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Sample records for block-face scanning electron

  1. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy--the future of cell ultrastructure imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Louise; Hawes, Chris; Monteith, Sandy; Vaughan, Sue

    2014-03-01

    One of the major drawbacks in transmission electron microscopy has been the production of three-dimensional views of cells and tissues. Currently, there is no one suitable 3D microscopy technique that answers all questions and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fills the gap between 3D imaging using high-end fluorescence microscopy and the high resolution offered by electron tomography. In this review, we discuss the potential of the serial block face SEM technique for studying the three-dimensional organisation of animal, plant and microbial cells.

  2. Challenges of microtome-based serial block-face scanning electron microscopy in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, A A; Kirschmann, M A; Genoud, C

    2015-08-01

    Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is becoming increasingly popular for a wide range of applications in many disciplines from biology to material sciences. This review focuses on applications for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience, which is one of the major driving forces advancing SBEM. Neuronal circuit reconstruction poses exceptional challenges to volume EM in terms of resolution, field of view, acquisition time and sample preparation. Mapping the connections between neurons in the brain is crucial for understanding information flow and information processing in the brain. However, information on the connectivity between hundreds or even thousands of neurons densely packed in neuronal microcircuits is still largely missing. Volume EM techniques such as serial section TEM, automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome, focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy and SBEM (microtome serial block-face scanning electron microscopy) are the techniques that provide sufficient resolution to resolve ultrastructural details such as synapses and provides sufficient field of view for dense reconstruction of neuronal circuits. While volume EM techniques are advancing, they are generating large data sets on the terabyte scale that require new image processing workflows and analysis tools. In this review, we present the recent advances in SBEM for circuit reconstruction in neuroscience and an overview of existing image processing and analysis pipelines.

  3. Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy to Reconstruct Three-Dimensional Tissue Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denk Winfried

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D structural information on many length scales is of central importance in biological research. Excellent methods exist to obtain structures of molecules at atomic, organelles at electron microscopic, and tissue at light-microscopic resolution. A gap exists, however, when 3D tissue structure needs to be reconstructed over hundreds of micrometers with a resolution sufficient to follow the thinnest cellular processes and to identify small organelles such as synaptic vesicles. Such 3D data are, however, essential to understand cellular networks that, particularly in the nervous system, need to be completely reconstructed throughout a substantial spatial volume. Here we demonstrate that datasets meeting these requirements can be obtained by automated block-face imaging combined with serial sectioning inside the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Backscattering contrast is used to visualize the heavy-metal staining of tissue prepared using techniques that are routine for transmission electron microscopy. Low-vacuum (20-60 Pa H2O conditions prevent charging of the uncoated block face. The resolution is sufficient to trace even the thinnest axons and to identify synapses. Stacks of several hundred sections, 50-70 nm thick, have been obtained at a lateral position jitter of typically under 10 nm. This opens the possibility of automatically obtaining the electron-microscope-level 3D datasets needed to completely reconstruct the connectivity of neuronal circuits.

  4. Staining and embedding of human chromosomes for 3-d serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Chen, Bo; Hashimoto, Teruo; Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Thompson, George; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-01

    The high-order structure of human chromosomes is an important biological question that is still under investigation. Studies have been done on imaging human mitotic chromosomes using mostly 2-D microscopy methods. To image micron-sized human chromosomes in 3-D, we developed a procedure for preparing samples for serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM). Polyamine chromosomes are first separated using a simple filtration method and then stained with heavy metal. We show that the DNA-specific platinum blue provides higher contrast than osmium tetroxide. A two-step procedure for embedding chromosomes in resin is then used to concentrate the chromosome samples. After stacking the SBFSEM images, a familiar X-shaped chromosome was observed in 3-D.

  5. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems.

  6. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment.

  7. Towards the imaging of Weibel-Palade body biogenesis by serial block face-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, M J; Faas, F G A; Zimmermann, H; Eikenboom, J; Koster, A J

    2015-08-01

    Electron microscopy is used in biological research to study the ultrastructure at high resolution to obtain information on specific cellular processes. Serial block face-scanning electron microscopy is a relatively novel electron microscopy imaging technique that allows three-dimensional characterization of the ultrastructure in both tissues and cells by measuring volumes of thousands of cubic micrometres yet at nanometre-scale resolution. In the scanning electron microscope, repeatedly an image is acquired followed by the removal of a thin layer resin embedded biological material by either a microtome or a focused ion beam. In this way, each recorded image contains novel structural information which can be used for three-dimensional analysis. Here, we explore focused ion beam facilitated serial block face-scanning electron microscopy to study the endothelial cell-specific storage organelles, the Weibel-Palade bodies, during their biogenesis at the Golgi apparatus. Weibel-Palade bodies predominantly contain the coagulation protein Von Willebrand factor which is secreted by the cell upon vascular damage. Using focused ion beam facilitated serial block face-scanning electron microscopy we show that the technique has the sensitivity to clearly reveal subcellular details like mitochondrial cristae and small vesicles with a diameter of about 50 nm. Also, we reveal numerous associations between Weibel-Palade bodies and Golgi stacks which became conceivable in large-scale three-dimensional data. We demonstrate that serial block face-scanning electron microscopy is a promising tool that offers an alternative for electron tomography to study subcellular organelle interactions in the context of a complete cell.

  8. Rapid specimen preparation to improve the throughput of electron microscopic volume imaging for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures with serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Truc Quynh; Nguyen, Huy Bang; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro; Takaki, Takashi; Joh, Kensuke; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy enables rapid observations of three-dimensional ultrastructures in a large volume of biological specimens. However, such imaging usually requires days for sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In this study, we report a rapid procedure to acquire serial electron microscopic images within 1 day for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures. This procedure is based on serial block-face with two major modifications, including a new sample treatment device and direct polymerization on the rivets, to reduce the time and workload needed. The modified procedure without uranyl acetate can produce tens of embedded samples observable under serial block-face scanning electron microscopy within 1 day. The serial images obtained are similar to the block-face images acquired by common procedures, and are applicable to three-dimensional reconstructions at a subcellular resolution. Using this approach, regional immune deposits and the double contour or heterogeneous thinning of basement membranes were observed in the glomerular capillary loops of an autoimmune nephropathy model. These modifications provide options to improve the throughput of three-dimensional electron microscopic examinations, and will ultimately be beneficial for the wider application of volume imaging in life science and clinical medicine.

  9. Serial block face-scanning electron microscopy: a tool for studying embryonic development at the cell-matrix interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starborg, Tobias; Kadler, Karl E

    2015-03-01

    Studies of gene regulation, signaling pathways, and stem cell biology are contributing greatly to our understanding of early embryonic vertebrate development. However, much less is known about the events during the latter half of embryonic development, when tissues comprising mostly extracellular matrix (ECM) are formed. The matrix extends far beyond the boundaries of individual cells and is refractory to study by conventional biochemical and molecular techniques; thus major gaps exist in our knowledge of the formation and three-dimensional (3D) organization of the dense tissues that form the bulk of adult vertebrates. Serial block face-scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) has the ability to image volumes of tissue containing numerous cells at a resolution sufficient to study the organization of the ECM. Furthermore, whereas light microscopy was once relatively straightforward and electron microscopy was performed in specialist laboratories, the tables are turned; SBF-SEM is relatively straightforward and is becoming routine in high-end resolution studies of embryonic structures in vivo. In this review, we discuss the emergence of SBF-SEM as a tool for studying embryonic vertebrate development.

  10. Cardiac Myocyte Diversity and a Fibroblast Network in the Junctional Region of the Zebrafish Heart Revealed by Transmission and Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lafontant, Pascal J.

    2013-08-23

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart. © 2013 Lafontant et al.

