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Sample records for blockade selectively targets

  1. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  2. Analgesia, sedation, and neuromuscular blockade during targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riker, Richard R; Gagnon, David J; May, Teresa; Seder, David B; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-12-01

    The approach to sedation, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade during targeted temperature management (TTM) remains largely unstudied, forcing clinicians to adapt previous research from other patient environments. During TTM, very little data guide drug selection, doses, and specific therapeutic goals. Sedation should be deep enough to prevent awareness during neuromuscular blockade, but titration is complex as metabolism and clearance are delayed for almost all drugs during hypothermia. Deeper sedation is associated with prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) and ventilator therapy, increased delirium and infection, and delayed wakening which can confound early critical neurological assessments, potentially resulting in erroneous prognostication and inappropriate withdrawal of life support. We review the potential therapeutic goals for sedation, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade during TTM; the adverse events associated with that treatment; data suggesting that TTM and organ dysfunction impair drug metabolism; and controversies and potential benefits of specific monitoring. We also highlight the areas needing better research to guide our therapy. PMID:26670815

  3. Immune checkpoint blockade in cancer treatment: a double-edged sword cross-targeting the host as an "innocent bystander".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelao, Lucia; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Targeted immune checkpoint blockade augments anti-tumor immunity and induces durable responses in patients with melanoma and other solid tumors. It also induces specific "immune-related adverse events" (irAEs). IrAEs mainly include gastrointestinal, dermatological, hepatic and endocrinological toxicities. Off-target effects that arise appear to account for much of the toxicity of the immune checkpoint blockade. These unique "innocent bystander" effects are likely a direct result of breaking immune tolerance upon immune check point blockade and require specific treatment guidelines that include symptomatic therapies or systemic corticosteroids. What do we need going forward to limit immune checkpoint blockade-induced toxicity? Most importantly, we need a better understanding of the roles played by these agents in normal tissues, so that we can begin to predict potentially problematic side effects on the basis of their selectivity profile. Second, we need to focus on the predictive factors of the response and toxicity of the host rather than serially focusing on individual agents. Third, rigorous biomarker-driven clinical trials are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms of both the benefit and toxicity. We will summarize the double-edged sword effect of immunotherapeutics in cancer treatment. PMID:24594636

  4. Viral vector-mediated selective and reversible blockade of the pathway for visual orienting in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi eIsa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, by using a combination of two viral vectors, we developed a technique for pathway-selective and reversible synaptic transmission blockade, and successfully induced a behavioral deficit of dexterous hand movements in macaque monkeys by affecting a population of spinal interneurons. To explore the capacity of this technique to work in other pathways and species, and to obtain fundamental methodological information, we tried to block the crossed tecto-reticular pathway, which is known to control orienting responses to visual targets, in mice. A neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer vector with the gene encoding enhanced tetanus neurotoxin (eTeNT tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of a tetracycline responsive element was injected into the left medial pontine reticular formation. 7–17 days later, an adeno-associated viral vector with a highly efficient Tet-ON sequence, rtTAV16, was injected into the right superior colliculus. 5–9 weeks later, the daily administration of doxycycline (Dox was initiated. Visual orienting responses toward the left side were impaired 1 - 4 days after Dox administration. Anti-GFP immunohistochemistry revealed that a number of neurons in the intermediate and deep layers of the right superior colliculus were positively stained, indicating eTeNT expression. After the termination of Dox administration, the anti-GFP staining returned to the baseline level within 28 days. A second round of Dox administration, starting from 28 days after the termination of the first Dox administration, resulted in the reappearance of the behavioral impairment. These findings showed that pathway-selective and reversible blockade of synaptic transmission causes behavioral effects also in rodents, and that the crossed tecto-reticular pathway surely controls visual orienting behaviors.

  5. Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Treatment: A Double-Edged Sword Cross-Targeting the Host as an “Innocent Bystander”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Gelao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeted immune checkpoint blockade augments anti-tumor immunity and induces durable responses in patients with melanoma and other solid tumors. It also induces specific “immune-related adverse events” (irAEs. IrAEs mainly include gastrointestinal, dermatological, hepatic and endocrinological toxicities. Off-target effects that arise appear to account for much of the toxicity of the immune checkpoint blockade. These unique “innocent bystander” effects are likely a direct result of breaking immune tolerance upon immune check point blockade and require specific treatment guidelines that include symptomatic therapies or systemic corticosteroids. What do we need going forward to limit immune checkpoint blockade-induced toxicity? Most importantly, we need a better understanding of the roles played by these agents in normal tissues, so that we can begin to predict potentially problematic side effects on the basis of their selectivity profile. Second, we need to focus on the predictive factors of the response and toxicity of the host rather than serially focusing on individual agents. Third, rigorous biomarker-driven clinical trials are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms of both the benefit and toxicity. We will summarize the double-edged sword effect of immunotherapeutics in cancer treatment.

  6. Combined TRPC3 and TRPC6 blockade by selective small-molecule or genetic deletion inhibits pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kinya; Rainer, Peter P; Shalkey Hahn, Virginia; Lee, Dong-Ik; Jo, Su-Hyun; Andersen, Asger; Liu, Ting; Xu, Xiaoping; Willette, Robert N; Lepore, John J; Marino, Joseph P; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Kass, David A

    2014-01-28

    Chronic neurohormonal and mechanical stresses are central features of heart disease. Increasing evidence supports a role for the transient receptor potential canonical channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 in this pathophysiology. Channel expression for both is normally very low but is increased by cardiac disease, and genetic gain- or loss-of-function studies support contributions to hypertrophy and dysfunction. Selective small-molecule inhibitors remain scarce, and none target both channels, which may be useful given the high homology among them and evidence of redundant signaling. Here we tested selective TRPC3/6 antagonists (GSK2332255B and GSK2833503A; IC50, 3-21 nM against TRPC3 and TRPC6) and found dose-dependent blockade of cell hypertrophy signaling triggered by angiotensin II or endothelin-1 in HEK293T cells as well as in neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes. In vivo efficacy in mice and rats was greatly limited by rapid metabolism and high protein binding, although antifibrotic effects with pressure overload were observed. Intriguingly, although gene deletion of TRPC3 or TRPC6 alone did not protect against hypertrophy or dysfunction from pressure overload, combined deletion was protective, supporting the value of dual inhibition. Further development of this pharmaceutical class may yield a useful therapeutic agent for heart disease management.

  7. CSF1 Receptor Targeting In Prostate Cancer Reverses Macrophage-Mediated Resistance To Androgen Blockade Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Jemima; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Liu, Connie; Priceman, Saul J.; Moughon, Diana; Jiang, Ziyue; Pouliot, Frederic; Magyar, Clara; Sung, James L.; Xu, Jingying; Deng, Gang; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Fradet, Yves; Lacombe, Louis; Jung, Michael E.; Huang, Jiaoti; Wu, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer progression and therapeutic resistance by enhancing angiogenesis, matrix-remodeling and immunosuppression. In this study prostate cancer (PCa) under androgen blockade therapy (ABT) was investigated, demonstrating that TAMs contribute to PCa disease recurrence through paracrine signaling processes. ABT induced the tumor cells to express macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (M-CSF-1 or CSF-1) and other cytokines that recruit and modulate macrophages, causing a significant increase in TAM infiltration. Inhibitors of CSF-1 signaling through its receptor, CSF-1R, were tested in combination with ABT, demonstrating that blockade of TAM influx in this setting disrupts tumor promotion and sustains a more durable therapeutic response compared to ABT alone. PMID:25736687

  8. Selective Blockade of Periostin Exon 17 Preserves Cardiac Performance in Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Katsuragi, Naruto; Sanada, Fumihiro; Azuma, Junya; Iekushi, Kazuma; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Okayama, Keita; Ikeda-Iwabu, Yuka; Muratsu, Jun; Otsu, Rei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that overexpression of full-length periostin, Pn-1, resulted in ventricular dilation with enhanced interstitial collagen deposition in a rat model. However, other reports have documented that the short-form splice variants Pn-2 (lacking exon 17) and Pn-4 (lacking exons 17 and 21) promoted cardiac repair by angiogenesis and prevented cardiac rupture after acute myocardial infarction. The apparently differing findings from those reports prompted us to use a neutralizing antibody to selectively inhibit Pn-1 by blockade of exon 17 in a rat acute myocardial infarction model. Administration of Pn neutralizing antibody resulted in a significant decrease in the infarcted and fibrotic areas of the myocardium, which prevented ventricular wall thinning and dilatation. The inhibition of fibrosis by Pn neutralizing antibody was associated with a significant decrease in gene expression of fibrotic markers, including collagen I, collagen III, and transforming growth factor-β1. Importantly, the number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts was significantly reduced in the hearts of animals treated with Pn neutralizing antibody, whereas cardiomyocyte proliferation and angiogenesis were comparable in the IgG and neutralizing antibody groups. Moreover, the level of Pn-1 expression was significantly correlated with the severity of myocardial infarction. In addition, Pn-1, but not Pn-2 or Pn-4, inhibited fibroblast and myocyte attachment, which might account for the cell slippage observed during cardiac remodeling. Collectively, these results indicate that therapeutics that specifically inhibit Pn exon-17, via a neutralizing antibody or drug, without suppressing other periostin variants might offer a new class of medication for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction patients.

  9. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  10. Targeted leptin receptor blockade: Role of VTA and NTS leptin receptors in body weight homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Matheny, M.; Strehler, K.Y.E.; M. King; Tümer, N.; Scarpace, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examined whether leptin stimulation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) has a role in body weight homeostasis independent of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To this end, recombinant adeno-associated viral techniques were employed to target leptin overexpression or overexpression of a dominant negative leptin mutant (Leptin Antagonist). Leptin Antagonist overexpression in MBH or VTA increased food intake and body weight to simil...

  11. Target selection for direct marketing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, Jan Roelf

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis we concentrated on the use ol direct mail for targeting potential buyers. The major characteristics that influences the success of a plomotional direct mail campaign are the of-fbr,the communication elements, the timing or sequence of these communication elements, and the list of cus

  12. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  13. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eShelton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6 induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg. Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15 or advance (CT22 wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light-induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals.

  14. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  15. A color hierarchy for automatic target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernikov, Illia; Fallah, Mazyar

    2010-01-01

    Visual processing of color starts at the cones in the retina and continues through ventral stream visual areas, called the parvocellular pathway. Motion processing also starts in the retina but continues through dorsal stream visual areas, called the magnocellular system. Color and motion processing are functionally and anatomically discrete. Previously, motion processing areas MT and MST have been shown to have no color selectivity to a moving stimulus; the neurons were colorblind whenever color was presented along with motion. This occurs when the stimuli are luminance-defined versus the background and is considered achromatic motion processing. Is motion processing independent of color processing? We find that motion processing is intrinsically modulated by color. Color modulated smooth pursuit eye movements produced upon saccading to an aperture containing a surface of coherently moving dots upon a black background. Furthermore, when two surfaces that differed in color were present, one surface was automatically selected based upon a color hierarchy. The strength of that selection depended upon the distance between the two colors in color space. A quantifiable color hierarchy for automatic target selection has wide-ranging implications from sports to advertising to human-computer interfaces. PMID:20195361

  16. A color hierarchy for automatic target selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illia Tchernikov

    Full Text Available Visual processing of color starts at the cones in the retina and continues through ventral stream visual areas, called the parvocellular pathway. Motion processing also starts in the retina but continues through dorsal stream visual areas, called the magnocellular system. Color and motion processing are functionally and anatomically discrete. Previously, motion processing areas MT and MST have been shown to have no color selectivity to a moving stimulus; the neurons were colorblind whenever color was presented along with motion. This occurs when the stimuli are luminance-defined versus the background and is considered achromatic motion processing. Is motion processing independent of color processing? We find that motion processing is intrinsically modulated by color. Color modulated smooth pursuit eye movements produced upon saccading to an aperture containing a surface of coherently moving dots upon a black background. Furthermore, when two surfaces that differed in color were present, one surface was automatically selected based upon a color hierarchy. The strength of that selection depended upon the distance between the two colors in color space. A quantifiable color hierarchy for automatic target selection has wide-ranging implications from sports to advertising to human-computer interfaces.

  17. PD-L1 is a novel direct target of HIF-1α, and its blockade under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Desantis, Giacomo; Janji, Bassam; Hasmim, Meriem; Karray, Saoussen; Dessen, Philippe; Bronte, Vincenzo; Chouaib, Salem

    2014-05-01

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form an important component of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Here, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on immune checkpoint receptors (programmed death [PD]-1 and CTLA-4) and their respective ligands (PD-1 ligand 1 [PD-L1], PD-L2, CD80, and CD86) on MDSCs. We demonstrate that MDSCs at the tumor site show a differential expression of PD-L1 as compared with MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organ (spleen). Hypoxia caused a rapid, dramatic, and selective up-regulation of PD-L1 on splenic MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice. This was not limited to MDSCs, as hypoxia also significantly increased the expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, dendritic cells, and tumor cells. Furthermore, PD-L1 up-regulation under hypoxia was dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) but not HIF-2α. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay revealed direct binding of HIF-1α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the PD-L1 proximal promoter. Blockade of PD-L1 under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation and was accompanied by the down-regulation of MDSCs IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, neutralizing antibodies against IL-10 under hypoxia significantly abrogated the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Simultaneous blockade of PD-L1 along with inhibition of HIF-1α may thus represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S.; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  19. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare the ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and fi...

  20. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  1. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  2. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  3. Selecting asteroids for a targeted spectroscopic survey

    CERN Document Server

    Oszkiewicz, D A; Tomov, T; Birlan, M; Geier, S; Penttilä, A; Polińska, M

    2014-01-01

    Asteroid spectroscopy reflects surface mineralogy. There are few thousand asteroids whose surfaces have been observed spectrally. Determining the surface properties of those objects is important for many practical and scientific applications, such as for example developing impact deflection strategies or studying history and evolution of the Solar System and planet formation. The aim of this study is to develop a pre-selection method that can be utilized in searching for asteroids of any taxonomic complex. The method could then be utilized im multiple applications such as searching for the missing V-types or looking for primitive asteroids. We used the Bayes Naive Classifier combined with observations obtained in the course of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer surveys as well as a database of asteroid phase curves for asteroids with known taxonomic type. Using the new classification method we have selected a number of possible V-type candidates. Some of the candidates we...

  4. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, James P; Otárola-Castillo, Erik; Ralph, Peter; Alas, Jesse; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis that seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here, we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: (1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) tend to evolve larger penises and pelvic bones compared to their body length, and (2) pelvic bone shape has diverged more in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time.

  5. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  6. Reduced Risk of Human Lung Cancer by Selective Cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2 Blockade: Results of a Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall E. Harris, Joanne Beebe-Donk, Galal A. Alshafie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a case control study of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 blocking agents and lung cancer. A total of 492 newly diagnosed lung cancer cases were ascertained during January 1, 2002 to September 30, 2004, at The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. All cases were confirmed by examination of the pathology report. Healthy population controls without cancer were ascertained during the same time period. Controls were frequency matched at a rate of 2:1 to the cases by age, gender, and county of residence. We collected information on type, frequency, and duration of use of selective COX-2 inhibitors (primarily celecoxib or rofecoxib and nonselective NSAIDs such as ibuprofen and aspirin. Estimates of odds ratios (OR were obtained with adjustment for cigarette smoking, age and other potential confounders using logistic regression analysis. Odds Ratios for selective COX-2 inhibitors were adjusted for past use of other NSAIDs. Use of any selective COX-2 inhibitor for more than one year produced a significant (60% reduction in the risk of lung cancer (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.19-0.81. Observed risk reductions were consistent for men (OR=0.26, 95% CI=0.10-0.62 and women (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.24-1.13 and for individual COX-2 inhibitors (OR=0.28, 95% CI=-0.12-0.67, for celecoxib and OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.19-1.56, for rofecoxib. Intake of ibuprofen or aspirin also produced significant risk reductions (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.23-0.73 and OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.34-0.82, respectively, whereas acetaminophen, an analgesic with negligible COX-2 activity, had no effect on the risk (OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.53-3.37. This investigation demonstrates for the first time that selective COX-2 blocking agents have strong potential for the chemoprevention of human lung cancer.

  7. Target Tracking Feature Selection Algorithm Based on Adaboost

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Yi

    2013-01-01

         With the development of image processing technology and popularization of computer technology, intelligent machine vision technology has a wide range of application in the medical, military, industrial and other fields. Target tracking feature selection algorithm is one of research focuses in the machine intelligent vision technology. Therefore, to design the target tracking feature selection algorithm with high accuracy and good stability is extremely necessary. This paper presents a ta...

  8. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions. PMID:26563393

  9. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat-t...

  10. Target selection and transfer trajectories design for exploring asteroid mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Technique of target selection and profiles of transfer trajectory for Chinese asteroid exploring mission are studied systemically.A complete set of approaches to selecting mission targets and designing the transfer trajectory is proposed.First,when selecting a target for mission,some factors regarded as the scientific motivations are discussed.Then,when analyzing the accessibility of targets,instead of the classical strategy,the multiple gravity-assist strategy is provided.The suitable and possible targets,taking into account scientific value and technically feasible,are obtained via selection and estimation.When designing the transfer trajectory for exploring asteroid mission,an approach to selecting gravity-assist celestial body is proposed.Finally,according to the mission constraints,the trajectory profile with 2-years △V-EGA for exploring asteroid is presented.Through analyzing the trajectory profile,unexpected result that the trajectory would pass by two main-belts asteroids is found.So,the original proposal is extended to the multiple flybys mission.It adds the scientific return for asteroid mission.

  11. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Alycia J; Kennedy, Grant M; Roberge, Aki; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P; Danchi, William C; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andrew J; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Wyatt, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ~300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels ...

  12. Protecting Ligands Enhance Selective Targeting of Multivalent Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programmed to bind biological targets, e.g. cells, depending on the receptors they express, providing a general platform for the development of different technologies, from selective drug-delivery to biosensing. In order to be highly selective ligands should exclusively bind to specific targeted receptors, since formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to non-specific binding and potentially harmful behaviour. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is presented here to describe the extent to which bond strength and nanoparticle valency can induce non-selective adsorption. The same model is used to describe a possible solution: functionalization of the nanoparticles with "protective" receptors. The latter compete with cell receptors for the targeting ligands, and can be optimized to strongly reduce the effect of u...

  13. Pharmacological targeting of dopamine D3 receptors: Possible clinical applications of selective drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Collo, Ginetta

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine D3 receptors have been pharmacologically engaged in humans since the development of the first antipsychotics and ergot-derivative dopamine (DA) agonists, even without knowing it. These agents were generally non-selective, developed primarily to target D2 receptors. In the last 10 years the understanding of the clinical implication of D3 receptors has been progressing also due to the identification of D3 gene polymorphisms, the use of more selective PET ligands such as [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO and the learning regarding the clinical use of the D3-preferential D2/D3 agonists ropinirole and pramipexole. A new specific neuroplasticity role of D3 receptor regarding dendrite arborisation outgrowth in dopaminergic neurons was also proposed to support, at least in part, the slowing of disease observed in subjects with Parkinson׳s Disease treated with DA agonists. Similar mechanisms could be at the basis of the antidepressant-like effects observed with DA agonists when co-administered with standard of care. Severe adverse event occurring with the use of anti-parkinsonian DA agonists in predisposed subjects, i.e., impulse control disorders, are now suggested to be putatively related to overactive D3 receptors. Not surprisingly, blockade of D3 receptors was proposed as treatment for addictive disorders, a goal that could be potentially achieved by repositioning buspirone, an anxiolytic drug with D3-preferential antagonistic features, or with novel selective D3 antagonists or partial agonists currently in development for schizophrenia. At the moment ABT-925 is the only selective D3 antagonist tested in schizophrenic patients in Phase II, showing an intriguing cognitive enhancing effects supported by preclinical data. Finally, exploratory pharmacogenetic analysis suggested that ABT-925 could be effective in a subpopulation of patients with a polymorphism on the D3 receptor, opening to a possible personalised medicine approach. PMID:26298833

  14. In-silico Leishmania Target Selectivity of Antiparasitic Terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifedayo Victor Ogungbe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs, like leishmaniasis, are major causes of mortality in resource-limited countries. The mortality associated with these diseases is largely due to fragile healthcare systems, lack of access to medicines, and resistance by the parasites to the few available drugs. Many antiparasitic plant-derived isoprenoids have been reported, and many of them have good in vitro activity against various forms of Leishmania spp. In this work, potential Leishmania biochemical targets of antiparasitic isoprenoids were studied in silico. Antiparasitic monoterpenoids selectively docked to L. infantum nicotinamidase, L. major uridine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase and methionyl t-RNA synthetase. The two protein targets selectively targeted by germacranolide sesquiterpenoids were L. major methionyl t-RNA synthetase and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Diterpenoids generally favored docking to L. mexicana glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Limonoids also showed some selectivity for L. mexicana glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and L. major dihydroorotate dehydrogenase while withanolides docked more selectively with L. major uridine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The selectivity of the different classes of antiparasitic compounds for the protein targets considered in this work can be explored in fragment- and/or structure-based drug design towards the development of leads for new antileishmanial drugs.

  15. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  16. Motor cortex guides selection of predictable movement targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Philip J.W.; Strauss, Soeren; Sami, Saber A.; Heinke, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The present paper asks whether the motor cortex contributes to prediction-based guidance of target selection. This question was inspired by recent evidence that suggests (i) recurrent connections from the motor system into the attentional system may extract movement-relevant perceptual information and (ii) that the motor cortex cannot only generate predictions of the sensory consequences of movements but may also operate as predictor of perceptual events in general. To test this idea we employed a choice reaching task requiring participants to rapidly reach and touch a predictable or unpredictable colour target. Motor cortex activity was modulated via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In Experiment 1 target colour repetitions were predictable. Under such conditions anodal tDCS facilitated selection versus sham and cathodal tDCS. This improvement was apparent for trajectory curvature but not movement initiation. Conversely, where no predictability of colour was embedded reach performance was unaffected by tDCS. Finally, the results of a key-press experiment suggested that motor cortex involvement is restricted to tasks where the predictable target colour is movement-relevant. The outcomes are interpreted as evidence that the motor system contributes to the top-down guidance of selective attention to movement targets. PMID:25835319

  17. Adaptive Robust Waveform Selection for Unknown Target Detection in Clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Lu Wang; Hong-Qiang Wang; Yu-Liang Qin; Yong-Qiang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    @@@A basic assumption of most recently proposed waveform design algorithms is that the target impulse response is a known deterministic function or a stochastic process with a known power spectral density (PSD). However, it is well-known that a target impulse response is neither easily nor accurately obtained; besides it changes sharply with attitude angles. Both of the aforementioned cases complicate the waveform design process. In this paper, an adaptive robust waveform selection method for unknown target detection in clutter is proposed. The target impulse response is considered to be unknown but belongs to a known uncertainty set. An adaptive waveform library is devised by using a signal-to-clutter-plus-noise ratio (SCNR)- based optimal waveform design method. By applying the minimax robust waveform selection method, the optimal robust waveform is selected to ensure the lowest performance bound of the unknown target detection in clutter. Results show that the adaptive waveform library outperforms the predefined linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform library on the SCNR bound.

  18. Pattern-Based Target Selection Applied to Fund Raising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob); U. Kaymak (Uzay)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper proposes a new algorithm for target selection. This algorithm collects all frequent patterns (equivalent to frequent item sets) in a training set. These patterns are stored e?ciently using a compact data structure called a trie. For each pattern the relative frequency of the t

  19. Classification and Target Group Selection Based Upon Frequent Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this technical report , two new algorithms based upon frequent patterns are proposed. One algorithm is a classification method. The other one is an algorithm for target group selection. In both algorithms, first of all, the collection of frequent patterns in the training set is constr

  20. Burglar Target Selection : A Cross-national Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Townsley, Michael; Birks, Daniel; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both envi

  1. An algorithm for preferential selection of spectroscopic targets in LEGUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey L.Carlin; Carl J.Grillmair; Puragra Guhathakurta; Zhan-Wen Han; Jin-Liang Hou; Hsu-Tai Lee; Jing Li; Chao Liu; Xiao-Wei Liu; Kai-Ke Pan; J.A.Sellwood; Sébastien Lépine; Hong-Chi Wang; Fan Yang; Brian Yanny; Yue-Yang Zhang; Zheng Zheng; Zi Zhu; Heidi Jo Newberg; Li-Cai Deng; Timothy C.Beers; Yu-Qin Chen; Norbert Christlieb; Xiao-Ting Fu; Shuang Gao

    2012-01-01

    We describe a general target selection algorithm that is applicable to any survey in which the number of available candidates is much larger than the number of objects to be observed.This routine aims to achieve a balance between a smoothlyvarying,well-understood selection function and the desire to preferentially select certain types of targets.Some target-selection examples are shown that illustrate different possibilities of emphasis functions.Although it is generally applicable,the algorithm was developed specifically for the LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration(LEGUE)survey that will be carried out using the Chinese Guo Shou Jing Telescope.In particular,this algorithm was designed for the portion of LEGUE targeting the Galactic halo,in which we attempt to balance a variety of science goals that require stars at fainter magnitudes than can be completely sampled by LAMOST.This algorithm has been implemented for the halo portion of the LAMOST pilot survey,which began in October 2011.

  2. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  3. Targets of balancing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrés, Aida M; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit;

    2009-01-01

    to maintaining phenotypic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, its prevalence and specific targets in the human genome remain largely unknown. We have analyzed the patterns of diversity and divergence of 13,400 genes in two human populations using an unbiased single-nucleotide polymorphism data set......, a genome-wide approach, and a method that incorporates demography in neutrality tests. We identified an unbiased catalog of genes with signatures of long-term balancing selection, which includes immunity genes as well as genes encoding keratins and membrane channels; the catalog also shows enrichment...... in functional categories involved in cellular structure. Patterns are mostly concordant in the two populations, with a small fraction of genes showing population-specific signatures of selection. Power considerations indicate that our findings represent a subset of all targets in the genome, suggesting...

  4. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively

  5. Selective Cell Targeting with Light-Absorbing Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Pitsillides, Costas M; Joe, Edwin K.; Wei, Xunbin; Anderson, R. Rox; Lin, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method for selective cell targeting based on the use of light-absorbing microparticles and nanoparticles that are heated by short laser pulses to create highly localized cell damage. The method is closely related to chromophore-assisted laser inactivation and photodynamic therapy, but is driven solely by light absorption, without the need for photochemical intermediates (particularly singlet oxygen). The mechanism of light-particle interaction was investigated by nanosecond ...

  6. Peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for selective targeting of pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Sabrina; Maione, Federica; Mura, Simona; Stella, Barbara; Desmaële, Didier; Noiray, Magali; Vergnaud, Juliette; Vauthier, Christine; Cattel, Luigi; Giraudo, Enrico; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-10-28

    Chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is hampered by the tumor's physio-pathological complexity. Here we show a targeted nanomedicine using a new ligand, the CKAAKN peptide, which had been identified by phage display, as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Taking advantage of the squalenoylation platform, the CKAAKN peptide was conjugated to squalene (SQCKAAKN) and then co-nanoprecipitated with the squalenoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (SQdFdC) giving near monodisperse nanoparticles (NPs) for safe intravenous injection. By interacting with a novel target pathway, the Wnt-2, the CKAAKN functionalization enabled nanoparticles: (i) to specifically interact with both tumor cells and angiogenic vessels and (ii) to simultaneously promote pericyte coverage, thus leading to the normalization of the vasculature likely improving the tumor accessibility for therapy. All together, this approach represents a unique targeted nanoparticle design with remarkable selectivity towards pancreatic cancer and multiple mechanisms of action.

  7. Selective Mitochondrial Targeting Exerts Anxiolytic Effects In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Markus; Asara, John M; Teplytska, Larysa; Murphy, Michael P; Logan, Angela; Turck, Christoph W; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-06-01

    Current treatment strategies for anxiety disorders are predominantly symptom-based. However, a third of anxiety patients remain unresponsive to anxiolytics highlighting the need for more effective, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. We have previously compared high vs low anxiety mice and identified changes in mitochondrial pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress. In this work, we show that selective pharmacological targeting of these mitochondrial pathways exerts anxiolytic effects in vivo. We treated high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) mice with MitoQ, an antioxidant that selectively targets mitochondria. MitoQ administration resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior in HAB mice. This anxiolytic effect was specific for high anxiety as MitoQ treatment did not affect the anxiety phenotype of C57BL/6N and DBA/2J mouse strains. We furthermore investigated the molecular underpinnings of the MitoQ-driven anxiolytic effect and found that MitoQ treatment alters the brain metabolome and that the response to MitoQ treatment is characterized by distinct molecular signatures. These results indicate that a mechanism-driven approach based on selective mitochondrial targeting has the potential to attenuate the high anxiety phenotype in vivo, thus paving the way for translational implementation as long-term MitoQ administration is well-tolerated with no reported side effects in mice and humans. PMID:26567514

  8. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE LBTI EXOZODI KEY SCIENCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberger, Alycia J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Bryden, Geoff; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Roberge, Aki; Danchi, William C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Skemer, Andrew J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Lane, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Millan-Gabet, Rafael [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Haniff, Chris, E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ∼300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels of survey sensitivity induced by weather conditions.

  9. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the

  10. Appraising the instantaneous secretory rates of luteinizing hormone and testosterone in response to selective mu opiate receptor blockade in late pubertal boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauras, N; Rogol, A D; Veldhuis, J D

    1987-01-01

    The pulsatile properties of gonadotropin and testosterone release were examined before and after chronic mu opiate receptor blockade with naltrexone, 50 mg every other day, in four normal boys in late puberty (ages 14 8/12 to 15 1/12 years). The nature of spontaneous secretory events was appraised for immunoactive LH and testosterone in blood withdrawn every 20 minutes for 24 hours, using a novel, discrete deconvolution algorithm to estimate apparent instantaneous secretory rates. The application of this methodology revealed that the frequency of discrete LH instantaneous secretory rates increased after mu opiate receptor blockade (P = 0.011). More strikingly, all parameters of testosterone secretory events responded significantly to mu opiate receptor blockade, including increases in mean estimated secretory rate (+47%, P = 0.02), testosterone pulse frequency (+ 64%, P less than 0.001) and amplitude (+ 20%, P = 0.027). Correspondingly, decreases in testosterone interpulse secretory intervals (-35%, P = 0.001), secretory pulse duration (-19%, P = 0.042) and interpulse valley duration (-35%, P = 0.006) also were noted. There was a prominent diurnal rhythm in testosterone secretion with maximal values in the morning and late evening, and marked reductions in the afternoon, sometimes to prepubertal levels. This variation in the testosterone secretory profile paralleled that of LH. In response to naltrexone, the FSH concentration series showed a significant increase in the mean FSH concentration (+ 18%) P = 0.003) and mean peak amplitude (+ 15%, P = 0.002). These data provide indirect evidence of functional coupling of the opiate system with the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3040654

  11. Highly selective luminescent nanostructures for mitochondrial imaging and targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, E.; Iacobazzi, R. M.; Laquintana, V.; Valente, G.; Caliandro, G.; Striccoli, M.; Agostiano, A.; Cutrignelli, A.; Lopedota, A.; Curri, M. L.; Franco, M.; Depalo, N.; Denora, N.

    2016-02-01

    Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino functionalized luminescent silica coated QD nanoparticles (QD@SiO2 NPs) provides a versatile nanoplatform to anchor a potent and selective TSPO ligand, characterized by a 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide structure along with a derivatizable carboxylic end group, useful to conjugate the TSPO ligand and achieve TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs by means of a covalent amide bond. The colloidal stability and optical properties of the proposed nanomaterials are comprehensively investigated and their potential as mitochondrial imaging agents is fully assessed. Sub-cellular fractionation, together with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and co-localization analysis of targeted TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs in C6 glioma cells overexpressing the TSPO, proves the great potential of these multifunctional nanosystems as in vitro selective mitochondrial imaging agents.Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino

  12. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. PMID:25228628

  13. Target inhibition networks: predicting selective combinations of druggable targets to block cancer survival pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available A recent trend in drug development is to identify drug combinations or multi-target agents that effectively modify multiple nodes of disease-associated networks. Such polypharmacological effects may reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance by means of attacking the disease networks through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. However, due to the exponentially increasing number of potential drug and target combinations, systematic approaches are needed for prioritizing the most potent multi-target alternatives on a global network level. We took a functional systems pharmacology approach toward the identification of selective target combinations for specific cancer cells by combining large-scale screening data on drug treatment efficacies and drug-target binding affinities. Our model-based prediction approach, named TIMMA, takes advantage of the polypharmacological effects of drugs and infers combinatorial drug efficacies through system-level target inhibition networks. Case studies in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated how the target inhibition modeling allows systematic exploration of functional interactions between drugs and their targets to maximally inhibit multiple survival pathways in a given cancer type. The TIMMA prediction results were experimentally validated by means of systematic siRNA-mediated silencing of the selected targets and their pairwise combinations, showing increased ability to identify not only such druggable kinase targets that are essential for cancer survival either individually or in combination, but also synergistic interactions indicative of non-additive drug efficacies. These system-level analyses were enabled by a novel model construction method utilizing maximization and minimization rules, as well as a model selection algorithm based on sequential forward floating search. Compared with an existing computational solution, TIMMA showed both enhanced

  14. A convergent mean shift algorithm to select targets for LAMOST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wei Li; Gang Zhao

    2009-01-01

    This paper firstly finds that the Mean Shift Algorithm used by the Observation Control System (OCS) Research Group of the University of Science and Technology of China in Survey Strategy System 2.10 (SSS2.10) to select targets for the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is not convergent in theory. By carefully studying the mathematical formulation of the Mean Shift Algorithm, we find that it tries to find a point where some objective function achieves its maximum value; the Mean Shift Vector can be regarded as the ascension direction for the objective function. If we regard the objective function as the numerical description for the imaging quality of all targets covered by the focal panel, then the Mean Shift Algorithm can find the place where the imaging quality is the best. So, the problem of selecting targets is equal to the problem of finding the place where the imaging quality is the best. In addition, we also give some effective heuristics to improve computational speed and propose an effective method to assign point sources to the respective fibers. As a result, our program runs fast, and it costs only several seconds to generate an observation.

  15. Development of hematin conjugated PLGA nanoparticle for selective cancer targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Md Lutful; Kim, Dami; Kim, SeJin

    2016-08-25

    Targeted nanomedicine for cancer therapy has gained widespread popularity and is being extensively explored. Porphyrins have intrinsic tumor localizing ability and have been studied for photodynamic therapy. However, they have not been used as cancer targeting agents for nanomedicines. In this study, PLGA nanoparticles were formulated and an iron-containing blood porphyrin, hematin was conjugated to the surface of the nanoparticles to investigate selectivity towards cancer cell and cellular internalization. Hematin was previously shown to facilitate growth and proliferation of cancer cells. PLGA nanoparticles were characterized by FE-SEM, AFM, DLS, and Zeta potential analyzer. The conjugation of hematin was confirmed by FTIR. HeLa cells were used to study tumor selectivity and uptake. Hematin conjugated particles (ζ potential: -15.19mV) showed higher affinity towards the cancer cells than the control particles. The result indicated that the particles were internalized by heme carrier protein-1. Together these data suggest that hematin is a promising cancer targeting material for nanotherapeutics. PMID:27260086

  16. Ionic Coulomb Blockade and Resonant Conduction in Biological Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I Kh; Eisenberg, R S

    2014-01-01

    The conduction and selectivity of calcium/sodium ion channels are described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade, a phenomenon based on charge discreteness and an electrostatic model of an ion channel. This novel approach provides a unified explanation of numerous observed and modelled conductance and selectivity phenomena, including the anomalous mole fraction effect and discrete conduction bands. Ionic Coulomb blockade and resonant conduction are similar to electronic Coulomb blockade and resonant tunnelling in quantum dots. The model is equally applicable to other nanopores.

  17. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  18. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  19. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles. PMID:21087645

  20. Traceable Coulomb Blockade Thermometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hahtela, Ossi; Kemppinen, Antti; Meschke, Matthias; Prunnila, Mika; Gunnarsson, David; Roschier, Leif; Penttila, Jari; Pekola, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement and analysis scheme for determining traceable thermodynamic temperature at cryogenic temperatures using Coulomb blockade thermometry. The uncertainty of the electrical measurement is improved by utilizing two sampling digital voltmeters instead of the traditional lock-in technique. The remaining uncertainty is dominated by that of the numerical analysis of the measurement data. Two analysis methods, the numerical fitting of the full conductance curve and measuring the height of the conductance dip yield almost identical results. The complete uncertainty analysis shows that the relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in determining the thermodynamic temperature in the temperature range from 20 mK to 200 mK is below 1 %. A good agreement within the measurement uncertainty is experimentally demonstrated between the Coulomb blockade thermometer and a superconducting reference point device that has been directly calibrated against the Provisional Low Temperature Scale of 2000.

  1. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  2. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  3. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  4. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Robotham, A S G; Croom, S M; Driver, S P; Drinkwater, M J; Lorente, N P F; Cortese, L; Scott, N; Colless, M; Schaefer, A; Taylor, E N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Allen, J T; Baldry, I; Barnes, L; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bloom, J V; Brooks, A M; Brough, S; Cecil, G; Couch, W; Croton, D; Davies, R; Ellis, S; Fogarty, L M R; Foster, C; Glazebrook, K; Goodwin, M; Green, A; Gunawardhana, M L; Hampton, E; Ho, I -T; Hopkins, A M; Kewley, L; Lawrence, J S; Leon-Saval, S G; Leslie, S; Lewis, G; Liske, J; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Mahajan, S; Medling, A M; Metcalfe, N; Meyer, M; Mould, J; Obreschkow, D; O'Toole, S; Pracy, M; Richards, S N; Shanks, T; Sharp, R; Sweet, S M; Thomas, A D; Tonini, C; Walcher, C J

    2014-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in a 3-year survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12, and 14.5 hours, and cover a total of 144 square degrees (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2dFGRS and SDSS and photometry in regions covered by the Slo...

  5. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  6. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Paegert, Martin; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution ($R \\sim 11000$) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between $4500$ and $6250 \\, \\mbox{K}$. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and $\\log(g)$ for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of $\\sim$30\\% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate ...

  7. Simultaneous blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and rapamycin results in reduced cell growth and survival in biliary tract cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberger, Beata; Berger, Walter; Puhalla, Harald; Schmid, Katharina; Novak, Sabine; Brandstetter, Anita; Pirker, Christine; Gruenberger, Thomas; Filipits, Martin

    2009-06-01

    The prognosis of patients with biliary tract adenocarcinomas (BTA) is still poor due to lack of effective systemic treatment options. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this disease is of importance for the development of new treatment strategies. We determined the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of BTA (n = 89) by immunohistochemistry. Overall survival was analyzed with Cox models adjusted for clinical and pathologic factors. Combined EGFR/p-mTOR expression was significantly associated with relapse-free survival [adjusted hazard ratio for relapse, 2.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.45-3.33; P BTA cell lines was tested in short-term 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays and long-term colony formation assays. Simultaneous blockade of EGFR and mTOR in biliary tract cancer cell lines results in a synergistic inhibition of both phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, leading to reduced cell growth and survival. These results suggest that combined targeted therapy with EGFR and mTOR inhibitors may potentially benefit patients with BTAs and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  8. Selective pharmacological targeting of a DEAD box RNA helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lindqvist

    Full Text Available RNA helicases represent a large family of proteins implicated in many biological processes including ribosome biogenesis, splicing, translation and mRNA degradation. However, these proteins have little substrate specificity, making inhibition of selected helicases a challenging problem. The prototypical DEAD box RNA helicase, eIF4A, works in conjunction with other translation factors to prepare mRNA templates for ribosome recruitment during translation initiation. Herein, we provide insight into the selectivity of a small molecule inhibitor of eIF4A, hippuristanol. This coral-derived natural product binds to amino acids adjacent to, and overlapping with, two conserved motifs present in the carboxy-terminal domain of eIF4A. Mutagenesis of amino acids within this region allowed us to alter the hippuristanol-sensitivity of eIF4A and undertake structure/function studies. Our results provide an understanding into how selective targeting of RNA helicases for pharmacological intervention can be achieved.

  9. Utilization of OIM for Measurement Selection in Multistatic Target Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Soysal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensor management problem can be expressed as obtaining the state estimation with desired accuracy by utilizing the resources effectively. In the literature, there are two principal approaches to this problem, namely task-driven and information driven sensor management. Performance metrics for both task-driven and information driven sensor management frameworks suffer from the heavy computational burden due to the evaluation of expectations or are available only in simulation. In this paper, the Observed Information Matrix (OIM, which is widely used in statistical practice as a surrogate for the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM in difficult problems, has been proposed as a metric that can be used in sensor management. Recursive computation of OIM has been derived for the cases with linear and nonlinear system dynamics corrupted with additive Gaussian noise. The usefulness of OIM in sensor selection in multistatic target tracking has been demonstrated via simulations.

  10. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  11. CD133, Selectively Targeting the Root of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg U. Schmohl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are capable of promoting tumor initiation and self-renewal, two important hallmarks of carcinoma formation. This population comprises a small percentage of the tumor mass and is highly resistant to chemotherapy, causing the most difficult problem in the field of cancer research, drug refractory relapse. Many CSC markers have been reported. One of the most promising and perhaps least ubiquitous is CD133, a membrane-bound pentaspan glycoprotein that is frequently expressed on CSC. There is evidence that directly targeting CD133 with biological drugs might be the most effective way to eliminate CSC. We have investigated two entirely unrelated, but highly effective approaches for selectively targeting CD133. The first involves using a special anti-CD133 single chain variable fragment (scFv to deliver a catalytic toxin. The second utilizes this same scFv to deliver components of the immune system. In this review, we discuss the development and current status of these CD133 associated biological agents. Together, they show exceptional promise by specific and efficient CSC elimination.

  12. Rocuronium blockade reversal with sugammadex vs. neostigmine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xinmin; Oerding, Helle; Liu, Jin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compared efficacy and safety of the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex (2 mg/kg) with neostigmine (50 μg/kg) for neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal in Chinese and Caucasian subjects. METHODS: This was a randomized, active-controlled, multicenter, safety-assessor......BACKGROUND: This study compared efficacy and safety of the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex (2 mg/kg) with neostigmine (50 μg/kg) for neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal in Chinese and Caucasian subjects. METHODS: This was a randomized, active-controlled, multicenter, safety...... Chinese subjects (sugammadex, n = 119, neostigmine, n = 111); and 59 Caucasian subjects (sugammadex, n = 29, neostigmine, n = 30) had evaluable data. Geometric mean (95% CI) time to recovery to TOF ratio 0.9 was 1.6 (1.5-1.7) min with sugammadex vs 9.1 (8.0-10.3) min with neostigmine in Chinese subjects...

  13. The LEGUE disk target selection for the LAMOST pilot survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Yu, Jincheng; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yueyang; Shen, Shiyin; Zhang, Haotong; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Yuqing; Christlieb, Norbert; Han, Zhanwen; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Liu, Xiaowei; Pan, Kaike; Shi, Jianrong; Wang, Hongchi; Zhu, Zi

    2012-01-01

    We describe the target selection algorithm for the low latitude disk portion of the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which aims to test systems in preparation for the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. We use the PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010) astrometric catalog, which provides positions, proper motions, B/R/I magnitudes (mostly) from USNO-B (Monet et al. 2003) and J/H/Ks from The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, see Skrutskie et al. 2006) as well. We chose 8 plates along the Galactic plane, in the region $0^\\circ<\\alpha<67^\\circ$ and $42^\\circ<\\delta<59^\\circ$, that cover 22 known open clusters with a range of ages. Adjacent plates may have small overlapping. Each plate covers an area $2.5^\\circ$ in radius,with central star (for Shark-Hartmann guider) brighter than $\\sim8^{\\rm th}$ magnitude. For each plate, we create an input catalog in the magnitude range $11.3selected to satisfy the requirements of the fiber positioning system and have a uniform dis...

  14. Blockade of KCa3.1 potassium channels protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Tubular cell apoptosis significantly contributes to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. Although KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, participates in apoptosis, its involvement in cisplatin-induced AKI is unknown. Here, we found that cisplatin treatment triggered an early induction of KCa3.1 expression associated with HK-2 cell apoptosis, the development of renal tubular damage, and apoptosis in mice. Treatment with the highly selective KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 suppressed cisplatin-induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. We further assessed whether KCa3.1 mediated cisplatin-induced AKI in genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade mouse models. KCa3.1 deficiency reduced renal function loss, renal tubular damage, and the induction of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated KCa3.1 (-/-) mice. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 by TRAM-34 similarly attenuated cisplatin-induced AKI in mice. Furthermore, we dissected the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced apoptosis reduction via KCa3.1 blockade. We found that KCa3.1 blockade attenuated cytochrome c release and the increase in the intrinsic apoptotic mediators Bax, Bak, and caspase-9 after cisplatin treatment. KCa3.1 blocking inhibited the cisplatin-induced activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediator caspase-12, which is independent of calcium-dependent protease m-calpain activation. Taken together, KCa3.1 blockade protects against cisplatin-induced AKI through the attenuation of apoptosis by interference with intrinsic apoptotic and ER stress-related mediators, providing a potential target for the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:26438401

  15. Human hair follicle: reservoir function and selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Vogt, A

    2011-10-01

    Penetration of topically applied compounds may occur via the stratum corneum, skin appendages and hair follicles. The follicular infundibulum increases the surface area, disrupts the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the follicle, and serves as a reservoir. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin, especially to distinct hair follicle compartments or cell populations, may help to treat local inflammatory reactions selectively, with reduced systemic side-effects. Various in vitro and in vivo methods exist for studying the hair follicle structure and follicular penetration pathways. These include cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping, confocal microscopy and cyanoacrylate scalp follicle biopsy. The complex anatomical structure as well as the cyclical activity of the hair follicle must be taken into consideration when designing delivery systems. In addition, delivery into and retention inside the infundibular reservoir are controlled by, for example, molecule or particle size, their polarity and the type of preparation. Preferred penetration depth and storage time must also be considered. Particles with release mechanisms should be preferred; however, the release of drugs from nanoparticles still requires further investigations.

