environments.

  13. Cryptanalysis of Selected Block Ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhzaimi, Hoda A.

    , pseudorandom number generators, and authenticated encryption designs. For this reason a multitude of initiatives over the years has been established to provide a secure and sound designs for block ciphers as in the calls for Data Encryption Standard (DES) and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), lightweight...... ciphers initiatives, and the Competition for Authenticated Encryption: Security, Applicability, and Robustness (CAESAR). In this thesis, we first present cryptanalytic results on different ciphers. We propose attack named the Invariant Subspace Attack. It is utilized to break the full block cipher...... on the family of lightweight block cipher SIMON that was published by the U.S National Security Agency (NSA). The ciphers are developed with optimization towards both hardware and software in mind. While the specification paper discusses design requirements and performance of the presented lightweight ciphers...

  14. Climatological features of blocking anticyclones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupo, A.R.; Smith, P.J.; Oglesby, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Several climatological studies have been previously performed using large observational data sets (i.e., 10 years or longer) in order to determine the predominant characteristics of blocking anticyclones, including favored development regions, duration, preferred seasonal occurrence, and frequency of occurrence. These studies have shown that blocking anticyclones occur most frequently from October to April over the eastern Atlantic and Pacific oceans downstream from both the North American and Asian continental regions and the storm track regions to the east of these continents. Some studies have also revealed the presence of a third region block formation in western Russia near 40 degrees E which is associated with another storm track region over the Mediterranean and western Asia

  15. Projectors, shadows, and conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons-Duffin, David [Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-04-24

    We introduce a method for computing conformal blocks of operators in arbitrary Lorentz representations in any spacetime dimension, making it possible to apply bootstrap techniques to operators with spin. The key idea is to implement the “shadow formalism' of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi in a setting where conformal invariance is manifest. Conformal blocks in d-dimensions can be expressed as integrals over the projective null-cone in the “embedding space' ℝ{sup d+1,1}. Taking care with their analytic structure, these integrals can be evaluated in great generality, reducing the computation of conformal blocks to a bookkeeping exercise. To facilitate calculations in four-dimensional CFTs, we introduce techniques for writing down conformally-invariant correlators using auxiliary twistor variables, and demonstrate their use in some simple examples.

  16. Projectors, Shadows, and Conformal Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons-Duffin, David

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a method for computing conformal blocks of operators in arbitrary Lorentz representations in any spacetime dimension, making it possible to apply bootstrap techniques to operators with spin. The key idea is to implement the “shadow formalism” of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi in a setting where conformal invariance is manifest. Conformal blocks in d -dimensions can be expressed as integrals over the projective null-cone in the “embedding space” $ \\mathbb{R} $ d +1,1 . Taking ...

  17. Delayed neurotoxicity - do trichlorphon and/or dichlorvos cause delayed neuropathy in man or in test animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M K

    1981-01-01

    Many, but not all, reports of delayed neuropathy associated with acute poisoning by trichlorphon refer to cases in U.S.S.R. Adulteration of technical trichlorphon with the ethyl analogue would greatly increase the neurotoxic hazard but analysis of a few samples has not revealed such impurities. Simultaneous ingestion of alcohol does not appear to increase neuropathic hazard. In hens double doses of trichlorphon each exceeding unprotected LD50 can produce moderate neuropathy associated with appropriately high inhibitions of neurotoxic esterase. Similar results are obtained with 2 doses of 10 x LD50 of dichlorvos. In vitro the inhibitory power of dichlorvos against neurotoxic esterase of hen brain is 0.02 x the power against acetylcholinesterase. This ratio correlates reasonably with the ratio of LD50/neuropathic dose. The factor for human brain enzymes is 0.06 suggesting that man is more susceptible to neuropathic effects of near-lethal doses of circulating dichlorvos. It is concluded that the only neuropathic hazard to man from good quality trichlorphon arises from rapid ingestion of massive doses. To obtain critical levels of inhibition of neurotoxic esterase and to cause neuropathy in man by repeated doses would require each dose to be severely toxic. Dichlorvos ingested in large doses is likely to kill rather than to cause neuropathy.

  18. Pre-fibrillar α-synuclein variants with impaired β-structure increase neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpinar, D.P.; Giller, K.; Becker, S.; Baldus, M.

    2009-01-01

    The relation of -synuclein (S) aggregation to Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been recognized, but the mechanism of toxicity, the pathogenic species and its molecular properties are yet to be identified. To obtain insight into the function different aggregated S species have in neurotoxicity in

  19. Neurotoxicity Induced by Bupivacaine via T-Type Calcium Channels in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianjie; Xu, Shiyuan; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Quinguo; Liang, Hua; Yang, Chenxiang; Wang, Hanbing

    2013-01-01

    There is concern regarding neurotoxicity induced by the use of local anesthetics. A previous study showed that an overload of intracellular calcium is involved in the neurotoxic effect of some anesthetics. T-type calcium channels, which lower the threshold of action potentials, can regulate the influx of calcium ions. We hypothesized that T-type calcium channels are involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we first investigated the effects of different concentrations of bupivacaine on SH-SY5Y cell viability, and established a cell injury model with 1 mM bupivacaine. The cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells was measured following treatment with 1 mM bupivacaine and/or different dosages (10, 50, or 100 µM) of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride, an antagonist of T-type calcium channels for 24 h. In addition, we monitored the release of lactate dehydrogenase, cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), cell apoptosis and caspase-3 expression. SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with different dosages (10, 50, or 100 µM) of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride improved cell viability, reduced lactate dehydrogenase release, inhibited apoptosis, and reduced caspase-3 expression following bupivacaine exposure. However, the protective effect of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride plateaued. Overall, our results suggest that T-type calcium channels may be involved in bupivacaine neurotoxicity. However, identification of the specific subtype of T calcium channels involved requires further investigation. PMID:23658789

  20. In vitro, inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways protects against bupivacaine- and ropivacaine-induced neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, Philipp; Haller, Ingrid; Colvin, Hans Peter; Lang, Leopold; Tomaselli, Bettina; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gerner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Animal models show us that specific activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) may be a pivotal step in lidocaine neurotoxicity, but this has not been investigated in the case of two very widely used local anesthetics, bupivacaine and ropivacaine. We investigated the hypotheses

  1. Involvement of direct inhibition of NMDA receptors in the effects of sigma-receptor ligands on glutamate neurotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, H; Hashino, A; Kume, T; Katsuki, H; Kaneko, S; Akaike, A

    2000-09-15

    This study was performed to examine the roles of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/phencyclidine (PCP) channel complex in the protective effects of sigma-receptor ligands against glutamate neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons derived from fetal rats. A 1-h exposure of cultures to glutamate caused a marked loss of viability, as determined by Trypan blue exclusion. This acute neurotoxicity of glutamate was prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. Expression of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in cortical cultures was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). sigma Receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptor channels including the PCP site, such as (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF10,047), haloperidol, and R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane ((-)-PPAP), prevented glutamate neurotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, other sigma-receptor ligands without affinity for NMDA receptors, such as carbetapentane and R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine ((+)-3-PPP), did not show neuroprotective effects. Putative endogenous sigma receptor ligands such as pregnenolone, progesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone did not affect glutamate neurotoxicity. The protective effects of (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol, and (-)-PPAP were not affected by the sigma(1) receptor antagonist rimcazole. These results suggested that a direct interaction with NMDA receptors but not with sigma receptors plays a crucial role in the neuroprotective effects of sigma receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptors.

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  3. Markers of murine embryonic and neural stem cells, neurons and astrocytes: reference points for developmental neurotoxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) is a significant concern for environmental chemicals, as well as for food and drug constituents. The sensitivity of animal-based DNT models is unclear, and they are expensive and time consuming. Murine embryonic stem cells (mESC) recapitulate sev...

  4. Clinical profile & complications of neurotoxic snake bite & comparison of two regimens of polyvalent anti-snake venom in its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Sarin

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: In this preliminary study, it was found that the national ASV protocol was as effective as the conventional regimen for neurotoxic snake bites. However, the findings need to be tested in a larger randomized controlled trial for definitive conclusions.

  5. An efficient analytical platform for on line microfluidic profiling of neurotoxic snake venoms towards nicotinic receptor like affinity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heus, F.A.H.; Vonk, F.; Otvos, R.A.; Bruyneel, B.; Smit, A.B.; Lingeman, H.; Richardson, M.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Kool, J.

    2013-01-01

    Venomous snakes have evolved their efficient venomous arsenals mainly to immobilize prey. The highly variable toxic peptides in these venoms target a myriad of neurotoxic and haemotoxic receptors and enzymes and comprise highly interesting candidates for drug discovery. Discovery of bioactive

  6. Design and validation of an ontology-driven animal-free testing strategy for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, Ellen V S; Staal, Yvonne C M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2018-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity entails one of the most complex areas in toxicology. Animal studies provide only limited information as to human relevance. A multitude of alternative models have been developed over the years, providing insights into mechanisms of action. We give an overview of

  7. Occupational exposure to neurotoxic substances in Asian countries - challenges and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Kim, Eun A; Nuwayhid, Iman; Ichihara, Gaku; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a conference on neurotoxicity was held in China triggered the idea to provide an insight into occupational diseases, their development and the approaches to investigate them in Asian countries. A historical review, a meta-analysis, and studies on humans and animals provide impressions on past and current problems. The Korean example showed that each newly introduced industry is accompanied by its own problems as regards occupational diseases. Mercury and carbon disulfide were of importance in the beginning, whereas solvents and manganese became important later. Outbreaks of diseases were important reasons to guide both the public and the governmental attention to prevention and allowed within a relatively short time considerable progress. As the example on the replacement of 2-bromopropane by 1-bromopropane showed, also the introduction of chemicals that are more beneficial for the environment may result in additional occupational risks. A lower mutagenicity of 1-bromopopane was shown to be associated with a greater neurotoxicity in Japanese studies. Although occupational health and diseases are commonly related to adults, child workers exposed to solvents were examined in a Lebanese study. The study started outlining the health hazards in young workers because they might be at a much greater risk due to the not yet completed maturation of their nervous system. That some occupational diseases are not yet a focus of prevention was shown by the study on pesticides. If at all, the serious health consequences resulting from excessive exposure were investigated. Research enabling precautionary actions was not available from the international literature. Despite globalization the knowledge on occupational diseases is not yet "globalized" and each country obviously undergoes its own development triggered by local experiences. Economic development that requires a healthy workforce, but also public interest that challenges governmental regulations further

  8. Nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity in humans from organogermanium compounds and germanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauss, A G

    1991-06-01

    There is no known biological requirement for germanium (Ge), germanates, or any organogermanium compound. Ge deficiency has not been demonstrated in any animal. The estimated average dietary intake of Ge in humans is 1.5 mg/d. Ge is widely distributed in edible foods, all of which, with few exceptions, contain less than 5 ppm Ge, since higher levels are toxic to most plants. Ingestion of Ge compounds has been shown to produce toxic effects in experimental animals. In recent years inorganic germanium salts and novel organogermanium compounds, such as carboxyethyl germanium sesquioxide (Ge-132) and lactate-citrate-germanate (Ge lactate citrate) have been sold as "nutritional supplements" in some countries for their purported immunomodulatory effects or as health-producing elixirs, resulting in intakes of Ge significantly exceeding the estimated average dietary intake. Since 1982, there have been 18 reported cases of acute renal dysfunction or failure, including two deaths, linked to oral intake of Ge elixirs containing germanium dioxide (GeO2) or Ge-132. In these cases, biopsies show vacuolar degeneration in renal tubular epithelial cells, without proteinuria or hematuria, in the absence of glomerular changes. Serum creatinine levels have been well above 400 mumol/L in such patients. In 17 of 18 cases, accumulated elemental Ge intakes reportedly ranged between 16 to 328 g over a 4-36 mo period, or between 100 to 2000 times the average estimated dietary intake for human. In surviving patients, renal function improved after discontinuation of Ge supplementation. However, in no case was recovery complete. One organogermanium compound, an azaspiran organogermanium compound, 2-aza-8-germanspiro[4,5] decane-2-propamine-8,8-diethyl-N,N-dimethyl dichloride (spirogermanium), has been found to cause both neurotoxicity and pulmonary toxicity in phase I and II studies examining its chemotherapeutic potential as an antitumor drug in the treatment of various malignancies. In