  11. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  12. A novel design of a scanning probe microscope integrated with an ultramicrotome for serial block-face nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Anton E.; Agapov, Igor I.; Agapova, Olga I.; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Mezin, Alexey V.; Molinari, Michael; Nabiev, Igor; Mochalov, Konstantin E.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new concept of a combined scanning probe microscope (SPM)/ultramicrotome apparatus. It enables "slice-and-view" scanning probe nanotomography measurements and 3D reconstruction of the bulk sample nanostructure from series of SPM images after consecutive ultrathin sections. The sample is fixed on a flat XYZ scanning piezostage mounted on the ultramicrotome arm. The SPM measuring head with a cantilever tip and a laser-photodiode tip detection system approaches the sample for SPM measurements of the block-face surface immediately after the ultramicrotome sectioning is performed. The SPM head is moved along guides that are also fixed on the ultramicrotome arm. Thereby, relative dysfunctional displacements of the tip, the sample, and the ultramicrotome knife are minimized. The design of the SPM head enables open frontal optical access to the sample block-face adapted for high-resolution optical lenses for correlative SPM/optical microscopy applications. The new system can be used in a wide range of applications for the study of 3D nanostructures of biological objects, biomaterials, polymer nanocomposites, and nanohybrid materials in various SPM and optical microscopy measuring modes.

  13. Deconstructing complexity: serial block-face electron microscopic analysis of the hippocampal mossy fiber synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Scott A; Antonios, Joseph K; Bushong, Eric A; Badkoobehi, Ali; Malek, Elmar; Hwang, Minju; Terada, Masako; Ellisman, Mark H; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2013-01-09

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) terminal is among the largest and most complex synaptic structures in the brain. Our understanding of the development of this morphologically elaborate structure has been limited because of the inability of standard electron microscopy techniques to quickly and accurately reconstruct large volumes of neuropil. Here we use serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to surmount these limitations and investigate the establishment of MF connectivity during mouse postnatal development. Based on volume reconstructions, we find that MF axons initially form bouton-like specializations directly onto dendritic shafts, that dendritic protrusions primarily arise independently of bouton contact sites, and that a dramatic increase in presynaptic and postsynaptic complexity follows the association of MF boutons with CA3 dendritic protrusions. We also identify a transient period of MF bouton filopodial exploration, followed by refinement of sites of synaptic connectivity. These observations enhance our understanding of the development of this highly specialized synapse and illustrate the power of SBEM to resolve details of developing microcircuits at a level not easily attainable with conventional approaches.

  14. X-ray microscopy as an approach to increasing accuracy and efficiency of serial block-face imaging for correlated light and electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal staining protocols render specimens light opaque and make it much more difficult to track and identify regions of interest (ROIs) for the SBEM imaging process than for a typical thin section transmission electron microscopy correlative light and electron microscopy study. We present a strategy employing X-ray microscopy (XRM) both for tracking ROIs and for increasing the efficiency of the workflow used for typical projects undertaken with SBEM. XRM was found to reveal an impressive level of detail in tissue heavily stained for SBEM imaging, allowing for the identification of tissue landmarks that can be subsequently used to guide data collection in the SEM. Furthermore, specific labeling of individual cells using diaminobenzidine is detectable in XRM volumes. We demonstrate that tungsten carbide particles or upconverting nanophosphor particles can be used as fiducial markers to further increase the precision and efficiency of SBEM imaging.

  15. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope. Specifications / Capabilities: Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  16. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  17. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  18. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  19. Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilyaprak, C; Daraspe, J; Humbel, B M

    2014-06-01

    Since the end of the last millennium, the focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) has progressively found use in biological research. This instrument is a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an attached gallium ion column and the 2 beams, electrons and ions (FIB) are focused on one coincident point. The main application is the acquisition of three-dimensional data, FIB-SEM tomography. With the ion beam, some nanometres of the surface are removed and the remaining block-face is imaged with the electron beam in a repetitive manner. The instrument can also be used to cut open biological structures to get access to internal structures or to prepare thin lamella for imaging by (cryo-) transmission electron microscopy. Here, we will present an overview of the development of FIB-SEM and discuss a few points about sample preparation and imaging.

  20. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kanemaru

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM and an electron microscope (EM. In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM (JEOL JXA8600 M was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM. In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  1. Control on Electron Beam Scanning Track

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学东; 姚舜

    2004-01-01

    In order to use electron beam as a movable welding heat source and whose energy distribution along its moving trace can be controlled, a method of electron beam scanning track and scanning mode control was put forward. Based on it, the electron beam scanning track and scanning mode can be edited at will according to actual requirements, and the energy input of each point of the scanning track can be controlled. In addition, the scanning frequency and points control, real time adjusting of the scanning track etc. were explained. This method can be used in electron beam brazing, surface modification, surface heat treatment etc.

  2. Volume scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Benjamin; Genoud, Christel

    2016-11-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has been a key imaging method to investigate biological ultrastructure for over six decades. In recent years, novel volume EM techniques have significantly advanced nanometre-scale imaging of cells and tissues in three dimensions. Previously, this had depended on the slow and error-prone manual tasks of cutting and handling large numbers of sections, and imaging them one-by-one with transmission EM. Now, automated volume imaging methods mostly based on scanning EM (SEM) allow faster and more reliable acquisition of serial images through tissue volumes and achieve higher z-resolution. Various software tools have been developed to manipulate the acquired image stacks and facilitate quantitative analysis. Here, we introduce three volume SEM methods: serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM), focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome SEM (ATUM-SEM). We discuss and compare their capabilities, provide an overview of the full volume SEM workflow for obtaining 3D datasets and showcase different applications for biological research.

  3. Electronically-Scanned Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument efficient, lightweight, and stable. Fourier-transform spectrometer configuration uses electronic, instead of mechanical, scanning. Configuration insensitive to vibration-induced sampling errors introduced into mechanically scanned systems.

  4. Scanning and three-dimensional electron microscopy methods for the study of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluenz, Eva; Wheeler, Richard John; Hughes, Louise; Vaughan, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy tools have revolutionized our understanding of cell structure and molecular complexes in biology. Here, we describe methods for studying flagellar ultrastructure and biogenesis in two unicellular parasites-Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana. We describe methods for the preparation of these parasites for scanning electron microscopy cellular electron tomography, and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM). These parasites have a highly ordered cell shape and form, with a defined positioning of internal cytoskeletal structures and organelles. We show how knowledge of these can be used to dissect cell cycles in both parasites and identify the old flagellum from the new in T. brucei. Finally, we demonstrate the use of SBFSEM three-dimensional models for analysis of individual whole cells, demonstrating the excellent potential this technique has for future studies of mutant cell lines.

  5. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This proximity transmission electron microscopy (PSTEM) does not require any lens to focus the electron beam. It also allows detailed characterization of the interaction of low-energy electron with materials. PSTEM can operate in a way very similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, which provides high-resolution imaging of geometric and electronic structures of the sample surface. In addition, it allows imaging and characterization of the interior structures of the sample based on the detected...

  6. 196 Beams in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, for the first time ever, it is demonstrated that 196 beams out of a single electron source can be finely focused onto the sample using the electron optics of a standard single beam SEM. During this PhD thesis, a multi beam scanning electron (MBSEM) was designed and built. The thesis

  7. Scanning probe methods applied to molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Pavliček, Niko

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe methods on insulating films offer a rich toolbox to study electronic, structural and spin properties of individual molecules. This work discusses three issues in the field of molecular and organic electronics. A scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) head to be operated in high magnetic fields has been designed and built up. The STM head is very compact and rigid relying on a robust coarse approach mechanism. This will facilitate investigations of the spin properties of individ...