  16. Human hair follicle: reservoir function and selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Vogt, A

    2011-10-01

    Penetration of topically applied compounds may occur via the stratum corneum, skin appendages and hair follicles. The follicular infundibulum increases the surface area, disrupts the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the follicle, and serves as a reservoir. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin, especially to distinct hair follicle compartments or cell populations, may help to treat local inflammatory reactions selectively, with reduced systemic side-effects. Various in vitro and in vivo methods exist for studying the hair follicle structure and follicular penetration pathways. These include cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping, confocal microscopy and cyanoacrylate scalp follicle biopsy. The complex anatomical structure as well as the cyclical activity of the hair follicle must be taken into consideration when designing delivery systems. In addition, delivery into and retention inside the infundibular reservoir are controlled by, for example, molecule or particle size, their polarity and the type of preparation. Preferred penetration depth and storage time must also be considered. Particles with release mechanisms should be preferred; however, the release of drugs from nanoparticles still requires further investigations. PMID:21919898

  17. Effects of Mode of Target Task Selection on Learning about Plants in a Mobile Learning Environment: Effortful Manual Selection versus Effortless QR-Code Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of effortless selection of target plants using quick respond (QR) code technology to effortful manual search and selection of target plants on learning about plants in a mobile device supported learning environment. In addition, it was investigated whether the effectiveness of the 2 selection methods was…

  18. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  19. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  20. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. PMID:27329556

  1. Targeting extracellular pyrophosphates underpins the high selectivity of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, Boyan B; Breukink, Eefjan; Swiezewska, E; De Kruijff, Ben; Watts, Anthony

    2004-12-01

    The spread of infectious diseases and the increase in antibiotic resistance represent a life-threatening global development that calls for new approaches to control microorganisms. Of all potential targets, the essential and unique pathway of bacterial cell wall synthesis, targeted by the first known antibiotic penicillin, remains a perfect candidate for the development of new antibiotics. Here we show that the lantibiotic nisin exercises its antibacterial action by targeting peptidoglycan intermediates' extracellular pyrophosphate, unique to bacterial cell wall precursors. We show that nisin sequesters cell wall precursors found in the outer leaflet of bacterial plasma membranes, Lipid II and undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, into stable complexes. We propose a model of antibacterial action for nisin in which the terminal amino group of Ile1 targets the pyrophosphate groups of the bacterial cell wall precursors, where it docks via a hydrogen bond. The pyrophosphate moiety, a highly conserved chemical group different from the L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala docking motif for vancomycin, has no biochemical analogs with comparable properties and is unlikely to be susceptible to bacterial adaptations akin to those responsible for resistance to penicillins and vancomycin. PMID:15576489

  2. Why not treat human cancer with interleukin-1 blockade?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinarello, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical successes of targeting angiogenesis provide a basis for trials of interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade and particularly anti-IL-1beta as an add-on therapy in human metastatic disease. In animal studies for over 20 years, IL-1 has been demonstrated to increase adherence of tumor cells to the en

  3. The ELG target selection with the BOSS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Escoffier, S; Ealet, A; Kneib, J -P; Zoubian, J; Lamareille, F

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the power spectrum of galaxies can be used as a standard ruler to probe the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this paper, we study several galaxy selection schemes aiming at building an emission-line galaxy (ELG) sample in the redshift range $0.6 < z < 1.7$, that would be suitable for future BAO studies using the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. We explore two different color selections using both the SDSS and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) photometry in the $u, g, r, i$ bands and evaluate their performance for selecting bright ELG. This study confirms the feasibility of massive ELG surveys using the BOSS spectrographs on the SDSS telescope for a BAO detection at redshift $z\\sim1$, in particular for the proposed eBOSS experiment.

  4. Involvement of Tspan8 in exosome assembly and target cell selection

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sanyukta

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are the most important intercellular communicators. Tetraspanins/their complexes are suggested to be important in exosomal target cell selection. I showed: changes in Tetraspanin8 associations created from internalization persist upto exosomes and, differences in tetraspanin-complexes on exosomes allow for target cell selectivity.Based on the tetraspanin-complex on exosomes, predictions on potential target cells might be possible, allowing tailored exosome generation for drug delivery.

  5. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, protonation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate to high...... predicted by the model and three were close. Five of the antimalarial drugs were lipophilic weak dibasic compounds. The predicted optimum properties for a selective accumulation of weak bivalent bases in lysosomes are consistent with experimental values and are more accurate than any prior calculation...

  6. The safety of ONRAB® in select non-target wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Tricia L; Vandalen, Kaci K; Duncan, Colleen; Vercauteren, Kurt

    2013-08-20

    ONRAB(®) is a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) with the rabies glycoprotein gene incorporated into its genome. ONRAB(®) has been used in Canada as an oral rabies vaccine in target wildlife species such as: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and striped skunk (Mepthis mephitis). We evaluated the safety of ONRAB(®) in non-target wildlife species likely to contact the vaccine baits during oral rabies vaccine campaigns in the United States. We investigated the effects of oral inoculation of high titer ONRAB(®), approximately ten times the dose given to target species, in wood rats (Neotoma spp.), eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestri), and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on fecal swabs, oral swabs, and tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, large intestine, and when appropriate nasal turbinates, to detect ONRAB(®) DNA from inoculated animals. By seven days post-inoculation, turkeys, opossums, and cottontails had all stopped shedding ONRAB(®) DNA. One wood rat and one fox squirrel still had detectable levels of ONRAB(®) DNA in fecal swabs 14 days post-inoculation. Real-time PCR analysis of the tissues revealed some ONRAB(®) DNA persisting in certain tissues; however, there were no significant gross or histologic lesions associated with ONRAB(®) in any of the species studied. Our results suggest that many non-target species are not likely to be impacted by the distribution of ONRAB(®) as part of oral rabies vaccination programs in the United States. PMID:23831321

  7. The safety of ONRAB® in select non-target wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Tricia L; Vandalen, Kaci K; Duncan, Colleen; Vercauteren, Kurt

    2013-08-20

    ONRAB(®) is a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) with the rabies glycoprotein gene incorporated into its genome. ONRAB(®) has been used in Canada as an oral rabies vaccine in target wildlife species such as: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and striped skunk (Mepthis mephitis). We evaluated the safety of ONRAB(®) in non-target wildlife species likely to contact the vaccine baits during oral rabies vaccine campaigns in the United States. We investigated the effects of oral inoculation of high titer ONRAB(®), approximately ten times the dose given to target species, in wood rats (Neotoma spp.), eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestri), and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on fecal swabs, oral swabs, and tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, large intestine, and when appropriate nasal turbinates, to detect ONRAB(®) DNA from inoculated animals. By seven days post-inoculation, turkeys, opossums, and cottontails had all stopped shedding ONRAB(®) DNA. One wood rat and one fox squirrel still had detectable levels of ONRAB(®) DNA in fecal swabs 14 days post-inoculation. Real-time PCR analysis of the tissues revealed some ONRAB(®) DNA persisting in certain tissues; however, there were no significant gross or histologic lesions associated with ONRAB(®) in any of the species studied. Our results suggest that many non-target species are not likely to be impacted by the distribution of ONRAB(®) as part of oral rabies vaccination programs in the United States.

  8. Target selection by natural and redesigned PUF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Douglas F; Koh, Yvonne Y; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) proteins bind RNA with sequence specificity and modularity, and have become exemplary scaffolds in the reengineering of new RNA specificities. Here, we report the in vivo RNA binding sites of wild-type (WT) and reengineered forms of the PUF protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf2p across the transcriptome. Puf2p defines an ancient protein family present throughout fungi, with divergent and distinctive PUF RNA binding domains, RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs), and prion regions. We identify sites in RNA bound to Puf2p in vivo by using two forms of UV cross-linking followed by immunopurification. The protein specifically binds more than 1,000 mRNAs, which contain multiple iterations of UAAU-binding elements. Regions outside the PUF domain, including the RRM, enhance discrimination among targets. Compensatory mutants reveal that one Puf2p molecule binds one UAAU sequence, and align the protein with the RNA site. Based on this architecture, we redesign Puf2p to bind UAAG and identify the targets of this reengineered PUF in vivo. The mutant protein finds its target site in 1,800 RNAs and yields a novel RNA network with a dramatic redistribution of binding elements. The mutant protein exhibits even greater RNA specificity than wild type. The redesigned protein decreases the abundance of RNAs in its redesigned network. These results suggest that reengineering using the PUF scaffold redirects and can even enhance specificity in vivo. PMID:26668354

  9. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. de Groote; P.J. Verschure; M.G. Rots

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined D

  10. Leveraging Big Data to Transform Target Selection and Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  11. Leveraging big data to transform target selection and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  12. Selection or Influence? Institutional Investors and Acquisition Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Lily; WAN, HONG

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the positive correlation between the presence of institutional investors and a firm’s likelihood of being acquired is due to ownership endogeneity, i.e., due to the fact that institutions are better informed investors. After controlling for this ownership endogeneity, the presence of institutional investors reduces the probability of being acquired. There is also evidence that mutual funds or funds with high turnover rates are more likely to benefit from selective disclo...

  13. Follicular targeting--a promising tool in selective dermatotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Annika; Mandt, Nathalie; Lademann, Juergen; Schaefer, Hans; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    The penetration of topically applied compounds varies considerably in the different regions of the human body. The presence of hair follicles significantly contributes to this effect by an increase in surface area and a disruption of the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the hair follicle. The human hair follicle, hereby, serves not only as a reservoir, but also as a major entry point for topically applied compounds. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin may help reduce side-effects caused by unspecific reactions, and may help develop new strategies in the prevention and treatment of skin diseases. Various drug carrier and drug delivery systems are currently being investigated. The aim of these investigational efforts is to direct topically applied compounds to the different types of hair follicles and, ideally, to specific compartments and cell populations within the hair follicles. Follicular targeting offers opportunities for new developments, not only in hair therapy and in the treatment of hair follicle associated diseases but also in gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  14. A Fast Global Node Selection Algorithm for Bearings-only Target Localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Liyang; Xu Zhen

    2008-01-01

    In the target tracking, the nodes aggregate their observations of the directions of arrival of the target. The network then uses an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to combine the measurements from multiple snapshots to track the target. In order to rapidly select the best subset of nodes to localize the target with the minimum mean square position error and low power consumption, this paper proposes a simple algorithm, which uses the location information of the target and the network. The lower bound of localization error is utilized according to the distances between the target and the selected active nodes. Furthermore, the direction likelihoods of the active nodes is predicted by way of the node/target bearing distributing relationships.

  15. Visual cells remember earlier applied target: plasticity of orientation selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Ghisovan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A canonical proposition states that, in mature brain, neurons responsive to sensory stimuli are tuned to specific properties installed shortly after birth. It is amply demonstrated that that neurons in adult visual cortex of cats are orientation-selective that is they respond with the highest firing rates to preferred oriented stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In anesthetized cats, prepared in a conventional fashion for single cell recordings, the present investigation shows that presenting a stimulus uninterruptedly at a non-preferred orientation for twelve minutes induces changes in orientation preference. Across all conditions orientation tuning curves were investigated using a trial by trial method. Contrary to what has been previously reported with shorter adaptation duration, twelve minutes of adaptation induces mostly attractive shifts, i.e. toward the adapter. After a recovery period allowing neurons to restore their original orientation tuning curves, we carried out a second adaptation which produced three major results: (1 more frequent attractive shifts, (2 an increase of their magnitude, and (3 an additional enhancement of responses at the new or acquired preferred orientation. Additionally, we also show that the direction of shifts depends on the duration of the adaptation: shorter adaptation in most cases produces repulsive shifts, whereas adaptation exceeding nine minutes results in attractive shifts, in the same unit. Consequently, shifts in preferred orientation depend on the duration of adaptation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The supplementary response improvements indicate that neurons in area 17 keep a memory trace of the previous stimulus properties, thereby upgrading cellular performance. It also highlights the dynamic nature of basic neuronal properties in adult cortex since repeated adaptations modified both the orientation tuning selectivity and the response strength to the preferred orientation. These

  16. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  17. Neuromuscular blockade lnduced by different target effect-site concentrations of rocuronium in female patients%女性患者不同效应室靶浓度罗库溴铵肌松效应的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张化; 张卫; 樊肖冲; 赵璞

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较女性患者不同效应室靶浓度罗库溴铵的肌松效应.方法 选择女性甲状腺或乳腺手术患者120例,ASA分级Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,年龄40~ 55岁,BMI 18~22 kg/m2.采用随机数字表法,将患者随机分为4组(n=30),A组、B组、C组麻醉诱导时罗库溴铵效应室靶浓度(Ce)为3.5 μg/ml,麻醉维持Ce分别为1.0、1.2、1.4 μg/ml;D组麻醉诱导时Ce为3.8μg/ml,麻醉维持Ce为1.2 μg/ml.记录肌松起效时间、恢复时间、恢复指数、罗库溴铵用量;评估气管插管条件和术中肌松程度.结果 与A组比较,B组、C组和D组肌松程度深,肌松满意率高(p<0.05),B组、C组、D组间上述指标差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与A组、B组和C组比较,D组起效时间最短(P<0.05).与C组比较,A组、B组和D组罗库溴铵用量、恢复时间、恢复指数降低(P<0.05).B组和D组罗库溴铵用量、恢复时间、恢复指数比较差异无统计学意义(P> 0.05).结论 麻醉诱导时罗库溴铵Ce 3.8 μg/ml,麻醉维持Ce1.2 μg/ml,可产生满意的肌松条件,且有利于术后肌松恢复,是一种适用于女性患者的TCI给药方案.%Objective To compare the neuromuscular blockade induced by different target effect-site concentrations (Ces) of rocuronium in female patients.Methods One hundred and twenty ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ female patients,aged 40-55 yr,with body mass index 18-22 kg/m2,scheduled for elective thyroid or breast surgery under general anesthesia,were included in the study.Anesthesia was induced with midazolam 0.1 mg/kg and fentanyl 5 μg/kg.Target-controlled infusion of rocuronium was started to facilitate tracheal intubation as soon as the patients lost consciousness.The patients were randomly divided into 4 groups ( n =30 each):A,B,C and D groups.In groups A,B,and C,the target Ce of rocuronium was set at 3.5 μg/ml during induction of anesthesia and at 1.0,1.2 and 1.4 μg/ml respectively during maintenance of anesthesia.In group D,the target Ce of

  18. Chemical tools selectively target components of the PKA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewianka Stephan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the eukaryotic cell the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA is a key enzyme in signal transduction and represents the main target of the second messenger cAMP. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterisation of specifically tailored cAMP analogs which can be utilised as a tool for affinity enrichment and purification as well as for proteomics based analyses of cAMP binding proteins. Results Two sets of chemical binders were developed based on the phosphorothioate derivatives of cAMP, Sp-cAMPS and Rp-cAMPS acting as cAMP-agonists and -antagonists, respectively. These compounds were tested via direct surface plasmon resonance (SPR analyses for their binding properties to PKA R-subunits and holoenzyme. Furthermore, these analogs were used in an affinity purification approach to analyse their binding and elution properties for the enrichment and improvement of cAMP binding proteins exemplified by the PKA R-subunits. As determined by SPR, all tested Sp-analogs provide valuable tools for affinity chromatography. However, Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS displayed (i superior enrichment properties while maintaining low unspecific binding to other proteins in crude cell lysates, (ii allowing mild elution conditions and (iii providing the capability to efficiently purify all four isoforms of active PKA R-subunit in milligram quantities within 8 h. In a chemical proteomics approach both sets of binders, Rp- and Sp-cAMPS derivatives, can be employed. Whereas Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS preferentially binds free R-subunit, Rp-AHDAA-cAMPS, displaying antagonist properties, not only binds to the free PKA R-subunits but also to the intact PKA holoenzyme both from recombinant and endogenous sources. Conclusion In summary, all tested cAMP analogs were useful for their respective application as an affinity reagent which can enhance purification of cAMP binding proteins. Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS was considered the most efficient analog since Sp-8-AHA-cAMPS and Sp-2-AHA

  19. Gold nanorods for target selective SPECT/CT imaging and photothermal therapy in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Boseung; Park, Seonhwa; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Joa Kyum; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, In-Hoo; Choi, Yongdoo

    2012-01-01

    The development of theranostic agents with high detection sensitivity and antitumor efficacy at low concentration is a challenging task for target selective imaging and therapy of cancers. In this study, folate-conjugated and radioactive-iodine-labeled gold nanorods (GNRs) were designed and synthesized for target selective SPECT/CT imaging and subsequent thermal ablation of folate-receptor-overexpressing cancers. Both (ortho-pyridyl) disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate and a short peptide,...

  20. Target-object integration, attention distribution, and object orientation interactively modulate object-based selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Shahd; Greenberg, Adam S

    2016-10-01

    The representational basis of attentional selection can be object-based. Various studies have suggested, however, that object-based selection is less robust than spatial selection across experimental paradigms. We sought to examine the manner by which the following factors might explain this variation: Target-Object Integration (targets 'on' vs. part 'of' an object), Attention Distribution (narrow vs. wide), and Object Orientation (horizontal vs. vertical). In Experiment 1, participants discriminated between two targets presented 'on' an object in one session, or presented as a change 'of' an object in another session. There was no spatial cue-thus, attention was initially focused widely-and the objects were horizontal or vertical. We found evidence of object-based selection only when targets constituted a change 'of' an object. Additionally, object orientation modulated the sign of object-based selection: We observed a same-object advantage for horizontal objects, but a same-object cost for vertical objects. In Experiment 2, an informative cue preceded a single target presented 'on' an object or as a change 'of' an object (thus, attention was initially focused narrowly). Unlike in Experiment 1, we found evidence of object-based selection independent of target-object integration. We again found that the sign of selection was modulated by the objects' orientation. This result may reflect a meridian effect, which emerged due to anisotropies in the cortical representations when attention is oriented endogenously. Experiment 3 revealed that object orientation did not modulate object-based selection when attention was oriented exogenously. Our findings suggest that target-object integration, attention distribution, and object orientation modulate object-based selection, but only in combination. PMID:27198915

  1. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  2. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR images or infrared (IR images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic

  3. Influence of target concentration and background binding on in vitro selection of affinity reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based aptamers possess many useful features that make them a promising alternative to antibodies and other affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, reversible folding, thermal stability and low cost. However, the selection process typically used to generate aptamers (SELEX often requires significant resources and can fail to yield aptamers with sufficient affinity and specificity. A number of seminal theoretical models and numerical simulations have been reported in the literature offering insights into experimental factors that govern the effectiveness of the selection process. Though useful, these previous models have not considered the full spectrum of experimental factors or the potential impact of tuning these parameters at each round over the course of a multi-round selection process. We have developed an improved mathematical model to address this important question, and report that both target concentration and the degree of non-specific background binding are critical determinants of SELEX efficiency. Although smaller target concentrations should theoretically offer superior selection outcome, we show that the level of background binding dramatically affect the target concentration that will yield maximum enrichment at each round of selection. Thus, our model enables experimentalists to determine appropriate target concentrations as a means for protocol optimization. Finally, we perform a comparative analysis of two different selection methods over multiple rounds of selection, and show that methods with inherently lower background binding offer dramatic advantages in selection efficiency.

  4. Concept for On-Board Safe Landing Target Selection and Landing for the Mars 2020 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugarolas, P.; Chen, A.; Johnson, A.; Casoliva, J.; Singh, G.; Stehura, A.; Way, D.; Dutta, S.

    2014-06-01

    We present a concept for a potential enhancement to Mars 2020 to enable landing on hazardous landing sites. It adds to MSL-EDL the capability to select and divert to a safe site through on-board terrain relative localization and target selection.

  5. Determination of More Realistic Target 95% Values of Post Selection Delay in Modern Telephone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the telephone network and the recommendations, dealing with the greatest target values of Post Selection Delay. It is shown that the Post Selection Delay is the sum of the delays between the network nodes and that it has the smaller dispersion than the one, recommended as the greatest in the recommendations.

  6. Pro and cons of targeted selective treatment against digestive-tract strongyles of ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabaret J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of resistance to anthelmintics among gastrointestinal nematodes and the desire for lower input agriculture have promoted the idea that targeted selective treatment (treating the animals in need of such a treatment and only them could be a sustainable solution for controlling internal parasites of ruminants. The pros are the slowing of resistance prevalence, lower residues of anthelmintics in meat and milk, and lower cost; the cons are the difficulty and time spent on selecting animals in need of treatment and the possibility of lower production. Using actual experiments and modelling we show that targeted selective treatment can be used to sustainably control gastrointestinal nematode infections in flock.

  7. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  8. Selective electron capture into highly stripped Ne and N target atoms after heavy-ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger electron and x-ray spectra from Ne and N gas targets excited with 1.4 MeV amu-1 Ar12+, Kr15+, Xe24+, and Pb36+ ions are measured, varying the target pressure and mixing other gases into the target volume. A dramatic change of line intensities from outer-shell configurations having a KL two-electron core and a third electron in the n = 4,5,6 shell is observed, depending on the target pressure and systematically on the target ionisation potential. This effect is explained by highly selective electron capture from neutral target atoms or molecules into outer-shell orbitals of slowly (Esub(r) -14 cm2 is estimated from the experiment. (author)

  9. Coulomb-Blockade Oscillations in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Houten, van, H.; Beenakker, C. W. J.; Staring, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    I. Introduction (Preface, Basic properties of semiconductor nanostructures). II. Theory of Coulomb-blockade oscillations (Periodicity of the oscillations, Amplitude and lineshape). III. Experiments on Coulomb-blockade oscillations (Quantum dots, Disordered quantum wires, Relation to earlier work on disordered quantum wires). IV. Quantum Hall effect regime (The Aharonov-Bohm effect in a quantum dot, Coulomb blockade of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Experiments on quantum dots, Experiments on disor...

  10. Comparison of the cancer gene targeting and biochemical selectivities of all targeted kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost C M Uitdehaag

    Full Text Available The anti-proliferative activities of all twenty-five targeted kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical use were measured in two large assay panels: (1 a panel of proliferation assays of forty-four human cancer cell lines from diverse tumour tissue origins; and (2 a panel of more than 300 kinase enzyme activity assays. This study provides a head-on comparison of all kinase inhibitor drugs in use (status Nov. 2013, and for six of these drugs, the first kinome profiling data in the public domain. Correlation of drug activities with cancer gene mutations revealed novel drug sensitivity markers, suggesting that cancers dependent on mutant CTNNB1 will respond to trametinib and other MEK inhibitors, and cancers dependent on SMAD4 to small molecule EGFR inhibitor drugs. Comparison of cellular targeting efficacies reveals the most targeted inhibitors for EGFR, ABL1 and BRAF(V600E-driven cell growth, and demonstrates that the best targeted agents combine high biochemical potency with good selectivity. For ABL1 inhibitors, we computationally deduce optimized kinase profiles for use in a next generation of drugs. Our study shows the power of combining biochemical and cellular profiling data in the evaluation of kinase inhibitor drug action.

  11. Optimal Intermittence in Search Strategies under Speed-Selective Target Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç; Bartumeus, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Random search theory has been previously explored for both continuous and intermittent scanning modes with full target detection capacity. Here we present a new class of random search problems in which a single searcher performs flights of random velocities, the detection probability when it passes over a target location being conditioned to the searcher speed. As a result, target detection involves an N-passage process for which the mean search time is here analytically obtained through a renewal approximation. We apply the idea of speed-selective detection to random animal foraging since a fast movement is known to significantly degrade perception abilities in many animals. We show that speed-selective detection naturally introduces an optimal level of behavioral intermittence in order to solve the compromise between fast relocations and target detection capability.

  12. Selection between Michaelis–Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E.; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis–Menten (M–M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M–M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these...

  13. Evaluating gaze-based interface tools to facilitate point-and-select tasks with small targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. ... to facilitate access to mainstream interfaces for people with motor disabilities and other users in need of hands-free interaction....

  14. Target selection of classical pulsating variables for space-based photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Plachy, E; Szabó, R; Kolenberg, K; Bányai, E

    2016-01-01

    In a few years the Kepler and TESS missions will provide ultra-precise photometry for thousands of RR Lyrae and hundreds of Cepheid stars. In the extended Kepler mission all targets are proposed in the Guest Observer (GO) Program, while the TESS space telescope will work with full frame images and a ~15-16th mag brightness limit with the possibility of short cadence measurements for a limited number of pre-selected objects. This paper highlights some details of the enormous and important work of the target selection process made by the members of Working Group 7 (WG#7) of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  15. Topical liposome targeting of dyes, melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R M

    1998-01-01

    For therapeutic and cosmetic modification of hair, we have developed a hair-follicle-selective macromolecule and small molecule targeting system with topical application of phosphatidylcholine-based liposomes. Liposome-entrapped melanins, proteins, genes, and small-molecules have been selectively targeted to the hair follicle and hair shafts of mice. Liposomal delivery of these molecules is time dependent. Negligible amounts of delivered molecules enter the dermis, epidermis, or bloodstream thereby demonstrating selective follicle delivery. Naked molecules are trapped in the stratum corneum and are unable to enter the follicle. The potential of the hair-follicle liposome delivery system for therapeutic use for hair disease as well as for cosmesis has been demonstrated in 3-dimensional histoculture of hair-growing skin and mouse in vivo models. Topical liposome selective delivery to hair follicles has demonstrated the ability to color hair with melanin, the delivery of the active lac-Z gene to hair matrix cells and delivery of proteins as well. Liposome-targeting of molecules to hair follicles has also been achieved in human scalp in histoculture. Liposomes thus have high potential in selective hair follicle targeting of large and small molecules, including genes, opening the field of gene therapy and other molecular therapy of the hair process to restore hair growth, physiologically restore or alter hair pigment, and to prevent or accelerate hair loss.

  16. Average Minimum Transmit Power to achieve SINR Targets: Performance Comparison of Various User Selection Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Umer

    2010-01-01

    In multi-user communication from one base station (BS) to multiple users, the problem of minimizing the transmit power to achieve some target guaranteed performance (rates) at users has been well investigated in the literature. Similarly various user selection algorithms have been proposed and analyzed when the BS has to transmit to a subset of the users in the system, mostly for the objective of the sum rate maximization. We study the joint problem of minimizing the transmit power at the BS to achieve specific signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio (SINR) targets at users in conjunction with user scheduling. The general analytical results for the average transmit power required to meet guaranteed performance at the users' side are difficult to obtain even without user selection due to joint optimization required over beamforming vectors and power allocation scalars. We study the transmit power minimization problem with various user selection algorithms, namely semi-orthogonal user selection (SUS), norm-based...

  17. Selective attention modulates the effect of target location probability on redundant signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Yun; Little, Daniel R; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the decision process underlying the detection of targets at multiple locations. In three experiments using the same observers, target location probability and attentional instructions were manipulated. A redundant-target detection task was conducted in which participants were required to detect a dot presented at one of two locations. When the dot appeared at the two locations with equal frequency (Experiment 1), those participants who were found to have limited to unlimited capacity were shown to adopt a parallel, self-terminating strategy. By contrast, those participants who had supercapacity were shown to process redundant targets in a coactive manner. When targets were presented with unequal probability, two participants adopted a parallel, self-terminating strategy regardless of whether they were informed the target location probability (Experiment 3) or not (Experiment 2). For the remaining two participants, the strategy changed from parallel, self-terminating to serial, self-terminating as a result of the probability instructions. In Experiments 2 and 3, all the participants were of unlimited to limited capacity. Taken together, these results suggest that target location probability differently affects the selection of a decision strategy and highlight the role of controlled attention in selecting a decision strategy. PMID:27188653

  18. Selective attention modulates the effect of target location probability on redundant signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Yun; Little, Daniel R; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the decision process underlying the detection of targets at multiple locations. In three experiments using the same observers, target location probability and attentional instructions were manipulated. A redundant-target detection task was conducted in which participants were required to detect a dot presented at one of two locations. When the dot appeared at the two locations with equal frequency (Experiment 1), those participants who were found to have limited to unlimited capacity were shown to adopt a parallel, self-terminating strategy. By contrast, those participants who had supercapacity were shown to process redundant targets in a coactive manner. When targets were presented with unequal probability, two participants adopted a parallel, self-terminating strategy regardless of whether they were informed the target location probability (Experiment 3) or not (Experiment 2). For the remaining two participants, the strategy changed from parallel, self-terminating to serial, self-terminating as a result of the probability instructions. In Experiments 2 and 3, all the participants were of unlimited to limited capacity. Taken together, these results suggest that target location probability differently affects the selection of a decision strategy and highlight the role of controlled attention in selecting a decision strategy.

  19. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  20. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-09-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  1. Selective Cancer Targeting via Aberrant Behavior of Cancer Cell-associated Glucocorticoid Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Narayan, Kumar P; Pal, Krishnendu; Kumar, Jerald M.; Rangaraj, Nandini; Shasi V Kalivendi; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are ubiquitous, nuclear hormone receptors residing in cell types of both cancer and noncancerous origin. It is not known whether cancer cell–associated GR alone can be selectively manipulated for delivery of exogenous genes to its nucleus for eliciting anticancer effect. We find that GR ligand, dexamethasone (Dex) in association with cationic lipoplex (termed as targeted lipoplex) could selectively manipulate GR in cancer cells alone for the delivery of transgen...

  2. Differential actions of insecticides on target sites: basis for selective toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Narahashi, T; Zhao, X.; Ikeda, T; Nagata, K.(Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan); Yeh, JZ

    2007-01-01

    Whereas the selective toxicity of insecticides between insects and mammals has a long history of studies, it is now becoming abundantly clear that, in many cases, the differential action of insecticides on insects and mammalian target receptor sites is an important factor. In this paper, we first introduce the mechanism of action and the selective toxicity of pyrethroids as a prototype of study. Then, a more detailed account is given for fipronil, based primarily on our recent studies. Pyreth...

  3. Antitumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, in combination with PI3K/mTOR inhibitors or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors in pimasertib-resistant human lung and colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; D'Aiuto, Elena; Morgillo, Floriana; Vitagliano, Donata; Capasso, Anna; Costantino, Sarah; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Merolla, Francesco; Vecchione, Loredana; De Vriendt, Veerle; Tejpar, Sabine; Nappi, Anna; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Berrino, Liberato; De Palma, Raffaele; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2013-11-01

    The RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways are key regulators of proliferation and survival in human cancer cells. Selective inhibitors of different transducer molecules in these pathways have been developed as molecular targeted anti-cancer therapies. The in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, alone or in combination with a PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki), a mTOR inhibitor (everolimus), or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors (sorafenib and regorafenib), that block also BRAF and CRAF, were tested in a panel of eight human lung and colon cancer cell lines. Following pimasertib treatment, cancer cell lines were classified as pimasertib-sensitive (IC50 for cell growth inhibition of 0.001 µM) or pimasertib-resistant. Evaluation of basal gene expression profiles by microarrays identified several genes that were up-regulated in pimasertib-resistant cancer cells and that were involved in both RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Therefore, a series of combination experiments with pimasertib and either PI3Ki, everolimus, sorafenib or regorafenib were conducted, demonstrating a synergistic effect in cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis with sustained blockade in MAPK- and AKT-dependent signaling pathways in pimasertib-resistant human colon carcinoma (HCT15) and lung adenocarcinoma (H1975) cells. Finally, in nude mice bearing established HCT15 and H1975 subcutaneous tumor xenografts, the combined treatment with pimasertib and BEZ235 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) or with sorafenib caused significant tumor growth delays and increase in mice survival as compared to single agent treatment. These results suggest that dual blockade of MAPK and PI3K pathways could overcome intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibition.

  4. W::Neo: a novel dual-selection marker for high efficiency gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Zhou

    Full Text Available We have recently developed a so-called genomic engineering approach that allows for directed, efficient and versatile modifications of Drosophila genome by combining the homologous recombination (HR-based gene targeting with site-specific DNA integration. In genomic engineering and several similar approaches, a "founder" knock-out line must be generated first through HR-based gene targeting, which can still be a potentially time and resource intensive process. To significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of HR-based gene targeting in Drosophila, we have generated a new dual-selection marker termed W::Neo, which is a direct fusion between proteins of eye color marker White (W and neomycin resistance (Neo. In HR-based gene targeting experiments, mutants carrying W::Neo as the selection marker can be enriched as much as fifty times by taking advantage of the antibiotic selection in Drosophila larvae. We have successfully carried out three independent gene targeting experiments using the W::Neo to generate genomic engineering founder knock-out lines in Drosophila.

  5. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L. [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Cudworth, K. M. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, Williams Bay, WI 53191 (United States); Munn, J. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Blake, C. H. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Covey, K. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fabbian, D., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  6. The feasibility of targeted selective gene therapy of the hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Hoffman, R M

    1995-07-01

    Loss of hair and hair colour is associated with ageing, and when it involves the scalp hair, it can be distressing to both sexes. Hair loss resulting from cancer chemotherapy is particularly distressing. However, safe, effective therapies directed to hair have only just started to be developed. The hair follicle is a complex skin appendage composed of epidermal and dermal tissue, with specialized keratinocytes, the hair matrix cells, forming the hair shaft. Specific therapy of the hair follicle depends on selective targeting of specific cells of the hair follicle. We have developed the histoculture of intact hair-growing skin on sponge-gel matrices. We have recently found in histocultured skin that liposomes can selectively target hair follicles to deliver both small and large molecules. That liposomes can target the hair follicle for delivery has been confirmed independently. Two decades ago we introduced the technique of entrapping DNA in liposomes for use in gene therapy. In this report we describe the selective targeting of the lacZ reporter gene to the hair follicles in mice after topical application of the gene entrapped in liposomes. These results demonstrate that highly selective, safe gene therapy for the hair process is feasible.

  7. Target Selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David W.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Jones, Michael; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) is a new large targeted HI survey now underway using Arecibo's L-band Wide receiver system. A major goal is to constrain models of the Pisces Perseus infall, producing 5-σ detections of infall motions ˜500 km s-1. We are targeting sources that are likely to be at the PPS distance, but that are just below the the HI mass detection threshold of the ALFALFA survey. We expect to identify ˜800 objects of mass ˜108—9 M⊙ which will alllow us to constrain the lower mass end of the HI mass function in this infall environment.We have pursued a multi-pronged approach to target selection for this survey. Sources from ALFALFA, SDSS, and the GALEX GCAT single source catalogs were matched and intercompared via multi-band color photometry, surface brightnesses, and appearance in SDSS images. Final target selection based on visual inspection of SDSS images was found to correlate well with a color-selection technique based on GALEX/NUV - SDSS/r. Along with the details of the source selection we will discuss the facilitation and implementation of this process via a multi-institution collaborative website, and early results from the APSS survey.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  8. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Abhishek; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ross, Ashley J; Myers, Adam D; Dawson, Kyle S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J; Bautista, Julian E; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L; Schlegel, David J; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M; McBride, Cameron K; Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Brownstein, Joel R; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S; Delubac, Timothee; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Prada, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z < 19.95 and 19.9 < i < 21.8, respectively. Our algorithm selects roughly 50 LRG targets per square degree, the great majority of which lie in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.0 (median redshift 0.71). We demonstrate that our methods are highly effective at eliminating stellar contamination and lower-redshift galaxies. We perform a number of tests using spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/BOSS to determine the redshift reliability of our target selection and its ability to meet the science requirements of eBOSS. The SDSS spectra are of high enough signal-to-noise ratio that at least 89% of the target sample yield...

  9. Photometric Observations of Selected BRITE Target Stars at Mt. Suhora Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, G.; Ogloza, W.; Drozdz, M.; Zakrzewski, B.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of ground-based photometric observations of selected bright stars targeted by the BRITE satellite mission, carried out at Mt. Suhora Observatory using the new small telescope and a CCD camera, with the chip partially covered by a neutral density filter.

  10. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  11. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  12. Patient selection and targeted treatment in the management of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leamon PC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher P Leamon,1 Chandra D Lovejoy,2 Binh Nguyen3 1Research and Development, 2Regulatory Affairs, 3Clinical Affairs, Endocyte Inc, West Lafayette, IN, USA Abstract: Ovarian cancer (OC has the highest mortality rate of any gynecologic cancer, and patients generally have a poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance and late stage disease diagnosis. Platinum-resistant OC can be treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy such as paclitaxel, topotecan, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, and gemcitabine, but many patients eventually relapse upon treatment. Fortunately, there are currently a number of targeted therapies in development for these patients who have shown promising results in recent clinical trials. These treatments often target the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway (eg, bevacizumab and aflibercept, DNA repair mechanisms (eg, iniparib and olaparib, or they are directed against folate related pathways (eg, pemetrexed, farletuzumab, and vintafolide. As many targeted therapies are only effective in a subset of patients, there is an increasing need for the identification of response predictive biomarkers. Selecting the right patients through biomarker screening will help tailor therapy to patients and decrease superfluous treatment to those who are biomarker negative; this approach should lead to improved clinical results and decreased toxicities. In this review the current targeted therapies used for treating platinum-resistant OC are discussed. Furthermore, use of prognostic and response predictive biomarkers to define OC patient populations that may benefit from specific targeted therapies is also highlighted. Keywords: platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, targeted therapy, patient selection, folate receptor, VEGF, biomarkers

  13. Perioperative Nerve Blockade: Clues from the Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Suter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral and neuraxial nerve blockades are widely used in the perioperative period. Their values to diminish acute postoperative pain are established but other important outcomes such as chronic postoperative pain, or newly, cancer recurrence, or infections could also be influenced. The long-term effects of perioperative nerve blockade are still controversial. We will review current knowledge of the effects of blocking peripheral electrical activity in different animal models of pain. We will first go over the mechanisms of pain development and evaluate which types of fibers are activated after an injury. In the light of experimental results, we will propose some hypotheses explaining the mitigated results obtained in clinical studies on chronic postoperative pain. Finally, we will discuss three major disadvantages of the current blockade: the absence of blockade of myelinated fibers, the inappropriate duration of blockade, and the existence of activity-independent mechanisms.

  14. Antithrombotic effects of beta2-adrenergic receptor blockade on top of beta1-receptor blockade in patients with acute coronary syndrome or heart failure : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Peuter, O.R.; Lussana, F.; Peters, R.J.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Non-selective beta1 + 2 blockers may have specific antithrombotic effects not present in eta1-blockers, due to a eta2-specific effect on sympathetic activity. Our aim was to assess the influence of eta2-receptor suppression on top of selective beta1-receptor blockade on the occurrence of

  15. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy," "dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an

  16. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Huan Feng; Ping Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease.Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use ofmonotherapy, without applying any language restrictions.Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy,""dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc.Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed.We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus.Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension.However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety.In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons.Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility.Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an evidence-based practice.

  17. Target selection by the frontal cortex during coordinated saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihasam, Krishna; Bullock, Daniel; Grossberg, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    Oculomotor tracking of moving objects is an important component of visually based cognition and planning. Such tracking is achieved by a combination of saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements. In particular, the saccadic and smooth-pursuit systems interact to often choose the same target, and to maximize its visibility through time. How do multiple brain regions interact, including frontal cortical areas, to decide the choice of a target among several competing moving stimuli? How is target selection information that is created by a bias (e.g., electrical stimulation) transferred from one movement system to another? These saccade-pursuit interactions are clarified by a new computational neural model, which describes interactions between motion processing areas: the middle temporal area, the middle superior temporal area, the frontal pursuit area, and the dorsal lateral pontine nucleus; saccade specification, selection, and planning areas: the lateral intraparietal area, the frontal eye fields, the substantia nigra pars reticulata, and the superior colliculus; the saccadic generator in the brain stem; and the cerebellum. Model simulations explain a broad range of neuroanatomical and neurophysiological data. These results are in contrast with the simplest parallel model with no interactions between saccades and pursuit other than common-target selection and recruitment of shared motoneurons. Actual tracking episodes in primates reveal multiple systematic deviations from predictions of the simplest parallel model, which are explained by the current model. PMID:18823247

  18. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  19. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  20. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  1. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary

  2. Valley blockade quantum switching in Silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Enrico

    2011-10-01

    In analogy to the Coulomb and the Pauli spin blockade, based on the electrostatic repulsion and the Pauli exclusion principle respectively, the concept of valley blockade in Silicon nanostructures is explored. The valley parity operator is defined. Valley blockade is determined by the parity conservation of valley composition eigenvectors in quantum transport. A Silicon quantum changeover switch based on a triple of donor quantum dots capable to separate electrons having opposite valley parity by virtue of the valley parity conservation is proposed. The quantum changeover switch represents a novel kind of hybrid quantum based classical logic device.

  3. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe,; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will improve measurements of the cosmological distance scale by applying the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to quasar samples. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over 7500 sq. deg. First, a "CORE" quasar sample will combine optical selection in ugriz using a likelihood-based routine called XDQSOz, with a mid-IR-optical color-cut. eBOSS CORE selection (to g < 22 OR r...

  4. Target Selection for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    CERN Document Server

    Zasowski, G; Frinchaboy, P M; Majewski, S R; Nidever, D L; Pinto, H J Rocha; Girardi, L; Andrews, B; Chojnowski, S D; Cudworth, K M; Jackson, K; Munn, J; Skrutskie, M F; Beaton, R L; Blake, C H; Covey, K; Deshpande, R; Epstein, C; Fabbian, D; Fleming, S W; Hernandez, A Garcia; Herrero, A; Mahadevan, S; Meszaros, Sz; Schultheis, M; Sellgren, K; Terrien, R; van Saders, J; Prieto, C Allende; Bizyaev, D; Burton, A; Cunha, K; da Costa, L N; Hasselquist, S; Hearty, F; Holtzman, J; Perez, A E Garcia; Maia, M A G; O'Connell, R W; O'Donnell, C; Pinsonneault, M; Santiago, B X; Schiavon, R P; Shetrone, M; Smith, V; Wilson, J C

    2013-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and ...

  5. The contribution of the major planet search surveys to EChO target selection

    CERN Document Server

    Micela, Giuseppina; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Maxted, Pierre F L; Pagano, Isabella; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Wheatley, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The EChO core science will be based on a three tier survey, each with increasing sensitivity, in order to study the population of exo-planets from super-Earths to Jupiter-like planets, in the very hot to temperate zones (temperatures of 300 K - 3000 K) of F to M-type host stars. To achieve a meaningful outcome an accurate selection of the target sample is needed. In this paper we analyse the targets, suitable for EChO observations, expected to result from a sample of present and forthcoming detection surveys. Exoplanets currently known are already sufficient to provide a large and diverse sample. However we expect the results from these surveys to increase the sample of smaller planets that will allow us to optimize the EChO sample selection.

  6. Impact of high-risk conjunctions on Active Debris Removal target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidtke, Aleksander A.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Armellin, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Space debris simulations show that if current space launches continue unchanged, spacecraft operations might become difficult in the congested space environment. It has been suggested that Active Debris Removal (ADR) might be necessary in order to prevent such a situation. Selection of objects to be targeted by ADR is considered important because removal of non-relevant objects will unnecessarily increase the cost of ADR. One of the factors to be used in this ADR target selection is the collision probability accumulated by every object. This paper shows the impact of high-probability conjunctions on the collision probability accumulated by individual objects as well as the probability of any collision occurring in orbit. Such conjunctions cannot be predicted far in advance and, consequently, not all the objects that will be involved in such dangerous conjunctions can be removed through ADR. Therefore, a debris remediation method that would address such events at short notice, and thus help prevent likely collisions, is suggested.

  7. Blockade of Death Ligand TRAIL Inhibits Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Many investigators have reported that cell death via apoptosis significantly contributed to the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, and induces apoptosis and inflammation. However, the role of TRAIL in renal IRI is unclear. Here, we investigated whether TRAIL contributes to renal IRI and whether TRAIL blockade could attenuate renal IRI. AKI was induced by unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 60 min in male FVB/N mice. We found that the expression of TRAIL and its receptors were highly upregulated in renal tubular cells in renal IRI. Neutralizing anti-TRAIL antibody or its control IgG was given 24 hr before ischemia and a half-dose booster injection was administered into the peritoneal cavity immediately after reperfusion. We found that TRAIL blockade inhibited tubular apoptosis and reduced the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. Furthermore, TRAIL blockade attenuated renal fibrosis and atrophy after IRI. In conclusion, our study suggests that TRAIL is a critical pathogenic factor in renal IRI, and that TRAIL could be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of renal IRI

  8. Targeted energy transfer between a Rotor and a Morse oscillator: A model for selective chemical dissociation

    OpenAIRE

    Memboeuf, Antony; Aubry, Serge

    2005-01-01

    Standard Kramers theory of chemical reactions involves a coupling with a Langevin thermal bath which intrinsically forbids the possible existence of Discrete Breathers (DBs) (i.e. local modes). However, it is now known that in complex systems, that energy may focus for long time as Discrete Breathers (local mode). In very special systems, targeted energy transfer may occur subsequently to another selected site and induces an ultraselective chemical reaction operating at low temperature. The d...

  9. Candidate Targets for New Anti-Virulence Drugs: Selected Cases of Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Kvist, Malin;

    2007-01-01

    formation are highly attractive targets for new drugs. Specific adhesion provides bacteria with target selection and prevents removal by hydrodynamic flow forces. Bacterial adhesion is of paramount importance for bacterial pathogenesis. Adhesion is also the first step in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation...... is particularly problematic in medical contexts because biofilm-associated bacteria are particularly hard to eradicate. Several promising candidate drugs that target bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are being developed. Some of these might be valuable weapons for fighting infectious diseases in the future......Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the rising frequency of strains that are resistant to many current antibiotics. New types of antibiotics are, therefore, urgently needed. Virulence factors or virulence-associated phenotypes such as adhesins and biofilm...

  10. Retroviral DNA integration: viral and cellular determinants of target-site selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K Lewinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses differ in their preferences for sites for viral DNA integration in the chromosomes of infected cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV integrates preferentially within active transcription units, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV integrates preferentially near transcription start sites and CpG islands. We investigated the viral determinants of integration-site selection using HIV chimeras with MLV genes substituted for their HIV counterparts. We found that transferring the MLV integrase (IN coding region into HIV (to make HIVmIN caused the hybrid to integrate with a specificity close to that of MLV. Addition of MLV gag (to make HIVmGagmIN further increased the similarity of target-site selection to that of MLV. A chimeric virus with MLV Gag only (HIVmGag displayed targeting preferences different from that of both HIV and MLV, further implicating Gag proteins in targeting as well as IN. We also report a genome-wide analysis indicating that MLV, but not HIV, favors integration near DNase I-hypersensitive sites (i.e., +/- 1 kb, and that HIVmIN and HIVmGagmIN also favored integration near these features. These findings reveal that IN is the principal viral determinant of integration specificity; they also reveal a new role for Gag-derived proteins, and strengthen models for integration targeting based on tethering of viral IN proteins to host proteins.

  11. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  12. BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target in Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mercati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices today contain many power hungry subsystems and execute different applications. Standard power management is not aware of the desired battery lifetime and has no visibility into which applications are executing. However, power consumption is strongly dependent on which applications are executed. In this work, we propose a novel power characterization strategy for mobile devices called application-dependent power states (AP-states. Based on that, we formulate a management problem to improve performance under battery lifetime constraints, and we implement the management framework on a real Android device. We call our framework BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target. The goal of such framework is to maximize performance while letting the device battery to last at least for a certain required lifetime, and only requires the user to select the desired target lifetime. The implementation does not require OS modifications and can be ported and installed to any Android device. We experimentally verify that our strategy can still meets user experience requirements with a selected target battery lifetime extension of at least 25%.