  9. Detecting acute neurotoxicity during platinum chemotherapy by neurophysiological assessment of motor nerve hyperexcitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Andrew; Bergin, Peter; Hanning, Fritha; Thompson, Paul; Findlay, Michael; Damianovich, Dragan; McKeage, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs, such as cisplatin and oxaliplatin, are well-known for inducing chronic sensory neuropathies but their acute and motor neurotoxicities are less well characterised. Use was made of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography (EMG) to assess motor nerve excitability in cancer patients during their first treatment cycle with platinum-based chemotherapy in this study. Twenty-nine adult cancer patients had a neurophysiological assessment either before oxaliplatin plus capecitabine, on days 2 to 4 or 14 to 20 after oxaliplatin plus capecitabine, or on days 2 to 4 after carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin, undertaken by a neurophysiologist who was blinded to patient and treatment details. Patients completed a symptom questionnaire at the end of the treatment cycle. Abnormal spontaneous high frequency motor fibre action potentials were detected in 100% of patients (n = 6) and 72% of muscles (n = 22) on days 2 to 4 post-oxaliplatin, and in 25% of patients (n = 8) and 13% of muscles (n = 32) on days 14 to 20 post-oxaliplatin, but in none of the patients (n = 14) or muscles (n = 56) tested prior to oxaliplatin or on days 2 to 4 after carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin. Repetitive compound motor action potentials were less sensitive and less specific than spontaneous high frequency motor fibre action potentials for detection of acute oxaliplatin-induced motor nerve hyperexcitability but were present in 71% of patients (n = 7) and 32% of muscles (n = 32) on days 2 to 4 after oxaliplatin treatment. Acute neurotoxicity symptoms, most commonly cold-induced paraesthesiae and jaw or throat tightness, were reported by all patients treated with oxaliplatin (n = 22) and none of those treated with carboplatin plus paclitaxel or cisplatin (n = 6). Abnormal spontaneous high frequency motor fibre activity is a sensitive and specific endpoint of acute oxaliplatin-induced motor nerve hyperexcitability, detectable on EMG on days 2 to 4 post

  10. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Ya-Yun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Yu-Ting [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Lo, Yi-Ching, E-mail: yichlo@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates production and apoptotic damage induced by high glucose are major causes of neuronal damage in diabetic neuropathy. Berberine (BBR), a natural antidiabetes drug with PI3K-activating activity, holds promise for diabetes because of its dual antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. We have previously reported that BBR attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} neurotoxicity via activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway. In this study, we further explored the novel protective mechanism of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptotic death and neurite damage of SH-SY5Y cells. Results indicated BBR (0.1–10 nM) significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nucleus condensation, and apoptotic death in high glucose-treated cells. However, AG1024, an inhibitor of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, significantly abolished BBR protection against high glucose-induced neuronal death. BBR also increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased cytochrome c release. High glucose down-regulated IGF-1 receptor and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β, the effects of which were attenuated by BBR treatment. BBR also activated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key antioxidative transcription factor, which is accompanied with up-regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, BBR markedly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and promoted neurite outgrowth in high glucose-treated cells. To further determine the role of the Nrf2 in BBR neuroprotection, RNA interference directed against Nrf2 was used. Results indicated Nrf2 siRNA abolished BBR-induced HO-1, NGF, neurite outgrowth and ROS decrease. In conclusion, BBR attenuated high glucose-induced neurotoxicity, and we are the first to reveal this novel mechanism of BBR as an Nrf2 activator against glucose neurotoxicity, providing another potential therapeutic use of BBR on the treatment of diabetic complications. - Highlights: • BBR attenuates high glucose-induced ROS

  11. Autophagy activation is involved in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'--induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsun Li

    Full Text Available Autophagic (type II cell death, characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of cells, has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptotic (type I and necrotic (type III cell death have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, while the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited neurotoxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons challenged with MDMA. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3; an autophagic marker using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Here, we demonstrate that MDMA exposure induced monodansylcadaverine (MDC- and LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation and increased conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, coinciding with the neurodegenerative phase of MDMA challenge. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA pretreatment significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, LC3B-II expression, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered neurite damage and neuronal death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration, indicating that excessive autophagosome accumulation contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, MDMA induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and its downstream unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1, suggesting the AMPK/ULK1 signaling pathway might be involved in MDMA-induced autophagy activation.

  12. Main-chain supramolecular block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si Kyung; Ambade, Ashootosh V; Weck, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Block copolymers are key building blocks for a variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to drug delivery. The material properties of block copolymers can be tuned and potentially improved by introducing noncovalent interactions in place of covalent linkages between polymeric blocks resulting in the formation of supramolecular block copolymers. Such materials combine the microphase separation behavior inherent to block copolymers with the responsiveness of supramolecular materials thereby affording dynamic and reversible materials. This tutorial review covers recent advances in main-chain supramolecular block copolymers and describes the design principles, synthetic approaches, advantages, and potential applications.

  13. In-vitro Neurotoxicity of Two Malaysian Krait Species (Bungarus candidus and Bungarus fasciatus Venoms: Neutralization by Monovalent and Polyvalent Antivenoms from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Rusdi Ahmad Rusmili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bungarus candidus and Bungarus fasciatus are two species of krait found in Southeast Asia. Envenoming by these snakes is often characterized by neurotoxicity and, without treatment, causes considerable morbidity and mortality. In this study, the in vitro neurotoxicity of each species, and the effectiveness of two monovalent antivenoms and a polyvalent antivenom, against the neurotoxic effects of the venoms, were examined in a skeletal muscle preparation. Both venoms caused concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect twitches, and attenuated responses to exogenous nicotinic receptor agonists, in the chick biventer preparation, with B. candidus venom being more potent than B. fasciatus venom. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis indicated different profiles between the venoms. Despite these differences, most proteins bands were recognized by all three antivenoms. Antivenom, added prior to the venoms, attenuated the neurotoxic effect of the venoms. Interestingly, the respective monovalent antivenoms did not neutralize the effects of the venom from the other Bungarus species indicating a relative absence of cross-neutralization. Addition of a high concentration of polyvalent antivenom, at the t90 time point after addition of venom, partially reversed the neurotoxicity of B. fasciatus venom but not B. candidus venom. The monovalent antivenoms had no significant effect when added at the t90 time point. This study showed that B. candidus and B. fasciatus venoms display marked in vitro neurotoxicity in the chick biventer preparation and administration of antivenoms at high dose is necessary to prevent or reverse neurotoxicity.

  14. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  15. Control rod removal blocking device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent excess power increase resulted from erroneous control rod removal during high power operation in BWR type reactor by decreasing the continuous removal enabling distance for the control rods along with increase in the reactor power where the reactor power is greater than a predetermined level. Constitution: When control rod selection signals are supplied from a control unit to a control rod removal blocking device, the blocking device judges whether the reactor core power is greater than a predetermined value A or not, using reactor core power signals outputted from an average power monitor. Where the reactor core power exceeds the predetermined value A and if the reactor core power is relatively low, a large continuous removal enabling distance N 1 is calculated in the blocking device to allow the continuous removal as far as the notch N 1 . The continuous removal enabling distance is shortened as the reactor core power increases and the removal is blocked, for example, at notch N 2 . While on the other hand, if the reactor core power is below the predetermined value A, both of the notchwise removal and the continuous removal are enabled. (Seki, T.)

  16. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  17. Vagal Blocking for Obesity Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Helene; Revesz, David; Kodama, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the US FDA has approved "vagal blocking therapy or vBLoc® therapy" as a new treatment for obesity. The aim of the present study was to study the mechanism-of-action of "VBLOC" in rat models. METHODS: Rats were implanted with VBLOC, an intra-abdominal electrical device...

  18. Thermo-responsive block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocan Cetintas, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Block copolymers (BCPs) are remarkable materials because of their self-assembly behavior into nano-sized regular structures and high tunable properties. BCPs are in used various applications such as surfactants, nanolithography, biomedicine and nanoporous membranes. In these thesis, we aimed to

  19. Scintigraphic visualization of 'Blocking' thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeonova, A.; Kostadinova, I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: An important problem in nuclear endocrinology is 'blocking' of thyroid gland, which necessitates postpone of the investigation, adverse clinical effect of stopping medications and a delay of making diagnosis. The aim of the study was to introduce and to determine the clinical value of the scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI in patients (Pts) with 'blocked thyroid'. In 365 Pts (aged 38-75 years), indicated for a thyroid scintigraphy after proper preparation, an investigation was performed with 74 MBq 99mTc-pertechnetate, 20 min. p.i. In 14 of them (3.8%), the thyroid was 'blocked' and additional scintigraphy was done with 370-555 MBq 99mTc-MIBI, 15 and 120 min.p.i. It was estimated that in all Pts there was a visualization of thyroid. In 1 of them, a large 'hot' nodule was visualized in the early and late image. Later on a differentiated thyroid carcinoma was proved histologically. In the rest of the patients 'cold' nodules with different size were visualized, eventually as a result of cysts. As a conclusion we consider, that a scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI is a useful tool in Pts with 'blocked' thyroid. In addition an evaluation of the thyroid nodule could be done and therefore- a recommendation for therapy

  20. Ipomoea batatas attenuates amyloid β peptide-induced neurotoxicity in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Choi, Soo Jung; Cho, Hong Yon; Kim, Young Jun; Lim, Seung-Taik; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Eun Ki; Kim, Hye Kyung; Peterson, Sabrina; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the protective effects of 17 Korean native plants against amyloid β peptide (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress were screened using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate assay and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Ipomoea batatas exerted the highest protective effects against oxidative stress and was selected for further investigation. To confirm the protective activity of this extract, the I. batatas extract was fed to ICR mice that had been injected with Aβ to induce neuronal deficits. In these experiments, the extract of I. batatas significantly reversed Aβ-induced neurotoxicity as assessed by the passive avoidance test, a behavioral experiment. Moreover, I. batatas administration reduced the level of lipid peroxidation and increased catalase activities in biochemical studies using the brain tissue of mice. These results indicate that I. batatas might be beneficial against Alzheimer's disease, especially by limiting oxidative stress in the brain.

  1. A Retrospective Performance Assessment of the Developmental Neurotoxicity Study in Support of OECD Test Guideline 426

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makris, Susan L.; Raffaele, Kathleen; Allen, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We conducted a review of the history and performance of developmental neurotoxicity mic (DNT) testing in support of the finalization and implementation of Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) DNT test guideline 426 (TG 426). INFORMATION SOURCES AND ANALYSIS......: In this review we summarize extensive scientific efforts that form the foundation for this testing paradigm, including basic neurotoxicology research, interlaboratory collaborative studies, expert workshops, and validation studies, and we address the relevance, applicability, and use of the DNT study in risk...... assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The OECD DNT guideline represents the best available science for assessing the potential for DNT in human health risk assessment, and data generated with this protocol are relevant and reliable for the assessment of these end points. The test methods used have been subjected...

  2. Neurotoxicity of hexachlorophene in humans. II. A clinicopathological study of 46 premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, R M; Leech, R W; Alvord, E C

    1975-05-01

    To assess neurotoxic effects of hexachlorophene in the human population previously shown to be most at risk, a blind clinicopathological analysis was made of all premature infants under 1,400 gm birth weight who survived at least four days and were examined by autopsy over a 7.5-year period. Repeated whole-body bathing of premature newborn infants in 3% hexachlorophene-bearing soap (undiluted pHisoHex) shows a significant statistical association with a vacuolar encephalopathy of the brain stem reticular formation. The prevalence of the vacuolar encephalopathy in premature infants on whom we have adequate brain stem histological information appears to be related to the number of exposures to hexachlorophene, the concentration of hexachlorophene, the thoroughness of rinsing, and other factors (including exposure to ultraviolet light).

  3. International STakeholder NETwork (ISTNET): creating a developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing road map for regulatory purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Crofton, Kevin M.; Leist, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    A major problem in developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) risk assessment is the lack of toxicological hazard information for most compounds. Therefore, new approaches are being considered to provide adequate experimental data that allow regulatory decisions. This process requires a matching...... of regulatory needs on the one hand and the opportunities provided by new test systems and methods on the other hand. Alignment of academically and industrially driven assay development with regulatory needs in the field of DNT is a core mission of the International STakeholder NETwork (ISTNET) in DNT testing....... The first meeting of ISTNET was held in Zurich on 23-24 January 2014 in order to explore the concept of adverse outcome pathway (AOP) to practical DNT testing. AOPs were considered promising tools to promote test systems development according to regulatory needs. Moreover, the AOP concept was identified...

  4. Getting to NO Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroprotection versus Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Balez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the loss of neurons in the brain which leads to progressive memory loss and behavioral changes. To date, there are only limited medications for AD and no known cure. Nitric oxide (NO has long been considered part of the neurotoxic insult caused by neuroinflammation in the Alzheimer’s brain. However, focusing on early developments, prior to the appearance of cognitive symptoms, is changing that perception. This has highlighted a compensatory, neuroprotective role for NO that protects synapses by increasing neuronal excitability. A potential mechanism for augmentation of excitability by NO is via modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel activity (Kv7 and Kv2. Identification of the ionic mechanisms and signaling pathways that mediate this protection is an important next step for the field. Harnessing the protective role of NO and related signaling pathways could provide a therapeutic avenue that prevents synapse loss early in disease.

  5. Neurotrophic and Neurotoxic Effects of Amyloid |beta Protein: Reversal by Tachykinin Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    The amyloid β protein is deposited in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease but its pathogenic role is unknown. In culture, the amyloid β protein was neurotrophic to undifferentiated hippocampal neurons at low concentrations and neurotoxic to mature neurons at higher concentrations. In differentiated neurons, amyloid β protein caused dendritic and axonal retraction followed by neuronal death. A portion of the amyloid β protein (amino acids 25 to 35) mediated both the trophic and toxic effects and was homologous to the tachykinin neuropeptide family. The effects of the amyloid β protein were mimicked by tachykinin antagonists and completely reversed by specific tachykinin agonists. Thus, the amyloid β protein could function as a neurotrophic factor for differentiating neurons, but at high concentrations in mature neurons, as in Alzheimer's disease, could cause neuronal degeneration.