  8. Gigahertz-band electronically scanned antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Nikolai A.

    2000-12-01

    Foundation and principles of radio lenses construction of centimeter and millimeter wave ranges with controlled refracting index, combining the quality of phased array antennas with optical devices are stated. Possibilities of the electronically scanning with wide-angle sector and high gain are maintained. Construction principles of scanning antennas with controlled lenses, combining the quality of phased array antennas with optical devices, are stated. Possibilities of electronically scanning with broad angle sector and high gain are maintained. Some examples of construction of antennas millimeter range of waves are listed here.

  9. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  10. Environmental scanning electron microscopy in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J E; Staniewicz, L T L; Guthrie Neé Kirk, S E; Donald, A M

    2013-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (1) is an imaging technique which allows hydrated, insulating samples to be imaged under an electron beam. The resolution afforded by this technique is higher than conventional optical microscopy but lower than conventional scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The major advantage of the technique is the minimal sample preparation needed, making ESEM quick to use and the images less susceptible to the artifacts that the extensive sample preparation usually required for CSEM may introduce. Careful manipulation of both the humidity in the microscope chamber and the beam energy are nevertheless essential to prevent dehydration and beam damage artifacts. In some circumstances it is possible to image live cells in the ESEM (2).In the following sections we introduce the fundamental principles of ESEM imaging before presenting imaging protocols for plant epidermis, mammalian cells, and bacteria. In the first two cases samples are imaged using the secondary electron (topographic) signal, whereas a transmission technique is employed to image bacteria.

  11. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using scann

  12. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  14. Dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S L

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using secondary electrons. The technique has been applied to a wide variety of doped silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride semiconductor test structures as well as a metal-oxide field effect transistor and several light emitting diodes. A concise set of guide-lines are provided for users of this technique, including the optimum SEM operating conditions that should be used for maximum contrast, an image manipulation procedure, and the resolution and sensitivity limits that can be expected. Dopant contrast observed with the SEM has been studied over the past few years by a number of researchers, and a theory for the contrast has evolved. This theory considers the patch fields outside the specimen to be the dominant factor determining the secondary electron intensity. In this dissertation the contrast mechanism has been further investigated by examining the contrast at different temperatures and after su...

  15. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  17. Evaluation of scanning electron microscope resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulny, Aude; Fanget, Gilles L.

    1998-06-01

    The evaluation of Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) resolution through Two Dimensions Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) image analysis is becoming a standard. We propose an improvement of these methods with a patented technique. This new image processing is designed to extract the transfer function of the SEM from the picture and then to realize the analysis of this function. A first algorithm extracts an 'ideal' image of the sample from the 'raw' image obtained on the equipment. Then a second algorithm extracts the SEM transfer function through a comparison between the two images ('ideal' and 'raw'). Finally a third algorithm modelizes the transfer function as a two dimensions Normal function and draws out the result. The representation of the transfer function of the SEM with a Normal function allows to define the shape of an Equivalent of the Electron Beam (EEB). This EEB represents the primary electron beam altered by the interactions with the sample and the losses in the acquisition loop. It is important to outline these alterations as they limit the sharpness of the images obtained from the tool. This way of doing lessens the influence of sample parameters on the final results and thus represent more precisely the SEM Transfer Function.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of bacteria Tetrasphaera duodecadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, E; Enríquez, L; Sánchez, A; Ovalle, M; Olivas, A

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of the Tetrasphaera duodecadis bacteria and the techniques used therein. In order to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the T. duodecadis bacteria scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used throughout its different growth stages. These microorganisms were grown in vitamin B12 broths with 1% tryptone, 0.2% yeast extract, and 0.1% glucose. The turbidimetric method was employed for the determination of bacterial concentration and growth curve. The SEM results show small agglomerates of 0.8 ± 0.05 µm during the lag phase, and rod-like shapes during the exponential phase with similar shapes in the stationary phase.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of Dalkon Shield tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, H L; Williamson, H O

    1983-09-01

    Scanning electron micrographs of Dalkon Shield tails removed from asymptomatic patients show a variety of microbes and debris throughout their entire length. Apparently, even in undamaged tails, bacterial flora thrive in the protein-rich environment within the multifilament tail. The presence of microbes in the portion of the tail beyond the double knot indicates that an alternative mechanism of microbial transport can occur. Since transient endometritis often occurs immediately after insertion of intrauterine devices, microbes may come in contact with both exposed ends of the multifilament tail and be drawn into the tail by capillary action from the uterine environment down the tail toward the double knot as well as upward from the vagina. Such microorganisms could serve as an inoculum for infection.

  20. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Shtengel, Gleb; Grimm, Jonathan B; Clayton, David A; Hess, Harald F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  1. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Kopek

    Full Text Available The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM and scanning electron microscope (SEM system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  2. Collection of secondary electrons in scanning electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllerová, I; Konvalina, I

    2009-12-01

    Collection of the secondary electrons in the scanning electron microscope was simulated and the results have been experimentally verified for two types of the objective lens and three detection systems. The aberration coefficients of both objective lenses as well as maximum axial magnetic fields in the specimen region are presented. Compared are a standard side-attached secondary electron detector, in which only weak electrostatic and nearly no magnetic field influence the signal trajectories in the specimen vicinity, and the side-attached (lower) and upper detectors in an immersion system with weak electrostatic but strong magnetic field penetrating towards the specimen. The collection efficiency was calculated for all three detection systems and several working distances. The ability of detectors to attract secondary electron trajectories for various initial azimuthal and polar angles was calculated, too. According to expectations, the lower detector of an immersion system collects no secondary electrons I and II emitted from the specimen and only backscattered electrons and secondary electrons III form the final image. The upper detector of the immersion system exhibits nearly 100% collection efficiency decreasing, however, with the working distance, but the topographical contrast is regrettably suppressed in its image. The collection efficiency of the standard detector is low for short working distances but increases with the same, preserving strong topographical contrast.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  4. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  5. Electron optics of multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A., E-mail: A.M.Gheidari@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Kruit, P. [Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-07-21

    We have developed a multi-beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM), which delivers a square array of 196 focused beams onto a sample with a resolution and current per beam comparable to a state of the art single beam SEM. It consists of a commercially available FEI Nova-nano 200 SEM column equipped with a novel multi-electron beam source module. The key challenge in the electron optical design of the MBSEM is to minimize the off-axial aberrations of the lenses. This article addresses the electron optical design of the system and presents the result of optics simulations for a specific setting of the system. It is shown that it is possible to design a system with a theoretical axial spot size of 1.2 nm at 15 kV with a probe current of 26 pA. The off-axial aberrations for the outermost beam add up 0.8 nm, increasing the probe size to 1.5 nm.

  6. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...

  7. A dynamic scanning method based on signal-statistics for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timischl, F

    2014-01-01

    A novel dynamic scanning method for noise reduction in scanning electron microscopy and related applications is presented. The scanning method dynamically adjusts the scanning speed of the electron beam depending on the statistical behavior of the detector signal and gives SEM images with uniform and predefined standard deviation, independent of the signal value itself. In the case of partially saturated images, the proposed method decreases image acquisition time without sacrificing image quality. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown and compared to the conventional scanning method and median filtering using numerical simulations.

  8. A MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF SECONDARY ELECTRON AND BACKSCATTERED ELECTRON IMAGES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.M. Li; Z.J. Ding

    2005-01-01

    A new parallel Monte Carlo simulation method of secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron images (BSE) of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for a complex geometric structure has been developed. This paper describes briefly the simulation method and the modification to the conventional sampling method for the step length. Example simulation results have been obtained for several artificial structures.

  9. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  10. Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Sampled Aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluhme, Anders Brostrøm; Kling, Kirsten; Mølhave, Kristian

    development of an automated software-based analysis of aerosols using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The automated analysis will be capable of providing both detailed physical and chemical single...