  13. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  14. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  15. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: QUASAR TARGET SELECTION FOR DATA RELEASE NINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Carithers, William C.; Ho, Shirley [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton, NY 11375 (United States); Yeche, Christophe; Aubourg, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Strauss, Michael A.; Lee, Khee-Gan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bovy, Jo; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Croft, Rupert A. C. [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Da Silva, Robert [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dawson, Kyle [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F., E-mail: npross@lbl.gov [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-03-01

    The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg{sup 2}, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption from the spectra of a sample of {approx}150,000 z > 2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z Almost-Equal-To 2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3.5, where their colors tend to overlap those of the far more numerous stars. During the first year of the BOSS survey, quasar target selection (QTS) methods were developed and tested to meet the requirement of delivering at least 15 quasars deg{sup -2} in this redshift range, with a goal of 20 out of 40 targets deg{sup -2} allocated to the quasar survey. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g {<=} 22.0 or r {<=} 21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection algorithm, many other astrophysical studies do. We have therefore defined a uniformly selected subsample of 20 targets deg{sup -2}, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50% ({approx}10 z > 2.20 quasars deg{sup -2}). This 'CORE' subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. For the remaining 20 targets deg{sup -2}, we will continue to develop improved selection techniques, including the use of additional data sets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. In this paper, we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS QTS algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations (through 2011 July), in support of the science investigations

  16. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  17. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  18. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine.

  19. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo. PMID:27197631

  20. Targeted and random bacterial gene disruption using a group II intron (targetron) vector containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jin; Karberg, Michael; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2003-01-01

    Mobile group II introns have been used to develop a novel class of gene targeting vectors, targetrons, which employ base pairing for DNA target recognition and can thus be programmed to insert into any desired target DNA. Here, we have developed a targetron containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker (RAM), which enables one-step bacterial gene disruption at near 100% efficiency after selection. The targetron can be generated via PCR without cloning, and after intron integrati...

  1. Theater targets plume edge extraction and hardbody aimpoint selection using morphological image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Clifford A.

    1997-06-01

    (U) Future successful ballistic missile booster intercepts will require advanced automatic target detection, tracking, classification and identification (ADTCI) image processing techniques. Two such techniques are presented in this classified SECRET paper using the synthetic scene generator model (SSGM) in combination with the advanced systems (AVS) image processing package. Two challenging multispectral cases are treated: (1) missile hardbody occultation by the missile exhaust plume, and (2) variable plume/hardbody system (PHS) gradient intensities generated by missile tumbling due to exiting the sensible atmosphere. The target detection, tracking and edge extraction methods selected for this study include morphological, open-close operations within decision- level fusion for the obscuration case and pixel-level fusion for variable edge intensities. Other investigators have approached this issue on similar image processing techniques. The multispectral (2.69 - 2.95 micrometer SWIR; 4.17 - 4.2, 4.35 - 4.50 micrometer MWIR; and 8.0 - 12.0 micrometer LWIR) target/background imagery includes SWIRM/MWIR boost phase track (with occlusion problem) and LWIR aimpoint selection (with tumbling problem). The two classified missile systems are: (1) a depressed-angle submarine launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and (2) a medium range ballistic missile (MRBM). The results indicate that for 6 degrees of freedom (6 DOF) hardbodies, ATDCI geometrical pattern reference libraries should be optimized to accommodate the extreme variable gradient geometries for tumbling midcourse targets. For boost- phase missile hardbody occultation by missile exhaust plumes, segmentation and feature extraction should be implemented in each bandpass before processing to the ATDCI classifier. This study demonstrates that although the plume/hardbody system edges were extracted, the geometry of the target edge often deviated from symmetry.

  2. Anti-CD44-mediated blockade of leukocyte migration in skin-associated immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Margot; Gupta, Pooja; Marhaba, Rachid; Vitacolonna, Mario; Freyschmidt-Paul, Pia

    2007-07-01

    CD44 plays an important role in leukocyte extravasation, which is fortified in autoimmune diseases and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. There is additional evidence that distinct CD44 isoforms interfere with the extravasation of selective leukocyte subsets. We wanted to explore this question in alopecia areata (AA), a hair-follicle centric autoimmune disease, and in a chronic eczema. The question became of interest because AA is treated efficiently by topical application of a contact sensitizer, such that a mild DTH reaction is maintained persistently. Aiming to support the therapeutic efficacy of a chronic eczema in AA by anti-CD44 treatment, it became essential to control whether a blockade of migration, preferentially of AA effector cells, could be achieved by CD44 isoform-specific antibodies. Anti-panCD44 and anti-CD44 variant 10 isoform (CD44v10) inhibited in vitro migration of leukocytes from untreated and allergen-treated, control and AA mice. In vivo, both antibodies interfered with T cell and monocyte extravasation into the skin; only anti-panCD44 prevented T cell homing into lymph nodes. Contributing factors are disease-dependent alterations in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression and a blockade of CD44 on endothelial cells and leukocytes. It is important that CD44 can associate with several integrins and ICAM-1. Associations depend on CD44 activation and vary with CD44 isoforms and leukocyte subpopulations. CD44 standard isoform preferentially associates with CD49d in T cells and CD44v10 with CD11b in monocytes. Accordingly, anti-panCD44 and anti-CD49d inhibit T cell, anti-CD11b, and anti-CD44v10 macrophage migration most efficiently. Thus, allergen treatment of AA likely can be supported by targeting AA T cells selectively via a panCD44-CD49d-bispecific antibody. PMID:17442857

  3. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets.

  4. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Adam D; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J; Newman, Jeffrey A; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; Miller, Adam A; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SDSS-IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will perform measurements of the cosmological distance scale via application of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to samples of quasars and galaxies. Quasar surveys are particularly useful in the BAO context as they can trace extremely large volumes back to moderately high redshift. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over a 7500 sq. deg. area. First, z > 2.1 quasars will be targeted to improve BAO measurements in the Lyman-Alpha Forest. Second, a homogeneously selected "CORE" sample of quasars at 0.9 2.1 quasars. A supplemental selection based on variability of quasars in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ~3-4 per sq. deg. z > 2.1 quasars to g 500,000 new spectroscopically confirmed quasars and > 500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of SDSS-IV, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra...

  5. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  6. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seula; Woo, Jong Kyu; Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer.

  7. Aurora B kinase is a potent and selective target in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, Dominik; Wei, Jun S; Azorsa, David O; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen; Guha, Rajarshi; Keller, Jonathan M; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Song, Young K; Liao, Hongling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Gryder, Berkley E; Sindri, Sivasish; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Zhang, Shile; Shern, John F; Yohe, Marielle E; Taschner-Mandl, Sabine; Shohet, Jason M; Thomas, Craig J; Martin, Scott E; Ambros, Peter F; Khan, Javed

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in multimodal treatment, neuroblastoma (NB) is often fatal for children with high-risk disease and many survivors need to cope with long-term side effects from high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed an siRNA screen of the druggable genome combined with a small molecule screen of 465 compounds targeting 39 different mechanisms of actions in four NB cell lines. We identified 58 genes as targets, including AURKB, in at least one cell line. In the drug screen, aurora kinase inhibitors (nine molecules) and in particular the AURKB-selective compound, barasertib, were the most discriminatory with regard to sensitivity for MYCN-amplified cell lines. In an expanded panel of ten NB cell lines, those with MYCN-amplification and wild-type TP53 were the most sensitive to low nanomolar concentrations of barasertib. Inhibition of the AURKB kinase activity resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the known target, histone H3, and upregulation of TP53 in MYCN-amplified, TP53 wild-type cells. However, both wild-type and TP53 mutant MYCN-amplified cell lines arrested in G2/M phase upon AURKB inhibition. Additionally, barasertib induced endoreduplication and apoptosis. Treatment of MYCN-amplified/TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma xenografts resulted in profound growth inhibition and tumor regression. Therefore, aurora B kinase inhibition is highly effective in aggressive neuroblastoma and warrants further investigation in clinical trials.

  8. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  9. Selection and delineation of target volumes in head and neck tumors: beyond ICRU definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement in irradiation techniques, which allows dose distributions sculpting around volumes of very complex shapes, has revealed the limitations in selection and delineation of target volumes. The use of functional imaging (PET, fMRI) in addition to anatomic imaging, will probably bring an extra level of complexity to this issue. In particular, the use of specific markers to visualize biological pathways known to influence response to ionizing radiation (e.g. hypoxia, proliferation) could lead to the delineation of sub-target volumes for delivering an extra boost dose. Such concept of Image-Guided Radiation Therapy still need to be tested in experimental models and in well defined clinical situations before its use in a routine clinical set-up. (author)

  10. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  11. Masitinib (AB1010, a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Dubreuil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stem cell factor receptor, KIT, is a target for the treatment of cancer, mastocytosis, and inflammatory diseases. Here, we characterise the in vitro and in vivo profiles of masitinib (AB1010, a novel phenylaminothiazole-type tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets KIT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro, masitinib had greater activity and selectivity against KIT than imatinib, inhibiting recombinant human wild-type KIT with an half inhibitory concentration (IC(50 of 200+/-40 nM and blocking stem cell factor-induced proliferation and KIT tyrosine phosphorylation with an IC(50 of 150+/-80 nM in Ba/F3 cells expressing human or mouse wild-type KIT. Masitinib also potently inhibited recombinant PDGFR and the intracellular kinase Lyn, and to a lesser extent, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. In contrast, masitinib demonstrated weak inhibition of ABL and c-Fms and was inactive against a variety of other tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. This highly selective nature of masitinib suggests that it will exhibit a better safety profile than other tyrosine kinase inhibitors; indeed, masitinib-induced cardiotoxicity or genotoxicity has not been observed in animal studies. Molecular modelling and kinetic analysis suggest a different mode of binding than imatinib, and masitinib more strongly inhibited degranulation, cytokine production, and bone marrow mast cell migration than imatinib. Furthermore, masitinib potently inhibited human and murine KIT with activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain. In vivo, masitinib blocked tumour growth in mice with subcutaneous grafts of Ba/F3 cells expressing a juxtamembrane KIT mutant. CONCLUSIONS: Masitinib is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT that is active, orally bioavailable in vivo, and has low toxicity.

  12. Margin selection to compensate for loss of target dose coverage due to target motion during external-beam radiation therapy of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W Kyle; Osei, Ernest; Barnett, Rob

    2015-01-08

    The aim of this study is to provide guidelines for the selection of external-beam radiation therapy target margins to compensate for target motion in the lung during treatment planning. A convolution model was employed to predict the effect of target motion on the delivered dose distribution. The accuracy of the model was confirmed with radiochromic film measurements in both static and dynamic phantom modes. 502 unique patient breathing traces were recorded and used to simulate the effect of target motion on a dose distribution. A 1D probability density function (PDF) representing the position of the target throughout the breathing cycle was generated from each breathing trace obtained during 4D CT. Changes in the target D95 (the minimum dose received by 95% of the treatment target) due to target motion were analyzed and shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. Furthermore, the amount of target D95 recovered per millimeter of increased field width was also shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. The sensitivity of changes in dose coverage with respect to target size was also determined. Margin selection recommendations that can be used to compensate for loss of target D95 were generated based on the simulation results. These results are discussed in the context of clinical plans. We conclude that, for PDF standard deviations less than 0.4 cm with target sizes greater than 5 cm, little or no additional margins are required. Targets which are smaller than 5 cm with PDF standard deviations larger than 0.4 cm are most susceptible to loss of coverage. The largest additional required margin in this study was determined to be 8 mm.

  13. Target selection and pharma industry productivity: what can we learn from technology S-curve theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David

    2006-07-01

    The number of new drug approvals per annum has been decreasing regularly over the past decade, and changes made 12 to 15 years ago to the research and development approach of the pharmaceutical industry may have contributed to this fall in productivity. In particular, the rapid switch at that time away from an 'observation-led' approach toward a 'hypothesis-led' approach to target selection may be a key contributing factor to this issue. The strengths and weaknesses of both approaches are analyzed herein, and it is suggested that unsolved weaknesses in both approaches are holding back the productivity of the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry.

  14. The Gaia Survey Contribution to EChO Target Selection and Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Sozzetti, A

    2014-01-01

    The scientific output of the proposed EChO mission (in terms of spectroscopic characterization of the atmospheres of transiting extrasolar planets) will be maximized by a careful selection of targets and by a detailed characterization of the main physical parameters (such as masses and radii) of both the planets and their stellar hosts. To achieve this aim, the availability of high-quality data from other space-borne and ground-based programs will play a crucial role. Here we identify and discuss the elements of the Gaia catalogue that will be of utmost relevance for the selection and characterization of transiting planet systems to be observed by the proposed EChO mission.

  15. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Myers, Adam D.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J.; Bautista, Julian E.; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Schlegel, David J.; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M.; McBride, Cameron K.; Ben Zhu, Guangtun; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S.; Delubac, Timothée; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R.; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Prada, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z secure redshift measurements. We also present tests of the uniformity and homogeneity of the sample, demonstrating that it should be clean enough for studies of the large-scale structure of the universe at higher redshifts than SDSS-III/BOSS LRGs reached.

  16. Rapid and targeted introgression of genes into popular wheat cultivars using marker-assisted background selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpinder S Randhawa

    Full Text Available A marker-assisted background selection (MABS-based gene introgression approach in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was optimized, where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome (RPG can be recovered in just two backcross (BC generations. A four-step MABS method was developed based on 'Plabsim' computer simulations and wheat genome structure information. During empirical optimization of this method, double recombinants around the target gene were selected in a step-wise fashion during the two BC cycles followed by selection for recurrent parent genotype on non-carrier chromosomes. The average spacing between carrier chromosome markers was <4 cM. For non-carrier chromosome markers that flanked each of the 48 wheat gene-rich regions, this distance was approximately 12 cM. Employed to introgress seedling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici resistance gene Yr15 into the spring wheat cultivar 'Zak', marker analysis of 2,187 backcross-derived progeny resulted in the recovery of a BC(2F(2ratio3 plant with 97% of the recurrent parent genome. In contrast, only 82% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in phenotypically selected BC(4F(7 plants developed without MABS. Field evaluation results from 17 locations indicated that the MABS-derived line was either equal or superior to the recurrent parent for the tested agronomic characteristics. Based on these results, MABS is recommended as a strategy for rapidly introgressing a targeted gene into a wheat genotype in just two backcross generations while recovering 97% or more of the recurrent parent genotype.

  17. Selective activity of deguelin identifies therapeutic targets for androgen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Andrew J; Cai, Shengxin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are aggressive malignancies with no effective targeted therapies. Recent gene expression profiling of these heterogeneous cancers and the classification of cell line models now allows for the identification of compounds with selective activities against molecular subtypes of TNBC. The natural product deguelin was found to have selective activity against MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cell lines, which both model the luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype of TNBC. Deguelin potently inhibited proliferation of these cells with GI50 values of 30 and 61 nM, in MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cells, respectively. Deguelin had exceptionally high selectivity, 197 to 566-fold, for these cell lines compared to cell lines representing other TNBC subtypes. Deguelin's mechanisms of action were investigated to determine how it produced these potent and selective effects. Our results show that deguelin has dual activities, inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, and decreasing androgen receptor levels and nuclear localization. Based on these data, we hypothesized that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and the antiandrogen enzalutamide would have efficacy in LAR models. Rapamycin and enzalutamide showed additive effects in MDA-MB-453 cells, and both drugs had potent antitumor efficacy in a LAR xenograft model. These results suggest that the combination of antiandrogens and mTOR inhibitors might be an effective strategy for the treatment of androgen receptor-expressing TNBC. PMID:27255535

  18. Selective pressures for accurate altruism targeting: evidence from digital evolution for difficult-to-test aspects of inclusive fitness theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Jeff; Goldsby, Heather J; Ofria, Charles; Pennock, Robert T

    2011-03-01

    Inclusive fitness theory predicts that natural selection will favour altruist genes that are more accurate in targeting altruism only to copies of themselves. In this paper, we provide evidence from digital evolution in support of this prediction by competing multiple altruist-targeting mechanisms that vary in their accuracy in determining whether a potential target for altruism carries a copy of the altruist gene. We compete altruism-targeting mechanisms based on (i) kinship (kin targeting), (ii) genetic similarity at a level greater than that expected of kin (similarity targeting), and (iii) perfect knowledge of the presence of an altruist gene (green beard targeting). Natural selection always favoured the most accurate targeting mechanism available. Our investigations also revealed that evolution did not increase the altruism level when all green beard altruists used the same phenotypic marker. The green beard altruism levels stably increased only when mutations that changed the altruism level also changed the marker (e.g. beard colour), such that beard colour reliably indicated the altruism level. For kin- and similarity-targeting mechanisms, we found that evolution was able to stably adjust altruism levels. Our results confirm that natural selection favours altruist genes that are increasingly accurate in targeting altruism to only their copies. Our work also emphasizes that the concept of targeting accuracy must include both the presence of an altruist gene and the level of altruism it produces.

  19. Criteria for selection of target materials and design of high-efficiency-release targets for radioactive ion beam generation

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, G D; Liu, Y

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we define criteria for choosing target materials and for designing, mechanically stable, short-diffusion-length, highly permeable targets for generation of high-intensity radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for use at nuclear physics and astrophysics research facilities based on the ISOL principle. In addition, lists of refractory target materials are provided and examples are given of a number of successful targets, based on these criteria, that have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF).

  20. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  1. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  2. Does Angling Technique Selectively Target Fishes Based on Their Behavioural Type?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D M Wilson

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been growing recognition that fish harvesting practices can have important impacts on the phenotypic distributions and diversity of natural populations through a phenomenon known as fisheries-induced evolution. Here we experimentally show that two common recreational angling techniques (active crank baits versus passive soft plastics differentially target wild largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris based on variation in their behavioural tendencies. Fish were first angled in the wild using both techniques and then brought back to the laboratory and tested for individual-level differences in common estimates of personality (refuge emergence, flight-initiation-distance, latency-to-recapture and with a net, and general activity in an in-lake experimental arena. We found that different angling techniques appear to selectively target these species based on their boldness (as characterized by refuge emergence, a standard measure of boldness in fishes but not other assays of personality. We also observed that body size was independently a significant predictor of personality in both species, though this varied between traits and species. Our results suggest a context-dependency for vulnerability to capture relative to behaviour in these fish species. Ascertaining the selective pressures angling practices exert on natural populations is an important area of fisheries research with significant implications for ecology, evolution, and resource management.

  3. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  4. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  5. FAMACHA©: A potential tool for targeted selective treatment of chronic fasciolosis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, Sophie; van Wyk, Jan A; Wall, Richard; Morgan, Eric R

    2015-09-15

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica causes considerable damage to the health, welfare and productivity of ruminants in temperate areas, and its control is challenged by anthelmintic resistance. Targeted selective treatment (TST) is an increasingly established strategy for preserving anthelmintic efficacy in grazing livestock, yet no practical indicators are available to target individuals for treatment against fluke infection. This paper evaluates the FAMACHA(©) system, a colour chart for the non-invasive detection of anaemia in small ruminants, for this purpose. FAMACHA(©) scores were collected from 288 sheep prior to slaughter during the winter period, when fluke infections were largely mature, and condemned livers were recovered and adult flukes extracted. Average FAMACHA(©) score was significantly higher (=paler conjunctivae) in animals whose livers were condemned (3.6, n=62) than in those whose livers were not condemned (2.1). The number of adult flukes recovered ranged from 2 to 485, and was positively correlated with FAMACHA(©) score (r(2)=0.54, ptreatment of individual sheep with FAMACHA(©) scores above 2 or 3 would have preserved between 27 and 100% of nematodes in refugia on the basis of FEC, depending on group and the threshold used for treatment. FAMACHA(©) holds promise as a tool for selective treatment of sheep against adult F. hepatica, in support of refugia-based control of fluke and nematode infections, and further field evaluation is warranted. PMID:26223154

  6. Selective killing of cancer cells by small molecules targeting heat shock stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel; Zhang, Bin

    2016-09-30

    HSF1 heat shock response has emerged as a valuable non-oncogenetic intervention point in targeted cancer therapy. Current reporter based high throughput screening has led to the discovery of several compounds or chemotypes that are effective in the growth inhibition of multiple cancer cell lines and relevant animal tumor models. However, some intrinsic limitations of reporter based assays can potentially lead to biased results. Using a previously validated high content image based assay, we performed a phenotypic screen targeting HSF1 heat shock pathway with a chemically diversified library of over 100,000 compounds. Several novel functional inhibitors of HSF1 pathway were identified with different chemotypes. Western blot analysis confirmed that selective compounds inhibit phosphorylation of HSF1, followed by reduced expression of HSP proteins. Moreover, HeLa cells stably transfected with HSF1 shRNA were more resistant to the compound treatment under lethal temperature than cells containing HSF1, validating HSF1 dependent mechanism of action. These compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency toward multiple cancer cell lines with relatively low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Further SAR and target identification study will pave the way for the potential development of next generation anticancer drugs. PMID:27553278

  7. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed

  8. Scientific objectives and selection of targets for the SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, A.T.; Keller, H.U.; Nathues, A.; Mall, U.; Hiesinger, H.; Rosiek, M.

    2004-01-01

    The European SMART-1 mission to the Moon, primarily a testbed for innovative technologies, was launched in September 2003 and will reach the Moon in 2005. On board are several scientific instruments, including the point-spectrometer SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR). Taking into account the capabilities of the SMART-1 mission and the SIR instrument in particular, as well as the open questions in lunar science, a selection of targets for SIR observations has been compiled. SIR can address at least five topics: (1) Surface/regolith processes; (2) Lunar volcanism; (3) Lunar crust structure; (4) Search for spectral signatures of ices at the lunar poles; and (5) Ground truth and study of geometric effects on the spectral shape. For each topic we will discuss specific observation modes, necessary to achieve our scientific goals. The majority of SIR targets will be observed in the nadir-tracking mode. More than 100 targets, which require off-nadir pointing and off-nadir tracking, are planned. It is expected that results of SIR observations will significantly increase our understanding of the Moon. Since the exact arrival date and the orbital parameters of the SMART-1 spacecraft are not known yet, a more detailed planning of the scientific observations will follow in the near future. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Akt mediated ROS-dependent selective targeting of mutant KRAS tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to cell death. Previously, we reported the ability of a small molecule compound, C1, to induce ROS dependent autophagy associated apoptosis in human cancer cell lines and primary tumor cells (Wong C. et al. 2010). Our ongoing investigations have unraveled a hitherto undefined novel signaling network involving hyper-phosphorylation of Akt and Akt-mediated ROS production in cancer cell lines. Interestingly, drug-induced Akt activation is selectively seen in cell lines that carry mutant KRAS; HCT116 cells that carry the V13D KRAS mutation respond favorably to C1 while HT29 cells expressing wild type KRAS are relatively resistant. Of note, not only does the compound target mutant KRAS expressing cells but also induces RAS activation as evidenced by the PAK pull down assay. Corroborating this, pharmacological inhibition as well as siRNA mediated silencing of KRAS or Akt, blocked C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony forming ability in HCT116 cells. To further confirm the involvement of KRAS, we made use of mutant KRAS transformed RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. Notably, drug-induced ROS generation and death sensitivity was significantly higher in RWPE-1-KRAS cells than the RWPE-1-vector cells, thus confirming the results obtained with mutant KRAS colorectal carcinoma cell line. Lastly, we made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout cells (KO) where the mutant KRAS allele had been deleted, thus expressing a single wild-type KRAS allele. Exposure of the KO cells to C1 failed to induce Akt activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Taken together, results show the involvement of activated Akt in ROS-mediated selective targeting of mutant KRAS expressing tumors, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of chemotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting KRAS mutant cancers. PMID:26461287

  10. Selective target inactivation rather than global metabolic dormancy causes antibiotic tolerance in uropathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goneau, Lee W; Yeoh, Nigel S; MacDonald, Kyle W; Cadieux, Peter A; Burton, Jeremy P; Razvi, Hassan; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells represent a multidrug-tolerant (MDT), physiologically distinct subpopulation of bacteria. The ability of these organisms to survive lethal antibiotic doses raises concern over their potential role in chronic disease, such as recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI). Persistence is believed to be conveyed through global metabolic dormancy, which yields organisms unresponsive to external stimuli. However, recent studies have contested this stance. Here, various antibiotics that target different cellular processes were used to dissect the activity of transcription, translation, and peptidoglycan turnover in persister cells. Differential susceptibility patterns were found in type I and type II persisters, and responses differed between Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Escherichia coli uropathogens. Further, SOS-deficient strains were sensitized to ciprofloxacin, suggesting DNA gyrase activity in persisters and indicating the importance of active DNA repair systems for ciprofloxacin tolerance. These results indicate that global dormancy per se cannot sufficiently account for antibiotic tolerance. Rather, the activity of individual cellular processes dictates multidrug tolerance in an antibiotic-specific fashion. Furthermore, the susceptibility patterns of persisters depended on their mechanisms of onset, with subinhibitory antibiotic pretreatments selectively shutting down cognate targets and increasing the persister fraction against the same agent. Interestingly, antibiotics targeting transcription and translation enhanced persistence against multiple agents indirectly related to these processes. Conducting these assays with uropathogenic E. coli isolated from RUTI patients revealed an enriched persister fraction compared to organisms cleared with standard antibiotic therapy. This finding suggests that persister traits are either selected for during prolonged antibiotic treatment or initially contribute to therapy failure. PMID:24449771

  11. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  12. Selective Vitamin D Receptor Activation as Anti-Inflammatory Target in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Donate-Correa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor (VDR activator used for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD, has been associated with survival advantages, suggesting that this drug, beyond its ability to suppress parathyroid hormone, may have additional beneficial actions. In this prospective, nonrandomised, open-label, proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the hypothesis that selective vitamin D receptor activation with paricalcitol is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD patients. Eight patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 44 mL/min/1.73 m2 and an intact parathyroid hormone (PTH level higher than 110 pg/mL received oral paricalcitol (1 μg/48 hours as therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Nine patients matched by age, sex, and stage of CKD, but a PTH level <110 pg/mL, were enrolled as a control group. Our results show that five months of paricalcitol administration were associated with a reduction in serum concentrations of hs-CRP (13.9%, P<0.01, TNF-α (11.9%, P=0.01, and IL-6 (7%, P<0.05, with a nonsignificant increase of IL-10 by 16%. In addition, mRNA expression levels of the TNFα and IL-6 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased significantly by 30.8% (P=0.01 and 35.4% (P=0.01, respectively. In conclusion, selective VDR activation is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD.

  13. Bezielle selectively targets mitochondria of cancer cells to inhibit glycolysis and OXPHOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Chen

    Full Text Available Bezielle (BZL101 is a candidate oral drug that has shown promising efficacy and excellent safety in the early phase clinical trials for advanced breast cancer. Bezielle is an aqueous extract from the herb Scutellaria barbata. We have reported previously that Bezielle was selectively cytotoxic to cancer cells while sparing non-transformed cells. In tumor, but not in non-transformed cells, Bezielle induced generation of ROS and severe DNA damage followed by hyperactivation of PARP, depletion of the cellular ATP and NAD, and inhibition of glycolysis. We show here that tumor cells' mitochondria are the primary source of reactive oxygen species induced by Bezielle. Treatment with Bezielle induces progressively higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide as well as peroxide-type ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration prevents generation of both types of ROS and protects cells from Bezielle-induced death. In addition to glycolysis, Bezielle inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells and depletes mitochondrial reserve capacity depriving cells of the ability to produce ATP. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain glycolytic activity in presence of Bezielle thus supporting the hypothesis that mitochondria are the primary target of Bezielle. The metabolic effects of Bezielle towards normal cells are not significant, in agreement with the low levels of oxidative damage that Bezielle inflicts on them. Bezielle is therefore a drug that selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria, and is distinguished from other such drugs by its ability to induce not only inhibition of OXPHOS but also of glycolysis. This study provides a better understanding of the mechanism of Bezielle's cytotoxicity, and the basis of its selectivity towards cancer cells.

  14. Selective inhibition of the kinase DYRK1A by targeting its folding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Sumida, Yuto; Goto, Toshiyasu; Sonamoto, Rie; Okuno, Yukiko; Yoshida, Suguru; Kato-Sumida, Tomoe; Koike, Yuka; Abe, Minako; Nonaka, Yosuke; Ikura, Teikichi; Ito, Nobutoshi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Autophosphorylation of amino-acid residues is part of the folding process of various protein kinases. Conventional chemical screening of mature kinases has missed inhibitors that selectively interfere with the folding process. Here we report a cell-based assay that evaluates inhibition of a kinase at a transitional state during the folding process and identify a folding intermediate-selective inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), which we refer to as FINDY. FINDY suppresses intramolecular autophosphorylation of Ser97 in DYRK1A in cultured cells, leading to its degradation, but does not inhibit substrate phosphorylation catalysed by the mature kinase. FINDY also suppresses Ser97 autophosphorylation of recombinant DYRK1A, suggesting direct inhibition, and shows high selectivity for DYRK1A over other DYRK family members. In addition, FINDY rescues DYRK1A-induced developmental malformations in Xenopus laevis embryos. Our study demonstrates that transitional folding intermediates of protein kinases can be targeted by small molecules, and paves the way for developing novel types of kinase inhibitors. PMID:27102360

  15. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Matthew; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G

    2013-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected $\\sqrt{N}$ Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi $\\pi$ pulses to produce ${\\cal N}=1,2$ atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48% respectively. The ${\\cal N}=2$ Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  16. Application of CellDesigner to the Selection of Anticancer Drug Targets: Test Case using P53

    OpenAIRE

    Isea, Raul; Hoebeke, Johan; Mayo, Rafael; Alvarez, Fernando; Holmes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving many genes, consequently it has been difficult to design anticancer drugs that are efficacious over a broad range of cancers. The robustness of cellular responses to gene knockout and the need to reduce undesirable side effects also contribute to the problem of effective anti-cancer drug design. To promote the successful selection of drug targets, each potential target should be subjected to a systems biology scrutiny to locate effective and specific targets whil...

  17. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  18. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  19. Selection between Michaelis-Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2010-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these two approaches. Theoretical derivations were used to determine conditions under which M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models are equivalent. Computer simulations and model fitting were conducted to demonstrate these conditions. Typical M-M and TMDD profiles were simulated based on literature data for an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (TRX1) and phenytoin administered intravenously. Both models were fitted to data and goodness of fit criteria were evaluated for model selection. A case study of recombinant human erythropoietin was conducted to qualify results. A rapid binding TMDD model is equivalent to the M-M model if total target density R ( tot ) is constant, and R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 where K ( D ) represents the dissociation constant and C is the free drug concentration. Under these conditions, M-M parameters are defined as: V ( max ) = k ( int ) R ( tot ) V ( c ) and K ( m ) = K ( D ) where k ( int ) represents an internalization rate constant, and V ( c ) is the volume of the central compartment. R ( tot ) is constant if and only if k ( int ) = k ( deg,) where k ( deg ) is a degradation rate constant. If the TMDD model predictions are not sensitive to k ( int ) or k ( deg ) parameters, the condition of R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 alone can preserve the equivalence between rapid binding TMDD and M-M models. The model selection process for drugs that exhibit TMDD should involve a full mechanistic model as well as reduced models. The best model

  20. Effects of sugammadex on incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brueckmann, B; Sasaki, N; Grobara, P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate whether reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex reduced the incidence of residual blockade and facilitated operating room discharge readiness. METHODS: Adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery received rocuronium, follow...

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  2. Differential actions of insecticides on target sites: basis for selective toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahashi, T; Zhao, X; Ikeda, T; Nagata, K; Yeh, J Z

    2007-04-01

    Whereas the selective toxicity of insecticides between insects and mammals has a long history of studies, it is now becoming abundantly clear that, in many cases, the differential action of insecticides on insects and mammalian target receptor sites is an important factor. In this paper, we first introduce the mechanism of action and the selective toxicity of pyrethroids as a prototype of study. Then, a more detailed account is given for fipronil, based primarily on our recent studies. Pyrethroids keep the sodium channels open for a prolonged period of time, causing elevation of the depolarizing after-potential. Once the after-potential reaches the threshold for excitation, repetitive after-discharges are produced, resulting in hyperexcitation of intoxicated animals. Only about 1% of sodium channels needs to be modified to produce hyperexcitation, indicating a high degree of toxicity amplification from sodium channels to animals. Pyrethroids were >1000-fold more potent on cockroach sodium channels than rat sodium channels, and this forms the most significant factor to explain the selective toxicity of pyrethroids in insects over mammals. Fipronil, a phenylpyrazole, is known to act on the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor to block the chloride channel. It is effective against certain species of insects that have become resistant to most insecticides, including those acting on the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, and is much more toxic to insects than to mammals. Recently, fipronil has been found to block glutamate-activated chloride channels in cockroach neurons in a potent manner. Since mammals are devoid of this type of chloride channel, fipronil block of the glutamate-activated chloride channel is deemed responsible, at least partially, for the higher selective toxicity to insects over mammals and for the lack of cross-resistance.

  3. Gene Therapy for Advanced Melanoma: Selective Targeting and Therapeutic Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Viola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, the treatment of malignant melanoma still results in the relapse of the disease, and second line treatment mostly fails due to the occurrence of resistance. A wide range of mutations are known to prevent effective treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Hence, approaches with biopharmaceuticals including proteins, like antibodies or cytokines, are applied. As an alternative, regimens with therapeutically active nucleic acids offer the possibility for highly selective cancer treatment whilst avoiding unwanted and toxic side effects. This paper gives a brief introduction into the mechanism of this devastating disease, discusses the shortcoming of current therapy approaches, and pinpoints anchor points which could be harnessed for therapeutic intervention with nucleic acids. We bring the delivery of nucleic acid nanopharmaceutics into perspective as a novel antimelanoma therapeutic approach and discuss the possibilities for melanoma specific targeting. The latest reports on preclinical and already clinical application of nucleic acids in melanoma are discussed.

  4. Plausible improvements for selective targeting of dopamine receptors in therapy of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Kumar, J B Senthil

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive and profound loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leading to the formation of eosinophillic, intracytoplamic, proteinacious inclusions termed as lewy bodies. L-dopa remains as a gold standard for the treatment of PD, and is often combined with carbidopa to reduce the dose-limiting side effects. Long-term levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor fluctuations and peak dose dyskinesias. Dopamine Replacement Therapy (DRT) with dopamine agonists (DAs) (ropinirole and pramipexole) is used to manage complications of L-dopa treatment, however, has been associated with numerous pharmacovigilence reports. The present review attempts to narrate the multiple receptor interaction of DAs followed by the assessment of their side effects during the treatment of PD and possible remedial strategy for selective targeting of dopamine receptors to overcome these affects in therapy of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22697513

  5. Structural determinants of host defense peptides for antimicrobial activity and target cell selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Guolong

    2010-09-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides (HDPs) are a critical component of the innate immunity with microbicidal, endotoxin-neutralizing, and immunostimulatory properties. HDPs kill bacteria primarily through non-specific membrane lysis, therefore with a less likelihood of provoking resistance. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies with a number of HDPs have revealed that net charge, amphipathicity, hydrophobicity, and structural propensity are among the most important physicochemical and structural parameters that dictate their ability to interact with and disrupt membranes. A delicate balance among these factors, rather than a mere alteration of a single factor, is critically important for HDPs to ensure the antimicrobial potency and target cell selectivity. With a better understanding of the structural determinants of HDPs for their membrane-lytic activities, it is expected that novel HDP-based antimicrobials with minimum toxicity to eukaryotic cells can be developed for resistant infections, which have become a global public health crisis.

  6. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Laura A; Burnell, Erica S; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4'-dinitro-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  7. THE EFFECTS OF ALPHA-ADRENOCEPTOR BLOCKADE ON DOPAMINE-INDUCED RENAL VASODILATION AND NATRIURESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, AJ; MEIJER, S; WESSELING, H; DONKER, AJM; REITSMA, WD

    1991-01-01

    To establish the effects of alpha-adrenoceptor blockade on dopamine-induced changes in renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion, dopamine dose-response curves were performed without and with pre-treatment with the selective postsynaptic alpha-1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin in normal volunteers an

  8. Differential effects of B7-1 blockade in the rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallon, L; Chandraker, A; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh;

    1997-01-01

    Blocking the CD28-B7 T cell costimulatory activation pathway protects animals from developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the mouse EAE model, selective blockade of B7-1 by specific mAbs has been shown to protect animals from EAE. In the Lewis rat model, we have shown that...

  9. Targeted metabolomics of Gammarus pulex following controlled exposures to selected pharmaceuticals in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Miller, Thomas H; Bury, Nicolas R; Tauler, Romà; Barron, Leon P

    2016-08-15

    The effects of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) on aquatic organisms represent a significant current concern. Herein, a targeted metabolomics approach using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) is presented to characterise concentration changes in 29 selected metabolites following exposures of aquatic invertebrates, Gammarus pulex, to pharmaceuticals. Method performance revealed excellent linearity (R(2)>0.99), precision (0.1-19%) and lower instrumental limits of detection (0.002-0.20ng) for all metabolites studied. Three pharmaceuticals were selected representing the low, middle and high range of measured acute measured toxicities (of a total of 26 compounds). Gammarids were exposed to both the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) of triclosan (0.1 and 0.3mgL(-1)), nimesulide (0.5 and 1.4mgL(-1)) and propranolol (100 and 153mgL(-1)) over 24h. Quantitative metabolite profiling was then performed. Significant changes in metabolite concentrations relative to controls are presented and display distinct clustered trends for each pharmaceutical. Approximately 37% (triclosan), 33% (nimesulide) and 46% (propranolol) of metabolites showed statistically significant time-related effects. Observed changes are also discussed with respect to internal concentrations of the three pharmaceuticals measured using a method based on pulverised liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS. Potential metabolic pathways that may be affected by such exposures are also discussed. This represents the first study focussing on quantitative, targeted metabolomics of this lower trophic level benthic invertebrate that may elucidate biomarkers for future risk assessment. PMID:27110989

  10. Visual encoding and fixation target selection in free viewing: presaccadic brain potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Andrey R.; Jurica, Peter; Nakatani, Chie; Plomp, Gijs; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2013-01-01

    In scrutinizing a scene, the eyes alternate between fixations and saccades. During a fixation, two component processes can be distinguished: visual encoding and selection of the next fixation target. We aimed to distinguish the neural correlates of these processes in the electrical brain activity prior to a saccade onset. Participants viewed color photographs of natural scenes, in preparation for a change detection task. Then, for each participant and each scene we computed an image heat map, with temperature representing the duration and density of fixations. The temperature difference between the start and end points of saccades was taken as a measure of the expected task-relevance of the information concentrated in specific regions of a scene. Visual encoding was evaluated according to whether subsequent change was correctly detected. Saccades with larger temperature difference were more likely to be followed by correct detection than ones with smaller temperature differences. The amplitude of presaccadic activity over anterior brain areas was larger for correct detection than for detection failure. This difference was observed for short “scrutinizing” but not for long “explorative” saccades, suggesting that presaccadic activity reflects top-down saccade guidance. Thus, successful encoding requires local scanning of scene regions which are expected to be task-relevant. Next, we evaluated fixation target selection. Saccades “moving up” in temperature were preceded by presaccadic activity of higher amplitude than those “moving down”. This finding suggests that presaccadic activity reflects attention deployed to the following fixation location. Our findings illustrate how presaccadic activity can elucidate concurrent brain processes related to the immediate goal of planning the next saccade and the larger-scale goal of constructing a robust representation of the visual scene. PMID:23818877

  11. Visual encoding and fixation target selection in free viewing: presaccadic brain potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey R Nikolaev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In scrutinizing a scene, the eyes alternate between fixations and saccades. During a fixation, two component processes can be distinguished: visual encoding and selection of the next fixation target. We aimed to distinguish the neural correlates of these processes in the electrical brain activity prior to a saccade onset. Participants viewed color photographs of natural scenes, in preparation for a change detection task. Then, for each participant and each scene we computed an image heat map, with temperature representing the duration and density of fixations. The temperature difference between the start and end points of saccades was taken as a measure of the expected task-relevance of the information concentrated in specific regions of a scene. Visual encoding was evaluated according to whether subsequent change was correctly detected. Saccades with larger temperature difference were more likely to be followed by correct detection than ones with smaller temperature differences. The amplitude of presaccadic activity over anterior brain areas was larger for correct detection than for detection failure. This difference was observed for short scrutinizing but not for long explorative saccades, suggesting that presaccadic activity reflects top-down saccade guidance. Thus, successful encoding requires local scanning of scene regions which are expected to be task-relevant. Next, we evaluated fixation target selection. Saccades moving up in temperature were preceded by presaccadic activity of higher amplitude than those moving down. This finding suggests that presaccadic activity reflects attention deployed to the following fixation location. Our findings illustrate how presaccadic activity can elucidate concurrent brain processes related to the immediate goal of planning the next saccade and the larger-scale goal of constructing a robust representation of the visual scene.

  12. Local node selection for target tracking based on underwater wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chaojie; Liu, Meiqin; Zhang, Senlin

    2015-12-01

    Traditional sonar-array-based target tracking algorithms may be unsuitable for on-demand tracking missions, since they assume that the sonar arrays should be towed or mounted by a submarine or a ship. Alternatively, underwater wireless sensor networks can offer a promising solution approach. First, each underwater node is battery-powered, so saving energy expenditure is a critical issue. Instead of keeping all sensor nodes active, this paper provides a local node selection (LNS) scheme which increases energy efficiency by waking up only a small part of nodes at each time. Second, considering node's limited computing ability and the real-time requirement for the tracking algorithm, instead of employing the centralised fusion structure, we utilise the distributed Kalman filtering fusion with feedback in this paper. Finally, instead of assuming one sensor node can uniquely determine target's location, a more practical range-only measurement model is proposed. Then the LNS scheme and distributed fusion with feedback are extended to our range-only measurement model. The simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of our scheme.

  13. Targeting LSCs through membrane antigens selectively or preferentially expressed on these cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana; Testa, Ugo

    2015-12-01

    Studies of xenotransplantation of bone marrow and blood cells of AML patients have supported the existence of rare leukemic stem cells, able to initiate and maintain the leukemic process and bearing the typical leukemic abnormalities. LSCs possess self-renewal capacity and are responsible for the growth of the more differentiated leukemic progeny in the bone marrow and in the blood. These cells are more resistant than bulk leukemic cells to anti-leukemic drugs, thus survive to treatment and are, at a large extent, responsible for leukemia relapse. During the last two decades, considerable progresses have been made in the understanding of the peculiar cellular and molecular properties of LSCs. In this context, particularly relevant was the discovery of several membrane markers, selectively or preferentially expressed on LSCs. These membrane markers offer now unique opportunities to identify LSCs and to distinguish them from normal HSCs, to monitor the response of the various anti-leukemic treatments at the level of the LSC compartment, to identify relevant therapeutic targets. Concerning this last point, the most promising therapeutic targets are CD33 and CD123.

  14. Identification of cytotoxic drugs that selectively target tumor cells with MYC overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Frenzel

    Full Text Available Expression of MYC is deregulated in a wide range of human cancers, and is often associated with aggressive disease and poorly differentiated tumor cells. Identification of compounds with selectivity for cells overexpressing MYC would hence be beneficial for the treatment of these tumors. For this purpose we used cell lines with conditional MYCN or c-MYC expression, to screen a library of 80 conventional cytotoxic compounds for their ability to reduce tumor cell viability and/or growth in a MYC dependent way. We found that 25% of the studied compounds induced apoptosis and/or inhibited proliferation in a MYC-specific manner. The activities of the majority of these were enhanced both by c-MYC or MYCN over-expression. Interestingly, these compounds were acting on distinct cellular targets, including microtubules (paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine and topoisomerases (10-hydroxycamptothecin, camptothecin, daunorubicin, doxorubicin, etoposide as well as DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and turnover (anisomycin, aphidicholin, gliotoxin, MG132, methotrexate, mitomycin C. Our data indicate that MYC overexpression sensitizes cells to disruption of specific pathways and that in most cases c-MYC and MYCN overexpression have similar effects on the responses to cytotoxic compounds. Treatment of the cells with topoisomerase I inhibitors led to down-regulation of MYC protein levels, while doxorubicin and the small molecule MYRA-A was found to disrupt MYC-Max interaction. We conclude that the MYC pathway is only targeted by a subset of conventional cytotoxic drugs currently used in the clinic. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying their specificity towards MYC may be of importance for optimizing treatment of tumors with MYC deregulation. Our data also underscores that MYC is an attractive target for novel therapies and that cellular screenings of chemical libraries can be a powerful tool for identifying compounds with a desired biological activity.

  15. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P<0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P<0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization.

  16. Efficient Grover search with Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølmer, Klaus; Isenhower, Larry; Saffman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present efficient methods to implement the quantum computing Grover search algorithm using the Rydberg blockade interaction. We show that simple π-pulse excitation sequences between ground and Rydberg excited states readily produce the key conditional phase shift and inversion...