  6. Suspected neurotoxicity due to Clostridium perfringens type B in a tiger (Panthera tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Offer; Briola, Chiara; Konar, Martin; Dumas, Maria Pia; Wrzosek, Marcin Adam; Papa, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    A 4-yr-old tiger (Panthera tigris) was referred with acute onset of severe abnormal consciousness. Neurological evaluation showed normal palpebral and corneal reflexes, normal pupil diameter with normal direct and consensual papillary light reflex, and absent menace response bilaterally. Diffuse forebrain lesion or focal lesion affecting the ascending reticular activating system was suspected. Complete blood examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed an empty sella as the only result. Clostridium perfringens 10(4) to 10(7) colony-forming units/g were detected in fecal flora samples. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay identified serotype B counts with production of epsilon toxin. This toxin specifically accumulates in the central nervous system, where it causes acute neurological signs in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. In this communication, the acute onset of neurological signs without evidence of trauma, vascular, metabolic, or inflammatory diseases may be caused by neurotoxicity due to C. perfringens.

  7. Evaluation of lead and mercury neurotoxic health risk by resident children in the Obuasi municipality, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiri, S; Dodoo, D K; Armah, F A; Essumang, D K; Cobbina, S J

    2010-05-01

    This study assesses neurotoxic effects associated with exposure to lead and mercury in borehole, tap and surface water by resident children in the Obuasi municipality in accordance with USEPA risk assessment guidelines. From the results of the study, the hazard quotient for oral ingestion of mercury in tap water in Obuasi is 7.4 and 15 respectively via both central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) parameters, respectively. This means that approximately 7 and 15 (by both CTE and RME parameters, respectively) resident children in Obuasi are likely to show neurologic effects associated with exposure to mercury and lead such as increased nervousness, loss of memory and/or decrease in concentration, impaired writing ability and tremor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anesthesia-related neurotoxicity and the developing animal brain is not a significant problem in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    A multitude of animal studies have shown that virtually all general anesthetics used in clinical practice possibly during a vulnerable period of brain development (i.e., brain growth spurt, peak of synaptogenesis) may lead to neurodegeneration (particularly apoptosis) and abnormal synaptic...... development with functional deficits in learning and behavior later in life. Initial studies were mainly performed in immature rodent pups, but more recent studies have included nonhumans primates (rhesus monkeys). Given the number of neonates, infants, and young children anesthetized annually worldwide...... no such association. Prospective studies are underway, but the result will not be available for several years. This paper reviews some of the preclinical background behind anesthesia-related neurotoxicity but focuses mainly on the human studies so far. It is concluded that although disturbing, the animal data lack...

  9. Developmental neurotoxicity testing: recommendations for developing alternative methods for the screening and prioritization of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofton, Kevin M; Mundy, William R; Lein, Pamela J; Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Seiler, Andrea E M; Knaut, Holger; Buzanska, Leonora; Goldberg, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternative methods to current animal testing protocols and guidelines. An immediate goal is to develop test methods that are capable of screening large numbers of chemicals. This document provides recommendations for developing alternative DNT approaches that will generate the type of data required for evaluating and comparing predictive capacity and efficiency across test methods and laboratories. These recommendations were originally drafted to stimulate and focus discussions of alternative testing methods and models for DNT at the TestSmart DNT II meeting (http://caat.jhsph.edu/programs/workshops/dnt2.html) and this document reflects critical feedback from all stakeholders that participated in this meeting. The intent of this document is to serve as a catalyst for engaging the research community in the development of DNT alternatives and it is expected that these recommendations will continue to evolve with the science.

  10. Prenatal exposure to nanosized zinc oxide in rats: neurotoxicity and postnatal impaired learning and memory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoli, Feng; Junrong, Wu; Xuan, Lai; Yanli, Zhang; Limin, Wei; Jia, Liu; Longquan, Shao

    2017-04-01

    To examine the neurotoxicity of prenatal exposure to ZnO nanoparticles on rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by gavage. Toxicity was assessed including zinc biodistribution, cerebral histopathology, antioxidant status and learning and memory capability. A significantly elevated concentration of zinc was detected in offspring brains. Transmission electron microscope observations showed abnormal neuron ultrastructures. Histopathologic changes such as decreased proliferation and higher apoptotic death were observed. An obvious imbalanced antioxidant status occurred in brains. Adult experimental offspring exhibited impaired learning and memory behavior in the Morris water maze test compared with control groups. These adverse effects on offspring brain may cause impaired learning and memory capabilities in adulthood, particularly in female rats.

  11. Neurotoxicity and bony diseases caused by the continuous contamination with aluminum of solutions of renal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquero Quiros, M.; Vargas Rojas, R.; Blanco Saenz, R.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the principal evidences about aluminum neurotoxicity in vitro, and some evidences in brain tissues of Alzheimer patients; and also show some studies realized with human that suffer renal deficiencies, dealing whit the principal osteodystrophy. The problem of analyzing low aluminum concentration in human fluids is overcome with very sensitive analytical methods as electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAS) and voltammetric methods as Anodic Striping Voltammetry with complexing agents that easing adsorption over solid electrodes or mercury hanging drops. Is a vital question to know with accuracy the aluminum concentration in water used in hemodialysis or in fluids used in ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, as a first stage to prevent contamination by aluminum. So the prevention of contamination during sapling storage and analysis of biological fluids should be the first need and the sources of water used in renal dialysis keep be as clean as possible of aluminum contamination. (Author) [es

  12. A curious case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ranjit; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a unique case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity featuring acute, recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria following multiple subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin. A 65-year-old man started chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with oxaliplatin-irinotecan-leucovorin-5-fluorouracil (FOLFIRINOX). During the first and subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin, the patient developed episodes of dysarthria that lasted between 2 and 4 h after oxaliplatin infusions, followed by their complete and uneventful resolution. A thorough neurological examination showed no new neurologic deficits except for very fine tongue fasciculations. Recognizing this self-limiting toxic effect of oxaliplatin is important in order to avoid dose reductions that may affect clinical outcomes. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Neurotoxicity and LSD treatment: a follow-up study of 151 patients in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jens Knud

    2016-06-01

    LSD was introduced in psychiatry in the 1950s. Between 1960 and 1973, nearly 400 patients were treated with LSD in Denmark. By 1964, one homicide, two suicides and four suicide attempts had been reported. In 1986 the Danish LSD Damages Law was passed after complaints by only one patient. According to the Law, all 154 applicants received financial compensation for LSD-inflicted harm. The Danish State Archives has preserved the case material of 151 of the 154 applicants. Most of the patients suffered from severe side effects of the LSD treatment many years afterwards. In particular, two-thirds of the patients had flashbacks. With the recent interest in LSD therapy, we should consider the neurotoxic potential of LSD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Ginger and Propolis Exert Neuroprotective Effects against Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama K. Hussein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system cytotoxicity is linked to neurodegenerative disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate whether monosodium glutamate (MSG neurotoxicity can be reversed by natural products, such as ginger or propolis, in male rats. Four different groups of Wistar rats were utilized in the study. Group A served as a normal control, whereas group B was orally administered with MSG (100 mg/kg body weight, via oral gavage. Two additional groups, C and D, were given MSG as group B along with oral dose (500 mg/kg body weight of either ginger or propolis (600 mg/kg body weight once a day for two months. At the end, the rats were sacrificed, and the brain tissue was excised and levels of neurotransmitters, ß-amyloid, and DNA oxidative marker 8-OHdG were estimated in the brain homogenates. Further, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain sections were used for histopathological evaluation. The results showed that MSG increased lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, neurotransmitters, and 8-OHdG as well as registered an accumulation of ß-amyloid peptides compared to normal control rats. Moreover, significant depletions of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase as well as histopathological alterations in the brain tissue of MSG-treated rats were noticed in comparison with the normal control. In contrast, treatment with ginger greatly attenuated the neurotoxic effects of MSG through suppression of 8-OHdG and β-amyloid accumulation as well as alteration of neurotransmitter levels. Further improvements were also noticed based on histological alterations and reduction of neurodegeneration in the brain tissue. A modest inhibition of the neurodegenerative markers was observed by propolis. The study clearly indicates a neuroprotective effect of ginger and propolis against MSG-induced neurodegenerative disorders and these beneficial effects could be attributed to the polyphenolic compounds present in these natural products.

  15. Neurotoxicity of coral snake phospholipases A2 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Nathalia Delazeri; Garcia, Raphael CaioTamborelli; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Batista, Daniel Rodrigo; Cassola, Antonio Carlos; Maria, Durvanei; Lebrun, Ivo; Carneiro, Sylvia Mendes; Afeche, Solange Castro; Marcourakis, Tania; Sandoval, Maria Regina Lopes

    2014-03-13

    The neurotoxicity of two secreted Phospholipases A2 from Brazilian coral snake venom in rat primary hippocampal cell culture was investigated. Following exposure to Mlx-8 or Mlx-9 toxins, an increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) and a reduction in mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) became evident and occurred prior to the morphological changes and cytotoxicity. Exposure of hippocampal neurons to Mlx-8 or Mlx-9 caused a decrease in the cell viability as assessed by MTT and LDH assays. Inspection using fluorescent images and ultrastructural analysis by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that multiphase injury is characterized by overlapping cell death phenotypes. Shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were observed. The most striking alteration observed in the electron microscopy was the fragmentation and rarefaction of the neuron processes network. Degenerated terminal synapses, cell debris and apoptotic bodies were observed among the fragmented fibers. Numerous large vacuoles as well as swollen mitochondria and dilated Golgi were noted. Necrotic signs such as a large amount of cellular debris and membrane fragmentation were observed mainly when the cells were exposed to highest concentration of the PLA2-neurotoxins. PLA2s exposed cultures showed cytoplasmic vacuoles filled with cell debris, clusters of mitochondria presented mitophagy-like structures that are in accordance to patterns of programmed cell death by autophagy. Finally, we demonstrated that the sPLA2s, Mlx-8 and Mlx-9, isolated from the Micrurus lemniscatus snake venom induce a hybrid cell death with apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic features. Furthermore, this study suggests that the augment in free cytosolic Ca(2+) and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the neurotoxicity of Elapid coral snake venom sPLA2s. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effect of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera against neurotoxicity induced by aluminum chloride in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E Elhadidy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ashwagandha extract against aluminum chloride-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Methods: Rats were divided into control, aluminum-intoxicated rats treated daily with aluminum trichloride (AlCl3 (100 mg/kg, orally for 30 d and aluminum-intoxicated animals protected by receiving daily ashwagandha extract (200 mg/kg, orally one hour before AlCl3 administration for 30 d. Levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. In addition, the activities of Na+, K+, ATPase and acetylcholinesterase were determined in the three studied brain regions. Results: Aluminum increased the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum and decreased the reduced glutathione level in the hippocampus and striatum. In rats protected with ashwagandha extract, non significant changes were observed in lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide and reduced glutathione. In addition, ashwagandha extracts prevented the increased activity of acetylcholinesterase and Na+, K+, ATPase induced by AlCl3 in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. The present findings also showed that the significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-α induced by AlCl3 in the cortex and hippocampus was prevented by ashwagandha extract. Conclusions: The present results suggest that ashwagandha extract possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects against aluminum neurotoxicity. In addition, ashwagandha extract could prevent the decline in cholinergic activity by maintaining normal acetylcholinesterase activity. The later effect could recommend the use of ashwagandha as a memory enhancer.