  11. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Electron-beam-assisted Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Of Insulating Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bullock, E T

    2000-01-01

    Insulating materials are widely used in electronic devices. Bulk insulators and insulating films pose unique challenges for high resolution study since most commonly used charged particle surface analysis techniques are incompatible with insulating surfaces and materials. A, method of performing scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on insulating surfaces has been investigated. The method is referred to as electron-beam assisted scanning tunneling microscopy (e-BASTM). It is proposed that by coupling the STM and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as one integrated device, that insulating materials may be studied, obtaining both high spatial resolution, and topographic and electronic resolution. The premise of the technique is based on two physical consequences of the interaction of an energetic electron beam (PE) with a material. First, when an electron beam is incident upon a material, low level material electrons are excited into conduction band states. For insulators, with very high secondary electron yi...

  13. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  14. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  15. Collective electronic effects in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, Ali

    The surface plasmon dispersion relations are calculated for a metal coated dielectric probe above a dielectric half space with and without metal coating. Employing prolate spheroidal coordinate system this configuration was modeled as confocal single-sheeted hyperboloids of revolution superimposed on planar domains. The involved media are characterized by frequency dependent, spatially local dielectric functions. Due to subwavelength dimensions of the region of interest, nonretarded electrodynamics is utilized to derive exact analytical expressions describing the resonant surface modes. The dispersion relations are studied as functions of the parameter that defines the hyperboloidal boundaries of the tip and the corresponding coating, and as functions of the involved coating thicknesses. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are considered. The results are simulated numerically and limiting cases are discussed with comparison to the Cartesian thin foil case. Using this new type of probe-substrate configuration, the surface plasmon coupling mechanism is investigated experimentally utilizing a scanning probe microscope, and the signal strength acquired by the probe is measured as a function of the distance between the probe and the sample. This is repeated at three different wavelengths of the incident p-polarized photons used to stimulate surface plasmons in the thin metal foil. The results are compared with the theory. Utilizing the prolate spheroidal coordinate system, the related and relevant problem of the Coulomb interaction of a dielectric probe tip with a uniform field existing above a semiinfinite, homogeneous dielectric substrate was studied. This is of interest in atomic force microscopy when the sample surface is electrically charged. The induced polarization surface charge density and the field distribution at the bounding surface of the dielectric medium with the geometry of a single-sheeted hyperboloid of revolution located above the dielectric

  16. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  17. Electronic Scanning of UterineEndometrium in Postpartum Cow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two postpartum cows were used to study the ultrastructural changes of uterine endometrium by using scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the process of repair of uterine endometrium after calving was demonstrated by scanning electron microscope through a series of endometrium biopsy. Some part of the endometrium was damaged after calving and its adjacent endometrium cells became necrosis and exfoliated during the first 7 days post-partum;the cilium and microvillus of the epithelial cell in the undamaged area of the endometrium disappeared. By 26 days postpartum the damaged area reduced and the cilium and microvillus increased in their numbers. The damaged tissues were all repaired by day 60 postpartum.

  18. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agterveld, DTL; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM; Bentley, J; Allen, C; Dahmen, U; Petrov,

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high-vacuum segregation studies on in-situ fractured Cu-Sb alloys were performed in terms of nanometer scale scanning Auger/Electron microscopy. S contamination leads to the formation Of Cu2S precipitates which, upon removal due to fracture, expose pits with morphology that depends on the prec

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  20. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  1. Microstress contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of image contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) due to the effect of residual stresses in materials is presented. It is found that in regions near the ends of the radial cracks induced by Vickers indentation the SEAM micrographs reveal a rather large variation of the acoustic output signal.

  2. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  3. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of the male genitalia of Sarcophagidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Souza Lopes

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available The male genitalia of nine species of Sarcophagidae (Diptera - Goniophyto honsuensis Rohdendorf, 1962, Tricharaea brevicornis (Wiedemann, 1830, Chaetoravinia derelicta (Walker, 1852, Austrohartigia spinigena (Rondani, 1864, Chrysagria duodecimpunctata Townsend, 1935, Boettcheria bisetosa Parker, 1914, Lipoptilocnema lanei Townsend, 1934, L. crispina (Lopes, 1938 and Euboettcheria alvarengai Lopes & Tibana, 1982 - were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM and the main morphological features are descirbed.

  5. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  6. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T. E.; Reilly, T. W.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The resolution of available low-voltage SEM (LVSEM) models used in the characterization of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is limited by a number of factors including energy spread in the electron source, beam brightness, scanning electron detector geometry, and various lens aberrations. This paper describes an improved model of LVSEM which offers an increased resolution at low voltage. The improvements include a cold cathode FE source which has an extremely low inherent energy spread and high brightness, a second condenser lens to converge the beam and maintain an optimum aperture half-angle, and a detector optimized for low-voltage scanning-electron collection. To reduce lens aberrations, the specimen is immersed in the objective lens field. The features of several IDP samples observed using the images obtained with this LVSEM model are described.

  7. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokzau.matsumura@etd.hpk.co.jp; Hirano, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.hirano@etd.hpk.co.jp; Suyama, Motohiro, E-mail: suyama@etd.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 314-5, Shimokanzo, Iwata City, Shizuoka-Pref. (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  8. Millimeter-wave electronically scanned reflectarray optimization and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2012-06-01

    The development of millimeter-wave scanning reflectarrays and phased arrays provides an important path to enabling electronic scanning capabilities at high frequencies. This technology could be used to eliminate the mechanical scanners that are currently used with radar imaging systems. In this work, we analyze properties of wafer-scale two-dimensional rectangular lattice arrays that can be used with a confocal imager for 220 GHz electronic scanning of meter-sized fields of regard at 50 m. Applications include covert imaging of hidden anomalies. We examine tradeoffs between overall system size and array complexity and analyze properties of reflectarrays compatible with a system design that was chosen based on these considerations. The effects of phase quantization are considered in detail for arrays with 1- and 2- bit phase shifters and the results are compared in terms of impacts to image quality. Beam pointing accuracy, main beam energy fraction, and the number and intensity of quantization lobes that appear over the scan ranges of interest are compared. Our results indicate that arrays with 1- and 2-bit phase quantization achieve similar main beam energy efficiencies over the desired scan range. Without restricting the scan range, 1-bit phase quantization is insufficient, resulting in maximum errors that are comparable to the required minimum scan angle. Two-bit phase quantization is preferable, resulting in pointing angle errors of at most 15 % of the diffraction-limited beam-size. Both 1- and 2-bit phase quantization cases result in lobes appearing above our threshold, indicating that spurious returns are a problem that will require further attention.

  9. Closed-Loop Autofocus Scheme for Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a full scale autofocus approach for scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optimal focus (in-focus position of the microscope is achieved by maximizing the image sharpness using a vision-based closed-loop control scheme. An iterative optimization algorithm has been designed using the sharpness score derived from image gradient information. The proposed method has been implemented and validated using a tungsten gun SEM at various experimental conditions like varying raster scan speed, magnification at real-time. We demonstrate that the proposed autofocus technique is accurate, robust and fast.

  10. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  11. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Marcelo Gaudenzi; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  12. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, E; Gerthsen, D

    2017-02-01

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin InxGa1-xAs layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion.

  13. Scanning electron microscope studies of human metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemilt, L A; Estandarte, A K C; Yusuf, M; Robinson, I K

    2014-03-06

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to evaluate potential chromosome preparations and staining methods for application in high-resolution three-dimensional X-ray imaging. Our starting point is optical fluorescence microscopy, the standard method for chromosomes, which only gives structural detail at the 200 nm scale. In principle, with suitable sample preparation protocols, including contrast enhancing staining, the surface structure of the chromosomes can be viewed at the 1 nm level by SEM. Here, we evaluate a heavy metal nucleic-acid-specific stain, which gives strong contrast in the backscattered electron signal. This study uses SEM to examine chromosomes prepared in different ways to establish a sample preparation protocol for X-rays. Secondary electron and backscattered electron signals are compared to evaluate the effectiveness of platinum-based stains used to enhance the contrast.