  17. Neuromuscular blockade: what was, is and will be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, Tom; Cammu, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) produce neuromuscular blockade by competing with acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, whereas depolarizing NMBAs open receptor channels in a manner similar to that of acetylcholine. Problems with NMBAs include malignant hyperthermia caused by succinylcholine, anaphylaxis with the highest incidence for succinylcholine and rocuronium, and residual neuromuscular blockade. To reverse these blocks, anticholinesterases can act indirectly by increasing the amount of acetylcholine in the neuromuscular junction; sugammadex is the only selective relaxant binding agent (SRBA) in clinical use. At all levels of blockade, recovery after sugammadex is faster than after neostigmine. Sugammadex potentially also has some other advantages over neostigmine that are related to neostigmine's increase in the amount of acetylcholine and the necessity of co-administering anticholinergics. However, hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have occurred in some patients and healthy volunteers after sugammadex and remain an issue for the FDA. In the near future, we may see the emergence of new SRBAs and of easier-to-use technologies that can routinely monitor neuromuscular transmissions in daily practice. The nature of the effect of sugammadex on freeing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located outside the neuromuscular junction from NMBAs is unknown. Moreover, it is uncertain whether the full removal of the competing antagonists (by SRBAs) at the neuromuscular junction impacts the efficiency of acetylcholine transmission. In a recent pilot study in healthy volunteers, we demonstrated increased electromyographic diaphragm activity after sugammadex, compared to neostigmine. Further research is needed to elucidate the role of NMBAs and their reversal agents in the central control of breathing, respiratory muscle activity, and respiratory outcomes. PMID:25622380

  18. Antihypertensive effects of selective prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Youfei; Zhang, Yahua; Wu, Jing; Qi, Zhonghua; Yang, Guangrui; Dou, Dou; Gao, Yuansheng; Chen, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Davis, Linda S.; Wei, Mingfeng; Fan, Xuefeng; Carmosino, Monica; Hao, Chuanming; Imig, John D.; Breyer, Richard M.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical use of prostaglandin synthase–inhibiting NSAIDs is associated with the development of hypertension; however, the cardiovascular effects of antagonists for individual prostaglandin receptors remain uncharacterized. The present studies were aimed at elucidating the role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) E-prostanoid receptor subtype 1 (EP1) in regulating blood pressure. Oral administration of the EP1 receptor antagonist SC51322 reduced blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. To define whether this antihypertensive effect was caused by EP1 receptor inhibition, an EP1-null mouse was generated using a “hit-and-run” strategy that disrupted the gene encoding EP1 but spared expression of protein kinase N (PKN) encoded at the EP1 locus on the antiparallel DNA strand. Selective genetic disruption of the EP1 receptor blunted the acute pressor response to Ang II and reduced chronic Ang II–driven hypertension. SC51322 blunted the constricting effect of Ang II on in vitro–perfused preglomerular renal arterioles and mesenteric arteriolar rings. Similarly, the pressor response to EP1-selective agonists sulprostone and 17-phenyltrinor PGE2 were blunted by SC51322 and in EP1-null mice. These data support the possibility of targeting the EP1 receptor for antihypertensive therapy. PMID:17710229

  19. Functionalizing Liposomes with anti-CD44 Aptamer for Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, Walhan; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Ismail, Said; Fattal, Elias

    2015-07-15

    CD44 receptor protein is found to be overexpressed by many tumors and is identified as one of the most common cancer stem cell surface markers including tumors affecting colon, breast, pancreas, and head and neck, making this an attractive receptor for therapeutic targeting. In this study, 2'-F-pyrimidine-containing RNA aptamer (Apt1), previously selected against CD44, was successfully conjugated to the surface of PEGylated liposomes using the thiol-maleimide click reaction. The conjugation of Apt1 to the surface of liposomes was confirmed by the change in size and zeta potential and by migration on agarose gel electrophoresis. The binding affinity of Apt1 was improved after conjugation compared to free-Apt1. The cellular uptake for Apt1-Lip was tested by flow cytometry and confocal imaging using the two CD44(+) cell lines, human lung cancer cells (A549) and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), and the CD44(-) cell line, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (NIH/3T3). The results showed higher sensitivity and selectivity for Apt1-Lip compared to the blank liposomes (Mal-Lip). In conclusion, we demonstrate a successful conjugation of anti-CD44 aptamer to the surface of liposome and binding preference of Apt1-Lip to CD44-expressing cancer cells and conclude to a promising potency of Apt1-Lip as a specific drug delivery system.

  20. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Copy-number variations (CNV, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and uniparental disomy (UPD are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS, is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs. In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  1. Functionalizing Liposomes with anti-CD44 Aptamer for Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, Walhan; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Ismail, Said; Fattal, Elias

    2015-07-15

    CD44 receptor protein is found to be overexpressed by many tumors and is identified as one of the most common cancer stem cell surface markers including tumors affecting colon, breast, pancreas, and head and neck, making this an attractive receptor for therapeutic targeting. In this study, 2'-F-pyrimidine-containing RNA aptamer (Apt1), previously selected against CD44, was successfully conjugated to the surface of PEGylated liposomes using the thiol-maleimide click reaction. The conjugation of Apt1 to the surface of liposomes was confirmed by the change in size and zeta potential and by migration on agarose gel electrophoresis. The binding affinity of Apt1 was improved after conjugation compared to free-Apt1. The cellular uptake for Apt1-Lip was tested by flow cytometry and confocal imaging using the two CD44(+) cell lines, human lung cancer cells (A549) and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), and the CD44(-) cell line, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (NIH/3T3). The results showed higher sensitivity and selectivity for Apt1-Lip compared to the blank liposomes (Mal-Lip). In conclusion, we demonstrate a successful conjugation of anti-CD44 aptamer to the surface of liposome and binding preference of Apt1-Lip to CD44-expressing cancer cells and conclude to a promising potency of Apt1-Lip as a specific drug delivery system. PMID:25343502

  2. A Data Mining-Based Response Model for Target Selection in Direct Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniafe Festus Ayetiran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying customers who are more likely to respond to new product offers is an important issue in direct marketing. In direct marketing, data mining has been used extensively to identify potential customers for a new product (target selection. Using historical purchase data, a predictive response model with data mining techniques was developed to predict a probability that a customer in Ebedi Microfinance bank will respond to a promotion or an offer. To achieve this purpose, a predictive response model using customers’ historical purchase data was built with data mining techniques. The data were stored in a data warehouse to serve as management decision support system. The response model was built from customers’ historic purchases and demographic dataset.Bayesian algorithm precisely Naïve Bayes algorithm was employed in constructing the classifier system. Both filter and wrapper feature selection techniques were employed in determining inputs to the model.The results obtained shows that Ebedi Microfinance bank can plan effective marketing of their products and services by obtaining a guiding report on the status of their customers which will go a long way in assisting management in saving significant amount of money that could have been spent on wasteful promotional campaigns.

  3. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40-OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  4. Effects of VLA-1 Blockade on Experimental Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsuka, Ryuichi; Kondo, Takaaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) is implicated in recruitment, retention and activation of leukocytes and its blockade has been referred as a potential target of new drug discovery to address unmet medical needs in inflammatory disease area. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an anti-murine CD49a (integrin α subunit of VLA-1) monoclonal antibody (Ha31/8) on various experimental models of inflammatory diseases in mice. Pretreatment with Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 250 µg significantly (P<0.01) reduced arthritic symptoms and joint tissue damage in mice with type II collagen-induced arthritis. In addition, Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg significantly (P<0.01) inhibited airway inflammatory cell infiltration induced by repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. In contrast, Ha31/8 failed to inhibit oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis and OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg. These results show that VLA-1 is involved, at least partly, in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis and cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammatory cell infiltration in mice, indicating the therapeutic potential of VLA-1 blockade against rheumatoid arthritis and chronic occlusive pulmonary disease. PMID:27578034

  5. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied

  6. Selective targeting of TGF-β activation to treat fibroinflammatory airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J; Erle, David J; Reichardt, Louis F; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2014-06-18

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  7. Characterisation of aptamer-target interactions by branched selection and high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Larsen, Niels; Jensen, Jan K;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) has shown great promise for use in the development of research tools, therapeutics and diagnostics. Typically, aptamers are identified from libraries containing up to 10(16) different RNA or DNA...... sequences by 5-10 rounds of affinity selection towards a target of interest. Such library screenings can result in complex pools of many target-binding aptamers. New high-throughput sequencing techniques may potentially revolutionise aptamer selection by allowing quantitative assessment of the dynamic...... provide detailed information about aptamer binding sites, preferences for specific target conformations, and functional effects of the aptamers. The procedure was applied on a diverse pool of 2'-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA enriched for aptamers specific for the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1...

  8. An Assessment of the Effect of Rotenone on Selected Non-Target Aquatic Fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalu, Tatenda; Wasserman, Ryan J; Jordaan, Martine; Froneman, William P; Weyl, Olaf L F

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, a naturally occurring ketone, is widely employed for the management of invasive fish species. The use of rotenone poses serious challenges to conservation practitioners due to its impacts on non-target organisms including amphibians and macroinvertebrates. Using laboratory studies, we investigated the effects of different rotenone concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 37.5, 50, 100 μg L-1) on selected invertebrate groups; Aeshnidae, Belostomatids, Decapods, Ephemeroptera, Pulmonata and zooplankton over a period of 18 hours. Based on field observations and body size, we hypothesized that Ephemeropterans and zooplankton would be more susceptible to rotenone than Decapods, Belostomatids and snails. Experimental results supported this hypothesis and mortality and behaviour effects varied considerably between taxa, ranging from no effect (crab Potamonuates sidneyi) to 100% mortality (Daphnia pulex and Paradiaptomus lamellatus). Planktonic invertebrates were particularly sensitive to rotenone even at very low concentrations. Future research should investigate the recovery time of invertebrate communities after the application of rotenone and conduct field assessments assessing the longer term effects of rotenone exposure on the population dynamics of those less sensitive organisms.

  9. Selective induction of oxidative stress in cancer cells via synergistic combinations of agents targeting redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akladios, Fady N; Andrew, Scott D; Parkinson, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy is still a heavy burden that impairs the response of many cancer patients to conventional chemotherapy. Using drug combinations is one therapeutic approach to overcome the developing resistance to any one drug. Oxidative stress is now a generally regarded hallmark of cancer that can be one approach to selectively target cancer cells while sparing normal cells. With the aim of increasing oxidative stress in cancer cells to a lethal set point, we have generated and combined several series of redox active compounds that act at different points of the cellular oxidative cascade. The premise of such combinations is to deplete of endogenous antioxidant defence proteins (e.g., Glutathione) while concomitantly increasing the generation of ROS via metal redox recycling and Fenton chemistry which eventually leads to the disruption of cellular redox homeostasis and induction of cell death. Through this approach, we have identified highly synergistic combinations of two distinctive classes of compounds (Azines and Copper(II) complexes of 2-pyridyl ketone thiosemicarbazones) which are capable of eliminating cancer cells without concomitant increase in toxicity toward normal cells. In one of our most potent combinations, a combination index (CI) value of 0.056 was observed, representing a 17 fold enhancement in activity beyond additive effects. Such new combination regimen of redox active compounds can be one step closer to potentially safer low dose chemotherapy. PMID:26022081

  10. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Sarah E; Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jin Yusheng [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lu Qingyi [Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rao Jianyu, E-mail: JRao@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: gim@chem.ucla.edu [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83; Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  11. In vitro selection of G-rich RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers that interact with various HIV-1 proteins,such as reverse transcriptase,Rev,Tat protein,and nuclear capsule protein,have been prepared through SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by ex-ponential enrichment) technique. However,there are few reports about the DNA or RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase. In this investigation,we selected alternative RNA aptamers specific for the HIV-1 integrase by using a different binding buffer containing 10 mmol·L-1 MgCl2 and 100 mmol·L-1 KCl. Aptamer IN1,IN2,IN3 had similar and the highest Kd values from 145 to 239 nmol·L-1. Structural studies showed that they formed similar stem-loop structure. Deletion of any stem structure resulted in diminished affinity. In addition,structure probing study with antisense DNA indicated that the stem-loop structure in the random region was critical for integrase binding. Although aptamer IN1 failed to form G-quartet structure,it might directly interact with the DDE motif of integrase,which is the virus DNA-binding site,because G-quadruplex T40214 competitively inhibited the interaction between IN1 and integrase. Together,this study generated a novel RNA aptamer IN1,which could be useful in basic research and anti-HIV drug screening.

  12. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83; Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  13. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  14. In vitro selection of G-rich RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YingChun; ZHANG Yan; YE GuoZhu; YANG ZhenJun; ZHANG LiangRen; ZHANG LiHe

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers that interact with various HIV-1 proteins, such as reverse transcriptase, Rev, Tat protein, and nuclear capsule protein, have been prepared through SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by ex-ponential enrichment) technique. However, there are few reports about the DNA or RNA aptamers that target HIV-1 integrase. In this investigation, we selected alternative RNA aptamers specific for the HIV-1 Aptamer IN1, IN2, IN3 had similar and the highest Kd values from 145 to 239 nmol. L-1. Structural studies showed that they formed similar stem-loop structure. Deletion of any stem structure resulted in diminished affinity. In addition, structure probing study with antisense DNA indicated that the stem-loop structure in the random region was critical for integrase binding. Although aptamer IN1 failed to form G-quartet structure, it might directly interact with the DDE motif of integrase, which is the virus DNA-binding site, because G-quadruplex T40214 competitively inhibited the interaction between IN1 and integrase. Together, this study generated a novel RNA aptamer IN1, which could be useful in basic research and anti-HIV drug screening.

  15. Tumour-selective targeting of drug metabolizing enzymes to treat metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierdl, Monika; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Hatfield, M Jason; Potter, Philip M

    2016-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for the detoxification of ester-containing xenobiotics. This hydrolysis reaction results in the formation of the corresponding carboxylic acid and alcohol. Due to their highly plastic active site, CEs can hydrolyze structurally very distinct and complex molecules. Because ester groups significantly increase the water solubility of compounds, they are frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry to make relatively insoluble compounds more bioavailable. By default, this results in CEs playing a major role in the distribution and metabolism of these esterified drugs. However, this can be exploited to selectively improve compound hydrolysis, and using specific in vivo targeting techniques can be employed to generate enhanced drug activity. Here, we seek to detail the human CEs involved in esterified molecule hydrolysis, compare and contrast these with CEs present in small mammals and describe novel methods to improve drug therapy by specific delivery of CEs to cells in vivo. Finally, we will discuss the development of such approaches for their potential application towards malignant disease.

  16. Generation of orthogonally selective bacterial riboswitches by targeted mutagenesis and in vivo screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Helen A; Robinson, Christopher J; Wu, Ming-Cheng; Dixon, Neil; Micklefield, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are naturally occurring RNA-based genetic switches that control gene expression in response to the binding of small-molecule ligands, typically through modulation of transcription or translation. Their simple mechanism of action and the expanding diversity of riboswitch classes make them attractive targets for the development of novel gene expression tools. The essential first step in realizing this potential is to generate artificial riboswitches that respond to nonnatural, synthetic ligands, thereby avoiding disruption of normal cellular function. Here we describe a strategy for engineering orthogonally selective riboswitches based on natural switches. The approach begins with saturation mutagenesis of the ligand-binding pocket of a naturally occurring riboswitch to generate a library of riboswitch mutants. These mutants are then screened in vivo against a synthetic compound library to identify functional riboswitch-ligand combinations. Promising riboswitch-ligand pairs are then further characterized both in vivo and in vitro. Using this method, a series of artificial riboswitches can be generated that are versatile synthetic biology tools for use in protein production, gene functional analysis, metabolic engineering, and other biotechnological applications. PMID:24549615

  17. Mucocutaneous candidiasis: the IL-17 pathway and implications for targeted immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huppler, Anna R; Bishu, Shrinivas; Sarah L Gaffen

    2012-01-01

    IL-17 and related cytokines are direct and indirect targets of selective immunosuppressive agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and other diseases of pathologic inflammation. Insights into the potential adverse effects of IL-17 blockade can be drawn from the experience of patients with deficiencies in the IL-17 pathway. A unifying theme of susceptibility to mucocutaneous candidiasis is seen in both mice and humans with a variety of genetic defects that converge on this pathway. Muc...

  18. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  19. New Strategies for the Next Generation of Matrix-Metalloproteinase Inhibitors: Selectively Targeting Membrane-Anchored MMPs with Therapeutic Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Devy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MMP intervention strategies have met with limited clinical success due to severe toxicities. In particular, treatment with broad-spectrum MMP-inhibitors (MMPIs caused musculoskeletal pain and inflammation. Selectivity may be essential for realizing the clinical potential of MMPIs. Here we review discoveries pinpointing membrane-bound MMPs as mediators of mechanisms underlying cancer and inflammation and as possible therapeutic targets for prevention/treatment of these diseases. We discuss strategies to target these therapeutic proteases using highly selective inhibitory agents (i.e., human blocking antibodies against individual membrane-bound MMPs.

  20. The photon blockade effect in optomechanical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rabl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the photon statistics of a weakly driven optomechanical system and discuss the effect of photon blockade under single photon strong coupling conditions. We present an intuitive interpretation of this effect in terms of displaced oscillator states and derive analytic expressions for the cavity excitation spectrum and the two photon correlation function $g^{(2)}(0)$. Our results predict the appearance of non-classical photon correlations in the combined strong coupling and sideband r...

  1. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles....... On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms....

  2. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12: galaxy target selection and large scale structure catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Beth; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J; Sanchez, Ariel G; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P; Scoccola, Claudia G; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated ...

  3. Metformin selectively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth and prolong remission

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Heather A; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Struhl, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that, unlike most cancer cells within a tumor, cancer stem cells resist chemotherapeutic drugs and can regenerate the various cell types in the tumor, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells offer great promise for cancer treatment, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. Here, we show that low doses of metformin, a standard drug for diabetes, inhibits cellular transformation and selectively ...

  4. An N-sulfanylethylanilide-based traceable linker for enrichment and selective labelling of target proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takuya; Denda, Masaya; Yamamoto, Jun; Tsuji, Daisuke; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Itoh, Kohji; Shigenaga, Akira; Otaka, Akira

    2016-05-25

    An N-sulfanylethylanilide-based traceable linker, developed to facilitate identification of target proteins of bioactive compounds, was introduced into an alkynylated target protein. Subsequent adsorption onto streptavidin beads allowed it to be treated with a cysteine-fluorophore conjugate in the presence of phosphate. This induced the N-S acyl transfer reaction of the N-sulfanylethylanilide unit. The subsequent native chemical ligation of the fluorophore resulted in cleavage of the linker for target elution and fluorescence labelling of the target, allowing it to be distinguished from non-target proteins. PMID:27146590

  5. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  6. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  7. NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets insoluble ubiquitinated protein aggregates in plant stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Plant autophagy plays an important role in delaying senescence, nutrient recycling, and stress responses. Functional analysis of plant autophagy has almost exclusively focused on the proteins required for the core process of autophagosome assembly, but little is known about the proteins involved in other important processes of autophagy, including autophagy cargo recognition and sequestration. In this study, we report functional genetic analysis of Arabidopsis NBR1, a homolog of mammalian autophagy cargo adaptors P62 and NBR1. We isolated two nbr1 knockout mutants and discovered that they displayed some but not all of the phenotypes of autophagy-deficient atg5 and atg7 mutants. Like ATG5 and ATG7, NBR1 is important for plant tolerance to heat, oxidative, salt, and drought stresses. The role of NBR1 in plant tolerance to these abiotic stresses is dependent on its interaction with ATG8. Unlike ATG5 and ATG7, however, NBR1 is dispensable in age- and darkness-induced senescence and in resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen. A selective role of NBR1 in plant responses to specific abiotic stresses suggest that plant autophagy in diverse biological processes operates through multiple cargo recognition and delivery systems. The compromised heat tolerance of atg5, atg7, and nbr1 mutants was associated with increased accumulation of insoluble, detergent-resistant proteins that were highly ubiquitinated under heat stress. NBR1, which contains an ubiquitin-binding domain, also accumulated to high levels with an increasing enrichment in the insoluble protein fraction in the autophagy-deficient mutants under heat stress. These results suggest that NBR1-mediated autophagy targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates most likely derived from denatured or otherwise damaged nonnative proteins generated under stress conditions.

  8. Kv4 channel blockade reduces motor and neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidi-Knani, Sabrine; Regaya, Imed; Amalric, Marianne; Mourre, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    The striatum, a major input structure of basal ganglia, integrates glutamatergic cortical and thalamic inputs to control psychomotor behaviors. Nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease causes a loss of spinal and glutamatergic synapses in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Adaptive responses, a form of homeostatic plasticity, to these changes are caused by a decrease in a potassium Kv4 channel-dependent inactivating A-type potassium (KIA) current that increases the intrinsic excitability of MSNs. Nevertheless, the functional outcome of these compensatory mechanisms does not allow adequate behavioral recovery in vivo. We thus addressed the question of whether further blockade of Kv4 activity could enhance the striatal responsiveness of MSNs to DA depletion and restore normal function in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of a selective blocker of Kv4 channels, AmmTX3, on the motor, cognitive, and emotional symptoms produced by 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal DA pathway in rats. Striatal infusion of AmmTX3 (0.2-0.4 μg) reduced motor deficits, decreased anxiety, and restored short-term social and spatial memories. These results underlie the importance of Kv4 channels as players in the homeostatic responses, and, more importantly, provide a potential target for adjunctive therapies for Parkinson's disease. PMID:25356731

  9. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  10. Optimal landmarks selection and fiducial marker placement for minimal target registration error in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Joskowicz, Leo; Shoshan, Yigal

    2009-02-01

    We describe a new framework and method for the optimal selection of anatomical landmarks and optimal placement of fiducial markers in image-guided neurosurgery. The method allows the surgeon to optimally plan the markers locations on routine diagnostic images before preoperative imaging and to intraoperatively select the fiducial markers and the anatomical landmarks that minimize the Target Registration Error (TRE). The optimal fiducial marker configuration selection is performed by the surgeon on the diagnostic image following the target selection based on a visual Estimated TRE (E-TRE) map. The E-TRE map is automatically updated when the surgeon interactively adds and deletes candidate markers and targets. The method takes the guesswork out of the registration process, provides a reliable localization uncertainty error for navigation, and can reduce the localization error without additional imaging and hardware. Our clinical experiments on five patients who underwent brain surgery with a navigation system show that optimizing one marker location and the anatomical landmarks configuration reduces the average TRE from 4.7mm to 3.2mm, with a maximum improvement of 4mm. The reduction of the target registration error has the potential to support safer and more accurate minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures.

  11. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Toonen, P.W.; Verheul, M.; van Roekel, H.S.; Nijman, I.J.; Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is cur

  12. Rydberg-interaction-based quantum gates free from blockade error

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accurate quantum gates are basic elements for building quantum computers. There has been great interest in designing quantum gates by using blockade effect of Rydberg atoms recently. The fidelity and operation speed of these gates, however, are fundamentally limited by the blockade error. Here we propose another type of quantum gates, which are based on Rydberg blockade effect, yet free from any blockade error. In contrast to the `blocking' method in previous schemes, we use Rydberg energy shift to realise a rational generalised Rabi frequency so that a novel $\\pi$ phase for one input state of the gate emerges. This leads to an accurate Rydberg-blockade based two-qubit quantum gate that can operate in a $0.1\\mu s$ timescale or faster thanks to that it operates by a Rabi frequency which is comparable to the blockade shift.

  13. Angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 activation contributes to vascular survival and tumor growth during VEGF blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jianzhong; Bae, Jae-O; Tsai, Judy P.; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela; Papa, Joey; Lee, Alice; Zeng, Shan; Kornfeld, Z. Noah; Ullner, Paivi; Zaghloul, Nibal; Ioffe, Ella; Nandor, Sarah; Burova, Elena; Holash, Jocelyn; Thurston, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Approval of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab by the FDA in 2004 reflected the success of this vascular targeting strategy in extending survival in patients with advanced cancers. However, consistent with previous reports that experimental tumors can grow or recur during VEGF blockade, it has become clear that many patients treated with VEGF inhibitors will ultimately develop progressive disease. Previous studies have shown that disruption of VEGF signali...

  14. Reversal of profound neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in an infant after bronchial foreign body removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoglu, Mustafa; Birbicer, Handan; Memis, Suleyman; Taşkınlar, Hakan

    2016-09-01

    Sugammadex is a selective chemical agent that can reverse neuromuscular blockade induced by vecuronium and rocuronium. The aim of this report is to discuss the effectiveness of sugammadex in the reversal of neuromuscular blockade in children younger than 2 years. A 16-month-old boy, weighing 10 kg, was admitted to the pediatric emergency department due to choking, cyanosis, and severe respiratory distress that occurred while he was eating peanuts. In the emergency department, the patient's condition deteriorated, and he went into respiratory arrest. He was immediately intubated and taken to the operating room. A rigid bronchoscopy was performed under general anesthesia, with administration of intravenous pentothal (5 mg/kg), rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg), and fentanyl (0.5 μg/kg) in the operating room. The foreign body was removed within 6 minutes, and the profound neuromuscular blockade was reversed with a dose of 2 mg/kg sugammadex. He was extubated successfully after obtaining the spontaneous respiratory activity, and adequate breathing was restored. Clinical use of sugammadex in children younger than 2 years is not recommended because of the lack of clinical studies. In this case report, the profound neuromuscular blockade was successfully reversed with a dose of 2 mg/kg sugammadex in a 16-month-old boy. However, more prospective clinical studies are required for the safe use of this agent in children. PMID:27555184

  15. Acquisitions as lotteries? : The selection of target-firm risk and its impact on merger outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Christoph; Spalt, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    From 1987 to 2008, riskier firms were more likely to be taken over. Yet, on average, the acquirer declined in value by 2.8% when it bought a "risky target" (the third tercile, having an annualized idiosyncratic volatility of 61% or more), but only by 0.6% when it bought a "safe target" (the first te

  16. Blockade of the MEK/ERK signalling cascade by AS703026, a novel selective MEK1/2 inhibitor, induces pleiotropic anti-myeloma activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihyun; Kong, Sun-Young; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Li, Xianfeng; Song, Weihua; Nahar, Sabikun; Burger, Peter; Rumizen, Mathew J; Podar, Klaus; Chauhan, Dharminder; Hideshima, Teru; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul; Clark, Ann; Ogden, Janet; Goutopoulos, Andreas; Rastelli, Luca; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tai, Yu-Tzu

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of AS703026, a novel, selective, orally bioavailable MEK1/2 inhibitor, in human multiple myeloma (MM). AS703026 inhibited growth and survival of MM cells and cytokine-induced osteoclast differentiation more potently (9- to 10-fold) than AZD6244. Inhibition of proliferation induced by AS703026 was mediated by G0-G1 cell cycle arrest and was accompanied by reduction of MAF oncogene expression. AS703026 further induced apoptosis via caspase 3 and Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage in MM cells, both in the presence or absence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Importantly, AS703026 sensitized MM cells to a broad spectrum of conventional (dexamethasone, melphalan), novel or emerging (lenalidomide, perifosine, bortezomib, rapamycin) anti-MM therapies. Significant tumour growth reduction in AS703026- vs. vehicle-treated mice bearing H929 MM xenograft tumours correlated with downregulated pERK1/2, induced PARP cleavage, and decreased microvessels in vivo. Moreover, AS703026 (BRAF genes. Importantly, BMSC-induced viability of MM patient cells was similarly blocked within the same dose range. Our results therefore support clinical evaluation of AS703026, alone or in combination with other anti-MM agents, to improve patient outcome.

  17. Reversal of profound, high-dose rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex at two different time points - An international, multicenter, randomized, dose-finding, safety assessor-blinded, phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhringer, F.K.; Rex, C.; Sielenkamper, A.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Sugammadex (Org 25969), a novel, selective relaxant binding agent, was specifically designed to rapidly reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. The efficacy and safety of sugammadex for the reversal of profound, high-dose rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade was evalua...

  18. Reversal of profound, high-dose rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex at two different time points: an international, multicenter, randomized, dose-finding, safety assessor-blinded, phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pühringer, Friedrich K; Rex, Christopher; Sielenkämper, Andreas W;

    2008-01-01

    Sugammadex (Org 25969), a novel, selective relaxant binding agent, was specifically designed to rapidly reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. The efficacy and safety of sugammadex for the reversal of profound, high-dose rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade was evaluated....

  19. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  20. Comparing the Selection and Placement of Best Management Practices in Improving Water Quality Using a Multiobjective Optimization and Targeting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chi Chiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Suites of Best Management Practices (BMPs are usually selected to be economically and environmentally efficient in reducing nonpoint source (NPS pollutants from agricultural areas in a watershed. The objective of this research was to compare the selection and placement of BMPs in a pasture-dominated watershed using multiobjective optimization and targeting methods. Two objective functions were used in the optimization process, which minimize pollutant losses and the BMP placement areas. The optimization tool was an integration of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA and a watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool—SWAT. For the targeting method, an optimum BMP option was implemented in critical areas in the watershed that contribute the greatest pollutant losses. A total of 171 BMP combinations, which consist of grazing management, vegetated filter strips (VFS, and poultry litter applications were considered. The results showed that the optimization is less effective when vegetated filter strips (VFS are not considered, and it requires much longer computation times than the targeting method to search for optimum BMPs. Although the targeting method is effective in selecting and placing an optimum BMP, larger areas are needed for BMP implementation to achieve the same pollutant reductions as the optimization method.

  1. Discovery: an interactive resource for the rational selection and comparison of putative drug target proteins in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odendaal Christiaan J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to half a billion human clinical cases of malaria are reported each year, resulting in about 2.7 million deaths, most of which occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to the over-and misuse of anti-malarials, widespread resistance to all the known drugs is increasing at an alarming rate. Rational methods to select new drug target proteins and lead compounds are urgently needed. The Discovery system provides data mining functionality on extensive annotations of five malaria species together with the human and mosquito hosts, enabling the selection of new targets based on multiple protein and ligand properties. Methods A web-based system was developed where researchers are able to mine information on malaria proteins and predicted ligands, as well as perform comparisons to the human and mosquito host characteristics. Protein features used include: domains, motifs, EC numbers, GO terms, orthologs, protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions and host-pathogen interactions among others. Searching by chemical structure is also available. Results An in silico system for the selection of putative drug targets and lead compounds is presented, together with an example study on the bifunctional DHFR-TS from Plasmodium falciparum. Conclusion The Discovery system allows for the identification of putative drug targets and lead compounds in Plasmodium species based on the filtering of protein and chemical properties.

  2. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Martin C.; de Geus, Susanna W.L.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Hawinkels, Lukas J.A.C.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications.

  3. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Matsen, Miles E.; Mundinger, Thomas O.; Morton, Gregory J.; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Central administration of ligands for fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) such as fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and FGF21 exert glucose-lowering effects in rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Conversely, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the non-selective FGFR inhibitor (FGFRi) PD173074 causes glucose intolerance, implying a physiological role for neuronal FGFR signaling in glucose homeostasis. The current studies were undertaken to identify neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the glucose intolerance induced by pharmacological blockade of central FGFRs. Methods Overnight fasted, lean, male, Long-Evans rats received icv injections of either PD173074 or vehicle (Veh) followed 30 min later by performance of a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data from the FSIGT was performed to estimate insulin-dependent and insulin-independent components of glucose disposal. Plasma levels of lactate, glucagon, corticosterone, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFA) and catecholamines were measured before and after intravenous (iv) glucose injection. Results Within 20 min of icv PD173074 injection (prior to the FSIGT), plasma levels of lactate, norepinephrine and epinephrine increased markedly, and each returned to baseline rapidly (within 8 min) following the iv glucose bolus. In contrast, plasma glucagon levels were not altered by icv FGFRi at either time point. Consistent with a previous report, glucose tolerance was impaired following icv PD173074 compared to Veh injection and, based on minimal model analysis of FSIGT data, this effect was attributable to reductions of both insulin secretion and the basal insulin effect (BIE), consistent with the inhibitory effect of catecholamines on pancreatic β-cell secretion. By comparison, there were no changes in glucose effectiveness at zero insulin (GEZI) or the insulin sensitivity index (SI). To determine if

  4. Prolonged rat liver allograft survival by in vivo targeting OX40-siRNA OX40-OX40L co-stimulatory cascade blockade%靶向OX40基因的siRNA抑制大鼠肝脏移植排斥反应的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武聚山; 夏仁品; 卢实春; 张毅; 娄金丽; 李宁

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨RNA干扰阻断OX40-OX40L共刺激通路对大鼠移植肝存活时间的影响.方法 制作原位肝脏移植物大鼠模型,供体DA大鼠,受体Lewis大鼠.移植术毕时将5 ml含5×109pfu的pLVTHM-OX40-siRNA重组慢病毒经阴茎背静脉在10秒内注射受鼠体内,术后观察受鼠存活时间,移植肝脏进行组织病理学检查,采用ELISA法检测大鼠外周血IL-2、IFN-γ的水平,并进行受者大鼠脾细胞对供者大鼠脾细胞的混和淋巴细胞反应(MLR). 结果转染组大鼠肝脏移植物的存活时间为(74.0±9.3)d,明显长于对照组(7.3±0.5)d和未转染组(7.5±0.5)d;转染组移植肝组织炎细胞浸润、间质水肿、肝组织坏死程度较对照组和未转染组减轻;耐受组大鼠脾脏中T淋巴细胞刺激T淋巴细胞增殖的能力较对照组降低(t=25.1,P<0.01);移植术后第7 d,转染组血清IL-2浓度为(46±8.4)pg/ml,IFN-γ浓度为(202.7±14.6)pg/ml,均显著低于对照组和未转染组(分别t=176.4,45.5,P<0.01).结论 转染靶向OX40的siRNA,可通过阻断OX40-OX40L共刺激通路,抑制大鼠肝脏移植后的排斥反应,延长大鼠移植肝的存活时间.%Objective To investigate the effect of blockading OX40-OX40L co-stimulatory signaling on the survival time of liver allograft in rat.Methods siRNA-expression vectors were constructed to targeting OX40.3~5 minutes before DA to Lewis orthotopic liver transplantation was performed,5×109 pfu of targeting OX40 siRNA plasmid DNA were diluted in 5 ml of phosphate buffered saline(PBS)and inlected intravenously into recipient Lewis rat over a period of 10 seconds.Serum IL-2 and IFN-γ levels were assayed by ELISA,and mix lymphocyte response(MLR)were tested by 3H-thymidine.Results The survival time of recipients in siRNA treatment group(74.0±9.3)was significantly longer than that in control group[(7.3±0.5)days].In experiment group,the inflammatory cell infihration and liver tissue structure destruction were very slight

  5. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugal, Cherie; van Beest, Floris; Vander Wal, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    , in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely......Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high......-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012...

  6. Economic assessment of FEC-based targeted selective drenching in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallé, Guillaume; Cortet, Jacques; Koch, Christine; Reigner, Fabrice; Cabaret, Jacques

    2015-11-30

    In the face of an increased prevalence of drug-resistant cyathostomin populations, a targeted selective treatment (TST) strategy based on Faecal Egg Counts (FECs) has been proposed as an alternative management strategy. However, associated costs may be a barrier to the uptake of this strategy. Our study aims to provide an economic assessment of FEC-based TST. FECs were determined in a Welsh pony herd thrice a year from 2010 to 2014. This database was used to explore the impact of FEC price, sampling strategy (individual or pooled) and labour-associated costs. Drug price was set at the cheapest level, hence providing a conservative framework to determine the maximum viable FEC price in the context of a cost-driven horse industry. The maximum viable FEC price for a cost-efficient individual based strategy was determined by an in silico bootstrap approach consisting of randomly sampling 1000 virtual pony herds of various sizes (1 to 100 ponies) from the available database and estimating the associated costs (FEC price ranging from € 1 to € 10, anthelmintic costs and labour-associated costs). The costs and benefits of the pooling strategy that consists of basing the decision to treat on group FEC values were also investigated. This is thought to reduce FEC-based costs but may result in highly infected individuals being left undrenched, i.e. in false-negatives, as a result of FEC overdispersion. For various pool-sizes (1-20 ponies) and various cut-off thresholds (50-200 eggs/g), we sampled 1000 pony herds in silico to estimate the associated costs and determine the number of positive ponies within a negative pool. Following these simulations, pool-based FECs of various sizes were performed on 40 ponies to compare predictions with real data. Within 4 years, anthelmintic costs were cut by 80%, albeit with free FECs. In silico estimations suggested that an individual FEC-based TST would not be cost-efficient in this context for an FEC price above € 5. With a pooled

  7. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  8. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Isobe Masaharu; Yoshioka Megumi; Kurosawa Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR), in which PCR-am...

  9. Animal models for medications development targeting alcohol abuse using selectively bred rat lines: Neurobiological and pharmacological validity

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Richard L.; Sable, Helen J. K.; Colombo, Giancarlo; Hyytia, Petri; Rodd, Zachary A.; Lumeng, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper is to present evidence that rat animal models of alcoholism provide an ideal platform for developing and screening medications that target alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus is on the 5 oldest international rat lines that have been selectively bred for a high alcohol-consumption phenotype. The behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes of these rat lines are reviewed and placed in the context of the clinical literature. The paper presents behavioral models f...

  10. Selective recognition and stabilization of new ligands targeting the potassium form of the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Hwa; Chuang, Show-Mei; Wu, Pei-Ching; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jeyachandran, Sivakamavalli; Lo, Shou-Chen; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a ligand that is capable of distinguishing among the wide variety of G-quadruplex structures and targeting telomeres to treat cancer is particularly challenging. In this study, the ability of two anthraquinone telomerase inhibitors (NSC749235 and NSC764638) to target telomeric G-quadruplex DNA was probed. We found that these ligands specifically target the potassium form of telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over the DNA counterpart. The characteristic interaction with the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and the anticancer activities of these ligands were also explored. The results of this present work emphasize our understanding of the binding selectivity of anthraquinone derivatives to G-quadruplex DNA and assists in future drug development for G-quadruplex-specific ligands. PMID:27511133

  11. Costimulatory signal blockade in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Stadlbauer, T H;

    1999-01-01

    Blockade of the CD28-B7 or CD40L-CD40 T cell costimulatory signals prevents induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the effect of simultaneous blockade of these signals in EAE is unknown. We show that administration of either MR1 (to block CD40L) or CTLA4Ig (to block...

  12. Antilocalization of Coulomb Blockade in a Ge-Si Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higginbotham, Andrew P.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Larsen, Thorvald Wadum;

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of Coulomb blockade peak heights as a function of magnetic field is investigated experimentally in a Ge-Si nanowire quantum dot. Strong spin-orbit coupling in this hole-gas system leads to antilocalization of Coulomb blockade peaks, consistent with theory. In particular, the peak...

  13. K-targeted metabolomic analysis extends chemical subtraction to DESIGNER extracts: selective depletion of extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F; Friesen, J Brent; Nikolić, Dejan; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G; van Breemen, Richard; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-12-26

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid-liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by (1)H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting. PMID:25437744

  14. PLS-Based and Regularization-Based Methods for the Selection of Relevant Variables in Non-targeted Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Daghir-Wojtkowiak, Emilia; Kaliszan, Roman; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics constitutes a part of the systems biology and aims at determining numerous metabolites in complex biological samples. Datasets obtained in the non-targeted metabolomics studies are high-dimensional due to sensitivity of mass spectrometry-based detection methods as well as complexity of biological matrices. Therefore, a proper selection of variables which contribute into group classification is a crucial step, especially in metabolomics studies which are focused on searching for disease biomarker candidates. In the present study, three different statistical approaches were tested using two metabolomics datasets (RH and PH study). The orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) without and with multiple testing correction as well as the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) with bootstrapping, were tested and compared. For the RH study, OPLS-DA model built without multiple testing correction selected 46 and 218 variables based on the VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. For the PH study, 217 and 320 variables were selected based on the VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the RH study, OPLS-DA model built after correcting for multiple testing, selected 4 and 19 variables as in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. For the PH study, 14 and 18 variables were selected based on the VIP criteria in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the RH and PH study, the LASSO selected 14 and 4 variables with reproducibility between 99.3 and 100%, respectively. In the light of PLS-based models, the larger the search space the higher the probability of developing models that fit the training data well with simultaneous poor predictive performance on the validation set. The LASSO offers potential improvements over standard linear regression due to the presence of the constrain, which promotes sparse solutions. This paper is the first one to date

  15. The use of selective volatization in the separation of {sup 68}Ge from irradiated Ga targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulen, N.P. van der, E-mail: nick@tlabs.ac.z [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Dolley, S.G.; Steyn, G.F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Walt, T.N. van der [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Raubenheimer, H.G. [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2011-05-15

    Cyclotron-produced {sup 68}Ge can be separated from its Ga target material by dissolving the target in aqua regia and collecting the volatile {sup 68}Ge in a solution containing 1.0 M NaOH and 2% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. The solution is then acidified with HF before being loaded onto a column containing AG MP-1 anion exchange resin. The column is rinsed with dilute HF to remove any remaining impurities, before eluting the desired product with 0.1 M HCl. A radiochemically pure product is obtained.

  16. 6-alkylsalicylates are selective Tip60 inhibitors and target the acetyl-CoA binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghizzoni, Massimo; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Tielong; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.; Zheng, Y. George

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases are important enzymes that regulate various cellular functions, such as epigenetic control of DNA transcription. Development of HAT inhibitors with high selectivity and potency will provide powerful mechanistic tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of HATs

  17. Target Selection by the Frontal Cortex during Coordinated Saccadic and Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihasam, Krishna; Bullock, Daniel; Grossberg, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oculomotor tracking of moving objects is an important component of visually based cognition and planning. Such tracking is achieved by a combination of saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements. In particular, the saccadic and smooth-pursuit systems interact to often choose the same target, and to maximize its visibility through time. How do…

  18. A Phase I Trial of Preoperative Partial Breast Radiotherapy: Patient Selection, Target Delineation, and Dose Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Arya, Ritu; Yoo, Sua; Baker, Jay A.; Chang, Zheng; Palta, Manisha; Duffy, Eileen; Horton, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) into clinical practice is limited by the need for specialized equipment and training. The accessible external beam technique yields unacceptable complication rates, likely due to large post-operative target volumes. We designed a phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy to the intact tumor utilizing widely available technology. Methods Patients received 15, 18, or 21Gy in a single fraction to the breast tumor plus margin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in conjunction with standard computed tomography (CT)-based planning to identify contrast enhancing tumor. Skin markers and an intra-tumor biopsy marker were utilized for verification during treatment. Results MRI imaging was critical for target delineation as not all breast tumors were reliably identified on CT scan. Breast shape differences were consistently seen between CT and MRI but did not impede image registration or tumor identification. Target volumes were markedly smaller than historical post-operative volumes and normal tissue constraints were easily met. A biopsy marker within the breast proved sufficient for set up localization. Conclusions This single fraction linear-accelerator based ABPI approach can be easily incorporated at most treatment centers. In vivo targeting may improve accuracy and can reduce the dose to normal tissues. PMID:25834942

  19. Relevance of dorsal raphe nucleus firing in serotonin 5-HT2C receptor blockade-induced augmentation of SSRIs effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotty, Florence; Folgering, Joost H. A.; Brennum, Lise T.; Hogg, Sandra; Mork, Arne; Hertel, Peter; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressant drugs. However, they exhibit a slow onset of action, putatively due to the initial decrease in serotonin cell firing mediated via somato-dendritic autoreceptors. Interestingly, blockade of 5-HT2C receptors signific

  20. PD-1/PD-L1 blockades in non-small-cell lung cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing W

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wang Jing,1,2,* Miaomiao Li,3,* Yan Zhang,2 Feifei Teng,2 Anqin Han,2 Li Kong,2 Hui Zhu2 1Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Shandong Medical College, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *Both these authors contributed equally to the work Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in males and the second leading cause of death in females worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the main pathological type of lung cancer, and most newly diagnosed NSCLC patients cannot undergo surgery because the disease is already locally advanced or metastatic. Despite chemoradiotherapy and targeted therapy improving clinical outcomes, overall survival remains poor. Immune checkpoint blockade, especially blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1 receptor and its ligand PD-L1, achieved robust responses and improved survival for patients with locally advanced/metastatic NSCLC in preclinical and clinical studies. However, with regard to PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint blockade as monotherapy or in combination with other antitumor therapies, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy (including conventional irradiation and stereotactic body radiotherapy, and target therapy, there are still many unknowns in treating patients with NSCLC. Despite this limited understanding, checkpoint blockade as a novel therapeutic approach may change the treatment paradigm of NSCLC in the future. Here we review the main results from completed and ongoing studies to investigate the feasibility of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, as monotherapy or combinatorial agents in patients with locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC, and explore optimal strategy in such patients. Keywords: immunotherapy, checkpoint, PD-1, PD-L1, NSCLC

  1. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ruibing [Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Yan, Lihui [Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan [Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Yan, Ming, E-mail: ymylh@163.com [Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250012 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0–400 mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100 mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72 h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca{sup 2+} overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases. - Highlights: • Blockade of SOCE alleviated overload of Ca{sup 2+} and hepatotoxicity after ethanol application. • Blockade of SOCE inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis after ethanol application. • SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  2. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation. PMID:26567894

  3. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation.

  4. Variable selection for confounder control, flexible modeling and Collaborative Targeted Minimum Loss-based Estimation in causal inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Mireille E.; Lok, Judith J.; Gruber, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the appropriateness of the integration of flexible propensity score modeling (nonparametric or machine learning approaches) in semiparametric models for the estimation of a causal quantity, such as the mean outcome under treatment. We begin with an overview of some of the issues involved in knowledge-based and statistical variable selection in causal inference and the potential pitfalls of automated selection based on the fit of the propensity score. Using a simple example, we directly show the consequences of adjusting for pure causes of the exposure when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Such variables are likely to be selected when using a naive approach to model selection for the propensity score. We describe how the method of Collaborative Targeted minimum loss-based estimation (C-TMLE; van der Laan and Gruber, 2010) capitalizes on the collaborative double robustness property of semiparametric efficient estimators to select covariates for the propensity score based on the error in the conditional outcome model. Finally, we compare several approaches to automated variable selection in low-and high-dimensional settings through a simulation study. From this simulation study, we conclude that using IPTW with flexible prediction for the propensity score can result in inferior estimation, while Targeted minimum loss-based estimation and C-TMLE may benefit from flexible prediction and remain robust to the presence of variables that are highly correlated with treatment. However, in our study, standard influence function-based methods for the variance underestimated the standard errors, resulting in poor coverage under certain data-generating scenarios. PMID:26226129

  5. A novel peptide, selected from phage display library of random peptides, can efficiently target into human breast cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jian; LIU WeiQing; JIANG AiMei; ZHANG KeJian; CHEN MingQing

    2008-01-01

    To develop a targeting vector for breast cancer biotherapy, MDA-MB-231 cell, a human breast cancer cell line, was co-cultured with pC89 (9 aa) phage display library of random peptides. In multiple inde-pendent peptide-presenting phage screening trials, subtilisin was used as a protease to inactivate ex-tra-cellular phages. The internalized phages were collected by cell lysising and amplified in E. coli XLI-Blue. Through five rounds of selection, the peptide-presenting phages which could be internalized in MDA-MB-231 cells were isolated. A comparison was made between internalization capacities of pep-tide-presenting phages isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells and RGD-integrin binding phage by cocultur-ing them with other human tumor cell lines and normal cells. The nucleotide sequences of isolated peptide-presenting phages were then determined by DNA sequencing. To uncover whether phage coat protein or amino acid order was required for the character of the peptide to MDA-MB-231 cells, three peptides were synthesized. They are CASPSGALRSC, ASPSGALRS and CGVIFDHSVPC (the shifted sequence of CASPSGALRSC), and after coculturing them with different cell lines, their targeting ca-pacities to MDA-MB-231 cells were detected. These data suggested that the internalization process was highly selective, and capable of capturing a specific peptide from parent peptide variants. Moreover, the targeting internalization event of peptides was an amino acid sequence dependent manner. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using phage display library of random peptides to develop new targeting system for intracellular delivery of macromolecules, and the peptide we obtained might be modified as a targeting vector for breast cancer gene therapy.

  6. Coulomb blockade of spin-dependent shuttling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Chul; Kadigrobov, Anatoli M.; Shekhter, Robert I.; Jonson, M.

    2013-12-01

    We show that nanomechanical shuttling of single electrons may enable qualitatively new functionality if spin-polarized electrons are injected into a nanoelectromechanical single-electron tunneling (NEM-SET) device. This is due to the combined effects of spin-dependent electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade of tunneling, which are phenomena that occur in certain magnetic NEM-SET devices. Two effects are predicted to occur in such structures. The first is a reentrant shuttle instability, by which we mean the sequential appearance, disappearance and again the appearance of a shuttle instability as the driving voltage is increased (or the mechanical dissipation is diminished). The second effect is an enhanced spin polarization of the nanomechanically assisted current flow.