  17. Features of Microglia and Neuroinflammation Relevant to Environmental Exposure and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jean Harry

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are resident cells of the brain involved in regulatory processes critical for development, maintenance of the neural environment, injury and repair. They belong to the monocytic-macrophage lineage and serve as brain immune cells to orchestrate innate immune responses; however, they are distinct from other tissue macrophages due to their relatively quiescent phenotype and tight regulation by the CNS microenvironment. Microglia actively survey the surrounding parenchyma and respond rapidly to changes such that any disruption to neural architecture or function can contribute to the loss in regulation of the microglia phenotype. In many models of neurodegeneration and neurotoxicity, early events of synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss are accompanied by an inflammatory response including activation of microglia, perivascular monocytes, and recruitment of leukocytes. In culture, microglia have been shown to be capable of releasing several potentially cytotoxic substances, such as reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, proteases, arachidonic acid derivatives, excitatory amino acids, and cytokines; however, they also produce various neurotrophic factors and quench damage from free radicals and excitotoxins. As the primary source for pro-inflammatory cytokines, microglia are implicated as pivotal mediators of neuroinflammation and can induce or modulate a broad spectrum of cellular responses. Neuroinflammation should be considered as a balanced network of processes whereby subtle modifications can shift the cells toward disparate outcomes. For any evaluation of neuroinflammation and microglial responses, within the framework of neurotoxicity or degeneration, one key question in determining the consequence of neuroinflammation is whether the response is an initiating event or the consequence of tissue damage. As examples of environmental exposure-related neuroinflammation in the literature, we provide an evaluation of data on manganese

  18. Epigallocatechin gallate attenuates amyloid β-induced inflammation and neurotoxicity in EOC 13.31 microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Chung Wei, James; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chien-Ning; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Lin, Chih-Li

    2016-01-05

    Microglia are the primary immune cells that contribute to neuroinflammation by releasing various proinflammatory cytokines and neurotoxins in the brain. Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is one of the key characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, inhibitory reagents that prevent microglial activation may be used as potential therapeutic agents for treating AD. Recently, many studies have been performed to determine the bioactivities of green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an efficient antioxidant that prevents neuroinflammation. However, limited information is available on the effects of EGCG on microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EGCG on amyloid β (Aβ)-induced microglial activation and neurotoxicity. Our results indicated that EGCG significantly suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in Aβ-stimulated EOC 13.31 microglia. EGCG also restored the levels of intracellular antioxidants nuclear erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), thus inhibiting reactive oxygen species-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation after Aβ treatment. Furthermore, EGCG effectively protected neuro-2a neuronal cells from Aβ-mediated, microglia-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent, Aβ-induced release of TNFα. Taken together, our findings suggested that EGCG suppressed Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory response of microglia and protected against indirect neurotoxicity. These results suggest that EGCG is a possible therapeutic agent for preventing Aβ-induced inflammatory neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Features of microglia and neuroinflammation relevant to environmental exposure and neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Andrew D; Harry, G Jean

    2011-07-01

    Microglia are resident cells of the brain involved in regulatory processes critical for development, maintenance of the neural environment, injury and repair. They belong to the monocytic-macrophage lineage and serve as brain immune cells to orchestrate innate immune responses; however, they are distinct from other tissue macrophages due to their relatively quiescent phenotype and tight regulation by the CNS microenvironment. Microglia actively survey the surrounding parenchyma and respond rapidly to changes such that any disruption to neural architecture or function can contribute to the loss in regulation of the microglia phenotype. In many models of neurodegeneration and neurotoxicity, early events of synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss are accompanied by an inflammatory response including activation of microglia, perivascular monocytes, and recruitment of leukocytes. In culture, microglia have been shown to be capable of releasing several potentially cytotoxic substances, such as reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, proteases, arachidonic acid derivatives, excitatory amino acids, and cytokines; however, they also produce various neurotrophic factors and quench damage from free radicals and excitotoxins. As the primary source for pro-inflammatory cytokines, microglia are implicated as pivotal mediators of neuroinflammation and can induce or modulate a broad spectrum of cellular responses. Neuroinflammation should be considered as a balanced network of processes whereby subtle modifications can shift the cells toward disparate outcomes. For any evaluation of neuroinflammation and microglial responses, within the framework of neurotoxicity or degeneration, one key question in determining the consequence of neuroinflammation is whether the response is an initiating event or the consequence of tissue damage. As examples of environmental exposure-related neuroinflammation in the literature, we provide an evaluation of data on manganese and diesel exhaust

  20. The network formation assay: a spatially standardized neurite outgrowth analytical display for neurotoxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Sisnaiske, Julia; Subbiah, Subanatarajan; Menne, Heike; Godoy, Patricio; Lampen, Peter; Leist, Marcel; Franzke, Joachim; Hengstler, Jan G; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2010-03-21

    We present a rapid, reproducible and sensitive neurotoxicity testing platform that combines the benefits of neurite outgrowth analysis with cell patterning. This approach involves patterning neuronal cells within a hexagonal array to standardize the distance between neighbouring cellular nodes, and thereby standardize the length of the neurite interconnections. This feature coupled with defined assay coordinates provides a streamlined display for rapid and sensitive analysis. We have termed this the network formation assay (NFA). To demonstrate the assay we have used a novel cell patterning technique involving thin film poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microcontact printing. Differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells colonized the array with high efficiency, reliably producing pattern occupancies above 70%. The neuronal array surface supported neurite outgrowth, resulting in the formation of an interconnected neuronal network. Exposure to acrylamide, a neurotoxic reference compound, inhibited network formation. A dose-response curve from the NFA was used to determine a 20% network inhibition (NI(20)) value of 260 microM. This concentration was approximately 10-fold lower than the value produced by a routine cell viability assay, and demonstrates that the NFA can distinguish network formation inhibitory effects from gross cytotoxic effects. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK1/2 and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling pathways also produced a dose-dependent reduction in network formation at non-cytotoxic concentrations. To further refine the assay a simulation was developed to manage the impact of pattern occupancy variations on network formation probability. Together these developments and demonstrations highlight the potential of the NFA to meet the demands of high-throughput applications in neurotoxicology and neurodevelopmental biology.

  1. Ameliorating effects of aged garlic extracts against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro antioxidant activities and neuron-like PC12 cell protective effects of solvent fractions from aged garlic extracts were investigated to evaluate their anti-amnesic functions. Ethyl acetate fractions of aged garlic had higher total phenolics than other fractions. Methods Antioxidant activities of ethyl acetate fractions from aged garlic were examined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibitory effect using mouse whole brain homogenates. Levels of cellular oxidative stress as reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation were measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA). PC12 cell viability was investigated by 3-[4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydtrogenase (LDH) assay. The learning and memory impairment in institute of cancer research (ICR) mice was induced by neurotoxic amyloid beta protein (Aβ) to investigate in vivo anti-amnesic effects of aged garlic extracts by using Y-maze and passive avoidance tests. Results We discovered that ethyl acetate fractions showed the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity and MDA inhibitory effect. Intracellular ROS accumulation resulting from Aβ treatment in PC12 cells was significantly reduced when ethyl acetate fractions were presented in the medium compare to PC12 cells which was only treated with Aβ only. Ethyl acetate fractions from aged garlic extracts showed protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Pre-administration with aged garlic extracts attenuated Aβ-induced learning and memory deficits in both in vivo tests. Conclusions Our findings suggest that aged garlic extracts with antioxidant activities may improve cognitive impairment against Aβ-induced neuronal deficit, and possess a wide range of beneficial activities for neurodegenerative disorders, notably Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:24134394

  2. Silymarin protects against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity via Nrf2 signalling in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Sun, Hong-Yang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Shao, Mei-Li

    2017-04-01

    Silymarin (SM) is a well-known antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer compound extracted from the milk thistle. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SM against acrylamide (AA)-induced neurotoxicity, mainly caused by oxidative stress, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signalling pathway in PC12 cells. The MTT reduction assay was used to measure cell viability in various drug-treated groups and demonstrated that SM could increase cell viability in AA-treated PC12 cells. We then measured the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by the peroxide-sensitive fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and intracellular glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by absorption spectrophotometry. Our data revealed that SM could reduce ROS and MDA levels and increase GSH levels in AA-induced PC12 cells. To identify a potential mechanism for SM-induced protection, we measured the mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf2 and its downstream target antioxidants glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results suggested that SM could activate Nrf2 signalling and increase the expression of Nrf2, Gpx, GCLC and GCLM in AA-treated PC12 cells. In conclusion, SM can effectively alleviate AA-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective effect of Cucurbita pepo fruit peel against CCl4 induced neurotoxicity in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaib, Sania; Khan, Muhammad Rashid

    2014-11-01

    Cucurbita pepo is a common vegetable used all over the world. In folk medicine it is used in gastroenteritis, hepatorenal and in brain anomalies. In the present study, protective effect of Cucurbita pepo fruit peel against CCl4-induced neurotoxicity in rats was investigated. In this study, 36 Sprague-Dawley female rats (190±15 g) were randomly divided into 6 groups of 6 rats each. Group I was given 1 ml/kg bw (body weight) of corn oil intraperotoneally (i.p); Group II, III and IV were treated with 20% CCl4 in corn oil (1ml/kg bw i.p.). However, animals of Group III and IV were also treated with CPME (methanol extract of C. pepo fruit peel) at 200 and 400mg/kg bw respectively. Animals of Group V and VI were administered only with CPME at 200 and 400mg/kg bw respectively. These treatments were administered 3 days a week for two weeks. Administration of CCl4 cause acute neurotoxicity as depicted by significant depletion (p<0.05) in the activities of antioxidant enzymes; catalase, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, quinone reductase, while enhanced the γ-glutamyl transferase level in brain samples. CCl4 intoxication decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) level whereas markedly (p<0.05) enhanced lipid peroxidation in brain samples. Co-treatment of CPME significantly (p<0.05) protected the brain tissues against CCl4 constituted injuries by restoring activities of antioxidant enzymes and ameliorated lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent fashion. These neuroprotective effects might be due to the presence of antioxidant constituents.

  4. Comparison of Cannabidiol, Antioxidants, and Diuretics in Reversing Binge Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelink, Carol; Hampson, Aidan; Wink, David A.; Eiden, Lee E.; Eskay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in the rat induces substantial neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Oxidative stress and cytotoxic edema have both been shown to be involved in such neurotoxicity, whereas N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity has been implicated in alcohol withdrawal and excitoxic injury. Because the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) was previously shown in vitro to prevent glutamate toxicity through its ability to reduce oxidative stress, we evaluated CBD as a neuroprotectant in a rat binge ethanol model. When administered concurrently with binge ethanol exposure, CBD protected against hippocampal and entorhinal cortical neurodegeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the common antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene and α-tocopherol also afforded significant protection. In contrast, the NMDA receptor antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801) and memantine did not prevent cell death. Of the diuretics tested, furosemide was protective, whereas the other two anion exchanger inhibitors, L-644,711 [(R)-(+)-(5,6-dichloro2,3,9,9a-tetrahydro 3-oxo-9a-propyl-1H-fluoren-7-yl)oxy acetic acid] and bumetanide, were ineffective. In vitro comparison of these diuretics indicated that furosemide is also a potent antioxidant, whereas the nonprotective diuretics are not. The lack of efficacy of L-644,711 and bumetanide suggests that the antioxidant rather than the diuretic properties of furosemide contribute most critically to its efficacy in reversing ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in vitro, in our model. This study provides the first demonstration of CBD as an in vivo neuroprotectant and shows the efficacy of lipophilic antioxidants in preventing binge ethanol-induced brain injury. PMID:15878999

  5. Olesoxime prevents microtubule-targeting drug neurotoxicity: selective preservation of EB comets in differentiated neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovini, Amandine; Carré, Manon; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Braguer, Diane

    2010-09-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs), anticancer drugs widely used in the clinic, often induce peripheral neuropathy, a main dose-limiting side effect. The mechanism for this neurotoxicity remains poorly understood and there are still no approved therapies for neuropathies triggered by MTAs. Olesoxime (cholest-4-en-3-one, oxime; TRO19622) has shown marked neuroprotective properties in animals treated with paclitaxel and vincristine. The purpose of this study was to investigate its mechanism of neuroprotection against MTA neurotoxicity by using rat and human differentiated neuronal cells. We first showed that olesoxime prevented neurite shrinkage induced by MTAs in differentiated PC-12 and SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell lines by up to 90%. This neuroprotective effect was correlated with enhanced EB1 accumulation at microtubule plus-ends, increased growth cone microtubule growing rate (20%) and decreased microtubule attenuation duration (54%). The effects of olesoxime on EB comets were specific for differentiated neuronal cells and were not seen either in proliferating neuroblastoma cells, glioblastoma cells or primary endothelial cells. Importantly, olesoxime did not alter MTA cytotoxic properties in a wide range of MTA-sensitive tumor cells, a prerequisite for future clinical application. Finally, olesoxime also counteracted MTA inhibition of microtubule-dependent mitochondria trafficking. These results provide additional insight into the neuroprotective properties of olesoxime, highlighting a role for microtubule dynamics in preservation of neurite architecture and axoplasmic transport, which are both disturbed by MTAs. The neuron-specific protective properties of olesoxime support its further development to treat MTA-induced neuropathy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 31 CFR 585.216 - Expenses of maintaining blocked property; liquidation into blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... property; liquidation into blocked account. 585.216 Section 585.216 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... blocked property; liquidation into blocked account. (a) Except as otherwise authorized, and... expenses incident to the blocking and maintenance of property blocked pursuant to § 585.201 or § 585.215(a...

  7. On the Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of Block Triangular Preconditioned Block Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Block lower triangular matrices and block upper triangular matrices are popular preconditioners for 2×2 block matrices. In this note we show that a block lower triangular preconditioner gives the same spectrum as a block upper triangular preconditioner and that the eigenvectors of the two preconditioned matrices are related. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Block-Matching Based Multifocus Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multifocus image fusion method is proposed. Two image blocks are selected by sliding the window from the two source images at the same position, discrete cosine transform (DCT is implemented, respectively, on these two blocks, and the alternating component (AC energy of these blocks is then calculated to decide which is the well-focused one. In addition, block matching is used to determine a group of image blocks that are all similar to the well-focused reference block. Finally, all the blocks are returned to their original positions through weighted average. The weight is decided with the AC energy of the well-focused block. Experimental results demonstrate that, unlike other spatial methods, the proposed method effectively avoids block artifacts. The proposed method also significantly improves the objective evaluation results, which are obtained by some transform domain methods.