  14. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF FILLED SILICONE RUBBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yufu; YANG Qiyun; LI Guangliang

    1988-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of a number of silicone vulcanizates were investigated by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the difference in the presence and absence of filler, the variation of its surface modification as well as the history of thermal aging of the vulcanizates, all of these factors made difference in surface morphology of the fractured surface. This was correlated with the strength of the vulcanizates. The reinforcing effect of filler and the process of fracture were discussed.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of erythropoietin-stimulated bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, P.F. (Hospital of St. Sacrement, Quebec); Chamberlain, J.K.; Weed, R.I.

    1975-01-01

    This work describes and illustrates the scanning electron microscopic modifications observed in the femoral bone marrow of normal mice 72 hours after a single injection of partly purified sheep erythropoietin and of mice afflicted with a chronic congenital hemolytic anemia analogous to the disease Hereditary Spherocytosis in man. In acordance with previous transmission electron microscopic studies, the observations are consistent with an effect of erythropoietin both on the frequency of cell migration across the normally intact marrow sinus endothelium and on the morphology of sinus adventitial cells. It is suggested that these ultrastructural modifications may be responsible for the greater patency of the marrow-blood barrier under erythropoietin stimulation.

  16. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  18. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging dynamics at low accelerating voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, N.R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mizoguchi, T. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Motivated by the desire to minimize specimen damage in beam sensitive specimens, there has been a recent push toward using relatively low accelerating voltages (<100kV) in scanning transmission electron microscopy. To complement experimental efforts on this front, this paper seeks to explore the variations with accelerating voltage of the imaging dynamics, both of the channelling of the fast electron and of the inelastic interactions. High-angle annular-dark field, electron energy loss spectroscopic imaging and annular bright field imaging are all considered. -- Highlights: {yields} Both elastic and inelastic scattering in STEM are acceleration voltage dependent. {yields} HAADF, EELS and ABF imaging are assessed with a view to optimum imaging. {yields} Lower accelerating voltages improve STEM EELS contrast in very thin crystals. {yields} Higher accelerating voltages give better STEM EELS contrast in thicker crystals. {yields} At fixed resolution, higher accelerating voltage aids ABF imaging of light elements.

  20. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  1. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  2. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum's magnetosome chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  3. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, V., E-mail: morandi@bo.imm.cnr.it; Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A. [CNR-IMM Sezione di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P. [ASSING S.P.A., via E. Amaldi 14, 00016 Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M. [Dip.to di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l’Ingegneria and Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all’Ingegneria (CNIS), Università degli Studi di Roma “Sapienza”, Via A. Scarpa, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sberveglieri, G. [SENSOR Lab, Dip.to di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Brescia and CNR-INO, Via Valotti 9, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Vittori-Antisari, M. [Unità Tecnica Tecnologie dei Materiali, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  4. Measurement of dihedral angles by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achutaramayya, G.; Scott, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The extension of Hoover's (1971) technique to the case of dihedral-angle measurement is described. Dihedral angles are often determined by interferometry on thermally grooved grain boundaries to obtain information on relative interfacial energies. In the technique considered the measured angles approach the true angles as the tilt angle approaches 90 deg. It is pointed out that the scanning electron microscopy method provides a means of seeing the real root of a groove at a lateral magnification which is higher than that obtainable with interferometry.

  5. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  6. [A scanning electron microscope observation of Dictyocaulus filaria.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Kader; Cavuşoğlu, Kültiğin

    2005-01-01

    In this study, D. filaria causing parasitic bronchopneumonia in sheep was observed using a scanning electron microscope. This parasite belongs to the Trichostrongyloidea super family. The oral opening of D. filaria was observed to be small and circular in shape. Lips were not evident. Any difference between anterior ends of male and female parasites was not observed in present study. In the female parasite, the anus was seen as a fissure in shape. The post anal papilla was seen near the posterior end of the female. Spicula and cloacae of male parasites were observed.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909 (Nematoda: Ascarididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfredi Reinalda Marisa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909 is a parasitic nematode with its biological cycle still unknown, even though it was found in humans, domestic and silvatic animals. Adult worms, collected by surgical drainage from a human patient from the State of Pará, Brazil, were micrographed using a scanning electron microscope. Morphological aspects of males and females such as cephalic structures, caudal papillae and cuticular patterns were analyzed and compared with the previous descriptions adding new data for the identification of this species.

  8. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  9. Theory and application of scanning electron acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Chen, Ruiyi; Yost, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional theoretical model based on the application of the thermal conduction and Navier equations to a chopped electron beam incident on a disk specimen is used to obtain the particle displacement field in the specimen. The results lead to a consideration of the signal generation, spatial resolution, and contrast mechanisms in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM). The model suggests that the time-variant heat source produced by the beam chopping generates driving source, thermal wave, and acoustic wave displacements simultaneously in the specimen. Evidence of the correctness of the prediction is obtained from the mathematically similar problem of pulsed laser light injection into a tank of water. High speed Schlieren photographs taken following laser injection show the simultaneous evolution of thermal and acoustic waveforms. Examples of contrast reversal, stress-induced contrast, and acoustic zone contrast and resolution with SEAM are presented and explained in terms of the model features.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples.

  11. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruna, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180{\\deg} tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of p...

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of primate chorionic villi following ultrasonic microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B F

    1991-01-01

    Villi from human, macaque and baboon placentae were subjected to ultrasonication after prolonged osmication, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The technique was often successful in removing the overlying trophoblast and revealing expanses of the trophoblastic basal lamina, a conclusion corroborated by transmission electron microscopy. These preparations bore a remarkable similarity in appearance to microvascular cast preparations of the fetal vasculature. Relatively straight parallel tubules appeared to correspond in position to the location of fetal vessels in intermediate villi, whereas portions of the basal laminae of terminal villi were in the form of convoluted, branched cylinders similar to SEM images of fetal capillaries of terminal villi. The basal lamina did not have evidence of pores as has been described in some basal laminae.

  13. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample.

  14. Three-dimensional shape of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types: serial section scanning electron microscopy of the osmium-impregnated Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies of the Golgi apparatus structure have been performed by light and electron microscopy, the full shape of the Golgi apparatus remained unclear due to the technical limitations of the previously applied microscopy techniques. In this study, we used serial section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the morphological study of the Golgi apparatus. This method is useful for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of cellular structures without requiring specialized instruments, unlike focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and serial block face SEM (SBF-SEM). Using the serial section SEM method developed by our laboratory, we investigate the 3D shape of the osmium-impregnated Golgi apparatus in rat epididymal cells, pancreatic acinar cells and gonadotropes. The combination of serial section SEM and a 3D reconstruction technique enabled us to elucidate the entire shape of the Golgi apparatus in these cells. The full shape of the Golgi apparatus in epididymal cells formed a basket-like structure with oval-shaped cisterns, while the Golgi apparatus in an acinar cell from the pancreas was composed of elongated ribbon-like structures that were connected to each other, making a coarse network. The overall image of the Golgi apparatus cisterns from a gonadotrope looked like a spherical cage. This study has clearly shown that entire 3D shape of the Golgi apparatus varies depending on the cell type and that the Golgi cisterns network appears as a single mass located in the large region of the cytoplasm.