  7. High Quality Targets Selection in SBAS-InSAR Technique by Considering Temporal and Spatial Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIONG Wenxiu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional coherence-based point-selection method in the SBAS technique is often suffered from the side lobe effect problem, which can result in the omission of partial high-quality points and reservation of partial low-quality points. A new algorithm to select high-quality points is proposed in the SBAS technique by quantifying the separated noise phase component. Compared with the traditional filtering methods, it is found that the Non-Local algorithm considering the homogeneous points can accurately separate spatially-correlated phase from the unwrapping differential interferometric phase, and then the precision of the noise phase component estimation is improved. Coherence-based approach and our new algorithm are compared by selecting high-quality points and mapping the surface deformation of the test area in Shanghai. There it is utilized the 24 JERS-1 SAR images acquired from 1992 to 1998. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm not only can select the high-quality points in fields covered by farmlands and hamlets which are omitted by coherence-based method, but also can effectively exclude the points extracted by coherence-based method due to the side lobe effect.

  8. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  9. Intrathecal amantadine for prolonged spinal blockade of sensory and motor functions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Heng-Teng; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to compare the hypothesized local anesthetic action of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) with that of the known local anesthetic mepivacaine. Motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive functions were evaluated in rats after intrathecal administration. Amantadine elicited spinal anesthesia in a dose-related fashion and produced a better sensory-selective action over motor blockade (P proprioceptive, and nociceptive block was mepivacaine > amantadine (P proprioception, and nociception. On an equipotent basis (ED25 , ED50 , and ED75 ), the duration of amantadine was longer (P proprioceptive, and nociceptive block. Our preclinical data demonstrated that amantadine was less potent than mepivacaine at producing spinal anesthesia. The spinal block duration produced by amantadine was greater than that produced by mepivacaine. Both amantadine and mepivacaine produced a markedly nociceptive-specific blockade. PMID:27011292

  10. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid-beta, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2009-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer's disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the cyclooxygenase inhibitory and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid were lowered by flurbiprofen, amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a selective amyloid lowering agent with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration-responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Selective targeting of nuclear receptor FXR by avermectin analogues with therapeutic effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lihua; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yanlin; Zheng, Weili; Han, Yaping; Guo, Fusheng; Ye, Frank Bin; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a predictive factor of death from many diseases. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an ideal target for NAFLD drug development due to its crucial roles in lipid metabolism. The aim of this work is to examine the molecular mechanisms and functional roles of FXR modulation by avermectin analogues in regulating metabolic syndromes like NAFLD. We found that among avermectin analogues studied, the analogues that can bind and activate FXR are effective in regulating metabolic parameters tested, including reducing hepatic lipid accumulation, lowering serum cholesterol and glucose levels, and improving insulin sensitivity, in a FXR dependent manner. Mechanistically, the avermectin analogues that interact with FXR exhibited features as partial agonists, with distinctive properties in modulating coregulator recruitment. Structural features critical for avermectin analogues to selectively bind to FXR were also revealed. This study indicated that in addition to antiparasitic activity, avermectin analogues are promising drug candidates to treat metabolism syndrome including NAFLD by directly targeting FXR. Additionally, the structural features that discriminate the selective binding of FXR by avermectin analogues may provide a unique safe approach to design drugs targeting FXR signaling. PMID:26620317

  12. A computational strategy to select optimized protein targets for drug development toward the control of cancer diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carels, Nicolas; Tilli, Tatiana; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a strategy for the optimized selection of protein targets suitable for drug development against neoplastic diseases taking the particular case of breast cancer as an example. We combined human interactome and transcriptome data from malignant and control cell lines because highly connected proteins that are up-regulated in malignant cell lines are expected to be suitable protein targets for chemotherapy with a lower rate of undesirable side effects. We normalized transcriptome data and applied a statistic treatment to objectively extract the sub-networks of down- and up-regulated genes whose proteins effectively interact. We chose the most connected ones that act as protein hubs, most being in the signaling network. We show that the protein targets effectively identified by the combination of protein connectivity and differential expression are known as suitable targets for the successful chemotherapy of breast cancer. Interestingly, we found additional proteins, not generally targeted by drug treatments, which might justify the extension of existing formulation by addition of inhibitors designed against these proteins with the consequence of improving therapeutic outcomes. The molecular alterations observed in breast cancer cell lines represent either driver events and/or driver pathways that are necessary for breast cancer development or progression. However, it is clear that signaling mechanisms of the luminal A, B and triple negative subtypes are different. Furthermore, the up- and down-regulated networks predicted subtype-specific drug targets and possible compensation circuits between up- and down-regulated genes. We believe these results may have significant clinical implications in the personalized treatment of cancer patients allowing an objective approach to the recycling of the arsenal of available drugs to the specific case of each breast cancer given their distinct qualitative and quantitative molecular traits. PMID:25625699

  13. A computational strategy to select optimized protein targets for drug development toward the control of cancer diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carels

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a strategy for the optimized selection of protein targets suitable for drug development against neoplastic diseases taking the particular case of breast cancer as an example. We combined human interactome and transcriptome data from malignant and control cell lines because highly connected proteins that are up-regulated in malignant cell lines are expected to be suitable protein targets for chemotherapy with a lower rate of undesirable side effects. We normalized transcriptome data and applied a statistic treatment to objectively extract the sub-networks of down- and up-regulated genes whose proteins effectively interact. We chose the most connected ones that act as protein hubs, most being in the signaling network. We show that the protein targets effectively identified by the combination of protein connectivity and differential expression are known as suitable targets for the successful chemotherapy of breast cancer. Interestingly, we found additional proteins, not generally targeted by drug treatments, which might justify the extension of existing formulation by addition of inhibitors designed against these proteins with the consequence of improving therapeutic outcomes. The molecular alterations observed in breast cancer cell lines represent either driver events and/or driver pathways that are necessary for breast cancer development or progression. However, it is clear that signaling mechanisms of the luminal A, B and triple negative subtypes are different. Furthermore, the up- and down-regulated networks predicted subtype-specific drug targets and possible compensation circuits between up- and down-regulated genes. We believe these results may have significant clinical implications in the personalized treatment of cancer patients allowing an objective approach to the recycling of the arsenal of available drugs to the specific case of each breast cancer given their distinct qualitative and quantitative molecular

  14. Design of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals: selective uptake of copper-64 complexes in hypoxic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearling, J.L.J.; Lewis, J.S.; Mullen, G.E.D.; Rae, M.T. [Biosciences Dept., University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Zweit, J. [Joint Dept of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blower, P.J. [Biosciences Dept., University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom)]|[Nuclear Medicine Dept, Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Canterbury (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    The well-known perfusion tracer CuPTSM, labelled with {sup 62}Cu or {sup 64}Cu, is believed to be trapped in cells non-selectively by a bioreductive mechanism. It is proposed that by modifying the ligand to increase its electron donor strength (for example by adding alkyl functionality or replacing sulphur ligands with oxygen ligands), the copper complexes will become less easily reduced and tracers with selectivity for hypoxic tissues could thus be developed. The aim of this work was to prepare {sup 64}Cu-labelled complexes of two series of ligands, based on the bis(thiosemicarbazone) (13 ligands) and bis(salicylaldimine) (3 ligands) skeletons, and to evaluate the hypoxia dependence of their uptake in cells. The complexes were incubated with Chinese hamster ovary cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and the cells isolated by centrifugation to determine radioactivity uptake at various time points up to 90 min. Several members of both series demonstrated significant (P<0.05) or highly significant (P<0.01) hypoxia selectivity, indicating that both series of complexes offer a basis for development of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography ({sup 60}Cu, {sup 61}Cu, {sup 62}Cu, {sup 64}Cu) and targeted radiotherapy ({sup 64}Cu, {sup 67}Cu). (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  15. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  16. Role of receptor tyrosine kinases in gastric cancer: New targets for a selective therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JC Becker; C Müller-Tidow; H Serve; W Domschke; T Pohle

    2006-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as the epidermal growth factor receptor family participate in several steps of tumor formation including proliferation and metastatic spread. Several known RTKs are upregulated in gastric cancer being prime targets of a tailored therapy. Only preliminary data exist, however, on the use of the currently clinically available drugs such as trastuzumab,cetuximab, bevacizumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, and imatinib in the setting of gastric cancer. Preclinical data suggest a potential benefit of their use, especially in combination with "conventional" cytostatic therapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge about their use in cancer therapy as well as new approaches and drugs to optimize treatment success.

  17. PLS-based and regularization-based methods for the selection of relevant variables in non-targeted metabolomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bujak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-targeted metabolomics constitutes a part of systems biology and aims to determine many metabolites in complex biological samples. Datasets obtained in non-targeted metabolomics studies are multivariate and high-dimensional due to the sensitivity of mass spectrometry-based detection methods as well as complexity of biological matrices. Proper selection of variables which contribute into group classification is a crucial step, especially in metabolomics studies which are focused on searching for disease biomarker candidates. In the present study, three different statistical approaches were tested using two metabolomics datasets (RH and PH study. Orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA without and with multiple testing correction as well as least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO were tested and compared. For the RH study, OPLS-DA model built without multiple testing correction, selected 46 and 218 variables based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the case of the PH study, 217 and 320 variables were selected based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the RH study, OPLS-DA model built with multiple testing correction, selected 4 and 19 variables as statistically significant in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. For PH study, 14 and 18 variables were selected based on VIP criteria in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. Additionally, the concept and fundaments of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO with bootstrap procedure evaluating reproducibility of results, was demonstrated. In the RH and PH study, the LASSO selected 14 and 4 variables with reproducibility between 99.3% and 100%. However, apart from the popularity of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA methods in metabolomics, it should be highlighted that they do not control type I or type II error, but only arbitrarily establish a cut-off value for PLS-DA loadings

  18. APE1/Ref-1 regulates STAT3 transcriptional activity and APE1/Ref-1-STAT3 dual-targeting effectively inhibits pancreatic cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Angelo A; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; Reed, April M; Shahda, Safi; He, Ying; Maitra, Anirban; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a largely incurable disease, and increasing evidence supports strategies targeting multiple molecular mediators of critical functions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Intracellular redox state modulates the activity of various signal transduction pathways and biological processes, including cell survival, drug resistance and responsiveness to microenvironmental factors. Recently, it has been shown that the transcription factor STAT3 is under redox control, but the mechanisms involved in its regulation are unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that STAT3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity is directly regulated by the redox function of the APE1/Ref-1 endonuclease, using overexpression and redox-specific mutational strategies, and gene knockdown. Also, pharmacological blockade of APE1/Ref-1 by the redox-selective inhibitor E3330 abrogates STAT3 DNA binding. Since APE1/Ref-1 also exerts redox control on other cancer-associated transcription factors, we assessed the impact of dual-targeting of STAT3 signaling and APE1/Ref-1 redox on pancreatic cancer cell functions. We observed that disruption of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity synergizes with STAT3 blockade to potently inhibit the proliferation and viability of human PDAC cells. Mechanistically, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual targeting promotes marked tumor cell apoptosis, with engagement of caspase-3 signaling, which are significantly increased in comparison to the effects triggered by single target blockade. Also, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual blockade results in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration. Overall, this work demonstrates that the transcriptional activity of STAT3 is directly regulated by the redox function of APE1/Ref-1, and that concurrent blockade of STAT3 and APE1/Ref-1 redox synergize effectively inhibit critical PDAC cell functions.

  19. Fully human MAP-fusion protein selectively targets and eliminates proliferating CD64(+) M1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Thepen, Theo

    2016-05-01

    Classical immunotoxins compromise a binding component (for example, a ligand, antibody or fragment thereof) and a cytotoxic component, usually derived from bacteria or plants (for example, Pseudomonas exotoxin A or ricin). Despite successful testing in vitro, the clinical development of immunotoxins has been hampered by immunogenicity and unsatisfactory safety profiles. Therefore, research has focused on fully human pro-apoptotic components suitable for the development of cytolytic fusion proteins (CFP). We recently reported that human microtubule-associated protein tau (MAP) can induce apoptosis when delivered to rapidly proliferating cancer cells. Here, we describe a new fully human CFP called H22(scFv)-MAP, which specifically targets CD64(+) cells. We show that H22(scFv)-MAP can efficiently kill proliferating HL-60 pro-monocytic cells in vitro. In addition, the human CFP specifically eliminates polarized M1 macrophages in a transgenic mouse model of cutaneous chronic inflammation. Because M1 macrophages promote the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases, targeting this cell population with H22(scFv)-MAP could help to treat diseases such as atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Effects of target distance on select biomechanical parameters in taekwondo roundhouse kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Coral; Molina-García, Javier; Alvarez, Octavio; Estevan, Isaac

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of target distance on temporal and impact force parameters that are important performance factors in taekwondo kicks. Forty-nine taekwondo athletes (age = 24.5 +/- 5.9 years; mass = 79.9 +/- 10.8 kg) were recruited: 13 male experts, 21 male novices, 8 female experts, and 6 female novices. Impact force, reaction time, and execution time were computed. Three-way repeated measure ANOVAs revealed significant 'distance' effect on impact force, reaction time, and execution time (p = 0.001). Comparisons between distance conditions revealed that taekwondo athletes kicked with higher impact force from short distance (17.6 +/- 7.5 N/kg) than from long distance (13.1 +/- 5.7 N/kg) (p < 0.001), had lower reaction time from short distance (498 +/- 90 ms) and normal distance (521 +/- 111 ms) than from long distance (602 +/- 121 ms) (p < 0.001), and had lower execution time from short distance (261 +/- 69 ms/m) than from normal distance (306 +/- 105 ms/m) or from long distance (350 +/- 106 ms/m) (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, target distance affected the kick performance; as distance increases, impact force decreased and reaction time increased. Therefore, when reaction to a simple visual stimulus is needed, kicking from a long distance is not recommended, as longer time is required to respond.

  1. Pauli Spin Blockade and the Ultrasmall Magnetic Field Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Danon, Jeroen

    2013-08-06

    Based on the spin-blockade model for organic magnetoresistance, we present an analytic expression for the polaron-bipolaron transition rate, taking into account the effective nuclear fields on the two sites. We reveal the physics behind the qualitatively different magnetoconductance line shapes observed in experiment, as well as the ultrasmall magnetic field effect (USFE). Since our findings agree in detail with recent experiments, they also indirectly provide support for the spin-blockade interpretation of organic magnetoresistance. In addition, we predict the existence of a similar USFE in semiconductor double quantum dots tuned to the spin-blockade regime.

  2. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle eTallet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin receptor (PRLR is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L or PRLR blockade (antagonist involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue-native electrophoresis, BRET1, we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell-surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements.

  3. Blockade of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 Prevents Inflammation and Vascular Leakage in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a leading cause of blindness in working age adults. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1 blockade on the complications of DR. Experimental models of diabetes were induced with streptozotocin (STZ treatment or Insulin2 gene mutation (Akita in mice. Protein expression and localization were examined by western blots (WB and immunofluorescence (IF. mRNA expression was quantified by PCR array and real-time PCR. The activity of VEGFR1 signaling was blocked by a neutralizing antibody called MF1. Vascular leakage was evaluated by measuring the leakage of [3H]-mannitol tracer into the retina and the IF staining of albumin. VEGFR1 blockade significantly inhibited diabetes-related vascular leakage, leukocytes-endothelial cell (EC adhesion (or retinal leukostasis, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule- (ICAM- 1 protein, abnormal localization and degeneration of the tight junction protein zonula occludens- (ZO- 1, and the cell adhesion protein vascular endothelial (VE cadherin. In addition, VEGFR1 blockade interfered with the gene expression of 10 new cytokines and chemokines: cxcl10, il10, ccl8, il1f6, cxcl15, ccl4, il13, ccl6, casp1, and ccr5. These results suggest that VEGFR1 mediates complications of DR and targeting this signaling pathway represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of DR.

  4. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R; Ho, Chia Chi M; Kauke, Monique J; Almo, Steven C; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2016-05-10

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47-SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:27091975

  5. The selectivity of the gill-nets used to target hake ( Merluccius merluccius ) in the Cornish and Irish offshore fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revill, A.; Cotter, J.; Armstrong, M.;

    2007-01-01

    -nets with this mesh size was close to 80 cm. The study indicates that the 120 mm gill-fishery off Cornwall and Ireland is a highly size-selective component of the international fishery exploiting the northern hake stock, a stock in which international landings at length peaked at around 30 cm (2004).......The North European gill-net fishery targeting hake (Merluccius merluccius) is mostly prosecuted using gill-nets with a mesh size of 120 mm. Fishers from both the UK and Ireland are active in this fishery using this particular gear type. A study was undertaken aboard a commercial gill-netter off...

  6. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  7. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  8. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS). 0. Target Selection and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, Hwankyung; Bessell, Michael S; Kim, Jinyoung S; Hur, Hyenoh; Chun, Moo-Young; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Star clusters are superb astrophysical laboratories containing cospatial and coeval samples of stars with similar chemical composition. We have initiated the Sejong Open cluster Survey (SOS) - a project dedicated to providing homogeneous photometry of a large number of open clusters in the SAAO Johnson-Cousins' $UBVI$ system. To achieve our main goal, we have paid much attention to the observation of standard stars in order to reproduce the SAAO standard system. Many of our targets are relatively small, sparse clusters that escaped previous observations. As clusters are considered building blocks of the Galactic disk, their physical properties such as the initial mass function, the pattern of mass segregation, etc. give valuable information on the formation and evolution of the Galactic disk. The spatial distribution of young open clusters will be used to revise the local spiral arm structure of the Galaxy. In addition, the homogeneous data can also be used to test stellar evolutionary theory, especially conc...

  9. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes;

    2013-01-01

    Mature Epitope Density (MED). Our method, though simple, is capable of identifying promising vaccine targets. Our online software implementation provides a computationally light and reliable analysis of bacterial exoproteins and their potential for vaccines or diagnosis projects against pathogenic......BACKGROUND: Current immunological bioinformatic approaches focus on the prediction of allele-specific epitopes capable of triggering immunogenic activity. The prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes is well studied, and various software solutions exist for this purpose...... organisms. We evaluated our computational approach by using the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv exoproteome as a gold standard model. A literature search was carried out on 60 out of 553 Mtb's predicted exoproteins, looking for previous experimental evidence concerning their possible antigenicity...

  10. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  11. A Novel Method for Gene-Specific Enhancement of Protein Translation by Targeting 5'UTRs of Selected Tumor Suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Master

    Full Text Available Translational control is a mechanism of protein synthesis regulation emerging as an important target for new therapeutics. Naturally occurring microRNAs and synthetic small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs are the most recognized regulatory molecules acting via RNA interference. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that interfering RNAs may also activate gene transcription via the newly discovered phenomenon of small RNA-induced gene activation (RNAa. Thus far, the small activating RNAs (saRNAs have only been demonstrated as promoter-specific transcriptional activators.We demonstrate that oligonucleotide-based trans-acting factors can also specifically enhance gene expression at the level of protein translation by acting at sequence-specific targets within the messenger RNA 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR. We designed a set of short synthetic oligonucleotides (dGoligos, specifically targeting alternatively spliced 5'UTRs in transcripts expressed from the THRB and CDKN2A suppressor genes. The in vitro translation efficiency of reporter constructs containing alternative TRβ1 5'UTRs was increased by up to more than 55-fold following exposure to specific dGoligos. Moreover, we found that the most folded 5'UTR has higher translational regulatory potential when compared to the weakly folded TRβ1 variant. This suggests such a strategy may be especially applied to enhance translation from relatively inactive transcripts containing long 5'UTRs of complex structure.This report represents the first method for gene-specific translation enhancement using selective trans-acting factors designed to target specific 5'UTR cis-acting elements. This simple strategy may be developed further to complement other available methods for gene expression regulation including gene silencing. The dGoligo-mediated translation-enhancing approach has the potential to be transferred to increase the translation efficiency of any suitable target gene and may have future application in

  12. Predicting the Interactome of Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae for target selection and DB service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kyong-Oh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs play key roles in various cellular functions. In addition, some critical inter-species interactions such as host-pathogen interactions and pathogenicity occur through PPIs. Phytopathogenic bacteria infect hosts through attachment to host tissue, enzyme secretion, exopolysaccharides production, toxins release, iron acquisition, and effector proteins secretion. Many such mechanisms involve some kind of protein-protein interaction in hosts. Our first aim was to predict the whole protein interaction pairs (interactome of Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae (Xoo that is an important pathogenic bacterium that causes bacterial blight (BB in rice. We developed a detection protocol to find possibly interacting proteins in its host using whole genome PPI prediction algorithms. The second aim was to build a DB server and a bioinformatic procedure for finding target proteins in Xoo for developing pesticides that block host-pathogen protein interactions within critical biochemical pathways. Description A PPI network in Xoo proteome was predicted by bioinformatics algorithms: PSIMAP, PEIMAP, and iPfam. We present the resultant species specific interaction network and host-pathogen interaction, XooNET. It is a comprehensive predicted initial PPI data for Xoo. XooNET can be used by experimentalists to pick up protein targets for blocking pathological interactions. XooNET uses most of the major types of PPI algorithms. They are: 1 Protein Structural Interactome MAP (PSIMAP, a method using structural domain of SCOP, 2 Protein Experimental Interactome MAP (PEIMAP, a common method using public resources of experimental protein interaction information such as HPRD, BIND, DIP, MINT, IntAct, and BioGrid, and 3 Domain-domain interactions, a method using Pfam domains such as iPfam. Additionally, XooNET provides information on network properties of the Xoo interactome. Conclusion XooNET is an open and free public

  13. Aldosterone blockade in post-acute myocardial infarction heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitt, Bertram; Ferrari, Roberto; Gheorghiade, Mihai; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John; Lopez-Sendon, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Development of heart failure (HF) or left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) significantly increases mortality post acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Aldosterone contributes to the development and progression of HF post AMI, and major guidelines now recommend aldosterone blockade in this setti

  14. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy: Squaring the Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A.V. Marzolini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manipulating the complex interaction between the immune system and tumour cells has been the focus of cancer research for many years, but it is only in the past decade that significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy resulting in clinically effective treatments. The blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, essential for maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis and self-tolerance, by immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies has resulted in the augmentation of anti-tumour responses. The greatest successes so far have been seen with the blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4, which has resulted in the first Phase III clinical trial showing an overall survival benefit in metastatic melanoma, and in the blockade of the programmed cell death protein-1 axis. This concise review will focus on the clinical advances made by the blockade of these two pathways and their role in current cancer treatment strategies.

  15. Dipole blockade in a cold Rydberg atomic sample

    CERN Document Server

    Comparat, Daniel; 10.1364/JOSAB.27.00A208

    2010-01-01

    We review here the studies performed about interactions in an assembly of cold Rydberg atoms. We focus more specially the review on the dipole-dipole interactions and on the effect of the dipole blockade in the laser Rydberg excitation, which offers attractive possibilities for quantum engineering. We present first the various interactions between Rydberg atoms. The laser Rydberg excitation of such an assembly is then described with the introduction of the dipole blockade phenomenon. We report recent experiments performed in this subject by starting with the case of a pair of atoms allowing the entanglement of the wave-functions of the atoms and opening a fascinating way for the realization of quantum bits and quantum gates. We consider then several works on the blockade effect in a large assembly of atoms for three different configurations: blockade through electric-field induced dipole, through F\\"orster resonance and in van der Waals interaction. The properties of coherence and cooperativity are analyzed. ...

  16. Affinity peptide developed by phage display selection for targeting gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jie Zhang; Yan-Xia Sui; Arun Budha; Jian-Bao Zheng; Xue-Jun Sun; Ying-Chun Hou; Thomas D Wang; Shao-Ying Lu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To develop an affinity peptide that binds to gastric cancer used for the detection of early gastric cancer.METHODS:A peptide screen was performed by biopanning the PhD-12 phage display library,clearing non-specific binders against tumor-adjacent normal appearing gastric mucosa and obtaining selective binding against freshly harvested gastric cancer tissues.Tumortargeted binding of selected peptides was confirmed by bound phage counts,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,competitive inhibition,fluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative analysis on immunohistochemistry using different types of cancer tissues.RESULTS:Approximately 92.8% of the non-specific phage clones were subtracted from the original phage library after two rounds of biopanning against normalappearing gastric mucosa.After the third round of positive screening,the peptide sequence AADNAKTKSFPV (AAD) appeared in 25% (12/48) of the analyzed phages.For the control peptide,these values were 6.8 ± 2.3,5.1 ± 1.7,3.5 ± 2.1,4.6 ± 1.9 and 1.1 ± 0.5,respectively.The values for AAD peptide were statistically significant (P < 0.01) for gastric cancer as compared with other histological classifications and control peptide.CONCLUSION:A novel peptide is discovered to have a specific binding activity to gastric cancer,and can be used to distinguish neoplastic from normal gastric mucosa,demonstrating the potential for early cancer detection on endoscopy.

  17. Microinterventions targeting regulatory focus and regulatory fit selectively reduce dysphoric and anxious mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Timothy J; Socolar, Yvonne; Kwapil, Lori; Cornwell, James F M; Franks, Becca; Sehnert, Steen; Higgins, E Tory

    2015-09-01

    Depression and generalized anxiety, separately and as comorbid states, continue to represent a significant public health challenge. Current cognitive-behavioral treatments are clearly beneficial but there remains a need for continued development of complementary interventions. This manuscript presents two proof-of-concept studies, in analog samples, of "microinterventions" derived from regulatory focus and regulatory fit theories and targeting dysphoric and anxious symptoms. In Study 1, participants with varying levels of dysphoric and/or anxious mood were exposed to a brief intervention either to increase or to reduce engagement in personal goal pursuit, under the hypothesis that dysphoria indicates under-engagement of the promotion system whereas anxiety indicates over-engagement of the prevention system. In Study 2, participants with varying levels of dysphoric and/or anxious mood received brief training in counterfactual thinking, under the hypothesis that inducing individuals in a state of promotion failure to generate subtractive counterfactuals for past failures (a non-fit) will lessen their dejection/depression-related symptoms, whereas inducing individuals in a state of prevention failure to generate additive counterfactuals for past failures (a non-fit) will lessen their agitation/anxiety-related symptoms. In both studies, we observed discriminant patterns of reduction in distress consistent with the hypothesized links between dysfunctional states of the two motivational systems and dysphoric versus anxious symptoms.

  18. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  19. Design of RC frames for pre-selected collapse mechanism and target displacement using energy–balance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Onur Merter; Taner Ucar

    2014-06-01

    In earthquake-prone countries, structures may be exposed to several seismic loads in any stage of building’s life. It is expected that the structures designed by engineers will show ductile behaviour under the effect of vertical and lateral loads and remain stable without making a sudden collapse. In consequence of nonlinear behaviour, plastic hinges are expected to form in structural members which are under the effect of external loads. Earthquake input energy is dissipated in plastic hinges, so, structures behave ductile. In this study, total energy of RC frames is calculated and the energy–based base shear force is determined by equating the total internal energy to the work done by external lateral design forces for pre-selected target displacement and collapse mechanism. Sections of RC frames are controlled if they can resist the calculated design lateral loads or not. If the capacity of the sections cannot withstand the external design loads, the design is rearranged and new sections are chosen. Beam and column sections that can resist the design loads securely are accepted as final sections of the energy–based design methodology. Pre-selected target displacement for desired performance level is checked using the results of nonlinear analyses. The results of the presented design methodology in this study are compatible with the results of nonlinear analyses.

  20. COULOMB BLOCKADE OSCILLATIONS OF Si SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSISTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王太宏; 李宏伟; 周均铭

    2001-01-01

    Coulomb blockade oscillations of Si single-electron transistors, which are fabricated completely by the conventional photolithography technique, have been investigated. Most of the single-electron transistors clearly show Coulomb blockade oscillations and these oscillations can be periodic by applying negative voltages to the in-plane gates. A shift of the peak positions is observed at high temperatures. It is also found that the fluctuation of the peak spacing cannot be neglected.

  1. Metabolic targeting of oncogene MYC by selective activation of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate family of transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, L; Xiu, R; Ren, P; Yue, M; Su, H; Guo, G; Xiao, D; Yu, J; Jiang, H; Liu, H; Hu, G; Qing, G

    2016-06-01

    Deregulation of the MYC oncogene produces Myc protein that regulates multiple aspects of cancer cell metabolism, contributing to the acquisition of building blocks essential for cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, disabling Myc function represents an attractive therapeutic option for cancer treatment. However, pharmacological strategies capable of directly targeting Myc remain elusive. Here, we identified that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that primarily inhibits glycolysis, preferentially induced massive cell death in human cancer cells overexpressing the MYC oncogene, in vitro and in vivo, without appreciable effects on those exhibiting low MYC levels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of glutamine metabolism synergistically potentiated the synthetic lethal targeting of MYC by 3-BrPA due in part to the metabolic disturbance caused by this combination. Mechanistically, we identified that the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and MCT2, which enable efficient 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells, were selectively activated by Myc. Two regulatory mechanisms were involved: first, Myc directly activated MCT1 and MCT2 transcription by binding to specific recognition sites of both genes; second, Myc transcriptionally repressed miR29a and miR29c, resulting in enhanced expression of their target protein MCT1. Of note, expressions of MCT1 and MCT2 were each significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas and C-MYC-overexpressing lymphomas than in tumors without MYC overexpression, correlating with poor prognosis and unfavorable patient survival. These results identify a novel mechanism by which Myc sensitizes cells to metabolic inhibitors and validate 3-BrPA as potential Myc-selective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26434591

  2. Development of a Genus-Specific Antigen Capture ELISA for Orthopoxviruses - Target Selection and Optimized Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stern

    Full Text Available Orthopoxvirus species like cowpox, vaccinia and monkeypox virus cause zoonotic infections in humans worldwide. Infections often occur in rural areas lacking proper diagnostic infrastructure as exemplified by monkeypox, which is endemic in Western and Central Africa. While PCR detection requires demanding equipment and is restricted to genome detection, the evidence of virus particles can complement or replace PCR. Therefore, an easily distributable and manageable antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of orthopoxviruses was developed to facilitate particle detection. By comparing the virus particle binding properties of polyclonal antibodies developed against surface-exposed attachment or fusion proteins, the surface protein A27 was found to be a well-bound, highly immunogenic and exposed target for antibodies aiming at virus particle detection. Subsequently, eight monoclonal anti-A27 antibodies were generated and characterized by peptide epitope mapping and surface plasmon resonance measurements. All antibodies were found to bind with high affinity to two epitopes at the heparin binding site of A27, toward either the N- or C-terminal of the crucial KKEP-segment of A27. Two antibodies recognizing different epitopes were implemented in an antigen capture ELISA. Validation showed robust detection of virus particles from 11 different orthopoxvirus isolates pathogenic to humans, with the exception of MVA, which is apathogenic to humans. Most orthopoxviruses could be detected reliably for viral loads above 1 × 103 PFU/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first solely monoclonal and therefore reproducible antibody-based antigen capture ELISA able to detect all human pathogenic orthopoxviruses including monkeypox virus, except variola virus which was not included. Therefore, the newly developed antibody-based assay represents important progress towards feasible particle detection of this important genus of viruses.

  3. Transport Through a Coulomb Blockaded Majorana Nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazunov, Alex; Egger, Reinhold; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy; Hützen, Roland; Braunecker, Bernd

    In one-dimensional (1D) quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman field, a superconducting substrate can induce zero-energy Majorana bound states located near the ends of the wire. We study electronic properties when such a wire is contacted by normal metallic or superconducting electrodes. A special attention is devoted to Coulomb blockade effects. We analyze the "Majorana single-charge transistor" (MSCT), i.e., a floating Majorana wire contacted by normal metallic source and drain contacts, where charging effects are important. We describe Coulomb oscillations in this system and predict that Majorana fermions could be unambiguously detected by the emergence of sideband peaks in the nonlinear differential conductance. We also study a superconducting variant of the MSCT setup with s-wave superconducting (instead of normal-conducting) leads. In the noninteracting case, we derive the exact current-phase relation (CPR) and find π-periodic behavior with negative critical current for weak tunnel couplings. Charging effects then cause the anomalous CPR I(\\varphi ) = Ic\\cos \\varphi, where the parity-sensitive critical current I c provides a signature for Majorana states.

  4. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  5. Selective targeting of IL-2 to NKG2D bearing cells for improved immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Reza; Lazear, Eric; Wang, Xiaoli; Arefanian, Saeed; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Carreno, Beatriz M.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fremont, Daved H.; Krupnick, Alexander Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Despite over 20 years of clinical use, IL-2 has not fulfilled expectations as a safe and effective form of tumour immunotherapy. Expression of the high affinity IL-2Rα chain on regulatory T cells mitigates the anti-tumour immune response and its expression on vascular endothelium is responsible for life threatening complications such as diffuse capillary leak and pulmonary oedema. Here we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of a cowpox virus encoded NKG2D binding protein (OMCP) and a mutated form of IL-2 with poor affinity for IL-2Rα. This fusion protein (OMCP-mutIL-2) potently and selectively activates IL-2 signalling only on NKG2D-bearing cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, without broadly activating IL-2Rα-bearing cells. OMCP-mutIL-2 provides superior tumour control in several mouse models of malignancy and is not limited by mouse strain-specific variability of NK function. In addition, OMCP-mutIL-2 lacks the toxicity and vascular complications associated with parental wild-type IL-2. PMID:27650575

  6. Targeted reengineering of protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I selectivity functionally implicates active-site residues in protein-substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Soumyashree A; Losito, Erica L; Hougland, James L

    2014-01-21

    Posttranslational modifications are vital for the function of many proteins. Prenylation is one such modification, wherein protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I) or protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) modify proteins by attaching a 20- or 15-carbon isoprenoid group, respectively, to a cysteine residue near the C-terminus of a target protein. These enzymes require a C-terminal Ca1a2X sequence on their substrates, with the a1, a2, and X residues serving as substrate-recognition elements for FTase and/or GGTase-I. While crystallographic structures of rat GGTase-I show a tightly packed and hydrophobic a2 residue binding pocket, consistent with a preference for moderately sized a2 residues in GGTase-I substrates, the functional impact of enzyme-substrate contacts within this active site remains to be determined. Using site-directed mutagenesis and peptide substrate structure-activity studies, we have identified specific active-site residues within rat GGTase-I involved in substrate recognition and developed novel GGTase-I variants with expanded/altered substrate selectivity. The ability to drastically alter GGTase-I selectivity mirrors similar behavior observed in FTase but employs mutation of a distinct set of structurally homologous active-site residues. Our work demonstrates that tunable selectivity may be a general phenomenon among multispecific enzymes involved in posttranslational modification and raises the possibility of variable substrate selectivity among GGTase-I orthologues from different organisms. Furthermore, the GGTase-I variants developed herein can serve as tools for studying GGTase-I substrate selectivity and the effects of prenylation pathway modifications on specific proteins. PMID:24344934

  7. Target-Driven Positive Selection at Hot Spots of Scorpion Toxins Uncovers Their Potential in Design of Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Limei; Peigneur, Steve; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Shangfei; Tytgat, Jan; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-08-01

    Positive selection sites (PSSs), a class of amino acid sites with an excess of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, are indicators of adaptive molecular evolution and have been detected in many protein families involved in a diversity of biological processes by statistical approaches. However, few studies are conducted to evaluate their functional significance and the driving force behind the evolution (i.e., agent of selection). Scorpion α-toxins are a class of multigene family of peptide neurotoxins affecting voltage-gated Na(+ )(Nav) channels, whose members exhibit differential potency and preference for insect and mammalian Nav channels. In this study, we undertook a systematical molecular dissection of nearly all the PSSs newly characterized in the Mesobuthus α-toxin family and a two-residue insertion ((19)AlaPhe(20)) located within a positively selected loop via mutational analysis of α-like MeuNaTxα-5, one member affecting both insect and mammalian Nav channels. This allows to identify hot-spot residues on its functional face involved in interaction with the receptor site of Nav channels, which comprises two PSSs (Ile(40) and Leu(41)) and the small insertion, both located on two spatially separated functional loops. Mutations at these hot-spots resulted in a remarkably decreased anti-mammalian activity in MeuNaTxα-5 with partially impaired or enhanced insecticide activity, suggesting the potential of PSSs in designing promising candidate insecticides from scorpion α-like toxins. Based on an experiment-guided toxin-channel complex model and high evolutionary variability in the receptor site of predators and prey of scorpions, we provide new evidence for target-driven adaptive evolution of scorpion toxins to deal with their targets' diversity. PMID:27189560

  8. Oncogenic fingerprint of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway and emerging epidermal growth factor receptor blockade resistance in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobani, Zain A; Sawant, Ashwin; Jafri, Mikram; Correa, Amit Keith; Sahin, Ibrahim Halil

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been an attractive target for treatment of epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Evidence from clinical trials indicates that cetuximab and panitumumab (anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies) have clinical activity in patients with metastatic CRC. The discovery of intrinsic EGFR blockade resistance in Kirsten RAS (KRAS)-mutant patients led to the restriction of anti-EGFR antibodies to KRAS wild-type patients by Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency. Studies have since focused on the evaluation of biomarkers to identify appropriate patient populations that may benefit from EGFR blockade. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with mutations in EGFR downstream signaling pathways including KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN could be intrinsically resistant to EGFR blockade. Recent whole genome studies also suggest that dynamic alterations in signaling pathways downstream of EGFR leads to distinct oncogenic signatures and subclones which might have some impact on emerging resistance in KRAS wild-type patients. While anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies have a clear potential in the management of a subset of patients with metastatic CRC, further studies are warranted to uncover exact mechanisms related to acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. PMID:27777877

  9. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid β, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T.; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer’s disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the COX inhibitory and NSAID activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of Aβ1–42 were lowered by flurbiprofen, Aβ1–42 levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a SALA with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19702655

  10. K-Targeted Metabolomic Analysis Extends Chemical Subtraction to DESIGNER Extracts: Selective Depletion of Extracts of Hops (Humulus lupulus)⊥

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F.; Friesen, J. Brent; Nikolić, Dejan; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G.; van Breemen, Richard; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid–liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DES...

  11. The solution structures of two soybean calmodulin isoforms provide a structural basis for their selective target activation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Huang, Hao; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Takaya, Yoshiaki; Vogel, Hans J

    2008-05-23

    The intracellular calcium ion is one of the most important secondary messengers in eukaryotic cells. Ca(2+) signals are translated into physiological responses by EF-hand calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM). Multiple CaM isoforms occur in plant cells, whereas only a single CaM protein is found in animals. Soybean CaM isoform 1 (sCaM1) shares 90% amino acid sequence identity with animal CaM (aCaM), whereas sCaM4 is only 78% identical. These two sCaM isoforms have distinct target-enzyme activation properties and physiological functions. sCaM4 is highly expressed during the self-defense reaction of the plant and activates the enzyme nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), whereas sCaM1 is incapable of activating NOS. The mechanism of selective target activation by plant CaM isoforms is poorly understood. We have determined high resolution NMR solution structures of Ca(2+)-sCaM1 and -sCaM4. These were compared with previously determined Ca(2+)-aCaM structures. For the N-lobe of the protein, the solution structures of Ca(2+)-sCaM1, -sCaM4, and -aCaM all closely resemble each other. However, despite the high sequence identity with aCaM, the C-lobe of Ca(2+)-sCaM1 has a more open conformation and consequently a larger hydrophobic target-protein binding pocket than Ca(2+)-aCaM or -sCaM4, the presence of which was further confirmed through biophysical measurements. The single Val-144 --> Met substitution in the C-lobe of Ca(2+)-sCaM1, which restores its ability to activate NOS, alters the structure of the C-lobe to a more closed conformation resembling Ca(2+)-aCaM and -sCaM4. The relationships between the structural differences in the two Ca(2+)-sCaM isoforms and their selective target activation properties are discussed. PMID:18347016

  12. Target Selection for Human Exploration of Asteroid%载人探测小行星的目标星选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王悦; 刘欢; 王开强; 张柏楠

    2012-01-01

    小行星探测具有目标多样化的特点,通过对小行星的相关物理特性进行分析和归类,以及国内外研究情况,从探测任务的安全性、技术可行性和探测价值3个方面,讨论提出了适于我国开展载人探测的选星方法和原则;按照技术可行性由易至难,将候选星分为3类,分别提出了相应的约束条件和优选条件,筛选出候选星;根据部分目标星轨道设计结果,结合未来运载器的发展规划,对这3类小行星的探测任务特点进行了分析,给出了针对性建议,结果可为我国制定载人小行星探测的战略规划提供参考。%The targets of human exploration to asteroid mission are diversified. Based on the anal- ysis of related physical characteristics and classification, as well as the domestic and overseas re- search, the selection method and principles to acquire target asteroids for Chinese crewed explora- tion mission are presented, from the view of safety, technical feasibility, and mission significance. The target asteroids are divided into three categories, according to the technical feasibility from low to high, the restrictions and optimal principles for each category are put forward, then the selection results are gained. Furthermore, according to trajectory design results of several target asteroids, the mission characteristics of human exploration of the three categories of asteroid are analysed, in which the future development of launch vehicles is taken into account. Some sugges- tions are put forward as reference for future strategic programming.

  13. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  14. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  15. Targeting of beta adrenergic receptors results in therapeutic efficacy against models of hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Stiles

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of the beta-adrenergic receptors has recently shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of benign vascular tumors such as infantile hemangiomas. As infantile hemangiomas are reported to express high levels of beta adrenergic receptors, we examined the expression of these receptors on more aggressive vascular tumors such as hemangioendotheliomas and angiosarcomas, revealing beta 1, 2, and 3 receptors were indeed present and therefore aggressive vascular tumors may similarly show increased susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of beta blockade. Using a panel of hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma cell lines, we demonstrate that beta adrenergic inhibition blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Beta blockade is selective for vascular tumor cells over normal endothelial cells and synergistically effective when combined with standard chemotherapeutic or cytotoxic agents. We demonstrate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling induces large scale changes in the global gene expression patterns of vascular tumors, including alterations in the expression of established cell cycle and apoptotic regulators. Using in vivo tumor models we demonstrate that beta blockade shows remarkable efficacy as a single agent in reducing the growth of angiosarcoma tumors. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the selective cytotoxicity and tumor suppressive ability of beta adrenergic inhibition on malignant vascular tumors and have laid the groundwork for a promising treatment of angiosarcomas in humans.

  16. TH17 Cell Induction and Effects of IL-17A and IL-17F Blockade in Experimental Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedebye Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny;

    2013-01-01

    T helper (TH) 17 cells are believed to play a pivotal role in development of inflammatory bowel disease, and their contribution to intestinal inflammation has been studied in various models of colitis. TH17 cells produce a range of cytokines, some of which are potential targets for immunotherapy....... However, blockade of IL-17A alone with secukinumab was not effective in Crohn's disease. In this regard, the pathogenic impact of IL-17A versus IL-17F during intestinal inflammation is still unresolved....

  17. Mixed methods evaluation of targeted selective anthelmintic treatment by resource-poor smallholder goat farmers in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Josephine G; Ofithile, Mphoeng; Tavolaro, F Marina; van Wyk, Jan A; Evans, Kate; Morgan, Eric R

    2015-11-30

    Due to the threat of anthelmintic resistance, livestock farmers worldwide are encouraged to selectively apply treatments against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs). Targeted selective treatment (TST) of individual animals would be especially useful for smallholder farmers in low-income economies, where cost-effective and sustainable intervention strategies will improve livestock productivity and food security. Supporting research has focused mainly on refining technical indicators for treatment, and much less on factors influencing uptake and effectiveness. We used a mixed method approach, whereby qualitative and quantitative approaches are combined, to develop, implement and validate a TST system for GINs in small ruminants, most commonly goats, among smallholder farmers in the Makgadikgadi Pans region of Botswana, and to seek better understanding of system performance within a cultural context. After the first six months of the study, 42 out of 47 enrolled farmers were followed up; 52% had monitored their animals using the taught inspection criteria and 26% applied TST during this phase. Uptake level showed little correlation with farmer characteristics, such as literacy and size of farm. Herd health significantly improved in those herds where anthelmintic treatment was applied: anaemia, as assessed using the five-point FAMACHA(©) scale, was 0.44-0.69 points better (95% confidence interval) and body condition score was 0.18-0.36 points better (95% C.I., five-point scale) in treated compared with untreated herds. Only targeting individuals in greatest need led to similar health improvements compared to treating the entire herd, leading to dose savings ranging from 36% to 97%. This study demonstrates that TST against nematodes can be implemented effectively by resource-poor farmers using a community-led approach. The use of mixed methods provides a promising system to integrate technical and social aspects of TST programmes for maximum uptake and effect. PMID

  18. CstF-64 and 3′-UTR cis-element determine Star-PAP specificity for target mRNA selection by excluding PAPα

    OpenAIRE

    Kandala, Divya T.; Mohan, Nimmy; A, Vivekanand; AP, Sudheesh; G, Reshmi; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly (A) tail at the 3′-end. Canonical PAPs (PAPα/γ) polyadenylate nuclear pre-mRNAs. The recent identification of the non-canonical Star-PAP revealed specificity of nuclear PAPs for pre-mRNAs, yet the mechanism how Star-PAP selects mRNA targets is still elusive. Moreover, how Star-PAP target mRNAs having canonical AAUAAA signal are not regulated by PAPα is unclear. We investigate specificity mechanisms of Star-PAP that selects pre-mRNA targets for polyadeny...

  19. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Applying new hybrid method of analytical hierarchy process, Monte Carlo Simulation and PROMETHEE to prioritize and selecting appropriate target market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Kariznoee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Making decision to choose the appropriate target market is one of the key decisions in the success of firms, which has direct effect in the amount of their profits. The aim of this paper is to introduce and use of new hybrid method of AHP, Monte Carlo simulation and PROMETHEE to prioritize cities to establish retailers, considering different indices. The problem of this study is related to a factory, constructing premade pieces of buildings, that to introduce and distribute its new products is searching the new retailers in different cities. To prioritize cities, with the interview with experts and the studying of the previous works the indices have been determined and the hierarchy pattern has been made. Then using the hybrid method of AHP and Monte Carlo simulation the weights of the indices have been determined and then using PROMETHEE method the best city has been chosen and the other ones have been prioritized. From the benefits of the new introduced hybrid method with respect to other ways of selecting target markets is decreasing the risk and increasing the power of decision making.