  9. Ozone (O{sub 3}) elicits neurotoxicity in spinal cord neurons (SCNs) by inducing ER Ca{sup 2+} release and activating the CaMKII/MAPK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yun; Lin, Xiaowen; Zhao, XueJun; Xie, Juntian; JunNan, Wang; Sun, Tao; Fu, Zhijian, E-mail: zhijian_fu@163.com

    2014-11-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) is widely used in the treatment of spinal cord related diseases. Excess or accumulation of this photochemical air can however be neurotoxic. In this study, in vitro cultured Wister rat spinal cord neurons (SCNs) were used to investigate the detrimental effects and underlying mechanisms of O{sub 3}. Ozone in a dose-dependent manner inhibited cell viability at a range of 20 to 500 μg/ml, with the dose at 40 μg/ml resulting in a decrease of cell viability to 75%. The cell death after O{sub 3} exposure was related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) release. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator, ER stabilizer (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonist and ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) antagonist could effectively block Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and inhibit cell death following 40 μg/ml O{sub 3} exposure. In addition, ER Ca{sup 2+} release due to O{sub 3} exposure enhanced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK levels and apoptosis of SCNs through activating CaMKII. Based on these results, we confirm that ozone elicits neurotoxicity in SCNs via inducing ER Ca{sup 2+} release and activating CaMKII/MAPK signaling pathway. Therefore, physicians should get attention to the selection of treatment concentrations of oxygen/ozone. And, approaches, such as chelating intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and stabilizing neuronal Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis could effectively ameliorate the neurotoxicity of O{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Exposure to O{sub 3} can reduce the viability of SCNs and cause the cell death. • Exposure to O{sub 3} can trigger RyR and IP3R dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release. • Exposure to O{sub 3} can enhance the phospho-CaMKII, phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 levels.

  10. Blocking incidental frustration during bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Maria Esperanza S; Brown, Anna-Leigh; Durkee, Cassandra M; Sim, Hoeun

    2018-02-08

    The current study examined the effects of an intervention aimed at blocking the transfer of frustration from a previous experience (i.e. recall task) to a subsequent and unrelated task (i.e. ultimatum bargaining task). Participants who went through the intervention were more likely to accept unfair offers in the ultimatum bargaining task than those who did not go through the intervention. These results show that participants who were blocked from transferring their feelings of frustration from the recall task to the subsequent bargaining task (no-transfer condition) more likely accepted unfair offers than those who inadvertently transferred their feelings of frustration (transfer condition). The effect of conditions on accept-reject decisions in the ultimatum bargaining was mediated by reported feelings of frustration.

  11. UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY: BLOCK TRIANGULATION COMPARISONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord", useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey, allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma, Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  12. Neurotoxicity of a polybrominated diphenyl ether mixture (DE-71) in mouse neurons and astrocytes is modulated by intracellular glutathione levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, Gennaro; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Costa, Lucio G.

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have become widespread environmental contaminants. Body burden in the U.S. population has been shown to be higher than in other countries, and infants and toddlers have highest exposure through maternal breast milk and household dust. The primary concern for adverse health effects of PBDEs relates to their potential developmental neurotoxicity, which has been found in a number of animal studies. Information on the possible mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity is limited, though some studies have suggested that PBDEs may elicit oxidative stress. The present study examined the in vitro neurotoxicity of DE-71, a penta-BDE mixture, in primary neurons and astrocytes obtained from wild-type and Gclm knockout mice, which lack the modifier subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase and, as a consequence, have very low levels of glutathione (GSH). These experiments show that neurotoxicity of DE-71 in these cells is modulated by cellular GSH levels. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) from Gclm (-/-) mice displayed a higher sensitivity to DE-71 toxicity compared to CGNs from wild-type animals. DE-71 neurotoxicity in CGNs from Gclm (+/+) mice was exacerbated by GSH depletion, and in CGNs from both genotypes it was antagonized by increasing GSH levels and by antioxidants. DE-71 caused an increase in reactive oxygen species and in lipid peroxidation in CGNs, that was more pronounced in Gclm (-/-) mice. Toxicity of DE-71 was mostly due to the induction of apoptotic cell death. An analysis of DE-71-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in neurons and astrocytes from different brain areas (cerebellum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex) in both mouse genotypes showed a significant correlation with intracellular GSH levels. As an example, DE-71 caused cytotoxicity in hippocampal neurons with IC50s of 2.2 and 0.3 μM, depending on genotype, and apoptosis with IC50s of 2.3 and 0.4 μM, respectively. These findings suggest that the developmental

  13. [THE TECHNOLOGY "CELL BLOCK" IN CYTOLOGICAL PRACTICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenko, N N; Borisova, O V; Baranova, I B

    2015-08-01

    The article presents summary information concerning application of "cell block" technology in cytological practice. The possibilities of implementation of various modern techniques (immune cytochemnical analysis. FISH, CISH, polymerase chain reaction) with application of "cell block" method are demonstrated. The original results of study of "cell block" technology made with gelatin, AgarCyto and Shadon Cyoblock set are presented. The diagnostic effectiveness of "cell block" technology and common cytological smear and also immune cytochemical analysis on samples of "cell block" technology and fluid cytology were compared. Actually application of "cell block" technology is necessary for ensuring preservation of cell elements for subsequent immune cytochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

  14. Rapid control of Chinese star anise fruits and teas for neurotoxic anisatin by Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) high resolution mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Y.; Beek, van T.A.; Claassen, F.W.; Zuilhof, H.; Chen, B.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    After ingestion, products containing Chinese star anise (Illicium verum) contaminated or adulterated with Japanese star anise (Illicium anisatum) or other Illicium species, can cause epilepsy, hallucinations, and nausea due to the rare neurotoxic sesquiterpene dilactone anisatin that is present in

  15. Neurotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenoming is Primarily due to U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, a Pre-Synaptic Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anjana; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Othman, Iekhsan; Goode, Robert J A; Hodgson, Wayne C; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2017-01-01

    Russell's vipers are snakes of major medical importance in Asia. Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming in Sri Lanka and South India leads to a unique, mild neuromuscular paralysis, not seen in other parts of the world where the snake is found. This study aimed to identify and pharmacologically characterise the major neurotoxic components of Sri Lankan Russell's viper venom. Venom was fractionated using size exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). In vitro neurotoxicities of the venoms, fractions and isolated toxins were measured using chick biventer and rat hemidiaphragm preparations. A phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ) toxin, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (13.6 kDa), which constitutes 19.2 % of the crude venom, was isolated and purified using HPLC. U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a produced concentration-dependent in vitro neurotoxicity abolishing indirect twitches in the chick biventer nerve-muscle preparation, with a t 90 of 55 ± 7 min only at 1 μM. The toxin did not abolish responses to acetylcholine and carbachol indicating pre-synaptic neurotoxicity. Venom, in the absence of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, did not induce in vitro neurotoxicity. Indian polyvalent antivenom, at the recommended concentration, only partially prevented the neurotoxic effects of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a was the basic S-type PLA 2 toxin previously identified from this venom (NCBI-GI: 298351762; SwissProt: P86368). The present study demonstrates that neurotoxicity following Sri Lankan Russell's viper envenoming is primarily due to the pre-synaptic neurotoxin U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a. Mild neurotoxicity observed in severely envenomed Sri Lankan Russell's viper bites is most likely due to the low potency of U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a, despite its high relative abundance in the venom.

  16. The classification of motor neuron defects in the zebrafish embryo toxicity test (ZFET) as an animal alternative approach to assess developmental neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Wichmann, Arne; Delov, Vera; Fenske, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Rodents are widely used to test the developmental neurotoxicity potential of chemical substances. The regulatory test procedures are elaborate and the requirement of numerous animals is ethically disputable. Therefore, non-animal alternatives are highly desirable, but appropriate test systems that meet regulatory demands are not yet available. Hence, we have developed a new developmental neurotoxicity assay based on specific whole-mount immunostainings of primary and secondary motor neurons (using the monoclonal antibodies znp1 and zn8) in zebrafish embryos. By classifying the motor neuron defects, we evaluated the severity of the neurotoxic damage to individual primary and secondary motor neurons caused by chemical exposure and determined the corresponding effect concentration values (EC₅₀). In a proof-of-principle study, we investigated the effects of three model compounds thiocyclam, cartap and disulfiram, which show some neurotoxicity-indicating effects in vertebrates, and the positive controls ethanol and nicotine and the negative controls 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and triclosan. As a quantitative measure of the neurotoxic potential of the test compounds, we calculated the ratios of the EC₅₀ values for motor neuron defects and the cumulative malformations, as determined in a zebrafish embryo toxicity test (zFET). Based on this index, disulfiram was classified as the most potent and thiocyclam as the least potent developmental neurotoxin. The index also confirmed the control compounds as positive and negative neurotoxicants. Our findings demonstrate that this index can be used to reliably distinguish between neurotoxic and non-neurotoxic chemicals and provide a sound estimate for the neurodevelopmental hazard potential of a chemical. The demonstrated method can be a feasible approach to reduce the number of animals used in developmental neurotoxicity evaluation procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A systems biology approach to predictive developmental neurotoxicity of a larvicide used in the prevention of Zika virus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine; Taboureau, Olivier; Grandjean, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The need to prevent developmental brain disorders has led to an increased interest in efficient neurotoxicity testing. When an epidemic of microcephaly occurred in Brazil, Zika virus infection was soon identified as the likely culprit. However, the pathogenesis appeared to be complex, and a larvi......The need to prevent developmental brain disorders has led to an increased interest in efficient neurotoxicity testing. When an epidemic of microcephaly occurred in Brazil, Zika virus infection was soon identified as the likely culprit. However, the pathogenesis appeared to be complex......). Especially in an acute situation like the microcephaly epidemic, where little toxicity documentation is available, new and innovative alternative methods, whether in vitro or in silico, must be considered. We have developed a network-based model using an integrative systems biology approach to explore...

  18. Cnidom analysis combined with an in vitro evaluation of the lytic, cyto- and neurotoxic potential of Cyanea capillata (Cnidaria: Scyphozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Helmholz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The cnidocysts and the lytic, cyto- and neurotoxic potency of a large specimen of Cyanea capillata (L. with 55 cm umbrella diameter were compared with those of a pooled C. capillata sample (average ø 14 cm in order to investigate organismal developments at a cellular and biochemical level. Nematocysts of the type A-isorhiza in both fishing tentacles and oral arms and the O-isorhizas of oral arms were enlarged in the 55 cm specimen. Additionally, the number of nematocysts per battery in the fishing tentacles was increased. Increased gill cell toxicity and neurotoxic activity were demonstrated for the fishing tentacle venom of the 55 cm C. capillata in comparison with the smaller medusae. A two-fold higher haemolytic activity was detected for the venom of oral arms obtained from the large C. capillata compared with the oral arm venom prepared from the smaller medusae.

  19. Blocking device especially for circulating pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susil, J.; Vychodil, V.; Lorenc, P.

    1976-01-01

    The claim of the invention is a blocking device which blocks reverse flow occurring after the shutdown of circulating pumps, namely in the operation of nuclear power plants or in pumps with a high delivery head. (F.M.)

  20. Demographic Data - MDC_BlockGroup

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade County Census 2000 Block Groups. A census Block Group is a statistical subdivision of a census Tract consisting of a cluster of...

  1. On the protective effect of omega-3 against propionic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rat pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Gezeery Amina R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The investigation of the environmental contribution for developmental neurotoxicity is very important. Many environmental chemical exposures are now thought to contribute to the development of neurological disorders, especially in children. Results from animal studies may guide investigations of human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants and drugs that produce or protect from neurotoxicity and may help in the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Objective To study the protective effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid on brain intoxication induced by propionic acid (PPA in rats. Methods 24 young male Western Albino rats were enrolled in the present study. They were grouped into three equal groups; oral buffered PPA-treated group given a nuerotoxic dose of 250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 days; omega-3 - protected group given a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight/day omega-3 orally daily for 5 days followed by PPA for 3 days, and a third group as control given only phosphate buffered saline. Tumor necrosis factor-α, caspase-3, interlukin-6, gamma amino-buteric acid (GABA, serotonin, dopamine and phospholipids were then assayed in the rats brain's tissue of different groups. Results The obtained data showed that PPA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity as measured by depletion of gamaaminobyteric acid (GABA, serotonin (5HT and dopamine (DA as three important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function. A high significant increase of interlukin-6 (Il-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α as excellent markers of proinflammation and caspase-3 as a proapotic marker were remarkably elevated in the intoxicated group of rats. Moreover, brain phospholipid profile was impaired in PPA-treated young rats recording lower levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylserine (PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC. Conclusions Omega-3 fatty acids showed a protective effects on PPA - induced changes in rats as

  2. Involvement of nicotinic receptors in methamphetamine- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity: pharmacological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escubedo, E; Camarasa, J; Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Pubill, D

    2009-01-01

    During the last years, we have focused on the study of the neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) on the central nervous system (CNS) and their pharmacological prevention methods. In the process of this research, we have used a semipurified synaptosomal preparation from striatum of mice or rats as a reliable in vitro model to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by these amphetamine derivatives, which is well-correlated with their dopaminergic injury in in vivo models. Using this preparation, we have demonstrated that blockade of alpha7 nicotinic receptors with methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevents ROS production induced by MDMA and METH. Consequently, in vivo, MLA significantly prevents MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic level (mouse striatum), without affecting hyperthermia induced by these amphetamines. Additionally, when neuroprotection was assayed with memantine (MEM), a dual antagonist of NMDA and alpha7 receptors, an effective neuroprotection was obtained also ahead of serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rats. MEM also prevents MDMA effect on serotonin transporter functionality and METH effect on dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting that behavioral effects of these psychostimulants can also be modulated by MEM. Finally, we have demonstrated that MEM prevents the impaired memory function induced by MDMA, and also, using binding studies with radioligands, we have characterized the interaction of these substances with nicotinic receptors. Studies at molecular level showed that both MDMA and METH displaced competitively the binding of radioligands with homomeric alpha7 and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), indicating that they can directly interact with them. In all the cases, MDMA displayed higher affinity than METH and it was higher for heteromeric than for alpha7 subtype. Pre-incubation of differentiated PC12 cells with MDMA or METH induces nAChR upregulation