  15. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer Vestlund, A. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); FIRA International Ltd., Maxwell Road, Stevenage, Herts SG1 2EW (United Kingdom); Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Drew, G.H., E-mail: g.h.drew@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  16. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  17. Direct current scanning field emission microscope integrated with existing scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Reece, Charles E.; Sundelin, Ronald M.

    2002-09-01

    Electron field emission (FE) from broad-area metal surfaces is known to occur at much lower electric field than predicted by Fowler-Nordheim law. Although micron or submicron particles are often observed at such enhanced field emission (EFE) sites, the strength and number of emitting sites and the causes of EFE strongly depend on surface preparation and handling, and the physical mechanism of EFE remains unknown. To systematically investigate the sources of this emission, a dc scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) has been built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer for emitter characterization. In the SFEM chamber of ultrahigh vacuum (approx10-9 Torr), a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern (2.5 mum step resolution) under a high voltage anode microtip for field emission detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum by a hermetic retractable linear transporter to the SEM chamber for individual emitter site characterization. Artificial marks on the sample surface serve as references to convert x, y coordinates of emitters in the SFEM chamber to corresponding positions in the SEM chamber with a common accuracy of plus-or-minus100-200 mum in x and y. Samples designed to self-align in sample holders are used in each chamber, allowing them to retain position registration after non-in situ processing to track interesting features. No components are installed inside the SEM except the sample holder, which does not affect the routine operation of the SEM. The apparatus is a system of low cost and maintenance and significant operational flexibility. Field emission sources from planar niobium--the material used in high-field rf superconducting cavities for particle accelerator--have been studied after different surface preparations, and significantly reduced field emitter density has been achieved by refining the preparation process based on scan

  18. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  20. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  1. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  2. Smart flexible microrobots for scanning electron microscope (SEM) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoeckel, Ferdinand; Fatikow, Sergej

    2000-06-01

    In the scanning electron microscope (SEM), specially designed microrobots can act as a flexible assembly facility for hybrid microsystems, as probing devices for in-situ tests on IC structures or just as a helpful teleoperated tool for the SEM operator when examining samples. Several flexible microrobots of this kind have been developed and tested. Driven by piezoactuators, these few cubic centimeters small mobile robots perform manipulations with a precision of up to 10 nm and transport the gripped objects at speeds of up to 3 cm/s. In accuracy, flexibility and price they are superior to conventional precision robots. A new SEM-suited microrobot prototype is described in this paper. The SEM's vacuum chamber has been equipped with various elements like flanges and CCD cameras to enable the robot to operate. In order to use the SEM image for the automatic real-time control of the robots, the SEM's electron beam is actively controlled by a PC. The latter submits the images to the robots' control computer system. For obtaining three-dimensional information in real time, especially for the closed-loop control of a robot endeffector, e.g. microgripper, a triangulation method with the luminescent spot of the SEM's electron beam is being investigated.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of ascospores of Debaryomyces and Saccharomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, C P; Smiley, M J; Baker, F L

    1975-02-28

    Ascospores from species of Debaryomyces and the Torulaspora-group of Saccharomyces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Ornamentation on ascospores of D. hansenii varied from short to long interconnected ridges or broad based, elongated conical protuberances. A spiral rigde system was detected on the ascospores of D. marama, but wart-like protuberances occurred on those of D. cantarelli, D. castellii, D. coudertii, D. formicarius, D. phaffii, D. vanriji and D. yarrowii. Ascospores of D. halotolerans did not have protuberances and the species appears to be identical with Pichia farinosa. Wart-like protuberances also were found on ascospores of S. delbrueckii, S. microellipsodes, S. rosei, S. inconspicuus, S. fermentati, S. montanus and S. vafer, but the ascospore surface of S. pretoriensis was covered by fine ridges. Short tapered ridges covered the ascospores of S. kloeckerianus.

  4. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  5. Trichomes of Cannabis sativa as viewed with scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, M.C.; Krikorian, A.D.

    1975-06-01

    Direct examination of fresh, unfixed and uncoated specimens from vegetative and floral parts of Cannabis sativa with the scanning electron microscope enables one to obtain a faithful representation of their surface morphology. The presence of two major types of trichomes has been confirmed: a glandular type comprising or terminating in a globoid structure, and a conically-shaped nonglandular type. Moreover, three or possibly four distinct glandular types can be distinguished: sessile globoid, small-stalked and large-stalked globoid, and a peltate type. The nonglandular trichomes can be distinguished by the nature of their surfaces: those with a warty surface, and those which are relatively smooth. The range of size and distribution, and the special features of all these types of trichomes are also provided.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of congenital corneal leukomas (Peters' anomaly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, F M; Graue, E L

    1979-08-01

    Specimens of three corneas in two patients with Peter's anomaly were obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty and studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In one patient, the anomaly was monocular, and the endothelial surface showed a central defect in Descemet's layer with isolated rounded defects in the midperiphery. Fine collagenous material covered the posterior surface. The other two specimens were obtained from a patient with rubella syndrome without cataracts. The cornea showed malformation of Descemet's membrane with fibroblastic overgrowth on the endothelial layer. Epithelial-like cells and leukocytes were also found. The congenital central leukoma we believe was caused by adhesion of the pupillary membrane in our first patient, and possibly was inflammatory in our second patient.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system.

  8. Conditioning of mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Palma-Jiménez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the methodology for an adequate conditioning for the cleaning of mealybugs specimens and its correct observation. This work was done in the laboratory of the Research Center in Microscopic Structures (CIEMIC of the University of Costa Rica, in 2012. Four types of methodologies were implemented, which evidenced a gradual improvement of the observation of the ultrastructures through the Scanning Electron Microscopy. Every process was described in detail. The best results were showed with 10% xylene (in some cases it was feasible using 95-100% ethanol. It allowed to remove the wax from the body of the insect, avoiding its collapse, and observing the specific ultrastructures of the individual. This approach will reduce the time and cost of future taxonomic research of mealybugs.

  9. Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis Using a Scanning Electron Microscope and an X-Ray Energy Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    show the results obtained for the analyses of three different alloys. Table 1 shows the results obtained for NBS SRM 162a monel alloy. Table 2 shows the...pro- vided by Mr. D.O. Morehouse in preparing samples and operating the scanning electron microscope. TABLE 1 MONEL TYPE ALLOY - NBS SRM 162a NBS

  10. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  12. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  13. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1‑x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1‑x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  14. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  15. Spinning Carbon Nanotube Nanothread under a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schulz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanothread with a diameter as small as one hundred nanometers was manufactured under a scanning electron microscope. Made directly from carbon nanotubes, and inheriting their superior electrical and mechanical properties, nanothread may be the world’s smallest man-made fiber. The smallest thread that can be spun using a bench-top spinning machine is about 5 microns in diameter. Nanothread is a new material building block that can be used at the nanoscale or plied to form yarn for applications at the micro and macro scales. Preliminary electrical and mechanical properties of nanothread were measured. The resistivity of nanothread is less than 10−5 Ω∙m. The strength of nanothread is greater than 0.5 GPa. This strength was obtained from measurements using special glue that cures in an electron microscope. The glue weakened the thread, thus further work is needed to obtain more accurate measurements. Nanothread will have broad applications in enabling electrical components, circuits, sensors, and tiny machines. Yarn can be used for various macroscale applications including lightweight antennas, composites, and cables.