  1. Developing a multi-pollutant conceptual framework for the selection and targeting of interventions in water industry catchment management schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodworth, J W; Holman, I P; Burgess, P J; Gillman, S; Frogbrook, Z; Brown, P

    2015-09-15

    In recent years water companies have started to adopt catchment management to reduce diffuse pollution in drinking water supply areas. The heterogeneity of catchments and the range of pollutants that must be removed to meet the EU Drinking Water Directive (98/83/EC) limits make it difficult to prioritise areas of a catchment for intervention. Thus conceptual frameworks are required that can disaggregate the components of pollutant risk and help water companies make decisions about where to target interventions in their catchments to maximum effect. This paper demonstrates the concept of generalising pollutants in the same framework by reviewing key pollutant processes within a source-mobilisation-delivery context. From this, criteria are developed (with input from water industry professionals involved in catchment management) which highlights the need for a new water industry specific conceptual framework. The new CaRPoW (Catchment Risk to Potable Water) framework uses the Source-Mobilisation-Delivery concept as modular components of risk that work at two scales, source and mobilisation at the field scale and delivery at the catchment scale. Disaggregating pollutant processes permits the main components of risk to be ascertained so that appropriate interventions can be selected. The generic structure also allows for the outputs from different pollutants to be compared so that potential multiple benefits can be identified. CaRPow provides a transferable framework that can be used by water companies to cost-effectively target interventions under current conditions or under scenarios of land use or climate change. PMID:26172105

  2. Measurements of non-target organ doses using MOSFET dosemeters for selected IMRT and 3D CRT radiation treatment procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Brian; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Many expressed concerns about the potential increase in second cancer risk from the widespread shift to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques from traditional 3-D conformal radiation treatment (3D CRT). This paper describes the study on in-phantom measurements of radiation doses in organ sites away from the primary tumour target. The measurements involved a RANDO((R)) phantom and Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor dosemeters for selected 3D CRT and IMRT treatment plans. Three different treatment plans, 4-field 3D CRT, 6-field 3D CRT and 7-field IMRT for the prostate, were considered in this study. Steps to reconstruct organ doses from directly measured data were also presented. The dosemeter readings showed that the doses decrease as the distances increase for all treatment plans. At 40 cm from the prostate target, doses were <1% of the therapeutic dose. At this location, however, the IMRT plan resulted in an absorbed dose from photons, that is a factor of 3-5 higher than the 3D CRT treatment plans. This increase on absorbed dose is due to the increased exposure time for delivering the IMRT plan. The total monitor unit (MU) was 2850 for the IMRT case, while the MU was 1308 and 1260 for 6-field and 4-field 3D CRT cases, respectively. Findings from this case study involving the prostate treatments agree with those from previous studies that IMRT indeed delivers higher photon doses to locations that are away from the primary target. PMID:17627959

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signaling blockade combined with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory W; Saba, Corey; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyh-Min; Benavente, Sergio; Ludwig, Dale L; Hicklin, Daniel J; Harari, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    Signaling through the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is implicated in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies. Targeted disruption of IGF-IR signaling combined with cytotoxic therapy may therefore yield improved anticancer efficacy over conventional treatments alone. In this study, a fully human anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 (ImClone Systems, Inc., New York, NY) is examined as an adjunct to radiation therapy. IGF-IR expression is shown for a diverse cohort of cell lines, whereas targeted IGF-IR blockade by A12 inhibits IGF-IR phosphorylation and activation of the downstream effectors Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Anchorage-dependent proliferation and xenograft growth is inhibited by A12 in a dose-dependent manner, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer lines. Clonogenic radiation survival of H226 and H460 cells grown under anchorage-dependent conditions is impaired by A12, demonstrating a radiation dose-enhancing effect for IGF-IR blockade. Postradiation anchorage-independent colony formation is inhibited by A12 in A549 and H460 cells. In the H460 xenograft model, combining A12 and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone. These effects may be mediated by promotion of radiation-induced, double-stranded DNA damage and apoptosis as observed in cell culture. In summary, these results validate IGF-IR signal transduction blockade as a promising strategy to improve radiation therapy efficacy in human tumors, forming a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:17283150

  4. A randomized, dose-response study of sugammadex given for the reversal of deep rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade under sevoflurane anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaldestin, Philippe; Kuizenga, Karel; Saldien, Vera;

    2010-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first of a new class of selective muscle relaxant binding drugs developed for the rapid and complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium and vecuronium. Many studies have demonstrated a dose-response relationship with sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular...... blockade in patients induced and maintained under propofol anesthesia. However, sevoflurane anesthesia, unlike propofol, can prolong the effect of neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs) such as rocuronium and vecuronium.......Sugammadex is the first of a new class of selective muscle relaxant binding drugs developed for the rapid and complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium and vecuronium. Many studies have demonstrated a dose-response relationship with sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular...

  5. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    Christine eDugovic; Shelton, Jonathan E.; Sujin eYun; Pascal eBonaventure; Shireman, Brock T.; Lovenberg, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R) and orexin-2 (OX2R) receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagon...

  6. GHRH excess and blockade in X-LAG syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Adrian F; Lysy, Philippe A; Desfilles, Céline; Rostomyan, Liliya; Mohamed, Amira; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Raverot, Veronique; Castermans, Emilie; Marbaix, Etienne; Maiter, Dominique; Brunelle, Chloe; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A; Bours, Vincent; Raftopoulos, Christian; Beauloye, Veronique; Barlier, Anne; Beckers, Albert

    2016-03-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated GH and prolactin secretion by mixed pituitary adenomas/hyperplasia. Microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 including the GPR101 gene cause X-LAG syndrome. In individual cases random GHRH levels have been elevated. We performed a series of hormonal profiles in a young female sporadic X-LAG syndrome patient and subsequently undertook in vitro studies of primary pituitary tumor culture following neurosurgical resection. The patient demonstrated consistently elevated circulating GHRH levels throughout preoperative testing, which was accompanied by marked GH and prolactin hypersecretion; GH demonstrated a paradoxical increase following TRH administration. In vitro, the pituitary cells showed baseline GH and prolactin release that was further stimulated by GHRH administration. Co-incubation with GHRH and the GHRH receptor antagonist, acetyl-(d-Arg(2))-GHRH (1-29) amide, blocked the GHRH-induced GH stimulation; the GHRH receptor antagonist alone significantly reduced GH release. Pasireotide, but not octreotide, inhibited GH secretion. A ghrelin receptor agonist and an inverse agonist led to modest, statistically significant increases and decreases in GH secretion, respectively. GHRH hypersecretion can accompany the pituitary abnormalities seen in X-LAG syndrome. These data suggest that the pathology of X-LAG syndrome may include hypothalamic dysregulation of GHRH secretion, which is in keeping with localization of GPR101 in the hypothalamus. Therapeutic blockade of GHRH secretion could represent a way to target the marked hormonal hypersecretion and overgrowth that characterizes X-LAG syndrome. PMID:26671997

  7. Renin-angiotensin system blockade: Its contribution and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Akira; Kosaka, Takeo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin II is a key biological peptide in the renin-angiotensin system that regulates blood pressure and renal hemodynamics, and extensive experimental studies have shown that angiotensin II promotes diverse fibrotic changes and induces neovascularization in several inflammatory diseases. It is known that angiotensin II can be controlled using renin-angiotensin system blockade when angiotensin II is the main factor inducing a particular disease, and renin-angiotensin system blockade has assumed a central role in the treatment of inflammatory nephritis, cardiovascular disorders and retinopathy. In contrast, renin-angiotensin system blockade was found to have not only these effects but also other functions, such as inhibition of cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Numerous studies have sought to elucidate the mechanisms and support these antitumor effects. However, a recent meta-analysis showed that renin-angiotensin system blockade use might in fact increase the incidence of cancer, so renin-angiotensin system blockade use has become somewhat controversial. Although the renin-angiotensin system has most certainly made great contributions to experimental models and clinical practice, some issues still need to be resolved. The present review discusses the contribution and controversy surrounding the renin-angiotensin system up to the present time.

  8. Selective Photothermolysis to target Sebaceous Glands: Theoretical Estimation of Parameters and Preliminary Results Using a Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernanda Sakamoto, Apostolos Doukas, William Farinelli, Zeina Tannous, Michelle D. Shinn, Stephen Benson, Gwyn P. Williams, H. Dylla, Richard Anderson

    2011-12-01

    The success of permanent laser hair removal suggests that selective photothermolysis (SP) of sebaceous glands, another part of hair follicles, may also have merit. About 30% of sebum consists of fats with copious CH2 bond content. SP was studied in vitro, using free electron laser (FEL) pulses at an infrared CH2 vibrational absorption wavelength band. Absorption spectra of natural and artificially prepared sebum were measured from 200 nm to 3000 nm, to determine wavelengths potentially able to target sebaceous glands. The Jefferson National Accelerator superconducting FEL was used to measure photothermal excitation of aqueous gels, artificial sebum, pig skin, human scalp and forehead skin (sebaceous sites). In vitro skin samples were exposed to FEL pulses from 1620 to 1720 nm, spot diameter 7-9.5 mm with exposure through a cold 4C sapphire window in contact with the skin. Exposed and control tissue samples were stained using H and E, and nitroblue tetrazolium chloride staining (NBTC) was used to detect thermal denaturation. Natural and artificial sebum both had absorption peaks near 1210, 1728, 1760, 2306 and 2346 nm. Laser-induced heating of artificial sebum was approximately twice that of water at 1710 and 1720 nm, and about 1.5x higher in human sebaceous glands than in water. Thermal camera imaging showed transient focal heating near sebaceous hair follicles. Histologically, skin samples exposed to {approx}1700 nm, {approx}100-125 ms pulses showed evidence of selective thermal damage to sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands were positive for NBTC staining, without evidence of selective loss in samples exposed to the laser. Epidermis was undamaged in all samples. Conclusions: SP of sebaceous glands appears to be feasible. Potentially, optical pulses at {approx}1720 nm or {approx}1210 nm delivered with large beam diameter and appropriate skin cooling in approximately 0.1 s may provide an alternative treatment for acne.

  9. Long-term but not short-term blockade of dopamine release in Drosophila impairs orientation during flight in a visual attention paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yizhou; Xi, Wang; Peng, Yueqing; Wang, Yizheng; Guo, Aike

    2004-08-01

    Dopamine is a major neuromodulator in both vertebrates and invertebrates and has profound effects on many physiological processes, including the regulation of attention. Most studies of the functions of dopamine use models with long-term blockade of dopamine release and few effects of transient blockade have yet been reported. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of dopamine in attention-like behavior in Drosophila by taking advantage of the fly's orientation behavior during flight. The examination of several different transgenic flies in a single-target visual attention paradigm showed that flies lost their orientation ability if dopamine release was blocked from the beginning of the development of dopaminergic neurons. This is similar to the attention loss in mammals. However, if the blockade of dopamine release was induced during the experimental procedure, flies performed normally. Statistical analysis of the behavioral assessment showed a significant difference between long-term and transient blockade. Using the RNA interference approach, we generated flies with down-regulated J-domain protein, which is a potential cochaperone in synaptic vesicle release, to make an alternative form of long-term dopamine-blockade mutant. Behavioral assays revealed that flies with permanent J-domain protein down-regulation specifically in dopaminergic neurons have an attention defect similar to that induced by long-term blockade of dopamine release. Furthermore, dopamine depletion beginning at eclosion also caused an attention deficit. Our results indicate that prolonged but not transient blockade of dopamine release impairs visual attention-like behavior in Drosophila.

  10. An approach to the construction of tailor-made amphiphilic peptides that strongly and selectively bind to hairpin RNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Soonsil; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Yu, Jaehoon

    2009-02-18

    strategies that can be used to prepare peptides that both strongly and selectively target hairpin RNAs. Specifically, the findings indicate that tailor-made amphiphilic peptide ligands against certain hairpin RNAs can be obtained if the RNA target possesses a deep groove in which both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres of the peptide interact. PMID:19199621

  11. Optimization of radiotherapy to target volumes with concave outlines: target-dose homogenization and selective sparing of critical structures by constrained matrix inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colle, C.; Van den Berge, D.; De Wagter, C.; Fortan, L.; Van Duyse, B.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    The design of 3D-conformal dose distributions for targets with concave outlines is a technical challenge in conformal radiotherapy. For these targets, it is impossible to find beam incidences for which the target volume can be isolated from the tissues at risk. Commonly occurring examples are most thyroid cancers and the targets located at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels related to some head and neck. A solution to this problem was developed, using beam intensity modulation executed with a multileaf collimator by applying a static beam-segmentation technique. The method includes the definition of beam incidences and beam segments of specific shape as well as the calculation of segment weights. Tests on Sherouse`s GRATISTM planning system allowed to escalate the dose to these targets to 65-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance. Further optimization by constrained matrix inversion was investigated to explore the possibility of further dose escalation.

  12. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  13. Online select feature and occlusion processing target tracking%在线特征选择和遮挡处理的目标跟踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨心力; 杨恢先; 冷爱莲

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the robustness of tracking system under complex surrounding such as similar object interference, illumination change, this paper proposed that employing Fisher criteria online selecting color feature mechanism, which was embedded in target tracking algorithm. However, when the target was severely occluded, still online selecting discriminative feature, would make target template offset, and lead to tracking failure. In order to select discriminative feature in the case of tracked target was severely occluded, selected a reliable sub-region of the occluded target and utilized reliable sub-region infer the color feature of the occluded target area, then online selected color feature. Experimental results show that this paper proposed method can greatly improve the robustness of target tracking method under complex surrounding such as similar to object interference, tracked target being occluded.%为了提高相似物体干扰、光照变化等复杂环境下目标跟踪的稳定性,提出利用Fisher准则的在线选择鉴别性特征,将在线特征选择嵌入到跟踪算法中.但是,在目标被严重遮挡时仍在线选择鉴别性特征,会使目标模板偏移,导致跟踪失败.为了在目标被严重遮挡的情况下仍能在线选择鉴别性目标特征,选择一个可靠的子区域来推测被遮挡目标的颜色特征,再选择鉴别性特征.实验结果表明该方法在相似物体干扰、被跟踪目标被遮挡等复杂环境下极大地改善了跟踪的稳定性.

  14. Anti-Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 Therapy in a Nonhuman Primate Renal Transplant Model of Costimulation Blockade-Resistant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D J; Lo, D J; Leopardi, F; Song, M; Turgeon, N A; Strobert, E A; Jenkins, J B; Wang, R; Reimann, K A; Larsen, C P; Kirk, A D

    2016-05-01

    Costimulation blockade with the fusion protein belatacept provides a desirable side effect profile and improvement in renal function compared with calcineurin inhibition in renal transplantation. This comes at the cost of increased rates of early acute rejection. Blockade of the integrin molecule leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) has been shown to be an effective adjuvant to costimulation blockade in a rigorous nonhuman primate (NHP) model of islet transplantation; therefore, we sought to test this combination in an NHP renal transplant model. Rhesus macaques received belatacept maintenance therapy with or without the addition of LFA-1 blockade, which was achieved using a murine-derived LFA-1-specific antibody TS1/22. Additional experiments were performed using chimeric rhesus IgG1 (TS1/22R1) or IgG4 (TS1/22R4) variants, each engineered to limit antibody clearance. Despite evidence of proper binding to the target molecule and impaired cellular egress from the intravascular space indicative of a therapeutic effect similar to prior islet studies, LFA-1 blockade failed to significantly prolong graft survival. Furthermore, evidence of impaired protective immunity against cytomegalovirus was observed. These data highlight the difficulties in translating treatment regimens between organ models and suggest that the primarily vascularized renal model is more robust with regard to belatacept-resistant rejection than the islet model. PMID:26602755

  15. Algal bioremediation of waste waters from land-based aquaculture using ulva: selecting target species and strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Rebecca J; Mata, Leonardo; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    The optimised reduction of dissolved nutrient loads in aquaculture effluents through bioremediation requires selection of appropriate algal species and strains. The objective of the current study was to identify target species and strains from the macroalgal genus Ulva for bioremediation of land-based aquaculture facilities in Eastern Australia. We surveyed land-based aquaculture facilities and natural coastal environments across three geographic locations in Eastern Australia to determine which species of Ulva occur naturally in this region and conducted growth trials at three temperature treatments on a subset of samples from each location to determine whether local strains had superior performance under local environmental conditions. DNA barcoding using the markers ITS and tufA identified six species of Ulva, with U. ohnoi being the most common blade species and U. sp. 3 the most common filamentous species. Both species occurred at multiple land-based aquaculture facilities in Townsville and Brisbane and multiple strains of each species grew well in culture. Specific growth rates of U. ohnoi and U. sp. 3 were high (over 9% and 15% day(-1) respectively) across temperature treatments. Within species, strains of U. ohnoi had higher growth in temperatures corresponding to local conditions, suggesting that strains may be locally adapted. However, across all temperature treatments Townsville strains had the highest growth rates (11.2-20.4% day(-1)) and Sydney strains had the lowest growth rates (2.5-8.3% day(-1)). We also found significant differences in growth between strains of U. ohnoi collected from the same geographic location, highlighting the potential to isolate and cultivate fast growing strains. In contrast, there was no clearly identifiable competitive strain of filamentous Ulva, with multiple species and strains having variable performance. The fast growth rates and broad geographical distribution of U. ohnoi make this an ideal species to target for

  16. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels. PMID:27019385

  17. PD-1 Blockade Expands Intratumoral Memory T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse;

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed by multi......Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed...

  18. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  19. Central serotonin(2B) receptor blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical dopamine outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devroye, Céline; Cathala, Adeline; Di Marco, Barbara; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Spampinato, Umberto

    2015-10-01

    The central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) is currently considered as an interesting pharmacological target for improved treatment of drug addiction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of two selective 5-HT2BR antagonists, RS 127445 and LY 266097, on cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and dopamine (DA) outflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the dorsal striatum of freely moving rats. The peripheral administration of RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) or LY 266097 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced basal DA outflow in the NAc shell, but had no effect on cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced DA outflow in this brain region. Also, RS 127445 failed to modify both basal and cocaine-induced DA outflow in the NAc core and the dorsal striatum. Conversely, both 5-HT2BR antagonists reduced cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, RS 127445 as well as the DA-R antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced significantly the late-onset hyperlocomotion induced by the DA-R agonist quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). Altogether, these results demonstrate that 5-HT2BR blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical DA outflow. This interaction takes place downstream to DA neurons and could involve an action at the level of dorsostriatal and/or NAc DA transmission, in keeping with the importance of these brain regions in the behavioural responses of cocaine. Overall, this study affords additional knowledge into the regulatory control exerted by the 5-HT2BR on ascending DA pathways, and provides additional support to the proposed role of 5-HT2BRs as a new pharmacological target in drug addiction. PMID:26116760

  20. Blockade of sonic hedgehog signal pathway enhances antiproliferative effect of EGFR inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-guo HU; Tao LIU; Jiong-xin XIONG; Chun-you WANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal molecules in pancreatic cancer cells, and to assess the inhibitory effects through the blockade of the SHH and EGFR signaling path- ways by cyclopamine and Iressa, respectively. Methods: The expression of SHH and EGFR in pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1, SUIT-2, and ASPC-1) was de-tected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. After treatment with different con-centrations of cyclopamine, alone or in combination with Iressa, the antiproliferative effect on pancreatic cancer cells was analyzed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays. A flow cytometry analysis was used to detect the cellular cycle distribu-tion and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Results: All of the 3 pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed SHH, Smoothened (SMO), and EGFR. Cyclopamine could downregulate the expression of EGFR in all cell lines. Cyclopamine or Iressa could induce a growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover,the combined use of 2.5 μmol/L cyclopamine and 1 μmol/L Iressa induced an enhanced inhibitory effect and a greater apoptosis rate than any agent alone. The percentage of the cell population of the G0/G1 and sub-G1 phases was significantly increased along with the increasing dose of cyclopamine and/or Iressa. Conclusion: The blockade of the sonic hedgehog signal pathway enhances the antiproliferative effect of the EGFR inhibitor through the downregulation of its expression in pancreatic cancer cells. The simultaneous blockade of SHH and EGFR signaling represents possible targets of new treatment strategies for pan-creatic carcinoma.

  1. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Adrian J. [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: adrian.charlton@csl.gov.uk; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare {sup 1}H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  2. Targeting of liver tumour in rats by selective delivery of holmium-166 loaded microspheres: a biodistribution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijsen, F.; Rook, D.; Zonnenberg, B.; Klerk, J. de; Rijk, P. van; Schip, F. van het [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brandt, C. [Animal Inst., Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Meijer, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dullens, H. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hennink, W. [Dept. of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    2001-06-01

    Intra-arterial administration of beta-emitting particles that become trapped in the vascular bed of a tumour and remain there while delivering high doses, represents a unique approach in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumours. Studies on selective internal radiation therapy of colorectal liver metastases using yttrium-90 glass microspheres have shown encouraging results. This study describes the biodistribution of 40-{mu}m poly lactic acid microspheres loaded with radioactive holmium-166, after intra-arterial administration into the hepatic artery of rats with implanted liver tumours. Radioactivity measurements showed >95% retention of injected activity in the liver and its resident tumour. The average activity detected in other tissues was {<=}0.1%ID/g, with incidental exceptions in the lungs and stomach. Very little {sup 166}Ho activity was detected in kidneys (<0.1%ID/g), thereby indicating the stability of the microspheres in vivo. Tumour targeting was very effective, with a mean tumour to liver ratio of 6.1{+-}2.9 for rats with tumour (n=15) versus 0.7{+-}0.5 for control rats (n=6; P<0.001). These ratios were not significantly affected by the use of adrenaline. Histological analysis showed that five times as many large (>10) and medium-sized (4-9) clusters of microspheres were present within tumour and peritumoural tissue, compared with normal liver. Single microspheres were equally dispersed throughout the tumour, as well as normal liver parenchyma. (orig.)

  3. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare 1H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications

  4. Metabolic consequences of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade for the acutely ischemic dog myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westera, G.; Hollander, W. den; Wall, E.E. van der; Eenige, M.J. van; Scholtalbers, S.; Visser, F.C.; Roos, J.P.

    1984-02-01

    In an experimental study in 50 dogs the myocardial uptake of free fatty acids (FFAs) after beta-blockade was determined using radioiodinated heptadecanoic acid as a metabolic tracer. All 4 beta-blockers used (metoprolol, timolol, propranolol and pindolol) lowered the uptake of FFAs in the normal canine heart. Uptake of FFAs was also diminished after coronary artery occlusion per se, but administration of beta-blockers exerted little additional influence on the uptake of FFAs. This observation was qualitatively parallelled by the uptake of /sup 201/Tl in concomitant experiments. Plasma FFA levels were increased by pindolol (non-selective with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity), not changed by metoprolol (a cardioselective betablocking agent) and lowered by timolol and propranolol (both non-selective compounds). The extent of ischemic tissue, as reflected by uptake of iodoheptadecanoic acid and /sup 201/Tl, was diminished by metoprolol but not by other beta-blockers. Regional distribution of both tracers, as shown in the endo-epicardial uptake ratios, was hardly influenced by beta-blockade, except for a small increase of /sup 201/Tl uptake in non-occluded endocardium. Uptake of /sup 201/Tl as well as of iodoheptadecanoic acid in the ischemic area was increased by metoprolol, timolol and propranolol and decreased by pindolol. We conclude that beta-blocking agents confer different effects on myocardial uptake and metabolism of FFAs which might possibly be related to their different inherent properties.

  5. Integration of Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry and Functional Cell-Based Assays to Rapidly Triage Druggable Target Space within the NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Victoria D; Andrews, Christine L; Richards, Matthew P; Xu, Zangwei; Sun, Tianxiao; Chen, Yiping; Hashke, Andrew; Smotrov, Nadya; Fernandez, Rafael; Nickbarg, Elliott B; Chamberlin, Chad; Sauvagnat, Berengere; Curran, Patrick J; Boinay, Ryan; Saradjian, Peter; Allen, Samantha J; Byrne, Noel; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Ford, Rachael E; Hall, Dawn L; Kornienko, Maria; Rickert, Keith W; Sharma, Sujata; Shipman, Jennifer M; Lumb, Kevin J; Coleman, Kevin; Dandliker, Peter J; Kariv, Ilona; Beutel, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective of early drug discovery is to associate druggable target space with a desired phenotype. The inability to efficiently associate these often leads to failure early in the drug discovery process. In this proof-of-concept study, the most tractable starting points for drug discovery within the NF-κB pathway model system were identified by integrating affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) with functional cellular assays. The AS-MS platform Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) was used to rapidly screen 15 NF-κB proteins in parallel against large-compound libraries. ALIS identified 382 target-selective compounds binding to 14 of the 15 proteins. Without any chemical optimization, 22 of the 382 target-selective compounds exhibited a cellular phenotype consistent with the respective target associated in ALIS. Further studies on structurally related compounds distinguished two chemical series that exhibited a preliminary structure-activity relationship and confirmed target-driven cellular activity to NF-κB1/p105 and TRAF5, respectively. These two series represent new drug discovery opportunities for chemical optimization. The results described herein demonstrate the power of combining ALIS with cell functional assays in a high-throughput, target-based approach to determine the most tractable drug discovery opportunities within a pathway. PMID:26969322

  6. Effect of spinal sympathetic blockade upon postural changes of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, K; Haxholdt, O; Henriksen, O;

    1982-01-01

    local nervous blockade was induced by Lidocaine in 133Xe labelled subcutaneous tissue on one side. During epidural blockade and tilt blood flow increased by 12% whereas blood flow decreased by 30% on the control side. Thus epidural blockade had no influence on the vasoconstrictor response...

  7. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-06-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4: (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.

  8. Benefits and harms of perioperative beta-blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Juul, Anne Benedicte

    2006-01-01

    randomized trials. However, confidence intervals of the intervention effects in the meta-analyses are wide, leaving room for both benefits and harms. The largest observational study performed suggests that perioperative beta-blockade is associated with higher mortality in patients with low cardiac risk...

  9. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  10. Non-linear HRV indices under autonomic nervous system blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Juan; Pueyo, Esther; Laguna, Pablo; Bailón, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been studied as a non-invasive technique to characterize the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the heart. Non-linear methods based on chaos theory have been used during the last decades as markers for risk stratification. However, interpretation of these nonlinear methods in terms of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity is not fully established. In this work we study linear and non-linear HRV indices during ANS blockades in order to assess their relation with sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Power spectral content in low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.4 Hz) bands of HRV, as well as correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropies were computed in a database of subjects during single and dual ANS blockade with atropine and/or propranolol. Parasympathetic blockade caused a significant decrease in the low and high frequency power of HRV, as well as in correlation dimension and sample and approximate entropies. Sympathetic blockade caused a significant increase in approximate entropy. Sympathetic activation due to postural change from supine to standing caused a significant decrease in all the investigated non-linear indices and a significant increase in the normalized power in the low frequency band. The other investigated linear indices did not show significant changes. Results suggest that parasympathetic activity has a direct relation with sample and approximate entropies.

  11. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles;

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality...... of the entanglement is measured using global rotations of the internal states of both atoms....

  12. Activated platelets in carotid artery thrombosis in mice can be selectively targeted with a radiolabeled single-chain antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Heidt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets can be found on the surface of inflamed, rupture-prone and ruptured plaques as well as in intravascular thrombosis. They are key players in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. In this study we describe the construction of a radiolabeled single-chain antibody targeting the LIBS-epitope of activated platelets to selectively depict platelet activation and wall-adherent non-occlusive thrombosis in a mouse model with nuclear imaging using in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography as well as small animal SPECT-CT for in vivo analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LIBS as well as an unspecific control single-chain antibody were labeled with (111Indium ((111In via bifunctional DTPA ( = (111In-LIBS/(111In-control. Autoradiography after incubation with (111In-LIBS on activated platelets in vitro (mean 3866 ± 28 DLU/mm(2, 4010 ± 630 DLU/mm(2 and 4520 ± 293 DLU/mm(2 produced a significantly higher ligand uptake compared to (111In-control (2101 ± 76 DLU/mm(2, 1181 ± 96 DLU/mm(2 and 1866 ± 246 DLU/mm(2 indicating a specific binding to activated platelets; P<0.05. Applying these findings to an ex vivo mouse model of carotid artery thrombosis revealed a significant increase in ligand uptake after injection of (111In-LIBS in the presence of small thrombi compared to the non-injured side, as confirmed by histology (49630 ± 10650 DLU/mm(2 vs. 17390 ± 7470 DLU/mm(2; P<0.05. These findings could also be reproduced in vivo. SPECT-CT analysis of the injured carotid artery with (111In-LIBS resulted in a significant increase of the target-to-background ratio compared to (111In-control (1.99 ± 0.36 vs. 1.1 ± 0.24; P < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nuclear imaging with (111In-LIBS allows the detection of platelet activation in vitro and ex vivo with high sensitivity. Using SPECT-CT, wall-adherent activated platelets in carotid arteries could be depicted in vivo. These results encourage further studies elucidating the role of

  13. I(Kr) vs. I(Ks) blockade and arrhythmogenicity in normoxic rabbit Purkinje fibers: does it really make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Legrand, Jean-Christophe; Sallé, Laurent; Rouet, René; Ducroq, Joffrey

    2011-06-01

    The electrophysiological (standard intracellular microelectrode technique) and pro-arrhythmic (occurrence of early after-depolarization) effects of five class III agents acting on delayed rectifier current (I(K)), rapid (I(Kr)), and/or slow (I(Ks)) components have been studied in rabbit Purkinje fibers taken near the septum and submitted in vitro to reduced stimulation rate (from 1 to 0.5 Hz) in the absence or presence of epinephrine (10 nm) during normoxic conditions. There were two I(Kr) blockers (d-sotalol and dofetilide), two I(Ks) blockers (chromanol 293B and HMR 1556), and a non-selective I(K) blocker (azimilide). d-sotalol, dofetilide, and azimilide lengthened APD(60) and APD(90) in a concentration-dependent manner. Both d-sotalol and dofetilide showed pro-arrhythmia at highest concentrations and in the presence of epinephrine and lower stimulation rate. Despite azimilide markedly lengthened APD(90), it was globally less pro-arrhythmic than dofetilide. Thus, in normoxic rabbit Purkinje fibers, I(Kr) blockade prolonged action potential duration (APD) and increased the incidence of early after-depolarizations, particularly so in the presence of adrenergic stimulation and bradycardia, I(Ks) blockade did neither, and non-selective I(K) blockade (by azimilide) behaved principally as I(Kr) blockade. It is concluded that in normoxic rabbit Purkinje fibers, I(Ks) blockade was neutral, whereas I(Kr) blockade was pro-arrhythmic, which may make a difference worth exploration in more complex models.

  14. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  15. Which is the best phenotypic trait for use in a targeted selective treatment strategy for growing lambs in temperate climates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenson, Yan C S M; Kahn, Lewis P; Bishop, Stephen C; Kyriazakis, Ilias

    2016-08-15

    Targeted selective treatment (TST) requires the ability to identify the animals for which anthelmintic treatment will result in the greatest benefit to the entire flock. Various phenotypic traits have previously been suggested as determinant criteria for TST; however, the weight gain benefit and impact on anthelmintic efficacy for each determinant criterion is expected to be dependent upon the level of nematode challenge and the timing of anthelmintic treatment. A mathematical model was used to simulate a population of 10,000 parasitologically naïve Scottish Blackface lambs (with heritable variation in host-parasite interactions) grazing on medium-quality pasture (grazing density=30 lambs/ha, crude protein=140g/kg DM, metabolisable energy=10MJ/kg DM) with an initial larval contamination of 1000, 3000 or 5000 Teladorsagia circumcincta L3/kg DM. Anthelmintic drenches were administered to 0, 50 or 100% of the population on a single occasion. The day of anthelmintic treatment was independently modelled for every day within the 121day simulation. Where TST scenarios were simulated (50% treated), lambs were either chosen by random selection or according to highest faecal egg count (FEC, eggs/g DM faeces), lowest live weight (LW, kg) or lowest growth rate (kg/day). Average lamb empty body weight (kg) and the resistance (R) allele frequency amongst the parasite population on pasture were recorded at slaughter (day 121) for each scenario. Average weight gain benefit and increase in R allele frequency for each determinant criterion, level of initial larval contamination and day of anthelmintic treatment were calculated by comparison to a non-treated population. Determinant criteria were evaluated according to average weight gain benefit divided by increase in R allele frequency to determine the benefit per R. Whilst positive phenotypic correlations were predicted between worm burden and FEC; using LW as the determinant criterion provided the greatest benefit per R for all

  16. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML. PMID:27641501

  17. CD47 blockade inhibits tumor progression human osteosarcoma in xenograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shui-Jun; Zhao, Chen; Qiu, Bin-Song; Gu, Hai-Feng; Hong, Jian-Fei; Cao, Li; Chen, Yu; Xia, Bing; Bi, Qin; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumors in children and adolescents. Despite intensive chemotherapy, patients with advanced disease still have a poor prognosis, illustrating the need for alternative therapies. In this study, we explored the use of antibodies that block CD47 with a tumor growth suppressive effect on osteosarcoma. We first found that up-regulation of CD47 mRNA levels in the tumorous tissues from eight patients with osteosarcoma when compared with that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Further western-blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that CD47 protein level was highly expressed in osteosarcoma compared to normal osteoblastic cells and adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Osteosarcoma cancer stem cell markers staining shown that the majority of CD44+ cells expressed CD47 albeit with different percentages (ranging from 80% to 99%). Furthermore, high CD47 mRNA expression levels were associated with a decreased probability of progression-free and overall survival. In addition, blockade of CD47 by specific Abs suppresses the invasive ability of osteosarcoma tumor cells and further inhibits spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of KRIB osteosarcoma cells in vivo. Finally, CD47 blockade increases macrophage phagocytosis of osteosarcoma tumor cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CD47 is a critical regulator in the metastasis of osteosarcoma and suggest that targeted inhibition of this antigen by anti-CD47 may be a novel immunotherapeutic approach in the management of this tumor. PMID:26093091

  18. Blockade of S100A3 activity inhibits murine hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, W; Deng, Q; Yu, X L; Yuan, Y S; Gao, J; Li, J J; Zhou, L; Xia, P; Han, G Y Q; Han, W; Yu, Y

    2015-10-28

    Using mouse gene expression microarray analysis, we obtained dynamic expression profiles of the whole genome in a depilation-induced hair growth mouse model. S100A3 expression increased during the anagen phase and returned to normal during the telogen phase. The effects of S100A3 blockade on the hair growth cycle were examined in mice after subcutaneous injection of an anti-mouse S100A3 antibody. Protein localization of S100A3 was confined to the hair shafts during the anagen phase and the sebaceous glands during the telogen phase. S100A3 blockade delayed hair follicle entry into the anagen phase, decreased hair elongation, and reduced the number of hair follicles in the subcutis, which correlated with the downregulated expression of hair growth induction-related genes in vivo. The present study demonstrates that anti-S100A3 antibody inhibits mouse hair growth, suggesting that S100A3 can be used as a target for hair loss treatment.

  19. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  20. Target Selection Recommendations Based on Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries on Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Houg Wang; Lin Zhang; Laura Sperry; John Olichney; Sarah Tomaszewski Farias; Kiarash Shahlaie; Norika Malhado Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) has extensive impact on nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to September, 2015, using various search terms and their combinations including PD, NMSs, DBS, globus pallidus intemus (GPi), subthalamic nucleus (STN), and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus.Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals on impacts of DBS on neuropsychological profiles, sensory function, autonomic symptoms, weight changes, and sleep disturbances.For psychological symptoms and cognitive impairment, we tried to use more reliable proofs: Random, control, multicenter, large sample sizes, and long period follow-up clinical studies.We categorized the NMSs into four groups: those that would improve definitively following DBS;those that are not significantly affected by DBS;those that remain controversial on their surgical benefit;and those that can be worsened by DBS.Results: In general, it seems to be an overall beneficial effect of DBS on NMSs, such as sensory, sleep, gastrointestinal, sweating, cardiovascular, odor, urological symptoms, and sexual dysfunction, GPi-DBS may produce similar results;Both STN and Gpi-DBS are safe with regard to cognition and psychology over long-term follow-up, though verbal fluency decline is related to DBS;The impact of DBS on behavioral addictions and dysphagia is still uncertain.Conclusions: As the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS are similar, NMSs may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients.

  1. Erythropoietin blockade inhibits the induction of tumor angiogenesis and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Hardee

    important angiogenic factor that regulates the induction of tumor cell-induced neovascularization and growth during the initial stages of tumorigenesis. The suppression of tumor angiogenesis and progression by erythropoietin blockade suggests that erythropoietin may constitute a potential target for the therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis in cancer.

  2. CstF-64 and 3′-UTR cis-element determine Star-PAP specificity for target mRNA selection by excluding PAPα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Divya T.; Mohan, Nimmy; A, Vivekanand; AP, Sudheesh; G, Reshmi; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly (A) tail at the 3′-end. Canonical PAPs (PAPα/γ) polyadenylate nuclear pre-mRNAs. The recent identification of the non-canonical Star-PAP revealed specificity of nuclear PAPs for pre-mRNAs, yet the mechanism how Star-PAP selects mRNA targets is still elusive. Moreover, how Star-PAP target mRNAs having canonical AAUAAA signal are not regulated by PAPα is unclear. We investigate specificity mechanisms of Star-PAP that selects pre-mRNA targets for polyadenylation. Star-PAP assembles distinct 3′-end processing complex and controls pre-mRNAs independent of PAPα. We identified a Star-PAP recognition nucleotide motif and showed that suboptimal DSE on Star-PAP target pre-mRNA 3′-UTRs inhibit CstF-64 binding, thus preventing PAPα recruitment onto it. Altering 3′-UTR cis-elements on a Star-PAP target pre-mRNA can switch the regulatory PAP from Star-PAP to PAPα. Our results suggest a mechanism of poly (A) site selection that has potential implication on the regulation of alternative polyadenylation. PMID:26496945

  3. CstF-64 and 3'-UTR cis-element determine Star-PAP specificity for target mRNA selection by excluding PAPα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Divya T; Mohan, Nimmy; A, Vivekanand; A P, Sudheesh; G, Reshmi; Laishram, Rakesh S

    2016-01-29

    Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly (A) tail at the 3'-end. Canonical PAPs (PAPα/γ) polyadenylate nuclear pre-mRNAs. The recent identification of the non-canonical Star-PAP revealed specificity of nuclear PAPs for pre-mRNAs, yet the mechanism how Star-PAP selects mRNA targets is still elusive. Moreover, how Star-PAP target mRNAs having canonical AAUAAA signal are not regulated by PAPα is unclear. We investigate specificity mechanisms of Star-PAP that selects pre-mRNA targets for polyadenylation. Star-PAP assembles distinct 3'-end processing complex and controls pre-mRNAs independent of PAPα. We identified a Star-PAP recognition nucleotide motif and showed that suboptimal DSE on Star-PAP target pre-mRNA 3'-UTRs inhibit CstF-64 binding, thus preventing PAPα recruitment onto it. Altering 3'-UTR cis-elements on a Star-PAP target pre-mRNA can switch the regulatory PAP from Star-PAP to PAPα. Our results suggest a mechanism of poly (A) site selection that has potential implication on the regulation of alternative polyadenylation. PMID:26496945

  4. Deep neuromuscular blockade leads to a larger intraabdominal volume during laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekaer, Astrid Listov; Halvor Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2013-01-01

    for measuring the intra-abdominal space available to the surgeon during laproscopy, in order to examine whether the relaxation produced by deep neuromuscular blockade can increase the working surgical space sufficiently to permit a reduction in the CO2 insufflation pressure. Using the laproscopic grasper...... patients shows that the intra-abdominal space at 8 mm Hg with blockade is comparable to the intra-abdominal space measured at 12 mm Hg without blockade. The impact of neuromuscular blockade was not correlated with patient height, weight, BMI, and age. Thus, using neuromuscular blockade to maintain a steady...

  5. The effect of spatial organization of targets and distractors on the capacity to selectively memorize objects in visual short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbes, Aymen Ben; Gavault, Emmanuelle; Ripoll, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments to explore how the spatial configuration of objects influences the selection and the processing of these objects in a visual short-term memory task. We designed a new experiment in which participants had to memorize 4 targets presented among 4 distractors. Targets were cued during the presentation of distractor objects. Their locations varied according to 4 spatial configurations. From the first to the last configuration, the distance between targets' locations was progressively increased. The results revealed a high capacity to select and memorize targets embedded among distractors even when targets were extremely distant from each other. This capacity is discussed in relation to the unitary conception of attention, models of split attention, and the competitive interaction model. Finally, we propose that the spatial dispersion of objects has different effects on attentional allocation and processing stages. Thus, when targets are extremely distant from each other, attentional allocation becomes more difficult while processing becomes easier. This finding implicates that these 2 aspects of attention need to be more clearly distinguished in future research.

  6. Response to BRAF inhibition in melanoma is enhanced when combined with immune checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Zachary A; Juneja, Vikram R; Sage, Peter T; Frederick, Dennie T; Piris, Adriano; Mitra, Devarati; Lo, Jennifer A; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; McMahon, Martin; Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    BRAF-targeted therapy results in objective responses in the majority of patients; however, the responses are short lived (∼6 months). In contrast, treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors results in a lower response rate, but the responses tend to be more durable. BRAF inhibition results in a more favorable tumor microenvironment in patients, with an increase in CD8(+) T-cell infiltrate and a decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines. There is also increased expression of the immunomodulatory molecule PDL1, which may contribute to the resistance. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that BRAF-targeted therapy may synergize with the PD1 pathway blockade to enhance antitumor immunity. To test this hypothesis, we developed a BRAF(V600E)/Pten(-/-) syngeneic tumor graft immunocompetent mouse model in which BRAF inhibition leads to a significant increase in the intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell density and cytokine production, similar to the effects of BRAF inhibition in patients. In this model, CD8(+) T cells were found to play a critical role in the therapeutic effect of BRAF inhibition. Administration of anti-PD1 or anti-PDL1 together with a BRAF inhibitor led to an enhanced response, significantly prolonging survival and slowing tumor growth, as well as significantly increasing the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. These results demonstrate synergy between combined BRAF-targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Although clinical trials combining these two strategies are ongoing, important questions still remain unanswered. Further studies using this new melanoma mouse model may provide therapeutic insights, including optimal timing and sequence of therapy.

  7. Unexpected High Sensory Blockade during Continuous Spinal Anesthesiology (CSA in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ketelaars

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 98-year-old woman presented for a hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. Because of her age and cardiac and pulmonary co-existing diseases we decided to provide adequate regional anesthesia by continuous spinal anesthesia. Fragmented doses of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% were administered through a system consisting of a spinal catheter connected to an antimicrobial filter. After an uneventful surgical procedure, prior to removal of the catheter, this system was flushed with 10 mL of normal saline in order to try to prevent post-dural-puncture headache. After arrival at the postanesthesia care unit and fifteen minutes after removal of the catheter the patient suffered an unexpected high thoracic sensory blockade and hypotension requiring treatment. The continuous spinal anesthesia technique can be used in selected cases to be able to administer local anesthetic agents in a slow and controlled manner to reach the desired effect. The risk of post-dural-puncture headache using this technique in elderly patients is very low and therefore precludes the need to try to prevent it. We have described a potentially dangerous complication of flushing a bupivacaine-filled system into the spinal canal of an elderly patient resulting in an undesirable high sensory blockade.

  8. Blockade of PLD2 Ameliorates Intestinal Mucosal Inflammation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangxi; Yu, Lin; Yang, Wenjing; Wu, Wei; Fang, Leilei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronically remittent and progressive inflammatory disorders. Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. However, the exact role of PLD2 in IBD is obscure. Methods. PLD2 expression was determined in peripheral blood cells and inflamed mucosa from patients with IBD by qRT-PCR. Colonic biopsies were also obtained from CD patients before and after infliximab (IFX) treatment to examine PLD2 expression. PLD2 selective inhibitor (CAY10594) was administrated daily by oral gavage in DSS-induced colitis mice. Bone marrow neutrophils from colitis mice were harvested to examine the migration using Transwell plate. Results. PLD2 was found to be significantly increased in peripheral blood cells and inflamed mucosa in patients with active IBD. Treatment with IFX could significantly decrease PLD2 expression in intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Moreover, blockade of PLD2 with CAY10594 could markedly ameliorate DSS-induced colitis in mice and promote neutrophil migration. Conclusions. PLD2 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Blockade of PLD2 may serve as a new therapeutic approach for treatment of IBD. PMID:27721573

  9. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben R Bender

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance. Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4 was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs.