  3. Non-linear dose-response of aluminium hydroxide adjuvant particles: Selective low dose neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crépeaux, Guillemette; Eidi, Housam; David, Marie-Odile; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Tzavara, Eleni; Giros, Bruno; Authier, François-Jérôme; Exley, Christopher; Shaw, Christopher A.; Cadusseau, Josette

    2017-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) oxyhydroxide (Alhydrogel ® ), the main adjuvant licensed for human and animal vaccines, consists of primary nanoparticles that spontaneously agglomerate. Concerns about its safety emerged following recognition of its unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence within immune cells in some individuals, and reports of chronic fatigue syndrome, cognitive dysfunction, myalgia, dysautonomia and autoimmune/inflammatory features temporally linked to multiple Al-containing vaccine administrations. Mouse experiments have documented its capture and slow transportation by monocyte-lineage cells from the injected muscle to lymphoid organs and eventually the brain. The present study aimed at evaluating mouse brain function and Al concentration 180 days after injection of various doses of Alhydrogel ® (200, 400 and 800 μg Al/kg of body weight) in the tibialis anterior muscle in adult female CD1 mice. Cognitive and motor performances were assessed by 8 validated tests, microglial activation by Iba-1 immunohistochemistry, and Al level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. An unusual neuro-toxicological pattern limited to a low dose of Alhydrogel ® was observed. Neurobehavioural changes, including decreased activity levels and altered anxiety-like behaviour, were observed compared to controls in animals exposed to 200 μg Al/kg but not at 400 and 800 μg Al/kg. Consistently, microglial number appeared increased in the ventral forebrain of the 200 μg Al/kg group. Cerebral Al levels were selectively increased in animals exposed to the lowest dose, while muscle granulomas had almost Completely disappeared at 6 months in these animals. We conclude that Alhydrogel ® injected at low dose in mouse muscle may selectively induce long-term Al cerebral accumulation and neurotoxic effects. To explain this unexpected result, an avenue that could be explored in the future relates to the adjuvant size since the injected suspensions corresponding to the lowest dose

  4. Non-linear dose-response of aluminium hydroxide adjuvant particles: Selective low dose neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépeaux, Guillemette; Eidi, Housam; David, Marie-Odile; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Tzavara, Eleni; Giros, Bruno; Authier, François-Jérôme; Exley, Christopher; Shaw, Christopher A; Cadusseau, Josette; Gherardi, Romain K

    2017-01-15

    Aluminium (Al) oxyhydroxide (Alhydrogel ® ), the main adjuvant licensed for human and animal vaccines, consists of primary nanoparticles that spontaneously agglomerate. Concerns about its safety emerged following recognition of its unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence within immune cells in some individuals, and reports of chronic fatigue syndrome, cognitive dysfunction, myalgia, dysautonomia and autoimmune/inflammatory features temporally linked to multiple Al-containing vaccine administrations. Mouse experiments have documented its capture and slow transportation by monocyte-lineage cells from the injected muscle to lymphoid organs and eventually the brain. The present study aimed at evaluating mouse brain function and Al concentration 180days after injection of various doses of Alhydrogel ® (200, 400 and 800μg Al/kg of body weight) in the tibialis anterior muscle in adult female CD1 mice. Cognitive and motor performances were assessed by 8 validated tests, microglial activation by Iba-1 immunohistochemistry, and Al level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. An unusual neuro-toxicological pattern limited to a low dose of Alhydrogel ® was observed. Neurobehavioural changes, including decreased activity levels and altered anxiety-like behaviour, were observed compared to controls in animals exposed to 200μg Al/kg but not at 400 and 800μg Al/kg. Consistently, microglial number appeared increased in the ventral forebrain of the 200μg Al/kg group. Cerebral Al levels were selectively increased in animals exposed to the lowest dose, while muscle granulomas had almost completely disappeared at 6 months in these animals. We conclude that Alhydrogel ® injected at low dose in mouse muscle may selectively induce long-term Al cerebral accumulation and neurotoxic effects. To explain this unexpected result, an avenue that could be explored in the future relates to the adjuvant size since the injected suspensions corresponding to the lowest dose, but

  5. Protective Effect ofPluchea lanceolataagainst Aluminum Chloride-induced Neurotoxicity in Swiss Albino Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundugaru, Ravi; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Udaykumar, Padmaja; Rao, Niranjan; Chandra, Naveen

    2017-10-01

    Aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) is a known potent environmental neurotoxin causing progressive neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The herb Pluchea lanceolata is commonly known as "Rasana" and used as a nerve tonic in neuroinflammatory conditions in Indian system of medicine. To evaluate the neuroprotective activity of hydroalcoholic extract of P. lanceolata in chronic AlCl 3 -induced neurotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. Albino mice were categorized into four different groups; Group 1served as vehicle control, Group 2 mice were administered with AlCl 3 , 40 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal route for 45 consecutive days. Groups 3 and 4 mice were administered with AlCl 3 , 40 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneal for 45 consecutive days along with hydroalcoholic extract of P. lanceolata at 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Chronic administration of AlCl 3 resulted in behavioral deficits, triggered lipid peroxidation, increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and histological alterations. Co-administration of hydroalcoholic extract of P. lanceolata attenuated many of the AlCl 3 -induced alterations such as behavioral, lipid peroxidation, AChE, and histological changes of brain tissue. The results of the present study have demonstrated the protective role of hydroalcoholic extract of P. lanceolata against AlCl 3 -induced neurotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. The neuroprotective efficacy of P. lanceolata can help reduce the symptoms caused by toxic protein aggregates in several degenerative diseases. The hydro alcoholic extract of Pluchea lanceolata showed neuroprotective activity in albino mice against AlCl 3 toxicityThe benefits of Pluchea lanceolata against AlCl 3 toxicity includes reduced lipid peroxidation and acetylcholine esterase activity with improved behavioral functionsThe hydro alcoholic extract of Pluchea lanceolata rendered protection against AlCl 3 in forebrain, midbrain, cerebellum and hippocampusTherefore Pluchea lanceolata holds pharmacological

  6. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu; Xie, Fei; Ma, Xuemei, E-mail: xmma@bjut.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Jiala; Wang, Minglian; Yang, Zhaona; Zhang, Yutong

    2014-10-01

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD{sub 50}) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in vivo

  7. Magnesium deficiency reveals the neurotoxicity of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) low doses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bac, P; Pages, N; Herrenknecht, C; Maurois, P; Durlach, J

    2003-03-01

    In the present study, muricide behaviour (MB) was studied in Long Evans rats in various situations. The MB pattern of each experimental group was compared, in 6 successive assays 1 hr-delayed to that of natural killer rats (NK). The percentage of NK rats was 11% in the strain used. In the 11 mg THC/kg b.w. treated naive rats, a significant additional percentage of rats (59%) became muricidal. The durations of the 3 MB phases were significantly increased as a result of an increased aggressiveness in the 1st assay but returned progressively to NK values on the 6th assay, in parallel with the physiological elimination of THC. This result indicates a true killing training in those non killer rats that became muricidal under THC. A severe magnesium deficiency induced by a 50 ppm magnesium-deficient diet induced 100% MB whereas a 150 ppm magnesium deficiency did not induce additional MB. In the severe deficiency, the MB pattern was rather similar to that of NK with the exception of the attack on the living mouse which was doubled probably because of magnesium-induced hyperexcitability responsible for a lower attack efficiency. In both 50 but also 150 ppm magnesium-deficient rats, a single injection of THC at low doses (2, 4 or 8 mg THC/kg b.w.) which is without aggressive effect in control rats, induced a 100% MB, the pattern of which was all the more severe as the magnesium deficiency was important or the THC dose higher. The pattern showed an important decrease in the two first phases and a dramatic increase in the attack on the dead mouse, suggesting that the combination of both treatments provoked severe central damage with a compulsive killing behavior. Consequently, it appears that a magnesium deficiency, even a moderate one, may aggravate the neurotoxicity of THC at low doses and, reciprocally, that low doses of THC may reveal the potential neurotoxicity of a moderate magnesium deficiency.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of aluminium ions neurotoxicity in brain cells of fish from various pelagic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sukharenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxic effects of aluminum chloride in higher than usual environment concentration (10 mg/L were studied in brains of fishes from various pelagic areas, especially in sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, 1819, roach (Rutilus rutilus Linnaeus, 1758, crucian carp (Carasius carasius Linnaeus, 1758, goby (Neogobius fluviatilis Pallas, 1811. The intensity of oxidative stress and the content of both cytoskeleton protein GFAP and cytosol Ca-binding protein S100β were determined. The differences in oxidative stress data were observed in the liver and brain of fish during 45 days of treatment with aluminum chloride. The data indicated that in the modeling of aluminum intoxication in mature adult fishes the level of oxidative stress was noticeably higher in the brain than in the liver. This index was lower by1.5–2.0 times on average in the liver cells than in the brain. The obtained data evidently demonstrate high sensitivity to aluminum ions in neural tissue cells of fish from various pelagic areas. Chronic intoxication with aluminum ions induced intense astrogliosis in the fish brain. Astrogliosis was determined as result of overexpression of both cytoskeleton and cytosole markers of astrocytes – GFAP and protein S100β (on 75–112% and 67–105% accordingly. Moreover, it was shown that the neurotixic effect of aluminum ions is closely related to metabolism of astroglial intermediate filaments. The results of western blotting showed a considerable increase in the content of the lysis protein products of GFAP with a range of molecular weight from 40–49 kDa. A similar metabolic disturbance was determined for the upregulation protein S100β expression and particularly in the increase in the content of polypeptide fragments of this protein with molecular weight 24–37 kDa. Thus, the obtained results allow one to presume that aluminum ions activate in the fish brain intracellular proteases which have a capacity to destroy the proteins of

  9. Neurochemical and Neurotoxic Effects of MDMA (Ecstasy) and Caffeine After Chronic Combined Administration in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska, Anna Maria; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Wawrzczak-Bargieła, Agnieszka; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela; Przewłocki, Ryszard; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Gołembiowska, Krystyna

    2017-11-13

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a psychostimulant popular as a recreational drug because of its effect on mood and social interactions. MDMA acts at dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) and is known to induce damage of dopamine and serotonin neurons. MDMA is often ingested with caffeine. Caffeine as a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist affects dopaminergic and serotonergic transmissions. The aim of the present study was to determine the changes in DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum induced by MDMA and caffeine after their chronic administration. To find out whether caffeine aggravates MDMA neurotoxicity, the content of DA and 5-HT, density of brain DAT and SERT, and oxidative damage of nuclear DNA were determined. Furthermore, the effect of caffeine on MDMA-induced changes in striatal dynorphin and enkephalin and on behavior was assessed. The DA and 5-HT release was determined with in vivo microdialysis, and the monoamine contents were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection. DNA damage was assayed with the alkaline comet assay. DAT and SERT densities were determined by immunohistochemistry, while prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin were determined by quantitative PCR reactions. The behavioral changes were measured by the open-field (OF) test and novel object recognition (NOR) test. Caffeine potentiated MDMA-induced DA release while inhibiting 5-HT release in the mouse striatum. Caffeine also exacerbated the oxidative damage of nuclear DNA induced by MDMA but diminished DAT decrease in the striatum and worsened a decrease in SERT density produced by MDMA in the frontal cortex. Neither the striatal PDYN expression, increased by MDMA, nor exploratory and locomotor activities of mice, decreased by MDMA, were affected by caffeine. The exploration of novel object in the NOR test was diminished by MDMA and caffeine. Our data provide evidence that long-term caffeine administration has a

  10. Prophylactic Neuroprotection of Total Glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba against Semen Strychni-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats: Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Reducing the Absorption of Toxic Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujuan; Chu, Yanjie; Zhang, Ruowen; Sun, Linjia; Chen, Xiaohui

    2018-04-20

    Strychnos alkaloids (SAs) are the main toxic constituents in Semen Strychni, a traditional Chinese medicine, which is known for its fatal neurotoxicity. Hence, the present study was carried out to evaluate the neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of the total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba (TGP). An SA brain damage model was firstly established. The neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of TGP were confirmed by physical and behavioral testing, biochemical assay, and histological examination. Then, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to investigate the time-course change and distribution of strychnine and brucine (two main SAs) in the brain after oral SA administration with or without TGP pretreatment. Biochemical analysis results indicated that TGP could ameliorate the oxidative stress status caused by SAs. Time-course change and distribution studies demonstrated that strychnine and brucine were rapidly absorbed into the brain, peaked early at 0.5 h, and were mainly located in the hippocampus and cerebellum. TGP showed a pre-protective effect against neurotoxicity by reducing the absorption of toxic alkaloids into the brain. These findings could provide beneficial information in facilitating future studies of Semen Strychni neurotoxicity and developing herbal medicines to alleviate neurotoxicity in the clinic.