  16. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  17. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  18. Investigation of the Remineralization Effect Tnrough Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damyanova Dobrinka M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Local fluoride varnishes have been widely used as a method of non-operative treatment and for caries preventive interventions for more than three decades. Purpose: Evaluation of the remineralization effect by means of electron microscopy of mineralization varnish - Clinpro ™ White Varnish with TCP (Tri-Calcium phosphate (3M. Materials and Methods: The material used is from 20 temporary intact teeth, extracted due to physiological change with permanent teeth, with a completely preserved structure and anatomy of crowns and fully physiologically resorbed roots. For the purposes of the study a scanning electron microscope JEOL JSM 6390 is used with an attachment for element analysis (EDS INCA of Oxford. Prepared samples are pre-coated with gold (cathode sputtering with apparatus JEOL JFC – 1200 to obtain a better contrast of the SEM image of early carious lesions on the smooth surfaces of the temporary teeth, with predilection for development of caries with a d1 threshold. For this purpose the two processes were monitored occurring continuously on the enamel surfacede- and remineralization. Performed was computer processing of the digital images. Results: There is presence of certain minerals deposited in the embossed enamel prisms after of remineralization. The chemical analysis established the presence of calcium (Ca2 + , around the organic matrix. Demineralised surface has pores present of around 1%, which is visible through the enamel on the surface of the deciduous teeth looking like filled and pores looking like partially covered, filled with newly formed and growing crystals. The crystals, which are hydroxylapatite, fluorapatite or fluorhydroxiapatite gradually connect, growing and forming mineral structure filling the microscopi defects and the pores from the demineralisation in the surface enamel prismless layer

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of xiphinema, longidorus, and californidorus stylet morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M R; Robbins, R T

    1990-04-01

    Stylet ultrastructure of five Xiphinema, four Longidorus, and three Californidorus species was compared by scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences were seen in the odontophores and odontostyle bases between the genera and some of the species. All Xiphinema studied had well-developed odontophore flanges; the Longidorus species lacked flanges, except for weakly developed ones in L. diadecturus; and none of the Californidorus had flanges. Three sinuses were present in the odontophores of all species. The sinuses varied in length depending upon species. In Xiphinema and Californidorus the odontostyle bases had distinct overlapping collars, but in Longidorus the collars were absent except for L. diadecturus. The odontostyle-odontophore junction from a lateral view appeared as a slanted transverse line in all the species, but in a dorsal view of Xiphinema and Californidorus it was V-shaped. Dorsal longitudinal seams of the odontostyle and odontophore were observed in all the species. The dorsally located odontostyle aperture was ca. 1 mum from the anterior end in all species, except in one Longidorus sp. it was ca. 4 mum from the end.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  1. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  2. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  4. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  5. Plinia edulis - leaf architecture and scanning electron micrographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Donato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many species of Myrtaceae, including Plinia edulis (Vell. Sobral (cambucá, have pharmacological properties and are used as hypoglycemiants and therapeutic agents against stomach problems and throat infections. Samples were collected from Tijuca Forest in Rio de Janeiro, and the morpho-anatomical data were compared with other specimens obtained from Trindade, Paraty, found in the literature. Variations in leaf anatomy were observed, and the possible causes for these effects are discussed. The plant material collected from Tijuca Forest was analyzed using scanning electron and optical microscopy. Histochemical tests were applied to identify starch, lipids, phenolic compounds and lignin. The epidermal cells exhibit straight or slightly sinuous anticlinal walls covered by a smooth cuticle with granules of wax. Simple trichomes are restricted to the midrib region, and paracytic stomata are only observed on the abaxial leaf surface. The mesophyll is dorsiventral, with conspicuous intercellular spaces in the spongy parenchyma. Intercalated columns of crystalliferous cells and subepidermal secretory cavities are observed in the single layer of palisade parenchyma. The samples obtained from Trindade, Paraty, show larger leaves, anomocytic stomata and trichomes scattered throughout the leaf surface. This plasticity might reflect leaf adaptations to environmental factors or different stages of leaf development.

  6. Char porosity characterisation by scanning electron microscopy and image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, H.S.; Rosenberg, P.; Petersen, H.I.; Soerensen, L.H. [Danfoss A/S, Nordborg (Denmark)

    2000-09-01

    No significant change in either the morphotype composition or the macroporosity (pores {gt}5 {mu}m) in the 0-30 wt.% char burnout interval were revealed by reflected light microscopy or image analysis. Two high temperature char series from a Tertiary South American coal (C1) and a Permian Gondwana coal (C2) were therefore examined by scanning electron microscopy to provide information on the combustion process up to {approximately} 60 wt% char burnout. This study documents a significant mesopore ({approximately} 0.1-5 {mu}m) development on the fused chars in the burnout interval studied. A method to quantify the size and amount of the mesopores is described and both the parameters increased with increasing char burnout. Above a char burnout of {approximately} 30 wt% an increase in macroporosity was detected and ascribed to coalescence of mesopores to form large pores. Although the measurement of mesoporosity is restricted to fused chars, i.e. pores in fragments and the char morphotypes inertoid, fusinoid and solid could not be measured, the consideration of mesoporosity seems to be fundamental in understanding, evaluating and modelling combustion processes in the char burnout interval studied. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy investigations regarding Adonis vernalis L. flower morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Neta GOSTIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The floral morphology of Adonis vernalis L. was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The investigations are important to clarify some taxonomical problems and also could provide useful diagnostic elements for the identification of this medicinal plant in powdered materials. All floral organs are initiated spirally and centripetally and develop centripetally. The petals (8-12 are shorter than the sepals (5-6 in early developmental stages. The petals are disposed on spiral (with 3-4 whorls. The stamens (numerous are unbranched and reach maturity centripetally; they are free of the perianth. The anther walls consisting of a single layer epidermis in the anther wall surrounding the sporagenous tissue, one row of endothecium, two to four rows of middle layer and one row of tapetum layer. In the anther walls, the tapetal cells, by glandular type, persist later in ontogenesis. Pollen grains are tricolpate with echinate surface. The gynoecium is multiple, apocarpous with distinct carpels. The carpels are ascidiate from the beginning. At the base of each carpel, numerousness short, unicellular, trichomes are present. The stigma differentiates as two crests along the ventral slit of the ovary. Each carpel contains a single ovule inside the ovary cavity. The mature ovule is anatropous, with two integuments. It is almost parallel to the funicle.

  8. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  9. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-09-02

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices.

  10. Electron beam heating effects during environmental scanning electron microscopy imaging of water condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Scott, J. H. J.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) show promise as promoters of dropwise condensation. Droplets with diameters below ˜10 μm account for the majority of the heat transferred during dropwise condensation but their growth dynamics on SHS have not been systematically studied. Due to the complex topography of the surface environmental scanning electron microscopy is the preferred method for observing the growth dynamics of droplets in this size regime. By studying electron beam heating effects on condensed water droplets we establish a magnification limit below which the heating effects are negligible and use this insight to study the mechanism of individual drop growth.

  11. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; T. Araki; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; A. P. Hitchcock

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provid...

  12. From the physics of secondary electron emission to image contrasts in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Image formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a combination of physical processes, electron emissions from the sample, and of a technical process related to the detection of a fraction of these electrons. For the present survey of image contrasts in SEM, simplified considerations in the physics of the secondary electron emission yield, δ, are combined with the effects of a partial collection of the emitted secondary electrons. Although some consideration is initially given to the architecture of modern SEM, the main attention is devoted to the material contrasts with the respective roles of the sub-surface and surface compositions of the sample, as well as with the roles of the field effects in the vacuum gap. The recent trends of energy filtering in normal SEM and the reduction of the incident energy to a few electron volts in very low-energy electron microscopy are also considered. For an understanding by the SEM community, the mathematical expressions are explained with simple physical arguments.