  10. Recent advances in hopanoids analysis: Quantification protocols overview, main research targets and selected problems of complex data exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Portka, Joanna K

    2015-09-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenoids, particularly hopanoids, are organism-specific compounds and are generally considered as useful biomarkers that allow fingerprinting and classification of biological, environmental and geological samples. Simultaneous quantification of various hopanoids together with battery of related non-polar and low-molecular mass compounds may provide principal information for geochemical and environmental research focusing on both modern and ancient investigations. Target compounds can be derived from microbial biomass, water columns, sediments, coals, crude fossils or rocks. This create number of analytical problems due to different composition of the analytical matrix and interfering compounds and therefore, proper optimization of quantification protocols for such biomarkers is still the challenge. In this work we summarizing typical analytical protocols that were recently applied for quantification of hopanoids like compounds from different samples. Main steps including components of interest extraction, pre-purification, fractionation, derivatization and quantification involving gas (1D and 2D) as well as liquid separation techniques (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, planar and low resolution column chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography) are described and discussed from practical point of view, mainly based on the experimental papers that were published within last two years, where significant increase in hopanoids research was noticed. The second aim of this review is to describe the latest research trends concerning determination of hopanoids and related low-molecular mass lipids analyzed in various samples including sediments, rocks, coals, crude oils and plant fossils as well as stromatolites and microbial biomass cultivated under different conditions. It has been found that majority of the most recent papers are based on uni- or bivariate approach for complex data analysis. Data interpretation involves

  11. Discovery of Pyridinyl Acetamide Derivatives as Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Porcupine Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dai; Liu, Jun; Han, Dong; Zhang, Guobao; Gao, Wenqi; Hsieh, Mindy H; Ng, Nicholas; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Tompkins, Celin; Li, Jie; Steffy, Auzon; Sun, Fangxian; Li, Chun; Seidel, H Martin; Harris, Jennifer L; Pan, Shifeng

    2016-07-14

    Blockade of aberrant Wnt signaling is an attractive therapeutic approach in multiple cancers. We developed and performed a cellular high-throughput screen for inhibitors of Wnt secretion and pathway activation. A lead structure (GNF-1331) was identified from the screen. Further studies identified the molecular target of GNF-1331 as Porcupine, a membrane bound O-acyl transferase. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the discovery of a novel series of potent and selective Porcupine inhibitors. Compound 19, GNF-6231, demonstrated excellent pathway inhibition and induced robust antitumor efficacy in a mouse MMTV-WNT1 xenograft tumor model. PMID:27437076

  12. Effect of beta blockade and beta stimulation on stage fright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantigan, C O; Brantigan, T A; Joseph, N

    1982-01-01

    Stage fright, physiologically the "fight or flight" reaction, is a disabling condition to the professional musician. Because it is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we have investigated the effects of beta blockade on musical performance with propranolol in a double blind fashion and the effects of beta stimulation using terbutaline. Stage fright symptoms were evaluated in two trials, which included a total of 29 subjects, by questionnaire and by the State Trai Anxiety Inventory. Quality of musical performance was evaluated by experienced music critics. Beta blockade eliminates the physical impediments to performance caused by stage fright and even eliminates the dry mouth so frequently encountered. The quality of musical performance as judged by experienced music critics is significantly improved. This effect is achieved without tranquilization. Beta stimulating drugs increase stage fright problems, and should be used in performing musicians only after consideration of the detrimental effects which they may have on musical performance. PMID:6120650

  13. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:27381687

  14. Current management of farms and internal parasites by conventional and organic meat sheep French farmers and acceptance of targeted selective treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, J; Benoit, M; Laignel, G; Nicourt, C

    2009-09-16

    Sheep meat production in France is characterized by large flocks and a limited supply of labour. Digestive-tract strongyles are considered as one of the main health problems and control relies mostly on the use of anthelminthics, although resistance to at least the benzimidazoles is increasing. We conducted interviews on nine conventional and seven organic farms regarding whether an anthelmintic targeted selective treatment program could fit within the operations of the farms. In addition, necropsies of lambs were performed on three organic farms, and faecal egg counts and small lungworm counts were performed on all farms in autumn in ewes. Each interview consisted of an open discussion on sheep health and was terminated with comments on digestive-tract helminth infection as detected in parallel with the interview. Factors likely to affect the adoption of the targeted selective treatment approach were subjected to cluster analysis. Conventional farms were mostly advised by veterinarians and relied on systematic planning of anthelmintic treatments. The frequency of treatments was up to once a month for lambs and two to three times a year for ewes. The concept of selecting animals to be treated according to a scheme of targeted selective treatments based on phenotypic markers (e.g., anaemia, diarrhoea, weight gains) was not seen as feasible by these farmers. Conversely, organic farmers, with greater use of advisors and a restricted range of anthelmintic treatments were more susceptible to integrating phenotypic markers into their practices for controlling digestive-tract strongyles. PMID:19414221

  15. Overcoming blockade in producing doubly-excited dimers by a single intense pulse and their decay

    CERN Document Server

    Demekhin, Ph V; Jabbari, G; Kopelke, S; Kuleff, A I; Cederbaum, L S

    2012-01-01

    Excitation of two identical species in a cluster by the absorption of two photons of the same energy is strongly suppressed since the excitation of one subunit blocks the excitation of the other one due to the binding Coulomb interaction. Here, we propose a very efficient way to overcome this blockade in producing doubly-excited homoatomic clusters by a single intense laser pulse. For Ne$_2$ it is explicitly demonstrated that the optimal carrier frequency of the pulse is given by half of the energy of the target state, which allows one to doubly excite more than half of the dimers at moderate field intensities. These dimers then undergo ultrafast interatomic decay bringing one Ne to its ground state and ionizing the other one. The reported \\emph{ab initio} electron spectra present reliable predictions for future experiments by strong laser pulses.

  16. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  17. Dynamical Coulomb blockade and spin-entangled electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Recher, Patrik; Loss, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    We consider the production of mobile and nonlocal pairwise spin-entangled electrons from tunneling of a BCS-superconductor (SC) to two normal Fermi liquid leads. The necessary mechanism to separate the two electrons coming from the same Cooper pair (spin-singlet) is achieved by coupling the SC to leads with a finite resistance. The resulting dynamical Coulomb blockade effect, which we describe phenomenologically in terms of an electromagnetic environment, is shown to be enhanced for tunneling...

  18. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmerling Thomas; Russo Gianluca; Bracco David

    2008-01-01

    There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary) sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and i...

  19. Indirect androgen doping by oestrogen blockade in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Handelsman, D J

    2008-01-01

    Androgens can increase muscular mass and strength and remain the most frequently abused and widely available drugs used in sports doping. Banning the administration of natural or synthetic androgens has led to a variety of strategies to circumvent the ban of the most effective ergogenic agents for power sports. Among these, a variety of indirect androgen doping strategies aiming to produce a sustained rise in endogenous testosterone have been utilized. These include oestrogen blockade by drug...

  20. H2-receptor blockade and exercise-induced asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Nogrady, S G; Hahn, A G

    1984-01-01

    While in vitro studies suggest that H2-receptor blockade enhances mediator release from bronchial mast cells and leads to bronchoconstriction, in vivo studies have given conflicting results. Eight asthmatic subjects were given cimetidine 800 mg and placebo double-blind on different days. Baseline values of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were obtained before an 8 min standardized exercise test using a bicycle ergometer. Subjects inhaled cold, dry air and exercise on cimetidine a...

  1. Input-output theory of the unconventional photon blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Flayac, H.; Savona, V.

    2013-01-01

    We study the unconventional photon blockade, recently proposed for a coupled-cavity system, in the presence of input and output quantum fields. Mixing of the input or output channels still allows strong photon antibunching of the output field, but for optimal values of the system parameters that differ substantially from those that maximize antibunching of the intracavity field. This result shows that the specific input-output geometry in a photonic system determines the optimal design in vie...

  2. Limitations of Short Range Mexican Hat Connection for Driving Target Selection in a 2D Neural Field: Activity Suppression and Deviation from Input Stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey eMégardon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localisation, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC, a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted towards the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioural data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioural data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements.

  3. Band Selection for Aircraft Targets Detection%面向飞机目标探测的波段选择方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁鸣; 刘德连; 张二磊

    2011-01-01

    针对飞机目标的探测与抗干扰问题,提出一种新的面向飞机目标探测的波段选择方法,通过耦合分析飞机目标、背景、大气、成像系统和干扰的特性,建立目标和背景的信噪比模型,确定出探测波段的中心.在此基础上,不断扩展探测波段,并分析信噪比的变化,得到探测波段的宽度.随后,根据干扰目标的辐射特性,添加抗干扰波段,有效解决了目标探测和抗干扰的结合.将所选择的探测波段应用于飞机目标的探测,仿真结果表明我们给出的波段选择方法得到的探测波段能够提高系统探测距离,同时具有一定的抗干扰能力.%To improve the performance of detection and anti-jamming of aircraft targets, a new band selection method is proposed. Base on the coupling analysis of the characteristics of aircraft targets, background, atmosphere, detection systems, and infrared-decoy, a signal to noise model (SNR) is build. And the center of the selected band is determined. Next, the width of the selected band is enlarged step by step to show the change of the SNR. As the SNR grows slowly and flatly, the width of the selected band is the final selected band. Subsequently, the characteristics of infrared-decoy are also analyzed. And a supplement band is got for anti-jamming. We test the band selection method by applying our selected bands to aircraft targets detection. The results indicate that the selected bands obtained by our new band selection method can improve the detection performance of aircraft targets and have good ability for Anti-jamming.

  4. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  5. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  6. Selective silencing of gene target expression by siRNA expression plasmids in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; De-la-O-Gómez, Faustino; Deas, Jessica; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Fierros-Zárate, Geny Del Socorro; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a natural mechanism to silence post-transcriptional gene expression in eukaryotic cells in which microRNAs act to cleave or halt the translation of target mRNAs at specific target sequences. Mature microRNAs, 19-25 nucleotides in length, mediate their effect at the mRNA level by inhibiting translation, or inducing cleavage of the mRNA target. This process is directed by the degree of complementary nucleotides between the microRNAs and the target mRNA; perfect complementary base pairing induces cleavage of mRNA, whereas several mismatches lead to translational arrest. Biological effects of microRNAs can be manipulated through the use of small interference RNAs (siRNAs) generated by chemical synthesis, or by cloning in molecular vectors. The cloning of a DNA insert in a molecular vector that will be transcribed into the corresponding siRNAs is an approach that has been developed using siRNA expression plasmids. These vectors contain DNA inserts designed with software to generate highly efficient siRNAs which will assemble into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC), and silence the target mRNA. In addition, the DNA inserts may be contained in cloning cassettes, and introduced in other molecular vectors. In this chapter we describe an attractive technology platform to silence cellular gene expression using specific siRNA expression plasmids, and evaluate its biological effect on target gene expression in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25348304

  7. Short Tandem Target Mimic: A Long Journey to the Engineered Molecular Landmine for Selective Destruction/Blockage of MicroRNAs in Plants and Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiliang Tang; Xiaoqing Tang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a population of highly conserved specific small ribo-regulators that negatively regulate gene expressions in both plants and animals.They play a key role in post-transcriptional gene regulation by destabilizing the target gene transcripts or blocking protein translation from them.Interestingly,these negative regulators are largely compromised by an upstream layer of negative regulators “target mimics” found in plants or “endogenous competing RNAs” revealed recently in animals.These endogenous regulatory mechanisms of “double negatives making a positive” have now been developed into a key strategy in the study of small RNA functions.This review presents some reflections on the long journey to the short tandem target mimic (STTM) for selective destruction/blockage of specific miRNAs in plants and animals,and the potential applications of STTM are discussed.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Hundreds of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Growth from a Kinase-Targeted Library Screening Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rosario; Luengo-Arratta, Sandra A.; Seixas, João D.; Amata, Emanuele; Devine, William; Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I.; Jimenez, Elena; Ortega, Fatima; Crouch, Sabrinia; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Fiandor, Jose Maria; Martin, Jose Julio; Berlanga, Manuela; Gonzalez, Silvia; Manzano, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Pollastri, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of identification of new kinase-targeting chemotypes for target and pathway analysis and drug discovery in Trypanosomal brucei, a high-throughput screen of 42,444 focused inhibitors from the GlaxoSmithKline screening collection was performed against parasite cell cultures and counter-screened against human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. In this way, we have identified 797 sub-micromolar inhibitors of T. brucei growth that are at least 100-fold selective over HepG2 cells. Importantly, 242 of these hit compounds acted rapidly in inhibiting cellular growth, 137 showed rapid cidality. A variety of in silico and in vitro physicochemical and drug metabolism properties were assessed, and human kinase selectivity data were obtained, and, based on these data, we prioritized three compounds for pharmacokinetic assessment and demonstrated parasitological cure of a murine bloodstream infection of T. brucei rhodesiense with one of these compounds (NEU-1053). This work represents a successful implementation of a unique industrial-academic collaboration model aimed at identification of high quality inhibitors that will provide the parasitology community with chemical matter that can be utilized to develop kinase-targeting tool compounds. Furthermore these results are expected to provide rich starting points for discovery of kinase-targeting tool compounds for T. brucei, and new HAT therapeutics discovery programs. PMID:25340575

  9. Putative role of monoamines in the antidepressant-like mechanism induced by striatal MT2 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Rodrigues, Lais S; Targa, Adriano D S; Aurich, Mariana F; Vital, Maria A B F; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2014-12-15

    It has been observed that the secretion pattern of melatonin is modified in Parkinson's disease (PD). Hence, it is hypothesized that dysregulations of melatonin MT2 receptors may be involved in the installation of depression in PD patients. Together with recent evidence based on the use of the intranigral rotenone model of PD, have led to the hypothesis that modulating the striatal MT2 receptor could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the antidepressant properties triggered. To further investigate this issue, male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12μg/μL) and seven days later subjected to a rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) for 24h. After, we injected within the striatum the MT2 selective agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10μg/μL), the MT2 selective antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, they were tested in the forced swimming test and were allowed to perform the sleep rebound (REB). Then, the rats were re-tested, and the striatum, hippocampus and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were collected for neurochemical purposes. Results indicated substantial antidepressant effects promoted by the blockade of striatal MT2 receptors that were potentiated by REMSD. MT2 activation increased DA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, while MT2 blockade increase DA in the SNpc. 4-P-PDOT treatment of the rotenone REMSD group generated a decrement in 5-HT levels within the striatum, hippocampus and SNpc. However, increased 5-HT turnover was observed among these structures. Therefore, we demonstrated the neurochemical antidepressant effect induced by striatal MT2 blockage associated with REMSD in the rotenone model of PD. PMID:25218873

  10. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen persistence in chronic infections and cancer upregulates inhibitory networks, such as the PD-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways, that impair immunity and lead to disease progression. These pathways are attractive targets for immunotherapy, as demonstrated by recent clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer patients. However, in HIV-1 infection not all subjects respond to inhibition of either pathway and the mechanistic interactions between these two networks remain to be bet...

  11. CRISPR-Mediated Drug-Target Validation Reveals Selective Pharmacological Inhibition of the RNA Helicase, eIF4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting translation initiation is an emerging anti-neoplastic strategy that capitalizes on de-regulated upstream MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signaling pathways in cancers. A key regulator of translation that controls ribosome recruitment flux is eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4F, a hetero-trimeric complex composed of the cap binding protein eIF4E, the scaffolding protein eIF4G, and the RNA helicase eIF4A. Small molecule inhibitors targeting eIF4F display promising anti-neoplastic activity in preclinical settings. Among these are some rocaglate family members that are well tolerated in vivo, deplete eIF4F of its eIF4A helicase subunit, have shown activity as single agents in several xenograft models, and can reverse acquired resistance to MAPK and PI3K-mTOR targeted therapies. Herein, we highlight the power of using genetic complementation approaches and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing for drug-target validation ex vivo and in vivo, linking the anti-tumor properties of rocaglates to eIF4A inhibition.

  12. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered plants on non-target organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs...

  13. Effects of adductor-canal-blockade on pain and ambulation after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenstrup, M T; Jæger, P; Lund, J;

    2012-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with intense post-operative pain. Besides providing optimal analgesia, reduction in side effects and enhanced mobilization are important in this elderly population. The adductor-canal-blockade is theoretically an almost pure sensory blockade. We...... hypothesized that the adductor-canal-blockade may reduce morphine consumption (primary endpoint), improve pain relief, enhance early ambulation ability, and reduce side effects (secondary endpoints) after TKA compared with placebo....

  14. Consequences of Zeeman Degeneracy for van der Waals Blockade between Rydberg Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Thad G.; Saffman, M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effects of Zeeman degeneracies on the long-range interactions between like Rydberg atoms, with particular emphasis on applications to quantum information processing using van der Waals blockade. We present a general analysis of how degeneracies affect the primary error sources in blockade experiments, emphasizing that blockade errors are sensitive primarily to the weakest possible atom-atom interactions between the degenerate states, not the mean interaction strength. We presen...

  15. Effect of epidural blockade and oxygen therapy on changes in subcutaneous oxygen tension after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, U; Erichsen, C J;

    1994-01-01

    The effect of oxygen therapy (37% by face mask) and epidural local anesthetic blockade (9 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at Th9-11 level) on wound oxygenation was evaluated in eight otherwise healthy patients undergoing elective colorectal resection. The patients were monitored continuously for subcutaneous...... any of the measured values. Oxygen therapy before epidural blockade increased median subcutaneous oxygen tension from 60 to 71 mmHg (P oxygen tension with oxygen therapy was 30 (15-55) min...... without epidural blockade and 15 (10-20) min with blockade (P oxygen tension with or without oxygen therapy after elective uncomplicated major abdominal surgery....

  16. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marchini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade.

  17. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12:galaxy target selection and large scale structure catalogues

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target cat...

  18. SOMATOSTATIN RECEPTOR SUBTYPE 2A IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY USING A NEW MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY SELECTS TUMORS SUITABLE FOR IN VIVO SOMATOSTATIN RECEPTOR TARGETING

    OpenAIRE

    Körner, Meike; Waser, Beatrice; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2012-01-01

    High over-expression of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumors allows imaging and radiotherapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. To know if a tumor is suitable for in vivo somatostatin receptor targeting, its somatostatin receptor expression has to be determined. There are specific indications to use immunohistochemistry for the somatostatin receptor subtype 2A (sst2A), but this has up to now been limited by the lack of an adequate reliable antibody. The aim of the present s...

  19. Elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels predict an enhanced anti-hypertensive and anti-proteinuric benefit of dietary sodium restriction and diuretics, but not angiotensin receptor blockade, in proteinuric renal patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagman, Maartje C. J.; Waanders, Femke; Vogt, Liffert; Damman, Kevin; Hemmelder, Marc; Navis, Gerjan; Laverman, Gozewijn D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade only partly reduces blood pressure, proteinuria and renal and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD) but often requires sodium targeting [i.e. low sodium diet (LS) and/or diuretics] for optimal efficacy. However, both unde

  20. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDugovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagonist was further investigated in the rat, and specifically on rapid eye movement (REM sleep since a deficiency of the orexin system is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy based on clinical and pre-clinical data. As expected, the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 was effective in promoting non-REM (NREM and REM sleep following oral dosing (10 and 30 mg/kg at the onset of the dark phase. However, a disruption of REM sleep was evidenced by a more pronounced reduction in the onset of REM as compared to NREM sleep, a marked enhancement of the REM/total sleep ratio, and the occurrence of a few episodes of direct wake to REM sleep transitions (REM intrusion. When administered subcutaneously, the OX2R antagonist JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg increased NREM duration whereas the OX1R antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg did not alter sleep. REM sleep was not affected either by OX2R or OX1R blockade alone, but administration of the OX1R antagonist in combination with the OX2R antagonist induced a significant reduction in REM sleep latency and an increase in REM sleep duration at the expense of the time spent in NREM sleep. These results indicate that additional blockade of OX1R to OX2R antagonism elicits a dysregulation of REM sleep by shifting the balance in favor of REM sleep at the expense of NREM sleep that may increase the risk of adverse events. Translation of this hypothesis remains to be tested in the clinic.

  1. Coulomb Blockade in an Ultrathin Ti Nanowire at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAIQiyu; YANGTao; CAIBingchu; YINYou; JIANGJianfei

    2003-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope operated in ambient air was employed to fabricate a~ 30nm-wide and ~ 700nm-long Ti nanowire connecting the source and drain electrodes on a 3nm-thick Ti film. The ultraflne but nonuniform Ti nanowire was well defined between two ox-idized lines. The gate electrode was capacitively coupled to the nanowire by a ~150nm-wide oxidized line. The electrical properties measured at room temperature of the Ti nanowire showed Coulomb blockade in highly nonlinear Ids-Vds characteristics and Coulomb oscillation in Ids - Vgs characteristics.

  2. Filtering single atoms from Rydberg blockaded mesoscopic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, David; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We propose an efficient method to filter out single atoms from trapped ensembles with unknown number of atoms. The method employs stimulated adiabatic passage to reversibly transfer a single atom to the Rydberg state which blocks subsequent Rydberg excitation of all the other atoms within the ensemble. This triggers the excitation of Rydberg blockaded atoms to short lived intermediate states and their subsequent decay to untrapped states. Using an auxiliary microwave field to carefully engineer the dissipation, we obtain a nearly deterministic single-atom source. Our method is applicable to small atomic ensembles in individual microtraps and in lattice arrays.

  3. COULOMB BLOCKADE EFFECT IN SELF-ASSEMBLED GOLD QUANTUM DOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Hu; Ru-Ling Yeh; Ru-Shi Liu

    2004-01-01

    Nanometer-scale Au quantum dots have been assembled on SiO2 by controlling the reaction of raw materials to form a citrate Au sol and an aminosilane/dithiol-treated patterned Si wafer. The detailed formation mechanism has been studied. Three gold colloidal particles (~15 nm), aligned in a chain to form a one-dimensional current path, was bridged across an 80-nm gap between source and drain metal electrodes. The device exhibited a Coulomb blockade effect at 33 K.

  4. Generation of gene knockouts and mutant models in the laboratory rat by ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Mudde, J.B.; Belt, J. van de; Verheul, M.; Olivier, J.; Homberg, J.R.; Guryev, V.; Cools, A.R.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Plasterk, R.H.; Cuppen, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rat is one of the most important model organisms for biomedical and pharmacological research. However, the generation of novel models for studying specific aspects of human diseases largely depends on selection for specific traits using existing rat strains, thereby solely depending o

  5. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered insect-resistant plants on non-target organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Keri; Cayabyab, Bonifacio; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gadaleta, Patricia G; Hellmich, Richard L; Romeis, Jörg; Storer, Nicholas; Valicente, Fernando H; Wach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs are assessed using surrogate species, and it is critical that the data derived from surrogates accurately predict any adverse impacts likely to be observed from the use of the crop in the agricultural context. The key is to select surrogate species that best represent the valued NTOs in the location where the crop is going to be introduced, but this selection process poses numerous challenges for the developers of GE crops who will perform the tests, as well as for the ecologists and regulators who will interpret the test results. These issues were the subject of a conference "Surrogate Species Selection for Assessing Potential Adverse Environmental Impacts of Genetically Engineered Plants on Non-Target Organisms" convened by the Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, ILSI Research Foundation. This report summarizes the proceedings of the conference, including the presentations, discussions and the points of consensus agreed to by the participants.

  6. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of folic acid targeted tetraphenylporphyrin as novel photosensitizers for selective photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Raphaël; Schmitt, Frédéric; Frochot, Céline; Fort, Yves; Lourette, Natacha; Guillemin, François; Müller, Jean-François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2005-04-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment involving systemic administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizer; this, when activated by the appropriate light wavelength, interacts with molecular oxygen to form a toxic, short-lived species known as singlet oxygen, which is thought to mediate cellular death. Targeted PDT offers the opportunity of enhancing photodynamic efficiency by directly targeting diseased cells and tissues. Two new conjugates of three components, folic acid/hexane-1,6-diamine/4-carboxyphenylporphyrine 1 and folic acid/2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)-bis-ethylamine/4-carboxyphenylporphyrine 2 were synthesized. The conjugates were characterized by 1H NMR, MALDI, UV-visible spectroscopy, and fluorescence quantum yield. The targeted delivery of these photoactive compounds to KB nasopharyngeal cell line, which is one of the numerous tumor cell types that overexpress folate receptors was studied. It was found that after 24 h incubation, conjugates 1 and 2 cellular uptake was on average 7-fold higher than tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) used as reference and that 1 and 2 cellular uptake kinetics increased steadily over the 24 h period, suggesting an active transport via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In corresponding results, conjugates 1 and 2 accumulation displayed a reduction of 70% in the presence of a competitive concentration of folic acid. Survival measurements demonstrated that KB cells were significantly more sensitive to conjugated porphyrins-mediated PDT. Under the same experimental conditions and the same photosensitizer concentration, TPP displayed no photocytotoxicity while conjugates 1 and 2 showed photodynamic activity with light dose values yielding 50% growth inhibition of 22.6 and 6.7 J/cm2, respectively.

  7. Discovery of selective inhibitors of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 by targeting the enzyme DNA-binding cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Bradley R; Abdelmalak, Monica; Lopez, Sophia; Tender, Gabrielle; Yan, Chunli; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2016-07-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) processes protein/DNA adducts resulting from abortive DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) activity. TDP2 inhibition could provide synergism with the Top2 poison class of chemotherapeutics. By virtual screening of the NCI diversity small molecule database, we identified selective TDP2 inhibitors and experimentally verified their selective inhibitory activity. Three inhibitors exhibited low-micromolar IC50 values. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a common binding mode for these inhibitors, involving association to the TDP2 DNA-binding cleft. MM-PBSA per-residue energy decomposition identified important interactions of the compounds with specific TDP2 residues. These interactions could provide new avenues for synthetic optimization of these scaffolds.

  8. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  9. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Peppa

    Full Text Available NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB, allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade.

  10. Identification and characterization of alphavirus M1 as a selective oncolytic virus targeting ZAP-defective human cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Kai LI; Zhu, Wenbo; FU, LIWU; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Xiaoke; Shi, Huijuan; Wu, Sihan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Lijun; TANG, LIPENG; Yan, Min; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Although oncolytic virotherapy is showing great promise in clinical trials, not all patients are benefiting. Identifying predictors of therapeutic effectiveness for each oncolytic virus would provide a good chance to increase response rate. Here, we describe an alphavirus (M1) that possesses selective and potent antitumor activity through intravenous infusion, whereas its replication is controlled by the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) gene. A survey of cancer tissue banks reveals that ZA...

  11. Genetic identification of thiosulfate sulfurtransferase as an adipocyte-expressed antidiabetic target in mice selected for leanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Nicholas M; Beltram, Jasmina; Carter, Roderick N; Michailidou, Zoi; Gorjanc, Gregor; McFadden, Clare; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Rodriguez-Cuenca, Sergio; Gibbins, Matthew T G; Aird, Rhona E; Moreno-Navarrete, José Maria; Munger, Steven C; Svenson, Karen L; Gastaldello, Annalisa; Ramage, Lynne; Naredo, Gregorio; Zeyda, Maximilian; Wang, Zhao V; Howie, Alexander F; Saari, Aila; Sipilä, Petra; Stulnig, Thomas M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kenyon, Christopher J; Seckl, Jonathan R; Walker, Brian R; Webster, Scott P; Dunbar, Donald R; Churchill, Gary A; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Fernandez-Real, José Manuel; Emilsson, Valur; Horvat, Simon

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of genetic mechanisms for resistance to obesity and diabetes may illuminate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this global health challenge. We used the polygenic 'lean' mouse model, which has been selected for low adiposity over 60 generations, to identify mitochondrial thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (Tst; also known as rhodanese) as a candidate obesity-resistance gene with selectively increased expression in adipocytes. Elevated adipose Tst expression correlated with indices of metabolic health across diverse mouse strains. Transgenic overexpression of Tst in adipocytes protected mice from diet-induced obesity and insulin-resistant diabetes. Tst-deficient mice showed markedly exacerbated diabetes, whereas pharmacological activation of TST ameliorated diabetes in mice. Mechanistically, TST selectively augmented mitochondrial function combined with degradation of reactive oxygen species and sulfide. In humans, TST mRNA expression in adipose tissue correlated positively with insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and negatively with fat mass. Thus, the genetic identification of Tst as a beneficial regulator of adipocyte mitochondrial function may have therapeutic significance for individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27270587

  12. Small and dim target detection via lateral inhibition filtering and Artificial Bee colony based selective visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haibin; Deng, Yimin; Wang, Xiaohua; Xu, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel bionic selective visual attention mechanism to quickly select regions that contain salient objects to reduce calculations. Firstly, lateral inhibition filtering, inspired by the limulus' ommateum, is applied to filter low-frequency noises. After the filtering operation, we use Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm based selective visual attention mechanism to obtain the interested object to carry through the following recognition operation. In order to eliminate the camera motion influence, this paper adopted ABC algorithm, a new optimization method inspired by swarm intelligence, to calculate the motion salience map to integrate with conventional visual attention. To prove the feasibility and effectiveness of our method, several experiments were conducted. First the filtering results of lateral inhibition filter were shown to illustrate its noise reducing effect, then we applied the ABC algorithm to obtain the motion features of the image sequence. The ABC algorithm is proved to be more robust and effective through the comparison between ABC algorithm and popular Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. Except for the above results, we also compared the classic visual attention mechanism and our ABC algorithm based visual attention mechanism, and the experimental results of which further verified the effectiveness of our method. PMID:23991033

  13. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE. I. target selection and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Yi, Weimin; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Wang, Shu; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at $z\\gtrsim4.5$. We have developed a new method to select $4.7\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.4$ quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous $z\\sim5$ quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with $z$-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and 64 (64.6\\%) of them are quasars with redshifts of $4.4\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.5$ and absolute magnitudes of $-29\\lesssim M_{1450} \\lesssim -26.4$. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same crite...

  14. Small and dim target detection via lateral inhibition filtering and Artificial Bee colony based selective visual attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Duan

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel bionic selective visual attention mechanism to quickly select regions that contain salient objects to reduce calculations. Firstly, lateral inhibition filtering, inspired by the limulus' ommateum, is applied to filter low-frequency noises. After the filtering operation, we use Artificial Bee Colony (ABC algorithm based selective visual attention mechanism to obtain the interested object to carry through the following recognition operation. In order to eliminate the camera motion influence, this paper adopted ABC algorithm, a new optimization method inspired by swarm intelligence, to calculate the motion salience map to integrate with conventional visual attention. To prove the feasibility and effectiveness of our method, several experiments were conducted. First the filtering results of lateral inhibition filter were shown to illustrate its noise reducing effect, then we applied the ABC algorithm to obtain the motion features of the image sequence. The ABC algorithm is proved to be more robust and effective through the comparison between ABC algorithm and popular Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm. Except for the above results, we also compared the classic visual attention mechanism and our ABC algorithm based visual attention mechanism, and the experimental results of which further verified the effectiveness of our method.

  15. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  16. Philosophical Intelligence: Letters, Print, and Experiment during Napoleon's Continental Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Iain P

    2015-12-01

    This essay investigates scientific exchanges between Britain and France from 1806 to 1814, at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. It argues for a picture of scientific communication that sees letters and printed texts not as separate media worlds, but as interconnected bearers of time-critical information within a single system of intelligence gathering and experimental practice. During this period, Napoleon Bonaparte's Continental System blockade severed most links between Britain and continental Europe, yet scientific communications continued--particularly on electrochemistry, a subject of fierce rivalry between Britain and France. The essay traces these exchanges using the archive of a key go-between, the English man of science Sir Charles Blagden. The first two sections look at Blagden's letter-writing operation, reconstructing how he harnessed connections with neutral American diplomats, merchants, and the State to get scientific intelligence between London and Paris. The third section, following Blagden's words from Britain to France to America, looks at how information in letters cross-fertilized with information in print. The final section considers how letters and print were used together to solve the difficult practical problem of replicating experiments across the blockade. PMID:27024935

  17. Our experience on brachial plexus blockade in upper extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Uslukaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral nerve blocks are usually used either alone or along with general anesthesia for postoperative analgesia. We also aimed to present the results and experiences.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted to scan the files of patients who underwent orthopedic upper extremity surgery with peripheral nerve block between September 2009 and October 2010. After ethics committee approval was obtained, 114 patients who were ASA physical status I-III, aged 18-70, performed upper extremity surgery in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic were included to study. Patients’ demographic data, clinical diagnoses, premedication status, peripheral block type, local anesthetic dose, stimuplex needle types, hemodynamic parameters at the during surgery, the first postoperative analgesic requirements, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded.Results: Demographic data were similar to each other. Brachial plexus block was commonly performed for the forearm surgery. Infraclavicular block was performed the most frequently to patients. As the classical methods in the supine position were preferred in 98.2% of patients, Stimuplex A needle (B. Braun, Melsungen AG, Germany have been used for blockage in 80.7% of patients. Also, in 54.4% of patients, 30 ml of local anesthetic solution composed of bupivacaine + prilocaine was used for blockade. Blocks applied to patients had provided adequate anesthesia.Conclusion: Since the brachial plexus blockade guided peripheral nerve stimulator for upper extremity surgery provide adequate depth of anesthesia and analgesia, it may be a good alternative to general anesthesia because of unwanted side effects

  18. The tumor targeted superantigen ABR-217620 selectively engages TRBV7-9 and exploits TCR-pMHC affinity mimicry in mediating T cell cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Hedlund

    Full Text Available The T lymphocytes are the most important effector cells in immunotherapy of cancer. The conceptual objective for developing the tumor targeted superantigen (TTS ABR-217620 (naptumomab estafenatox, 5T4Fab-SEA/E-120, now in phase 3 studies for advanced renal cell cancer, was to selectively coat tumor cells with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL target structures functionally similar to natural CTL pMHC target molecules. Here we present data showing that the molecular basis for the anti-tumor activity by ABR-217620 resides in the distinct interaction between the T cell receptor β variable (TRBV 7-9 and the engineered superantigen (Sag SEA/E-120 in the fusion protein bound to the 5T4 antigen on tumor cells. Multimeric but not monomeric ABR-217620 selectively stains TRBV7-9 expressing T lymphocytes from human peripheral blood similar to antigen specific staining of T cells with pMHC tetramers. SEA/E-120 selectively activates TRBV7-9 expressing T lymphocytes resulting in expansion of the subset. ABR-217620 selectively triggers TRBV7-9 expressing cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill 5T4 positive tumor cells. Furthermore, ABR-217620 activates TRBV7-9 expressing T cell line cells in the presence of cell- and bead-bound 5T4 tumor antigen. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that ABR-217620 binds to 5T4 with high affinity, to TRBV7-9 with low affinity and to MHC class II with very low affinity. The T lymphocyte engagement by ABR-217620 is constituted by displaying high affinity binding to the tumor cells (KD approximately 1 nM and with the mimicry of natural productive immune TCR-pMHC contact using affinities of around 1 µM. This difference in kinetics between the two components of the ABR-217620 fusion protein will bias the binding towards the 5T4 target antigen, efficiently activating T-cells via SEA/E-120 only when presented by the tumor cells.

  19. Structure and selectivity of novel ω-conotoxins and conus catus that target neuronal calcium channel subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ω-Conotoxins selective for N-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels have promising therapeutic applications in conditions such as pain and neurodegeneration following cerebral ischaemia. Here we report the discovery of novel conotoxins from the piscivorous snail Conus carus using 125I-GVIA binding to rat brain membrane to guide fractionation of crude venom, and cloning to identify the expressed gene products from the venom duct tissue. Four peptides were isolated and named ω-conotoxins CVIA-D (CVIA-D) on the basis of their pharmacology and structure. CVIA-D had varying extents of homology to other ω-conotoxins, with loop 4 of CVID showing significant sequence divergence. From binding studies in rat brain, the rank order of potency to displace 125I-GVIA from N-type calcium channel (CVID = GVIA=MVIIA > CVIA > CVIC = CVIB > MVIIC) was reversed at the P/Q-type calcium channel (defined by 125I-MVIIC). CVID was most selective for N-type vs P/Q-type calcium channels, being 1.5 to 2-orders of magnitude more selective than GVIA and MVIIA, respectively. CVIA-D each inhibited neurally-evoked contractions in rat vas deferens in a reversible manner, with potencies that correlated with their ability to inhibit 125I-GVIA binding. Compared with GVIA, CVID was a more potent inhibitor of central N-type calcium channels (α1,B-dexpressed in Xenopus oocytes) than of peripheral N-type calcium channels (rat vas deferens). 1H NMR studies revealed that CVID adopts a similar 3D fold to other ω-conotoxins. However, in contrast to GVIA, MVIIA or MVIIC, CVID has two hydrogen bonds that hold loops 2 and 4 proximal, a factor that may contribute to the enhanced ability of CVID to discriminate among neuronal calcium channels

  20. Targeting tumor-associated immune suppression with selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) inhibitors may enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Muzammal; Shah, Zahir; Abbas, Nasir; Javeed, Aqeel; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress in last few years, the cancer immunotherapy has not yet improved disease-free because of the tumor-associated immune suppression being a major barrier. Novel trends to enhance cancer immunotherapy aims at harnessing the therapeutic manipulation of signaling pathways mediating the tumor-associated immune suppression, with the general aims of: (a) reversing the tumor immune suppression; (b) enhancing the innate and adaptive components of anti-tumor immunosurveillance, and (c) protecting immune cells from the suppressive effects of T regulatory cells (Tregs) and the tumor-derived immunoinhibitory mediators. A particular striking example in this context is the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A type I (PKAI) pathway. Oncogenic cAMP/PKAI signaling has long been implicated in the initiation and progression of several human cancers. Emerging data indicate that cAMP/PKAI signaling also contributes to tumor- and Tregs-derived suppression of innate and adaptive arms of anti-tumor immunosurveillance. Therapeutically, selective PKAI inhibitors have been developed which have shown promising anti-cancer activity in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Rp-8-Br-cAMPS is a selective PKAI antagonist that is widely used as a biochemical tool in signal transduction research. Collateral data indicate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS has shown immune-rescuing potential in terms of enhancing the innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity, as well as protecting adaptive T cells from the suppressive effects of Tregs. Therefore, this proposal specifically implicates that combining selective PKAI antagonists/inhibitors with cancer immunotherapy may have multifaceted benefits, such as rescuing the endogenous anti-tumor immunity, enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, and direct anti-cancer effects.

  1. Cyclosporine preserves the anergic state of human T cells induced by costimulation blockade in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Fasse, E.; Joosten, I.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Costimulation blockade based tolerance-inducing therapies might be disrupted by adjunct conventional immunosuppressive drug use. In the current study, we evaluated the compatibility of various immunosuppressive agents on costimulation blockade-based immunosuppression and T-cell anergy in

  2. Epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine : effects of age on the pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Mischa J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Epidural neural blockade results from processes after the administration of a local anaesthetic in the epidural space until the uptake in neural tissue. The pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics after epidural anaesthesia may be influenced by several factors, with age as the most impor

  3. Disentangling the effects of spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions on spin blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadj-Perge, S.; Frolov, S.M.; Van Tilburg, J.W.W.; Danon, J.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Algra, R.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2010-01-01

    We have achieved the few-electron regime in InAs nanowire double quantum dots. Spin blockade is observed for the first two half-filled orbitals, where the transport cycle is interrupted by forbidden transitions between triplet and singlet states. Partial lifting of spin blockade is explained by spin

  4. Practical consideration in the selection of X-ray fluorescence tube targets for analysis of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four X-ray fluorescence tubes with different targets (Cr, W, Mo and Rh) were compared for their suitability to analyze twelve of the most common major and trace elements in some geological samples. The major elements and Si, Al, Ca, K, Ti, and S. All elements having wavelengths higher than that of the iron K-absorption edge, gave significantly higher intensities of their characteristic fluorescence radiations when using a Cr-anode tube compared to W, Mo and Rh anode tubes. However, for the light elements (Si and Al) the Rh-anode tube of equal efficiency as the Cr-anode tube. The highest Ka-line intensity of Fe was obtained by the W-anode tube. The lowest detection limits (highest sensitivity) for the trace elements Rb, Sr, Zr, and Nb are obtained using both the Mo and Rh tubes. (author)

  5. Targeting of VX2 Rabbit Liver Tumor by Selective Delivery of 3-Bromopyruvate: A Biodistribution and Survival Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vali, Mustafa; Vossen, Josephina A.; Buijs, Manon; Engles, James M; Liapi, Eleni; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Khwaja, Afsheen; Acha-Ngwodo, Obele; Shanmugasundaram, Ganapathy; Syed, Labiq; Wahl, Richard L.; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the biodistribution and tumor targeting ability of 14C-labeled 3-bromopyruvate ([14C]3-BrPA) after i.a. and i.v. delivery in the VX2 rabbit model. In addition, we evaluated the effects of [14C]3-BrPA on tumor and healthy tissue glucose metabolism by determining 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Last, we determined the survival benefit of i.a. administered 3-BrPA. In total, 60 rabbits with VX2 liver tumor received either 1.75 mM [14C]3-BrPA i.a., 1.75 mM [14...

  6. A Rational Design Strategy for the Selective Activity Enhancement of a Molecular Chaperone toward a Target Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A; Sormanni, Pietro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-18

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the folding and assembly of proteins and inhibit their aberrant aggregation. They thus offer several opportunities for biomedical and biotechnological applications, as for example they can often prevent protein aggregation more effectively than other therapeutic molecules, including small molecules and antibodies. Here we present a method of designing molecular chaperones with enhanced activity against specific amyloidogenic substrates while leaving unaltered their functions toward other substrates. The method consists of grafting onto a molecular chaperone a peptide designed to bind specifically an epitope in the target substrate. We illustrate this strategy by describing Hsp70 variants with increased affinities for α-synuclein and Aβ42 but otherwise unaltered affinities for other substrates. These designed variants inhibit protein aggregation and disaggregate preformed fibrils significantly more effectively than wild-type Hsp70 indicating that the strategy presented here provides a possible route for tailoring rationally molecular chaperones for specific purposes.

  7. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  8. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Paula A; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their "top down" control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression. PMID:27494187

  9. Selecting Pharmacological Targets of PCSK9%PCSK9的药理学筛选靶点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武春艳; 唐志晗; 刘录山; 姜志胜

    2009-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and heart disease. Current cholesterol-limiting therapies fail in some patients, where additional therapeutic targets are needed. PCSK9 encodes a pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9a that plays an important role in cholesterol metabolism by the modulation of LDL receptor levels in the liver. Gain-of-function mutations of PCSK9 resulted in elevated levels of LDL-cholesterol in the plasma. Loss-of-function mutations led to high levels of the LDL receptor and low LDL-cholesterol. This review focuses on the structure, functions and pharmacological targets of PCSK9.%前蛋白转化酶枯草溶菌素9(PCSK9)基因编码神经凋亡调节转化酶即NARC1,通过影响肝LDLR水平,在胆固醇代谢中发挥了重要的作用.其功能获得型突变使血浆胆固醇水平增高,而功能缺失型突变降低胆固醇水平.流行病学调查显示,高胆固醇血症是动脉粥样硬化和心脏病的主要危险因素.一些患者运用当前的降胆固醇药物治疗仍不能达到推荐的目标LDL水平,PCSK9作为新的降脂靶点引起了广泛的关注.本文将对PCSK9的结构、功能和药理学靶点进行综述.

  10. Zea mays(L.) P1 locus for cob glume color identified as a post-domestication selection target with an effect on temperate maize genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanxiao; Xie; Jianfeng; Weng; Wenguo; Liu; Cheng; Zou; Zhuanfang; Hao; Wenxue; Li; Minshun; Li; Xiaosen; Guo; Gengyun; Zhang; Yunbi; Xu; Xinhai; Li; Shihuang; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Artificial selection during domestication and post-domestication improvement results in loss of genetic diversity near target loci. However, the genetic locus associated with cob glume color and the nature of the genomic pattern surrounding it was elusive and the selection effect in that region was not clear. An association mapping panel consisting of 283 diverse modern temperate maize elite lines was genotyped by a chip containing over 55,000 evenly distributed SNPs. Ten-fold resequencing at the target region on 40 of the panel lines and 47 tropical lines was also undertaken. A genome-wide association study(GWAS) for cob glume color confirmed the P1 locus, which is located on the short arm of chromosome 1, with a-log10 P value for surrounding SNPs higher than the Bonferroni threshold(α/n, α < 0.001) when a mixed linear model(MLM) was implemented. A total of 26 markers were identified in a 0.78 Mb region surrounding the P1 locus, including 0.73 Mb and 0.05 Mb upstream and downstream of the P1 gene, respectively. A clear linkage disequilibrium(LD) block was found and LD decayed very rapidly with increasing physical distance surrounding the P1 locus. The estimates of π and Tajima’s D were significantly(P < 0.001) lower at both ends compared to the locus. Upon comparison of temperate and tropical lines at much finer resolution by resequencing(180-fold finer than chip SNPs), a more structured LD block pattern was found among the 40 resequenced temperate lines. All evidence indicates that the P1 locus in temperate maize has not undergone neutral evolution but has been subjected to artificial selection during post-domestication selection or improvement. The information and analytical results generated in this study provide insights as to how breeding efforts have affected genome evolution in crop plants.

  11. Blockade of EGFR and MEK intercepts heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapies in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misale, Sandra; Arena, Sabrina; Lamba, Simona; Siravegna, Giulia; Lallo, Alice; Hobor, Sebastijan; Russo, Mariangela; Buscarino, Michela; Lazzari, Luca; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bencardino, Katia; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Valtorta, Emanuele; Siena, Salvatore; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto

    2014-02-19

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that are sensitive to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab almost always develop resistance within several months of initiating therapy. We report the emergence of polyclonal KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations in CRC cells with acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Regardless of the genetic alterations, resistant cells consistently displayed mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, which persisted after EGFR blockade. Inhibition of MEK1/2 alone failed to impair the growth of resistant cells in vitro and in vivo. An RNA interference screen demonstrated that suppression of EGFR, together with silencing of MEK1/2, was required to hamper the proliferation of resistant cells. Indeed, concomitant pharmacological blockade of MEK and EGFR induced prolonged ERK inhibition and severely impaired the growth of resistant tumor cells. Heterogeneous and concomitant mutations in KRAS and NRAS were also detected in plasma samples from patients who developed resistance to anti-EGFR antibodies. A mouse xenotransplant from a CRC patient who responded and subsequently relapsed upon EGFR therapy showed exquisite sensitivity to combinatorial treatment with MEK and EGFR inhibitors. Collectively, these results identify genetically distinct mechanisms that mediate secondary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, all of which reactivate ERK signaling. These observations provide a rational strategy to overcome the multifaceted clonal heterogeneity that emerges when tumors are treated with targeted agents. We propose that MEK inhibitors, in combination with cetuximab or panitumumab, should be tested in CRC patients who become refractory to anti-EGFR therapies.

  12. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  13. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  14. 联合互信息水下目标特征选择算法%Joint Mutual Information Feature Selection for Underwater Acoustic Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申昇; 杨宏晖; 王芸; 潘悦; 唐建生

    2015-01-01

    The existing exhaustive feature selection algorithms can select the optimal feature subset of an underwater acoustic target but cannot be used in engineering practices because of their too high computational cost. To balance the computational cost and the optimal feature subset search, we propose what we believe to be a new joint mutual information feature selection (JMIFS) algorithm. Its core consists of: we use the sequence forward feature search mechanism to select the feature that shows the largest amount of mutual information for classification and then select the feature that contributes more mutual information that is complementary to the selected feature so as to remove the noise and redundant features of the underwater acoustic target and enhance the recognition performance. We simu⁃late the selection of multi⁃field features of four classes of underwater acoustic targets. The simulation results show preliminarily that: on the condition that the recognition accuracy of the SVM classifier declines only 1%, our JMIFS algorithm can reduce about 87% of the redundant features, and its classification time decreases by 58%. Compared with the SVM and genetic algorithm hybrid feature selection algorithms, the JMIFS algorithm selects a smaller num⁃ber of feature subsets that have a better generalization performance.%在特征选择算法中,穷举特征选择算法可选择出最优特征子集,但由于计算量过高而在实际中不可实现。针对计算成本和最优特征子集搜索之间的平衡问题,提出一种新的用于水下目标识别的联合互信息特征选择算法。这个算法的核心思想是:利用顺序向前特征搜索机制,在选择出与类别具有最大互信息特征的条件下,选择具有更多互补分类信息的特征,从而达到快速去除噪声特征和冗余特征及提高识别性能的目的。利用4类实测水下目标数据进行仿真实验,结果表明:在支持向量机识别正确

  15. PeptideManager: A Peptide Selection Tool for Targeted Proteomic Studies Involving Mixed Samples from Different Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eDemeure

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for clinically useful protein biomarkers using advanced mass spectrometry approaches represents a major focus in cancer research. However, the direct analysis of human samples may be challenging due to limited availability, the absence of appropriate control samples, or the large background variability observed in patient material. As an alternative approach, human tumors orthotopically implanted into a different species (xenografts are clinically relevant models that have proven their utility in pre-clinical research. Patient derived xenografts for glioblastoma have been extensively characterized in our laboratory and have been shown to retain the characteristics of the parental tumor at the phenotypic and genetic level. Such models were also found to adequately mimic the behavior and treatment response of human tumors. The reproducibility of such xenograft models, the possibility to identify their host background and perform tumor-host interaction studies, are major advantages over the direct analysis of human samples.At the proteome level, the analysis of xenograft samples is challenged by the presence of proteins from two different species which, depending on tumor size, type or location, often appear at variable ratios. Any proteomics approach aimed at quantifying proteins within such samples must consider the identification of species specific peptides in order to avoid biases introduced by the host proteome. Here, we present an in-house methodology and tool developed to select peptides used as surrogates for protein candidates from a defined proteome (e.g., human in a host proteome background (e.g., mouse, rat suited for a mass spectrometry analysis. The tools presented here are applicable to any species specific proteome, provided a protein database is available. By linking the information from both proteomes, PeptideManager significantly facilitates and expedites the selection of peptides used as surrogates to analyze

  16. Field trials of low dose Bayluscide on snail hosts of schistosome and selected non-target organisms in sahelian Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Takougang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 85% of all cases of schistosomiasis in Cameroon occur in the northern sahelian half of the country representing 20% of the population. Several workers have advocated the integrated approach to schistosomiasis control, including snail control, but the death and decay of aquatic organisms, and fish kill that often follows Bayluscide application at the dose of 1g/m³ decrease its acceptability. The present study was designed to assess the effect of lower Bayluscide doses on snail host and non-target fish, frog, the tadpole kill. Bayluscide was applied to study ponds at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/m³ (ppm. Pre and post application assessment of snails hosts of schistosomes, fish, frog, and tadpole kill were carried out. All 0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/m³ Bayluscide concentrations reduced snail population significantly. Bayluscide concentration of 0.50 g/m³ applied in two rounds of 0.25 g/m³ resulted in high snail mortality and low lethality to fish, frogs, and tadpoles. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of Bayluscide in the control of schistosomiasis following the simplified approach.