  11. Prophylactic Neuroprotection of Total Glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba against Semen Strychni-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats: Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Reducing the Absorption of Toxic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujuan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Strychnos alkaloids (SAs are the main toxic constituents in Semen Strychni, a traditional Chinese medicine, which is known for its fatal neurotoxicity. Hence, the present study was carried out to evaluate the neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of the total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix Alba (TGP. An SA brain damage model was firstly established. The neurotoxicity induced by SAs and the pre-protective effects of TGP were confirmed by physical and behavioral testing, biochemical assay, and histological examination. Then, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to investigate the time-course change and distribution of strychnine and brucine (two main SAs in the brain after oral SA administration with or without TGP pretreatment. Biochemical analysis results indicated that TGP could ameliorate the oxidative stress status caused by SAs. Time-course change and distribution studies demonstrated that strychnine and brucine were rapidly absorbed into the brain, peaked early at 0.5 h, and were mainly located in the hippocampus and cerebellum. TGP showed a pre-protective effect against neurotoxicity by reducing the absorption of toxic alkaloids into the brain. These findings could provide beneficial information in facilitating future studies of Semen Strychni neurotoxicity and developing herbal medicines to alleviate neurotoxicity in the clinic.

  12. Studies of (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) metabolism and disposition in rats and mice: relationship to neuroprotection and neurotoxicity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Melanie; Maldonado-Adrian, Concepcion; Yuan, Jie; McCann, Una D; Ricaurte, George A

    2013-02-01

    The neurotoxicity of (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy") is influenced by temperature and varies according to species. The mechanisms underlying these two features of MDMA neurotoxicity are unknown, but differences in MDMA metabolism have recently been implicated in both. The present study was designed to 1) assess the effect of hypothermia on MDMA metabolism, 2) determine whether the neuroprotective effect of hypothermia is related to inhibition of MDMA metabolism, and 3) determine if different neurotoxicity profiles in mice and rats are related to differences in MDMA metabolism and/or disposition in the two species. Rats and mice received single neurotoxic oral doses of MDMA at 25°C and 4°C, and body temperature, pharmacokinetic parameters, and serotonergic and dopaminergic neuronal markers were measured. Hypothermia did not alter MDMA metabolism in rats and only modestly inhibited MDMA metabolism in mice; however, it afforded complete neuroprotection in both species. Rats and mice metabolized MDMA in a similar pattern, with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine being the major metabolite, followed by 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine and 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine, respectively. Differences between MDMA pharmacokinetics in rats and mice, including faster elimination in mice, did not account for the different profile of MDMA neurotoxicity in the two species. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that inhibition of MDMA metabolism is not responsible for the neuroprotective effect of hypothermia in rodents, and that different neurotoxicity profiles in rats and mice are not readily explained by differences in MDMA metabolism or disposition.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to diabetic neurotoxicity induced by streptozocin in mice: protective effect of Urtica dioica and pioglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Mirshafa, Atefeh; Yekta Moghaddam, Niusha; Birjandian, Behnoosh; Shaki, Fatemeh

    2018-04-18

    Uncontrolled chronic hyperglycemia in diabetic patients could result in various complications, including neurotoxicity. Urtica dioica L. (UD) is known for its hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of UD and pioglitazone (PIO) in reduction of neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice. Male mice were divided into seven groups: control, diabetic, dimethyl sulfoxide-treated control, PIO-treated, UD-treated, UD-PIO-treated, and vitamin E-treated. For induction of diabetes, streptozocin was injected in a single dose (65 mg/kg, i.p.). All treatments were performed for 5 weeks. Neurotoxicity was evaluated through hot plate and formalin test. Then, animals were killed, brain tissue was separated and the mitochondrial fraction was isolated with different centrifuge technique. Also, oxidative stress markers (reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl, glutathione) were measured in brain. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by MTT test in brain isolated mitochondria. Elevation of oxidative stress markers and mitochondrial damage were observed in diabetic mice compared to control group. Administration of PIO and UD ameliorated the oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage (p < 0.05) in diabetic mice. Also increase in pain score was shown in diabetic mice that treatment with UD and PIO diminished elevation of pain score in diabetic mice. Interestingly, simultaneous administration of PIO and UD showed synergism effect in attenuation of oxidative stress and hyperglycemia. UD showed a therapeutic potential for the attenuation of oxidative stress and diabetes-induced hyperglycemia that can be considered as co-treatment in treatment of diabetic neurotoxicity.

  14. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Mediated Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Induced-Neurotoxicity via Epigenetics Regulation in SK-N-SH Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Xin Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, a new kind of persistent organic pollutant, is widely distributed in the environment and exists in various organisms, where it is also a neurotoxic compound. However, the potential mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still unclear. To examine the role of epigenetics in the neurotoxicity induced by PFOS, SK-N-SH cells were treated with different concentrations of PFOS or control medium (0.1% DMSO for 48 h. The mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, microRNA-16, microRNA-22, and microRNA-30a-5p were detected by Quantitative PCR (QPCR. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA was used to measure the protein levels of BDNF, and a western blot was applied to analyze the protein levels of DNMTs. Bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP was used to detect the methylation status of the BDNF promoter I and IV. Results of MTT assays indicated that treatment with PFOS could lead to a significant decrease of cell viability, and the treated cells became shrunk. In addition, PFOS exposure decreased the expression of BDNF at mRNA and protein levels, increased the expression of microRNA-16, microRNA-22, microRNA-30a-5p, and decreased the expression of DNMT1 at mRNA and protein levels, but increased the expression of DNMT3b at mRNA and protein levels. Our results also demonstrate that PFOS exposure changes the methylation status of BDNF promoter I and IV. The findings of the present study suggest that methylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter and increases of BDNF-related-microRNA might underlie the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity.

  15. In vitro acute and developmental neurotoxicity screening: an overview of cellular platforms and high-throughput technical possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Béla Z; Lehmann, Martin; Gutbier, Simon; Nembo, Erastus; Noel, Sabrina; Smirnova, Lena; Forsby, Anna; Hescheler, Jürgen; Avci, Hasan X; Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2017-01-01

    Neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity are important issues of chemical hazard assessment. Since the interpretation of animal data and their extrapolation to man is challenging, and the amount of substances with information gaps exceeds present animal testing capacities, there is a big demand for in vitro tests to provide initial information and to prioritize for further evaluation. During the last decade, many in vitro tests emerged. These are based on animal cells, human tumour cell lines, primary cells, immortalized cell lines, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells. They differ in their read-outs and range from simple viability assays to complex functional endpoints such as neural crest cell migration. Monitoring of toxicological effects on differentiation often requires multiomics approaches, while the acute disturbance of neuronal functions may be analysed by assessing electrophysiological features. Extrapolation from in vitro data to humans requires a deep understanding of the test system biology, of the endpoints used, and of the applicability domains of the tests. Moreover, it is important that these be combined in the right way to assess toxicity. Therefore, knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of all cellular platforms, endpoints, and analytical methods is essential when establishing in vitro test systems for different aspects of neurotoxicity. The elements of a test, and their evaluation, are discussed here in the context of comprehensive prediction of potential hazardous effects of a compound. We summarize the main cellular characteristics underlying neurotoxicity, present an overview of cellular platforms and read-out combinations assessing distinct parts of acute and developmental neurotoxicology, and highlight especially the use of stem cell-based test systems to close gaps in the available battery of tests.

  16. The role of thymoquinone as a potent antioxidant in ameliorating the neurotoxic effect of sodium arsenate in female rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami B. Kassab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a neurotoxic substance that makes the brain susceptible to free radicals. Thymoquinone (TQ is a potent antioxidant extracted from Nigella sativa seeds. It scavenges free radicals and prevents the cell damage resulted from oxidative substances. In this study, the ameliorative effect of TQ in arsenic-induced neurotoxicity was investigated. Rats were treated for 21 days with: distilled water, 20 mg/kg sodium arsenate, 10 mg/kg TQ, and arsenate followed by TQ. Cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem were removed for the measurements of different physiological parameters. Cerebelli were prepared for histopathological studies. Arsenate treatment caused a decrease in the levels of norepinephrine (NE, dopamine (DA, acetylcholine esterase (AChE and Na+-K+-ATPase activities in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem of rats. Similarly, the levels of glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT were declined. In contrast, serotonin (5-HT, lipid peroxidation (MDA, nitrite/nitrate (NO, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α levels were increased after arsenate treatment. The presence of degenerated Purkinje cells in cerebellum was noticed. Results revealed that, post-treatment with TQ suppressed the arsenate-induced neurotoxic effects as it decreased the levels of 5-HT, MAD, NO, TNF-α and increased the levels of NE, DA, GH, GPx, GR, SOD, and CAT, in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. Likewise, AChE and Na+-K+-ATPase activities were increased after TQ post-treatment. In conclusion, TQ ameliorated the neurotoxic effect of arsenate and suppressed the oxidative stress induced in the nervous system through its antioxidant mechanism.

  17. Sulforaphane protects against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in vivo: Involvement of the mTOR, Nrf2, and autophagy pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Zhou; Bin Chen; Xindong Wang; Lixin Wu; Yang Yang; Xiaolan Cheng; Zhengli Hu; Xueting Cai; Jie Yang; Xiaoyan Sun; Wuguang Lu; Huaijiang Yan; Jiao Chen; Juan Ye; Jianping Shen

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be neuroprotective in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of sulforaphane in an in vivo Parkinson?s disease (PD) model, based on rotenone-mediated neurotoxicity. Our results showed that sulforaphane inhibited rotenone-induced locomotor activity deficiency and dopaminergic neuronal loss. Addition...

  18. Used, Blocking and Sleeping Patents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrisi, Salvatore; Gambardella, Alfonso; Giuri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    patents are being utilized. A substantial share of patents is neither used internally nor for market transactions, which confirms the importance of strategic patenting and inefficiency in the management of intellectual property. We investigate different types of unused patents—unused blocking patents...... and sleeping patents. We also examine the association between used and unused patents and their characteristics such as family size, scope, generality and overlapping claims, technology area, type of applicant, and the competitive environment from where these patents originate. We discuss our results...

  19. Large block test status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.; Lin, W.; Blair, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a status report, which essentially transmits the data that have been collected to date on the Large Block Test (LBT). The analyses of data will be performed during FY98, and then a complete report will be prepared. This status report includes introductory material that is not needed merely to transmit data but is available at this time and therefore included. As such, this status report will serve as the template for the future report, and the information is thus preserved

  20. Protective effects of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) against manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marreilha dos Santos, A.P., E-mail: apsantos@ff.ul.pt [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Lucas, Rui L.; Andrade, Vanda; Mateus, M. Luísa [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Milatovic, Dejan; Aschner, Michael [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Batoreu, M. Camila [I-Med.UL, Department of Toxicology and Food Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2012-02-01

    Chronic, excessive exposure to manganese (Mn) may induce neurotoxicity and cause an irreversible brain disease, referred to as manganism. Efficacious therapies for the treatment of Mn are lacking, mandating the development of new interventions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in attenuating the neurotoxic effects of Mn in an in vivo rat model. Exposure biomarkers, inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, as well as behavioral parameters were evaluated. Co-treatment with Mn plus Ebs or Mn plus PAS caused a significant decrease in blood and brain Mn concentrations (compared to rats treated with Mn alone), concomitant with reduced brain E{sub 2} prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) and enhanced brain glutathione (GSH) levels, decreased serum prolactin (PRL) levels, and increased ambulation and rearing activities. Taken together, these results establish that both PAS and Ebs are efficacious in reducing Mn body burden, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and locomotor activity impairments in a rat model of Mn-induced toxicity. -- Highlights: ► The manuscript is unique in its approach to the neurotoxicity of Mn. ► The manuscript incorporates molecular, cellular and functional (behavioral) analyses. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in restoring Mn behavioral function. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in reducing Mn-induced oxidative stress. ► Both PAS and Ebs led to a decrease in Mn-induced neuro-inflammation.

  1. Curcumin Attenuated Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells Via Activation of the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, You-Ling; Li, Heng-Chang; Zhao, Wei; Peng, Hui-Hua; Huang, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Hang; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Bupivacaine is widely used for regional anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, and pain management. However, bupivacaine could cause neuronal injury. Curcumin, a low molecular weight polyphenol, has a variety of bioactivities and may exert neuroprotective effects against damage induced by some stimuli. In the present study, we tested whether curcumin could attenuate bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell injury was evaluated by examining cell viability, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. We also investigated the levels of activation of the Akt signaling pathway and the effect of Akt inhibition by triciribine on cell injury following bupivacaine and curcumin treatment. Our findings showed that the bupivacaine treatment could induce neurotoxicity. Pretreatment of the SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin significantly attenuated bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Interestingly, the curcumin treatment increased the levels of Akt phosphorylation. More significantly, the pharmacological inhibition of Akt abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against bupivacaine-induced cell injury. Our data suggest that pretreating SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin provides a protective effect on bupivacaine-induced neuronal injury via activation of the Akt signaling pathway.