  17. Selected issues relating to target companies and their boards in the context of merger and acquisition transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the practical, legal and regulatory issues which the board of directors of a target company should bear in mind in their deliberations concerning a take-over bid are reviewed. Directors of such companies will require compliance with and adherence to standard legal and regulatory rules of conduct. Developing a team to deal with the myriad details of a take-over, acquisition or merger, preparing and compiling and maintaining a manual of relevant information are highly recommended. Fiduciary duties of directors and its relevance to mergers and acquisitions are illustrated by reference to a number of recent actual court cases involving these issues. Relevant Canadian and U.S. Case Law is reviewed. It is emphasized throughout the paper that take-over transactions, mergers and acquisitions are complex and time consuming processes. It is essential and customary for senior management to be active participants in most merger and acquisition matters to provide the strategic input which drives the efforts of all involved. Equally important is to establish appropriate governance practices and to prepare and equip the corporation's mergers and acquisitions team in advance, should such events arise on short notice by design or otherwise. 38 refs

  18. Selective killing of gastric cancer cells by a small molecule targeting ROS-mediated ER stress activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Tongke; Zhang, Junru; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Wenbo; Chen, Minxiao; Kanchana, Karvannan; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world. Curcumin is a natural product with multiple pharmacological activities, while its clinical application has been limited by the poor chemical stability. We have previously designed a series of curcumin derivatives with high stability and anticancer potentials. The present study aims to identify the anti-cancer effects and mechanisms of WZ26, an analog of curcumin, in gastric cancer cells. In vitro, WZ26 showed higher chemical stability and much stronger anti-proliferative effects than curcumin, accompanied by dose-dependent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, the novel compound WZ26 induced ROS production, resulting in the activation of JNK-mitochondrial and ER stress apoptotic pathways. Blockage of ROS production totally reversed WZ26-induced JNK activation, Bcl-2/Bax decrease, ER stress activation, and final cell apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. WZ26 also exhibited potent anti-tumor effects in human gastric cancer cell xenograft models. WZ26 could be considered as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. In addition, this study also demonstrated that ROS production could be act as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial and ER stress-related death pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26086416

  19. Perivagal antagonist treatment in rats selectively blocks the reflex and afferent responses of vagal lung C fibers to intravenous agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, You Shuei; Lai, Ching Jung; Yuan, Zung Fan; Ruan, Ting; Kou, Yu Ru

    2013-02-01

    The terminals of vagal lung C fibers (VLCFs) express various types of pharmacological receptors that are important to the elicitation of airway reflexes and the development of airway hypersensitivity. We investigated the blockade of the reflex and afferent responses of VLCFs to intravenous injections of agonists using perivagal treatment with antagonists (PAT) targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, P2X, and 5-HT(3) receptors in anesthetized rats. Blockading these responses via perivagal capsaicin treatment (PCT), which blocks the neural conduction of C fibers, was also studied. We used capsaicin, α,β-methylene-ATP, and phenylbiguanide as the agonists, and capsazepine, iso-pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',5'-disulfonate, and tropisetron as the antagonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, P2X, and 5-HT(3) receptors, respectively. We found that each of the PATs abolished the VLCF-mediated reflex apnea evoked by the corresponding agonist, while having no effect on the response to other agonists. Perivagal vehicle treatment failed to produce any such blockade. These blockades had partially recovered at 3 h after removal of the PATs. In contrast, PCT abolished the reflex apneic response to all three agonists. Both PATs and PCT did not affect the myelinated afferent-mediated apneic response to lung inflation. Consistently, our electrophysiological studies revealed that each of the PATs prevented the VLCF responses to the corresponding agonist, but not to any other agonist. PCT inevitably prevented the VLCF responses to all three agonists. Thus these PATs selectively blocked the stimulatory action of corresponding agonists on the VLCF terminals via mechanisms that are distinct from those of PCT. PAT may become a novel intervention for studying the pharmacological modulation of VLCFs.

  20. 水下目标识别中样本选择与SVME融合算法%Instance Selection and SVM Ensembles for Underwater Acoustic Target Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宏晖; 王芸; 戴健

    2014-01-01

    Because the training instance set for recognizing underwater acoustic targets contains many noise sam-ples, redundant samples and irrelevant samples, and because the systems for feature extraction, feature selection and decision making are designed separately, the underwater acoustic target recognition performance declines. Hence we propose the SVM ensemble based on weighted reduced nearest neighbor ( SVME-WRNN) and the SVM ensemble based on weighted immune clone instance selection algorithm(SVME-WICISA). The ensembles use in-stance selection to build precise and diverse sub-classifiers and then combine them. We simulate the classification of the measurement data of four types of underwater acoustic targets. The simulation results, given in Figs.3, 4 and 5 and Table 3, and their analysis show preliminarily that, compared with the SVME without instance selection, the two ensembles can greatly reduce the number of training instances when their classification accuracy is almost the same and that the combined classifier has satisfactory classification accuracy.%水下目标识别中训练样本集含有冗余样本、噪声样本及无关样本,且特征提取、特征选择和决策系统设计过程分离而导致系统识别性能的下降,为此提出了基于加权最近邻收缩样本选择的SVM集成算法( SVME-WRNN)和基于加权免疫克隆样本选择的SVM集成算法( SVME-WICISA)。这2种集成方法通过样本选择来构建精度高、差异大的子分类器,并将其集成。利用4类水下目标实测数据进行了分类仿真实验。实验结果表明:SVME-WRNN算法和SVME-WICISA算法与SVME算法(无样本选择)相比较,在识别率相当的情况下,大幅度地降低了训练样本数目,得到的综合分类器具有良好的分类精度。

  1. Targeted delivery of macromolecular drugs: asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) expression by selected hepatoma cell lines used in antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Huang, Guifang; Diakur, James; Wiebe, Leonard I

    2008-10-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), an endocytotic cell surface receptor expressed by hepatocytes, is triggered by triantennary binding to galactose residues of macromolecules such as asialoorosomucoid (ASOR). The capacity of this receptor to import large molecules across the cellular plasma membrane makes it an enticing target for receptor-mediated drug delivery to hepatocytes and hepatoma cells via ASGPR-mediated endocytosis. This study describes the preparation and characterization of (125)I-ASOR, and its utility in the assessment of ASGPR expression by HepG2, HepAD38 and Huh5-2 human hepatoma cell lines. ASOR was prepared from human orosomucoid, using acid hydrolysis to remove sialic acid residues, then radioiodinated using iodogen. (125)I-ASOR was purified by gel column chromatography and characterized by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The ASOR yield by acid hydrolysis was 75%, with approximately 87 % of the sialic acid residues removed. Electrophoresis and gel chromatography demonstrated substantial differences in (125)I-ASOR quality depending on the method of radioiodination. ASGPR densities per cell were estimated at 76,000 (HepG2), 17,000 (HepAD38) and 3,000 (Huh-5-2). (125)I-ASOR binding to ASGPR on HepG2 cells was confirmed through galactose- and EDTA- challenge studies. It is concluded that (125)I-ASOR is a facilely-prepared, stable assay reagent for ASGPR expression if appropriately prepared, and that HepG2 cells, but not HepAD38 or Huh-5-2 cells, are suitable for studies exploiting the endocytotic ASGPR.

  2. CREDVW-Linked Polymeric Micelles As a Targeting Gene Transfer Vector for Selective Transfection and Proliferation of Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuefang; Li, Qian; Lv, Juan; Yu, Li; Ren, Xiangkui; Zhang, Li; Feng, Yakai; Zhang, Wencheng

    2015-06-10

    Nowadays, gene transfer technology has been widely used to promote endothelialization of artificial vascular grafts. However, the lack of gene vectors with low cytotoxicity and targeting function still remains a pressing challenge. Herein, polyethylenimine (PEI, 1.8 kDa or 10 kDa) was conjugated to an amphiphilic and biodegradable diblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (mPEG-b-PLGA) to prepare mPEG-b-PLGA-g-PEI copolymers with the aim to develop gene vectors with low cytotoxicity while high transfection efficiency. The micelles were prepared from mPEG-b-PLGA-g-PEI copolymers by self-assembly method. Furthermore, Cys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Trp (CREDVW) peptide was linked to micelle surface to enable the micelles with special recognition for endothelial cells (ECs). In addition, pEGFP-ZNF580 plasmids were condensed into these CREDVW-linked micelles to enhance the proliferation of ECs. These CREDVW-linked micelle/pEGFP-ZNF580 complexes exhibited low cytotoxicity by MTT assay. The cell transfection results demonstrated that pEGFP-ZNF580 could be transferred into ECs efficiently by these micelles. The results of Western blot analysis showed that the relative ZNF580 protein level in transfected ECs increased to 76.9%. The rapid migration of transfected ECs can be verified by wound healing assay. These results indicated that CREDVW-linked micelles could be a suitable gene transfer vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, which has great potential for rapid endothelialization of artificial blood vessels. PMID:26011845

  3. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms involving metabolic changes and insensitive target sites selected in anopheline vectors of malaria in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunaratne SHP Parakrama

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance and the underlying resistance mechanisms were studied in the major vector of malaria, Anopheles culicifacies, and the secondary vector, Anopheles subpictus in five districts (Anuradhapura, Kurunegala, Moneragala, Puttalam and Trincomalee of Sri Lanka. Eight other anophelines, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles jamesii, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles tessellatus, Anopheles vagus and Anopheles varuna from Anuradhapura district were also tested. Methods Adult females were exposed to the WHO discriminating dosages of DDT, malathion, fenitrothion, propoxur, λ-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and etofenprox. The presence of metabolic resistance by esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST and monooxygenase-based mechanisms, and the sensitivity of the acetylcholinesterase target site were assessed using synergists, and biochemical, and metabolic techniques. Results All the anopheline species had high DDT resistance. All An. culicifacies and An. subpictus populations were resistant to malathion, except An. culicifacies from Kurunegala, where there was no malathion carboxylesterase activity. Kurunegala and Puttalam populations of An. culicifacies were susceptible to fenitrothion. All the An. culicifacies populations were susceptible to carbamates. Both species were susceptible to the discriminating dosages of cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, but had different levels of resistance to other pyrethroids. Of the 8 other anophelines, only An. nigerrimus and An. peditaeniatus were resistant to all the insecticides tested, probably due to their high exposure to the insecticides used in agriculture. An. vagus showed some resistance to permethrin. Esterases, GSTs and monooxygenases were elevated in both An. culicifacies and An. subpictus. AChE was most sensitive to insecticides in Kurunegala and Trincomalee An. culicifacies

  4. Development of a Genus-Specific Antigen Capture ELISA for Orthopoxviruses – Target Selection and Optimized Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel; Pauly, Diana; Zydek, Martin; Miller, Lilija; Piesker, Janett; Laue, Michael; Lisdat, Fred; Dorner, Martin B.; Dorner, Brigitte G.; Nitsche, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Orthopoxvirus species like cowpox, vaccinia and monkeypox virus cause zoonotic infections in humans worldwide. Infections often occur in rural areas lacking proper diagnostic infrastructure as exemplified by monkeypox, which is endemic in Western and Central Africa. While PCR detection requires demanding equipment and is restricted to genome detection, the evidence of virus particles can complement or replace PCR. Therefore, an easily distributable and manageable antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of orthopoxviruses was developed to facilitate particle detection. By comparing the virus particle binding properties of polyclonal antibodies developed against surface-exposed attachment or fusion proteins, the surface protein A27 was found to be a well-bound, highly immunogenic and exposed target for antibodies aiming at virus particle detection. Subsequently, eight monoclonal anti-A27 antibodies were generated and characterized by peptide epitope mapping and surface plasmon resonance measurements. All antibodies were found to bind with high affinity to two epitopes at the heparin binding site of A27, toward either the N- or C-terminal of the crucial KKEP-segment of A27. Two antibodies recognizing different epitopes were implemented in an antigen capture ELISA. Validation showed robust detection of virus particles from 11 different orthopoxvirus isolates pathogenic to humans, with the exception of MVA, which is apathogenic to humans. Most orthopoxviruses could be detected reliably for viral loads above 1 × 103 PFU/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first solely monoclonal and therefore reproducible antibody-based antigen capture ELISA able to detect all human pathogenic orthopoxviruses including monkeypox virus, except variola virus which was not included. Therefore, the newly developed antibody-based assay represents important progress towards feasible particle detection of this important genus of viruses. PMID:26930499

  5. Effects of sustained proNGF blockade on attentional capacities in aged rats with compromised cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegla, B; Parikh, V

    2014-03-01

    Disruption in nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling via tropomyosin-related kinase A (trkA) receptors compromises the integrity of the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system, yielding cognitive, specifically attentional, impairments in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although normal aging is considered a risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of the aging cholinergic system to trkA disruption is not clear. The levels of proNGF, a proneurotrophin that possesses higher affinity for p75 receptors, increase in aging. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that cholinergic and attentional dysfunction in aged rats with reduced BF trkA receptors occurs due to the overactivation of endogenous proNGF signaling. We employed a viral vector that produced trkA shRNA to suppress trkA receptors in the corticopetal cholinergic neurons of aged rats. BF trkA suppression impaired animals' performance on signal trials in both the sustained attention task (SAT) and the cognitively taxing distractor version of SAT (dSAT) and these deficits were normalized by chronic intracerebroventricular administration of proNGF antibody. Moreover, depolarization-evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release and the density of cortical cholinergic fibers were partially restored in these animals. However, SAT/dSAT scores reflecting overall performance did not improve following proNGF blockade in trkA knockdown rats due to impaired performance in non-signal trials. Sustained proNGF blockade alone did not alter baseline attentional performance but produced moderate impairments during challenging conditions. Collectively, our findings indicate that barring proNGF-p75 signaling may exert some beneficial effects on attentional capacities specifically when BF trkA signaling is abrogated. However, endogenous proNGF may also possess neurotrophic effects and blockade of this proneurotrophin may not completely ameliorate attentional impairments in AD and potentially hinder

  6. CTLA-4 blockade enhances polyfunctional NY-ESO-1 specific T cell responses in metastatic melanoma patients with clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda; Gnjatic, Sacha; Li, Hao; Powel, Sarah; Gallardo, Humilidad F; Ritter, Erika; Ku, Geoffrey Y; Jungbluth, Achim A; Segal, Neil H; Rasalan, Teresa S; Manukian, Gregor; Xu, Yinyan; Roman, Ruth-Ann; Terzulli, Stephanie L; Heywood, Melanie; Pogoriler, Evelina; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Allison, James P; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2008-12-23

    Blockade of inhibitory signals mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) has been shown to enhance T cell responses and induce durable clinical responses in patients with metastatic melanoma. The functional impact of anti-CTLA-4 therapy on human immune responses is still unclear. To explore this, we analyzed immune-related adverse events and immune responses in metastatic melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab, a fully human anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody. Fifteen patients were selected on the basis of availability of suitable specimens for immunologic monitoring, and eight of these showed evidence of clinical benefit. Five of the eight patients with evidence of clinical benefit had NY-ESO-1 antibody, whereas none of seven clinical non-responders was seropositive for NY-ESO-1. All five NY-ESO-1 seropositive patients had clearly detectable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against NY-ESO-1 following treatment with ipilimumab. One NY-ESO-1 seronegative clinical responder also had a NY-ESO-1 CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell response, possibly related to prior vaccination with NY-ESO-1. Among five clinical non-responders analyzed, only one had a NY-ESO-1 CD4(+) T cell response and this patient did not have detectable anti-NY-ESO-1 antibody. Overall, NY-ESO-1-specific T cell responses increased in frequency and functionality during anti-CTLA-4 treatment, revealing a polyfunctional response pattern of IFN-gamma, MIP-1beta and TNF-alpha. We therefore suggest that CTLA-4 blockade enhanced NY-ESO-1 antigen-specific B cell and T cell immune responses in patients with durable objective clinical responses and stable disease. These data provide an immunologic rationale for the efficacy of anti-CTLA-4 therapy and call for immunotherapeutic designs that combine NY-ESO-1 vaccination with CTLA-4 blockade.

  7. Modular Approach to Select Bacteriophages Targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Their Application to Children Suffering With Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Pleteneva, Elena; Bourkaltseva, Maria; Krylov, Sergey; Kaplan, Alla; Chesnokova, Elena; Kulakov, Leonid; Magill, Damian; Polygach, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the potential application of bacterial viruses (phage therapy) toward the eradication of antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this regard, several potential relationships between bacteria and their bacteriophages are considered. The most important aspect that must be addressed with respect to phage therapy of bacterial infections in the lungs of CF patients is in ensuring the continuity of treatment in light of the continual occurrence of resistant bacteria. This depends on the ability to rapidly select phages exhibiting an enhanced spectrum of lytic activity among several well-studied phage groups of proven safety. We propose a modular based approach, utilizing both mono-species and hetero-species phage mixtures. With an approach involving the visual recognition of characteristics exhibited by phages of well-studied phage groups on lawns of the standard P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, the simple and rapid enhancement of the lytic spectrum of cocktails is permitted, allowing the development of tailored preparations for patients capable of circumventing problems associated with phage resistant bacterial mutants. PMID:27790211

  8. Gene-targeted embryonic stem cells: real-time PCR assay for estimation of the number of neomycin selection cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Cecilia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the preparation of transgenic murine ES cells it is important to verify the construct has a single insertion, because an ectopic neomycin phosphortransferase positive selection cassette (NEO may cause a position effect. During a recent work, where a knockin SCA28 mouse was prepared, we developed two assays based on Real-Time PCR using both SYBR Green and specific minor groove binder (MGB probes to evaluate the copies of NEO using the comparative delta-delta Ct method versus the Rpp30 reference gene. We compared the results from Southern blot, routinely used to quantify NEO copies, with the two Real-Time PCR assays. Twenty-two clones containing the single NEO copy showed values of 0.98 ± 0.24 (mean ± 2 S.D., and were clearly distinguishable from clones with two or more NEO copies. This method was found to be useful, easy, sensitive and fast and could substitute for the widely used, but laborious Southern blot method.

  9. Computational analysis and ratiometric comparison approaches aimed to assist column selection in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampsonidis, Ioannis; Witting, Michael; Koch, Wendelin; Virgiliou, Christina; Gika, Helen G; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Theodoridis, Georgios A

    2015-08-01

    In the present work two different approaches, a semi-quantitative and a Derringer function approach, were developed to assist column selection for method development in targeted metabolomics. These approaches were applied in the performance assessment of three HILIC columns with different chemistries (an amide, a diol and a zwitterionic phase). This was the first step for the development of a HILIC UPLC-MS/MS method that should be capable to analyze a large number of polar metabolites. Two gradient elution profiles and two mobile phase pH values were tested for the analysis of multi-analyte mixtures. Acquired chromatographic data were firstly treated by a ratiometric, "semi-quantitative" approach which quantifies various overall analysis parameters (e.g. the percent of detected compounds, retentivity and resolved critical pairs). These parameters were used to assess chromatographic performance in a rather conventional/traditional and cumbersome/labor-intensive way. Secondly, a comprehensive and automated comparison of the three columns was performed by monitoring several well-known chromatographic parameters (peak width, resolution, tailing factor, etc.) using a lab-built programming script which calculates overall desirability utilizing Derringer functions. Derringer functions exhibit the advantage that column performance is ultimately expressed in an objective single and quantitative value which can be easily interpreted. In summary, results show that each column exhibits unique strengths in metabolic profiling of polar compounds. The applied methodology proved useful for the selection of the most effective chromatographic system during method development for LC-MS/MS targeted metabolomics, while it could further assist in the selection of chromatographic conditions for the development of multi-analyte methods.

  10. Ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors for Coulomb blockade devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkhov, Sergey V

    2013-06-14

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication and low-temperature characterization of ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors made of a thin film of weakly oxidized titanium. Nearly linear voltage-current characteristics were measured at temperatures down to T ~ 20 mK for films with sheet resistivities as high as ~7 kΩ, i.e. about an order of magnitude higher than our previous findings for weakly oxidized Cr. Our analysis indicates that such an improvement can help to create an advantageous high-impedance environment for different Coulomb blockade devices. Further properties of the Ti film addressed in this work show the promise of low-noise behavior of the resistors when applied in different realizations of the quantum standard of current. PMID:23670293

  11. Coulomb blockade in turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S C; Kang, D S; Kim, D C; Choi, C K; Ryu, J Y

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the analytic solutions to the electrostatic problem of the multi-grated-small-junction systems, the stable domain for the Coulomb blockade of turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions at zero temperature has been analyzed as a function of the number of tunnel junction, the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance, and the asymmetric factor. Our results show that domains form various shaped regions according to the asymmetric factor and their size depends on the number of junction and the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance. In particular, it is shown that electrons can be transferred in positive and/or negative bias voltage depending on the asymmetric factor when an appropriate gate cycle is applied. Thus, the asymmetric factor plays an important role in determining the turnstile operation.

  12. Thermoelectric properties of Coulomb-blockaded fractional quantum Hall islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachezar S. Georgiev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We show that it is possible and rather efficient to compute at non-zero temperature the thermoelectric characteristics of Coulomb blockaded fractional quantum Hall islands, formed by two quantum point contacts inside of a Fabry–Pérot interferometer, using the conformal field theory partition functions for the chiral edge excitations. The oscillations of the thermopower with the variation of the gate voltage as well as the corresponding figure-of-merit and power factors, provide finer spectroscopic tools which are sensitive to the neutral multiplicities in the partition functions and could be used to distinguish experimentally between different universality classes sharing the same electric properties. We also propose a procedure for measuring the ratio r=vn/vc of the Fermi velocities of the neutral and charged edge modes for filling factor νH=5/2 from the power-factor data in the low-temperature limit.

  13. Edge-state blockade of transport in quantum dot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    We propose a transport blockade mechanism in quantum dot arrays and conducting molecules based on an interplay of Coulomb repulsion and the formation of edge states. As a model we employ a dimer chain that exhibits a topological phase transition. The connection to a strongly biased electron source and drain enables transport. We show that the related emergence of edge states is manifest in the shot noise properties as it is accompanied by a crossover from bunched electron transport to a Poissonian process. For both regions we develop a scenario that can be captured by a rate equation. The resulting analytical expressions for the Fano factor agree well with the numerical solution of a full quantum master equation.

  14. Coulomb blockade and BLOCH oscillations in superconducting Ti nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, J S; Zakharov, K; Arutyunov, K Yu

    2012-11-01

    Quantum fluctuations in quasi-one-dimensional superconducting channels leading to spontaneous changes of the phase of the order parameter by 2π, alternatively called quantum phase slips (QPS), manifest themselves as the finite resistance well below the critical temperature of thin superconducting nanowires and the suppression of persistent currents in tiny superconducting nanorings. Here we report the experimental evidence that in a current-biased superconducting nanowire the same QPS process is responsible for the insulating state--the Coulomb blockade. When exposed to rf radiation, the internal Bloch oscillations can be synchronized with the external rf drive leading to formation of quantized current steps on the I-V characteristic. The effects originate from the fundamental quantum duality of a Josephson junction and a superconducting nanowire governed by QPS--the QPS junction.

  15. Cavity polaritons with Rydberg blockade and long-range interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Litinskaya, Marina; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We study interactions between polaritons, arising when photons strongly couple to collective excitations in an array of two-level atoms trapped in an optical lattice inside a cavity. We consider two types of interactions between atoms: Dipolar forces and atomic saturability, which ranges from hard-core repulsion to Rydberg blockade. We show that, in spite of the underlying repulsion in the subsystem of atomic excitations, saturability induces a broadband bunching of photons for two-polariton scattering states. We interpret this bunching as a result of interference, and trace it back to the mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons. We examine also bound bipolaritonic states: These include states created by dipolar forces, as well as a gap bipolariton, which forms solely due to saturability effects in the atomic transition. Both types of bound states exhibit strong bunching in the photonic component. We discuss the dependence of bunching on experimentally relevant parameters.

  16. Abdominal compartment syndrome successfully treated with neuromuscular blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris T Chiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old male admitted to the intensive care unit after a cardiac arrest complicated by a stroke intra-operatively during automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. He post-operatively developed a rigid abdomen, elevated peak and plateau pressures, hypoxia and renal insufficiency. He was diagnosed with abdominal compartment syndrome with an intra-abdominal compartment pressure of 40mmHg. The patient was administered 10 mg of intravenous cisatracuriumbesylate in preparation for bedside surgical abdominal decompression. Cisatracurium eliminated the patients need for surgical intervention by reducing his abdominal compartment pressures to normal and improving his hypoxia and renal function. This case illustrates that neuromuscular blockade should be attempted in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome prior to surgical intervention.

  17. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A. [MIKES Centre for Metrology and Accreditation, Tekniikantie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L. [Aivon Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-09-11

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin.

  18. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  19. Selective killing of K-ras-transformed pancreatic cancer cells by targeting NAD(P)H oxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Yi-Chen Sun; Wen-Hua Lu; Peng Huang; and Yumin Hu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Oncogenic activation of the K-ras gene occurs in>90%of pancreatic ductal carcinoma and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. Increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has also been observed in a wide spectrum of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the mechanistic association between K-ras–induced transformation and increased ROS stress and its therapeutic implications in pancreatic cancer. Methods:ROS level, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and expression, and cel invasion were examined in human pancreatic duct epithelial E6E7 cel s transfected with K-rasG12V compared with parental E6E7 cel s. The cytotoxic effect and antitumor effect of capsaicin, a NOX inhibitor, were also tested in vitro and in vivo. Results:K-ras transfection caused activation of the membrane-associated redox enzyme NOX and elevated ROS generation through the phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Importantly, capsaicin preferential y inhibited the enzyme activity of NOX and induced severe ROS accumulation in K-ras–transformed cel s compared with parental E6E7 cel s. Furthermore, capsaicin effectively inhibited cel proliferation, prevented invasiveness of K-ras–transformed pancreatic cancer cel s, and caused minimum toxicity to parental E6E7 cel s. In vivo, capsaicin exhibited antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer and showed oxidative damage to the xenograft tumor cel s. Conclusions:K-ras oncogenic signaling causes increased ROS stress through NOX, and abnormal ROS stress can selectively kil tumor cel s by using NOX inhibitors. Our study provides a basis for developing a novel therapeutic strategy to effectively kil K-ras–transformed cel s through a redox-mediated mechanism.

  20. Targeting the PDGF-B/PDGFR-β Interface with Destruxin A5 to Selectively Block PDGF-BB/PDGFR-ββ Signaling and Attenuate Liver Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingqi Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PDGF-BB/PDGFR-ββ signaling plays very crucial roles in the process of many diseases such as liver fibrosis. However, drug candidates with selective affinities for PDGF-B/PDGFR-β remain deficient. Here, we identified a natural cyclopeptide termed destruxin A5 that effectively inhibits PDGF-BB-induced PDGFR-β signaling. Interestingly and importantly, the inhibitory mechanism is distinct from the mechanism of tyrosine kinase inhibitors because destruxin A5 does not have the ability to bind to the ATP-binding pocket of PDGFR-β. Using Biacore T200 technology, thermal shift technology, microscale thermophoresis technology and computational analysis, we confirmed that destruxin A5 selectively targets the PDGF-B/PDGFR-β interaction interface to block this signaling. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of destruxin A5 on PDGF-BB/PDGFR-ββ signaling was verified using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models, in which the extent of liver fibrosis was effectively alleviated by destruxin A5. In summary, destruxin A5 may represent an efficacious and more selective inhibitor of PDGF-BB/PDGFR-ββ signaling.

  1. Humoral immune response induced by an engineered cell-based neuroblastoma vaccine with or without CD25 blockade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zheng; Rimas Orentas; Xiaofei Yan; Hongli Liu

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and it can develop in the nerve tissue of the adrenal gland, neck, chest, or spinal cord A number of tumor-associated antigens(TAAs), which can elicit humoral immunity, have been identified in cancer patients. To investigate the humoral immunity during neuroblastoma development, we treated A/J mice with an aggressive clone of neuroblastoma(AGN2a)cells, then vaccinated the mice with cells expressing AGN2a-CD80/CD137L under the condihons with or without regulatory T cell blockade. Strong humoral immunity was induced by AGN2a-CD80/CD137L immunization in the context of regulatory T cell blockade. Sera from treated mice were used to screen an AGN2a cDNA expression library for identifying TAAs by SEREX(serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries). Clones were identified by sequencing and comparative analysis of gene pools. Further investigation of these gene products revealed that most of them play a role in the neuronal differentiation, cell metabolism, and are highly expressed in other types of malignancy. Asz1(ankyrin repeat, SAM, and basic leucine zipper domaincontaining protein)was found in all tumor-bearing groups. These results implicated that these candidates identified from tumor-bearing mice may be neuroblastoma-associated antigens, which can be used as biomarkers in early diagnosis of neuroblastoma, whereas those identified from vaccinated mice may be the potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Blockade of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Aggravated Silica-Induced Lung Inflammation through Tregs Regulation on Th Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujing Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells play an important role in regulating silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. Recent studies showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could modulate the function and the differentiation of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in the development and progress of silicosis. To investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we used lentivirus expressing β-catenin shRNA to block the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by intratracheal instillation to the mice model of silicosis. Treatment of lentivirus could significantly aggravate the silica-induced lung inflammation and attenuated the fibrosis at the late stage. By analyzing CD4+ T cells, we found that blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppressed regulatory T cells (Tregs. Reciprocally, enhanced Th17 response was responsible for the further accumulation of neutrophils and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway delayed the Th1/Th2 polarization by inhibiting Tregs and Th2 response. These results indicated that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could regulate Tregs to modulate Th immune response, which finally altered the pathological character of silicosis. Our study suggested that Wnt/β-catenin pathway might be a potential target to treat the silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis.

  3. Functional capacity in healthy volunteers before and following beta-blockade with controlled-release metoprolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnevik, P K; Nordrehaug, J E; von der Lippe, G

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the beta 1-selective beta-adrenergic blocker metoprolol on physiological responses, exercise capacity and gas exchange parameters were measured in healthy men using different graded bicycle exercise protocols on separate days before and following administration of 200 mg controlled-release metoprolol. Eleven men performed in randomised order maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing on 50-W/6-min stage, 50-W/3-min stage and ramp (15-W/min-1) protocols. Peak heart rate and peak heart rate-blood pressure products were similar on all exercise protocols, and were significantly reduced by metoprolol. Submaximal and peak oxygen consumption were similar before and following beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Depending on the exercise protocol applied, an insignificant decrease of 4-10% in maximal cumulated exercise capacity (work-rate x time integral) was observed following administration of metoprolol. It is concluded that in healthy men evaluated with different exercise protocols the beta 1-selective controlled-release beta-adrenoceptor blocker metoprolol does not influence exercise capacity despite a marked reduction of heart rate and rate-pressure product. PMID:7589026

  4. [Effects of blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors on the development of pentylenetetrazole kindling in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomskaia, N Ia; Lavrent'eva, V V; Starshinova, L A; Zhabko, E P; Gorbunova, L V; Tikhonova, T B; Gmiro, V E; Magazanik, L G

    2005-11-01

    Effects of mono- and dicationic derivatives of adamantane and phenylcyclohexyl on the petyleneterazole-induced (35 mg/kg i. p.) kindling were studied in the experiments on mice. Monocationic derivative of phenylcyclohexyl IEM-1921, effectively retarded the development of kindling beginning the dose 0.0001 microM/kg. Memantine: derivative of adamantane (derivative of adamatane) produced the same effect with 100-fold increased dose. Dicationic derivative ofphenylcyclohexyl: IEM-1925, is able to block equally the open channels of both NMDA and subtype of Ca-permeable AMPA receptors. Its effect on kindling differed markedly from selective NMDA antagonists (IEM-1921 and memantine) in more complicated dose-dependence. The retardation of kindling IEM-1925 was induced at 0.001 microM/kg. On the contrary, a 10-time lower dose: 0.0001 microM/kg, facilitated the development of kindling. The observed difference in the activity of selective NMDA antagonists and the drugs combining anti-NMDA and anti-AMPA potency indicates that both types of ionotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the mechanism of petyleneterazole-induced kindling. The integral effect of channel blockade evoked by drugs seems to be dependent not only upon the ratio of the receptor types but on the kinetics of drug action, too.

  5. Selective Targeting and Restrictive Damage for Nonspecific Cells by Pulsed Laser-Activated Hyaluronan-Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Lih-Rou; Tsao, Shu-Wei; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we describe an approach that immobilizes low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (low-MW HA) on the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which can serve as a cellular probe and photodamage media, to evaluate the selectivity and efficiency of HA-based GNPs (HGNPs) as a mediator of laser-induced photothermal cell damage. In addition, it is known that solid tumors contain a higher content of low-MW HA than normal tissues. Thus, we used low-MW HA rather than high-MW HA used in other studies. In the present study, we conjugated low-MW HA, which is a linear polysaccharide with a disaccharide repeat unit, to prevent a reduction of the ligand-receptor binding efficiency in contrast to the conjugation of protein or peptides, which have unique three-dimensional structures. Three cell lines-MDA-MB-435 S (with CD44), MDA-MB-453 and NIH/3T3 (both are without CD44)-were investigated in the study, and qualitative observations were conducted by dark-field microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In addition, quantitative measurements calculated using inductively coupled plasma emissions were taken for comparison. Our results showed that within the same treatment time, the uptake dosage of HGNPs by the MDA-MB-435 S cells was higher than that by the MDA-MB-453 and NIH 3T3 cells. Meanwhile, HGNPs uptake by the untreated MDA-MB-435 S cells was higher than that of MDA-MB-435 S cells with CD44 blocked by antibodies or silencing CD44 expression. This result implies that receptor-mediated endocytosis can enhance the cellular uptake of HGNPs. In addition, when exposed to a low-power pulsed laser, the former cell morphologies showed a more laser-induced giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMV) than the latter morphologies. Therefore, this study utilized the specific photothermal property of HA-modified GNPs with laser-induced blebs to create a possible new method for medical applications. PMID:27439142

  6. Selective splenic targeting of In-114m by heat-treated red blood cells for the treatment of lymphoid cell malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spleen targeted In-114m, using labelled autologous lymphocytes, has produced a significant antitumour effect in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Non-Hodgkins lymphoma (Sharma et al, Anti-Cancer Research 17, 1815-1822,1997). Heat treated red blood cells could be used as alternative vectors for splenic targeting of In-114m, making the technique easier, more universally applicable and furthermore, may reduce the myelosuppression seen with labelled lymphocytes. Red blood cells from HO3T rats were labelled with In-114m-oxine, incubated at 49.5 deg. C for 15 minutes and their distribution investigated in the spleen, liver and blood or recipient animals. The splenic uptake in the spleen at 24h was 64.08%, remained unchanged at 7 days, cleared slowly after that, clearly demonstrating the specificity of HTRBC to target In-114m to the spleen. The depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured in two groups of HO3T rats following the administration of 1.6 and 3.2 MBq of In-114m-HTRBC respectively. Compared to the controls, ∼ 70% of lymphocytes were depleted in the treated animals within one week and remained unchanged for 6 weeks. Using a rat T-cell lymphocytic leukaemia model, with resemblance to the clinical disease, an anti-leukaemic effect of his method of treatment, was monitored. An average life span of the treated group (1.85 MBq of In-114m-HTRBC) was 17.1 days, compared to the 13.5 days for the untreated group. These results are similar to the ones reported by targeting In-114m with labelled lymphocytes. In summary, the project has shown that In-114m-HTRBC can be used to deposit the radioactivity, selectively in the spleen, which in turn, depletes the peripheral blood lymphocytes and produces an anti-leukaemic effect in terms of enhanced life span. The bone marrow toxicity from In-114m therapy is under investigation and a pharmacokinetic study in selected cancer patients is planned following which, a clinical trial will be considered. (author)

  7. Combining targeted therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of metastatic melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa Kim; Rodabe N Amaria; Christine Spencer; Alexandre Reuben; Zachary A Cooper; Jennifer A Wargo

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and has an incidence that is rising faster than any other solid tumor. Metastatic melanoma treatment has considerably progressed in the past ifve years with the introduction of targeted therapy (BARF and MEK inhibitors) and immune checkpoint blockade (anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1). However, each treatment modality has limitations. Treatment with targeted therapy has been associated with a high response rate, but with short-term responses. Conversely, treatment with immune checkpoint blockade has a lower response rate, but with long-term responses. Targeted therapy affects antitumor immunity, and synergy may exist when targeted therapy is combined with immunotherapy. hTis article presents a brief review of the rationale and evidence for the potential synergy between targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Challenges and directions for future studies are also proposed.

  8. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor van Mierlo

    discovered. Over one third of articles identified the following risk factors as common contributors to medication non-adherence (percent of studies reporting: patients not understanding treatment (44%, side effects (41%, age (37%, dose regimen (33%, and perceived medication ineffectiveness (33%. An unanticipated finding that emerged was the need for risk stratification tools (81% with patient-centric approaches (67%.This study systematically identifies and categorizes medication non-adherence risk factors in select autoimmune diseases. Findings indicate that patients understanding of their disease and the role of medication are paramount. An unexpected finding was that the majority of research articles called for the creation of tailored, patient-centric interventions that dispel personal misconceptions about disease, pharmacotherapy, and how the body responds to treatment. To our knowledge, these interventions do not yet exist in digital format. Rather than adopting a systems level approach, digital health programs should focus on cohorts with heterogeneous needs, and develop tailored interventions based on individual non-adherence patterns.

  9. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor and of combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade on cardiac performance and vascular resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hilsted, J;

    1992-01-01

    ) blockade. 2. During alpha-adrenoceptor blockade heart rate and cardiac output increased considerably and left ventricular ejection fraction increased because of increased contractility. Systemic vascular resistance fell both during alpha-adrenoceptor blockade alone and during combined blockade. The...... increase in calf blood flow was of the same magnitude after combined blockade and after alpha-adrenoceptor blockade alone, and was considerably higher than the fall in systemic vascular resistance. Plasma catecholamine concentrations increased after phentolamine, but the changes were blunted when...... propranolol and atropine were added. 3. These results indicate that peripheral vasoconstriction especially that exerted by alpha-adrenoceptor nervous tone in skeletal muscle restricts left ventricular emptying of the intact heart. During pharmacologic blockade of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous...

  10. Discovery of 2-(4-sulfonamidophenyl)-indole 3-carboxamides as potent and selective inhibitors with broad hepatitis C virus genotype activity targeting HCV NS4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nanjing; Turpoff, Anthony; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Song; Liu, Yalei; Almstead, Neil; Njoroge, F George; Gu, Zhengxian; Graci, Jason; Jung, Stephen P; Pichardo, John; Colacino, Joseph; Lahser, Fred; Ingravallo, Paul; Weetall, Marla; Nomeir, Amin; Karp, Gary M

    2016-01-15

    A novel series of 2-(4-sulfonamidophenyl)-indole 3-carboxamides was identified and optimized for activity against the HCV genotype 1b replicon resulting in compounds with potent and selective activity. Further evaluation of this series demonstrated potent activity across HCV genotypes 1a, 2a and 3a. Compound 4z had reduced activity against HCV genotype 1b replicons containing single mutations in the NS4B coding sequence (F98C and V105M) indicating that NS4B is the target. This novel series of 2-(4-sulfonamidophenyl)-indole 3-carboxamides serves as a promising starting point for a pan-genotype HCV discovery program.

  11. Skin-targeted inhibition of PPAR β/δ by selective antagonists to treat PPAR β/δ-mediated psoriasis-like skin disease in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hack

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator activating receptor ß/δ (PPAR β/δ is overexpressed in psoriasis. PPAR β/δ is not present in adult epidermis of mice. Targeted expression of PPAR β/δ and activation by a selective synthetic agonist is sufficient to induce an inflammatory skin disease resembling psoriasis. Several signalling pathways dysregulated in psoriasis are replicated in this model, suggesting that PPAR β/δ activation contributes to psoriasis pathogenesis. Thus, inhibition of PPAR β/δ might harbour therapeutical potential. Since PPAR β/δ has pleiotropic functions in metabolism, skin-targeted inhibition offer the potential of reducing systemic adverse effects. Here, we report that three selective PPAR β/δ antagonists, GSK0660, compound 3 h, and GSK3787 can be formulated for topical application to the skin and that their skin concentration can be accurately quantified using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC/mass spectrometry. These antagonists show efficacy in our transgenic mouse model in reducing psoriasis-like changes triggered by activation of PPAR β/δ. PPAR β/δ antagonists GSK0660 and compound 3 do not exhibit systemic drug accumulation after prolonged application to the skin, nor do they induce inflammatory or irritant changes. Significantly, the irreversible PPAR β/δ antagonist (GSK3787 retains efficacy when applied topically only three times per week which could be of practical clinical usefulness. Our data suggest that topical inhibition of PPAR β/δ to treat psoriasis may warrant further exploration.

  12. Developing risk hypotheses and selecting species for assessing non-target impacts of GM trees with novel traits: the case of altered-lignin pine trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Louise A; Todd, Jacqui H; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Walter, Christian; Wagner, Armin; Barratt, Barbara I P

    2010-01-01

    A procedure is presented for developing environmental risk hypotheses associated with the deployment of forest trees genetically modified to have altered wood properties and for selecting non-target species to test these hypotheses. Altered-lignin Pinus radiata trees intended for use in New Zealand are used as a hypothetical case study to illustrate our approach. Firstly, environmental management goals (such as wood production, flood control or preservation of biodiversity) were identified and linked to the forest attributes they require. Necessary conditions for each attribute were listed and appropriate assessment endpoints for them developed. For example, biological control of pests may be one condition necessary for a forest to have healthy trees, and the diversity and abundance of natural enemy species in the forest could be an appropriate assessment endpoint for measuring this condition. A conceptual model describing the relationships between an altered-lignin GM pine tree and potentially affected invertebrates and micro-organisms in a plantation forest was used to develop a set of risk hypotheses describing how the GM trees might affect each assessment endpoint. Because purified lignin does not represent the properties it imparts to wood, maximum hazard dose tests with non-target organisms, as are used to inform toxin risk assessment, cannot be conducted. Alternative experiments, based on current knowledge of the responses of organisms to lignin, must be designed. A screening method was adapted and applied to a database of invertebrate species known to inhabit New Zealand pine forests to identify and prioritize non-target invertebrate species that could be used as experimental subjects for examining these hypotheses. The screening model and its application are presented, along with a set of recommendations for pre-release tests with GM pines and potentially affected invertebrates and micro-organisms.

  13. Combined targeting of EGFR-dependent and VEGF-dependent pathways: rationale, preclinical studies and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gasparini, Giampietro

    2008-09-01

    Cellular heterogeneity, redundancy of molecular pathways and effects of the microenvironment contribute to the survival, motility and metastasis of cells in solid tumors. It is unlikely that tumors are entirely dependent on only one abnormally activated signaling pathway; consequently, treatment with an agent that interferes with a single target may be insufficient. Combined blockade of functionally linked and relevant multiple targets has become an attractive therapeutic strategy. The EGFR and ERBB2 (HER2) pathways and VEGF-dependent angiogenesis have a pivotal role in cancer pathogenesis and progression. Robust experimental evidence has shown that these pathways are functionally linked and has demonstrated a suggested role for VEGF in the acquired resistance to anti-ERBB drugs when these receptors are pharmacologically blocked. Combined inhibition of ERBB and VEGF signaling interferes with a molecular feedback loop responsible for acquired resistance to anti-ERBB agents and promotes apoptosis while ablating tumor-induced angiogenesis. To this aim, either two agents highly selective against VEGF and ERBB respectively, or, alternatively, a single multitargeted agent, can be used. Preclinical studies have proven the efficacy of both these approaches and early clinical studies have provided encouraging results. This Review discusses the experimental rationale for, preclinical studies of and clinical trials on combined blockade of ERBB and VEGF signaling.

  14. PD-L1 blockade for cancer treatment: MEDI4736.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ramy; Stewart, Ross; Shalabi, Aiman

    2015-06-01

    MEDI4736 is a human immunoglobulin (Ig) G1к monoclonal antibody that blocks programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) binding to its receptors, allowing T cells to recognize and kill tumor cells. Key attributes include high affinity and selectivity for PD-L1, sustained drug exposure for up to 1 year of dosing, and engineering of the antibody to prevent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. No immunogenicity impacting on the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of MEDI4736 has been reported at the 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks dose selected for further clinical development. The current safety profile and encouraging early anti-tumor activity of MEDI4736 support further clinical assessment. A broad development program for MEDI4736, both as monotherapy and in combination, is underway across a range of tumor types. This includes a large, multicenter, phase I, dose-escalation/expansion study in solid tumors (with a smaller corresponding study in Japanese patients), a phase I study in myelodysplastic syndrome, and a phase II study in advanced colorectal cancer. In addition, multiple phase I combination studies are ongoing with different agents, including those targeting MEK/BRAF in melanoma, epidermal growth factor receptor, programmed cell death-1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, OX40, chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 4, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Development is most advanced in non-small cell lung cancer, with a program currently comprising four pivotal studies and three phase I combination studies. A pivotal program for MEDI4736 in head and neck cancer began in late 2014. PMID:25965366

  15. Examination of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Mechanisms controlling survival and induction of apoptosis following selective inhibition