  2. Liu Jun Zi Tang—A Potential, Multi-Herbal Complementary Therapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Tang Chiou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Liu Jun Zi Tang (LJZT has been used to treat functional dyspepsia and depression, suggesting its effects on gastrointestinal and neurological functions. LJZT is currently used as a complementary therapy to attenuate cisplatin-induced side effects, such as dyspepsia. However, its effect on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain or neurotoxicity has rarely been studied. Thus, we explored potential mechanisms underlying LJZT protection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. We observed that LJZT attenuated cisplatin-induced thermal hyperalgesia in mice and apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, it also attenuated cisplatin-induced cytosolic and mitochondrial free radical formation, reversed the cisplatin-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the release of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic factors. LJZT not only activated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α promoter region, but also attenuated the cisplatin-induced reduction of PGC-1α expression. Silencing of the PGC-1α gene counteracted the protection of LJZT. Taken together, LJZT mediated, through anti-oxidative effect and mitochondrial function regulation, to prevent cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Neurotoxicity in breast cancer survivors ≥10 years post-treatment is dependent on treatment type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten-Kemperman, Myrle M; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Koppelmans, Vincent; Boogerd, Willem; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schagen, Sanne B

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) for breast cancer (BC) is associated with very late side-effects on brain function and structure. However, little is known about neurotoxicity of specific treatment regimens. To compare neurotoxicity profiles after different treatment strategies, we used neurocognitive testing and multimodality MRI in BC survivors randomized to high-dose (HI), conventional-dose (CON-) CT or radiotherapy (RT) only and a healthy control (HC) group. BC survivors who received CON-CT (n = 20) and HC (n = 20) were assessed using a neurocognitive test battery and multimodality MRI including 3D-T1, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and 1H-MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to measure various aspects of cerebral white (WM) and gray matter (GM). Data were compared to previously assessed groups of BC survivors who received HI-CT (n = 17) and RT-only (n = 15). Testing took place on average 11.5 years post-CT. 3D-T1 showed focal GM volume reductions both for HI-CT and CON-CT compared to RT-only (p compared to HC on MRI and neurocognitive measurements (p brain changes after BC treatment may show more pronounced (partial) recovery than GM. Furthermore, our results suggest residual neurotoxicity in the RT-only group, which warrants further investigation.

  4. Silver nanoparticles reduce brain inflammation and related neurotoxicity through induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel A.; Leo, Bey Fen; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Chung, Kian Fan; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are known to penetrate into the brain and cause neuronal death. However, there is a paucity in studies examining the effect of AgNP on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia. Given microglia are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), it is important to examine how AgNPs affect microglial inflammation to fully assess AgNP neurotoxicity. In addition, understanding AgNP processing by microglia will allow better prediction of their long term bioreactivity. In the present study, the in vitro uptake and intracellular transformation of citrate-capped AgNPs by microglia, as well as their effects on microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity were examined. Analytical microscopy demonstrated internalization and dissolution of AgNPs within microglia and formation of non-reactive silver sulphide (Ag2S) on the surface of AgNPs. Furthermore, AgNP-treatment up-regulated microglial expression of the hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, AgNPs showed significant anti-inflammatory effects, reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated ROS, nitric oxide and TNFα production, which translated into reduced microglial toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons. Hence, the present results indicate that intracellular Ag2S formation, resulting from CSE-mediated H2S production in microglia, sequesters Ag+ ions released from AgNPs, significantly limiting their toxicity, concomitantly reducing microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity.

  5. Micellization and Dynamics of a Block Copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Triblock copolymers of the type EPE, where E and P denote ethylene oxide and propylene oxide blocks, respectively, are industrially important copolymers often called Pluronics or Poloxamers. EPE copolymers form micelles with a core of P blocks and different micellar shapes depending on block leng...

  6. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or other...

  7. 31 CFR 500.319 - Blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 500.319 Section 500... § 500.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals of other...

  8. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  9. 21 CFR 882.5070 - Bite block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bite block. 882.5070 Section 882.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5070 Bite block. (a) Identification. A bite block...

  10. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  11. Coastal protection using topological interlocking blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2013-04-01

    The coastal protection systems mainly rely on the self-weight of armour blocks to ensure its stability. We propose a system of interlocking armour blocks, which form plate-shape assemblies. The shape and the position of the blocks are chosen in such a way as to impose kinematic constraints that prevent the blocks from being removed from the assembly. The topological interlocking shapes include simple convex blocks such as platonic solids, the most practical being tetrahedra, cubes and octahedra. Another class of topological interlocking blocks is so-called osteomorphic blocks, which form plate-like assemblies tolerant to random block removal (almost 25% of blocks need to be removed for the assembly to loose integrity). Both classes require peripheral constraint, which can be provided either by the weight of the blocks or post-tensioned internal cables. The interlocking assemblies provide increased stability because lifting one block involves lifting (and bending) the whole assembly. We model the effect of interlocking by introducing an equivalent additional self-weight of the armour blocks. This additional self-weight is proportional to the critical pressure needed to cause bending of the interlocking assembly when it loses stability. Using beam approximation we find an equivalent stability coefficient for interlocking. It is found to be greater than the stability coefficient of a structure with similar blocks without interlocking. In the case when the peripheral constraint is provided by the weight of the blocks and for the slope angle of 45o, the effective stability coefficient for a structure of 100 blocks is 33% higher than the one for a similar structure without interlocking. Further increase in the stability coefficient can be reached by a specially constructed peripheral constraint system, for instance by using post-tension cables.

  12. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  13. Neurotoxic effect of 2,5-hexanedione on neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Sun; Park, Hee Ra; Park, Mikyung; Kim, So Jung; Kwon, Mugil; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kwack, Seung Jun; Kang, Tae Seok; Kim, Seung Hee; Lee, Jaewon

    2009-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD), a metabolite of n-hexane, causes central and peripheral neuropathy leading to motor neuron deficits. Although chronic exposure to n-hexane is known to cause gradual sensorimotor neuropathy, there are no reports on the effects of low doses of HD on neurogenesis in the central nervous system. In the current study, we explored HD toxicity in murine neural progenitor cells (NPC), primary neuronal culture and young adult mice. HD (500 nM∼50 μM) dose-dependently suppressed NPC proliferation and cell viability, and also increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). HD (10 or 50 mg/kg for 2 weeks) inhibited hippocampal neuronal and NPC proliferation in 6-week-old male ICR mice, as measured by BrdU incorporation in the dentate gyrus, indicating HD impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, elevated microglial activation was observed in the hippocampal CA3 region and lateral ventricles of HD-treated mice. Lastly, HD dose-dependently decreased the viability of primary cultured neurons. Based on biochemical and histochemical evidence from both cell culture and HD-treated animals, the neurotoxic mechanisms by which HD inhibits NPC proliferation and hippocampal neurogenesis may relate to its ability to elicit an increased generation of deleterious ROS.

  14. α7 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes the Neuroprotective Functions of Astrocytes against Oxaliplatin Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Di Cesare Mannelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathies are characterized by a complex response of the central nervous system to injuries. Glial cells are recruited to maintain neuronal homeostasis but dysregulated activation leads to pain signaling amplification and reduces the glial neuroprotective power. Recently, we highlighted the property of α7 nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR agonists to relieve pain and induce neuroprotection simultaneously with a strong increase in astrocyte density. Aimed to study the role of α7 nAChR in the neuron-glia cross-talk, we treated primary rat neurons and astrocytes with the neurotoxic anticancer drug oxaliplatin evaluating the effect of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU-282987 (PNU. Oxaliplatin (1 μM, 48 h reduced cell viability and increased caspase-3 activity of neuron monocultures without damaging astrocytes. In cocultures, astrocytes were not able to protect neurons by oxaliplatin even if glial cell metabolism was stimulated (pyruvate increase. On the contrary, the coculture incubation with 10 μM PNU improved neuron viability and inhibited apoptosis. In the absence of astrocytes, the protection disappeared. Furthermore, PNU promoted the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 and the expression of the glutamate-detoxifying enzyme glutamine synthetase. The α7 nAChR stimulation protects neurons from oxaliplatin toxicity through an astrocyte-mediated mechanism. α7 nAChR is suggested for recovering the homeostatic role of astrocytes.

  15. Methylmercury Induced Neurotoxicity and the Influence of Selenium in the Brains of Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Daniel Rasinger

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg is well characterised, and the ameliorating effects of selenium have been described. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind this contaminant-nutrient interaction. We investigated the influence of selenium (as selenomethionine, SeMet and MeHg on mercury accumulation and protein expression in the brain of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio. Fish were fed diets containing elevated levels of MeHg and/or SeMet in a 2 × 2 full factorial design for eight weeks. Mercury concentrations were highest in the brain tissue of MeHg-exposed fish compared to the controls, whereas lower levels of mercury were found in the brain of zebrafish fed both MeHg and SeMet compared with the fish fed MeHg alone. The expression levels of proteins associated with gap junction signalling, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly (p < 0.05 altered in the brain of zebrafish after exposure to MeHg and SeMet alone or in combination. Analysis of upstream regulators indicated that these changes were linked to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways, which were activated by MeHg and inhibited by SeMet, possibly through a reactive oxygen species mediated differential activation of RICTOR, the rapamycin-insensitive binding partner of mTOR.

  16. Sex-Specific Neurotoxic Effects of Organophosphate Pesticides Across the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Nicole; Re, Diane B

    2017-12-01

    This review discusses the sex-specific effects of exposure to various organophosphate (OP) pesticides throughout the life course and potential reasons for the differential vulnerabilities observed across sexes. Sex is a crucial factor in the response to toxicants, yet the sex-specific effects of OP exposure, particularly in juveniles and adults, remain unresolved. This is largely due to study design and inconsistencies in exposure and outcome assessments. Exposure to OPs results in multiple adverse outcomes influenced by many factors including sex. Reported sex-specific effects suggest that males are more susceptible to OPs, which reflects the sex-dependent prevalence of various neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders such as autism and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in which males are at greater risk. Thus, this review proposes that the biological sex-specific effects elicited by OP exposure may in part underlie the dimorphic susceptibilities observed in neurological disorders. Understanding the immediate and long-term effects of OP exposure across sexes will be critical in advancing our understanding of OP-induced neurotoxicity and disease.

  17. The similar neurotoxic effects of nanoparticulate and ionic silver in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Loeschner, Katrin; Mortensen, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    We compared the neurotoxic effects of 14nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and ionic silver, in the form of silver acetate (AgAc), in vivo and in vitro. In female rats, we found that AgNPs (4.5 and 9mg AgNP/kg bw/day) and ionic silver (9mg Ag/kg bw/day) increased the dopamine concentration...... in the brain following 28 days of oral administration. The concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain was increased only by AgNP at a dose of 9mg Ag/kg bw/day. Only AgAc (9mg Ag/kg bw/day) was found to increase noradrenaline concentration in the brain. In contrast to the results obtained from...... a 28-day exposure, the dopamine concentration in the brain was decreased by AgNPs (2.25 and 4.5mg/kg bw/day) following a 14-day exposure. These data suggest that there are differential effects of silver on dopamine depending on the length of exposure. In vitro, AgNPs, AgAc and a 12kDa filtered sub...

  18. MDMA, serotonergic neurotoxicity, and the diverse functional deficits of recreational 'Ecstasy' users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Andrew C

    2013-09-01

    Serotonergic neurotoxicity following MDMA is well-established in laboratory animals, and neuroimaging studies have found lower serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in abstinent Ecstasy/MDMA users. Serotonin is a modulator for many different psychobiological functions, and this review will summarize the evidence for equivalent functional deficits in recreational users. Declarative memory, prospective memory, and higher cognitive skills are often impaired. Neurocognitive deficits are associated with reduced SERT in the hippocampus, parietal cortex, and prefrontal cortex. EEG and ERP studies have shown localised reductions in brain activity during neurocognitive performance. Deficits in sleep, mood, vision, pain, psychomotor skill, tremor, neurohormonal activity, and psychiatric status, have also been demonstrated. The children of mothers who take Ecstasy/MDMA during pregnancy have developmental problems. These psychobiological deficits are wide-ranging, and occur in functions known to be modulated by serotonin. They are often related to lifetime dosage, with light users showing slight changes, and heavy users displaying more pronounced problems. In summary, abstinent Ecstasy/MDMA users can show deficits in a wide range of biobehavioral functions with a serotonergic component. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies Abeta oligomers neurotoxicity providing an unexpected mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sanz-Blasco

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid beta peptide (Abeta toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Abeta(1-42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Abeta fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca(2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Abeta oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Abeta oligomers. Our results indicate that i mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers and ii inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Abeta oligomers and AD.

  20. FluoroGold-Labeled Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture for Neurotoxicity Screening Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Smedowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical toxicity screening of the new retinal compounds is an absolute requirement in the pathway of further drug development. Since retinal neuron cultivation and in vivo studies are relatively expensive and time consuming, we aimed to create a fast and reproducible ex vivo system for retinal toxicity screening. For this purpose, we used rat retinal explant culture that was retrogradely labeled with the FluoroGold before the isolation. Explants were exposed to a toxic concentration of gentamicin and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a known neuroprotective agent. The measured outcomes showed the cell density in retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the culture medium. Gentamicin-induced oxidative stress resulted in retinal cell damage and rapid LDH release to the culture medium (p0.05. As well as this, the LDH activity was directly correlated with the cell count in GCL (R=−0.84, p<0.00001, making a sensitive marker of retinal neuron damage. The FLOREC protocol could be considered as a fast, reproducible, and sensitive method to detect neurotoxicity in the screening studies of the retinal drugs.