  13. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  14. Environmental scanning electron microscopy of hydrated conditioned/etched dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, F A; van der Vyver, P J; Eick, J D; Dusevich, V M

    2000-11-01

    Various etchants/conditioners are used during dental treatment to affect or remove the smear layer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different treatments on moist dentine, using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FE-ESEM). Twenty freshly extracted, human molar teeth were utilised. The roots and pulps were removed, and the crowns horizontally sectioned with a low speed diamond saw (Isomet) (with cooling in a saline solution) in order to expose superficial dentine. A smear layer was created on these surfaces by using 600 grit silicone carbide paper. Test surfaces were then treated in one of the following ways: 1. 37% phosphoric acid liquid 2. 37% phosphoric acid gel 3. NRC (non-rinse conditioner) without rinsing 4. NRC with rinsing. Shallow grooves were cut on the untreated sides, using a thin diamond bur. This enabled the samples to be split in half when pressure was applied in the grooves. Samples were maintained moist throughout specimen preparation. Samples were examined in the FE-ESEM (Philips XL 30) in such a way that the effect of the treatment could be viewed occlusally, as well as perpendicular to the treated interface. Phosphoric acid liquid and gel removed the smear layer, and demineralised the dentine for approximately 5-10 micrometers. NRC penetrated the smear layer and modified it to a lesser degree. However, washing of the NRC treated surface removed part of the smear layer, and opened up some dentinal tubules. Excellent resolution was possible with the FE-ESEM in both the wet and dry modes.

  15. An image acquisition system built with a modular frame grabber for scanning electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, S. [The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Kapp, O.H. [The Department of Radiology and The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We have built an image acquisition and processing system based on a modular frame grabber board (MFG) for use with scanning (or scanning transmission) electron microscopes. The variable-scan acquisition module of the grabber board provides compatibility with electron microscopes processing various scan speeds, e.g., the very slow scan rate of our mirror-type electron microscope. In addition to the acquisition function, the board provides many image processing capabilities. A special time-base unit was built to synchronize the acquisition system with the scanning system on the electron microscope. A Windows application has been built to operate the MFG as well as manage all functions of the electron microscope. Using this approach we have been able to greatly simplify the task of digital image acquisition as well as creating a powerful and seamless interface to our Windows-based environment. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  17. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  18. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  19. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  20. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  1. Imaging and analysis of subsurface Cu interconnects by detecting backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, L. M.; Kawasaki, M.; Boettcher, S. H.; Wells, O. C.

    2005-06-01

    Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnects that were located 0.65-2.7-μm below the surface of silicon-integrated circuits were imaged in a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope with a scanning attachment by detecting backscattered electrons (BSEs) with an incident electron-beam energy (Eo) in the range of 30-400keV. BSE images could be used to detect voids in subsurface Cu interconnects, even in regions covered with upper level Cu lines or vias. As Eo was increased from 30to400keV, structures could be seen as a result of atomic number (Z) contrast farther below the surface while structures closer to the surface had reduced Z contrast. The subsurface beam diameter was measured from BSE images as a function of Eo and depth below the surface. For all Eo, the subsurface beam diameter initially rapidly increased with SiO2 overlayer thickness but, for 150keV, a leveling off in the beam spread was seen for depths >1.7μm. Beam broadening affected whether the TaN /Ta liners that surrounded the Cu conductors could be seen at the edges of the lines; this contrast was observed only when the subsurface beam diameter was ⩽1.5× the liner thickness. The BSE information depth for imaging 0.2-μm-sized voids in subsurface Cu -SiO2-SiNx interconnect structures at 30 and 150keV was estimated to be 0.65 and 3μm, respectively.

  2. Cryo-FIB-SEM serial milling and block face imaging: Large volume structural analysis of biological tissues preserved close to their native state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidavsky, Netta; Akiva, Anat; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Rechav, Katya; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Schertel, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Many important biological questions can be addressed by studying in 3D large volumes of intact, cryo fixed hydrated tissues (⩾10,000μm(3)) at high resolution (5-20nm). This can be achieved using serial FIB milling and block face surface imaging under cryo conditions. Here we demonstrate the unique potential of the cryo-FIB-SEM approach using two extensively studied model systems; sea urchin embryos and the tail fin of zebrafish larvae. We focus in particular on the environment of mineral deposition sites. The cellular organelles, including mitochondria, Golgi, ER, nuclei and nuclear pores are made visible by the image contrast created by differences in surface potential of different biochemical components. Auto segmentation and/or volume rendering of the image stacks and 3D reconstruction of the skeleton and the cellular environment, provides a detailed view of the relative distribution in space of the tissue/cellular components, and thus of their interactions. Simultaneous acquisition of secondary and back-scattered electron images adds additional information. For example, a serial view of the zebrafish tail reveals the presence of electron dense mineral particles inside mitochondrial networks extending more than 20μm in depth in the block. Large volume imaging using cryo FIB SEM, as demonstrated here, can contribute significantly to the understanding of the structures and functions of diverse biological tissues.

  3. Electronically Steerable Antennas with Panoramic Scan Field of View Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronically steerable antennas are key to effective radio transmission at millimeter-wave frequencies. To enable communication with rovers, robots, EVA...

  4. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning El...

  5. A method of dynamic chromatic aberration correction in low-voltage scanning electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2005-07-01

    A time-of-flight concept that dynamically corrects for chromatic aberration effects in scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) is presented. The method is predicted to reduce the microscope's chromatic aberration by an order of magnitude. The scheme should significantly improve the spatial resolution of low-voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEMs). The dynamic means of correcting for chromatic aberration also allows for the possibility of obtaining high image resolution from electron guns that have relatively large energy spreads.

  6. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency.

  7. Local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline AlN ceramics measured by scanning thermal microscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yue-Fei; Wang Li; R. Heiderhoff; A. K. Geinzer; Wei Bin; Ji Yuan; Han Xiao-Dong; L. J. Balk; Zhang Ze

    2012-01-01

    The local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics is measured and imaged by using a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) and complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) based techniques at room temperature.The quantitative thermal conductivity for the AlN sample is gained by using a SThM with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer scale through using the 3w method.A thermal conductivity of 308 W/m·K withingrains corresponding to that of high-purity single crystal AlN is obtained.The slight differences in thermal conduction between the adjacent grains are found to result from crystallographic misorientations,as demonstrated in the electron backscattered diffraction.A much lower thermal conductivity at the grain boundary is due to impurities and defects enriched in these sites,as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  8. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  10. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger–scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Palasantzas, G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1999-01-01

    This letter concentrates on a quantitative description of surface roughness effects on Auger peak-line profiles for pure and alloyed specimens. The nanometer lateral electron probe size of the order of 10 nm yielded peak-line profiles that capture surface topology variations down to nanometer-length

  11. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  12. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores del Carmen Castro

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti Werneck, 1955, mainly the external chorionic features of the egg, is described through electronic microscopy techniques. This species was first cited in Argentina, infesting Arctocephalus australis (Zimmermann, 1873. The morphological adaptations of adults and nymphs are described in both species of Proechinophthirus parasitic on Otariidae: P. fluctus (Ferris, 1916 and P. zumpti.

  13. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Es, van P.; Petersen, W.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  14. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsuiker, L; VAN Es, P; Petersen, W; VAN Leeuwen, T G; Terstappen, L W M M; Otto, C

    2011-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample preparation protocol was developed to enable imaging of cells and gold nanoparticles with a conventional below lens scanning electron microscopes. The negative influence of 'charging' on the quality of scanning electron microscopes' images could be limited by deposition of biological cells on a conductive (gold) surface. The novel protocol enabled high-resolution scanning electron microscopes' imaging of small clusters and individual gold nanoparticles on uncoated cell surfaces. Gold nanoparticles could be counted on cancer cells with automated routines.

  15. A Low Cost, Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) Antenna Technology for Aviation Hazard Detection and Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will investigate the feasibility of utilizing ThinKom's low cost electronically scanned array (ESA) antenna concepts to enable affordable...

  16. Scanning-electron-microscope used in real-time study of friction and wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Small friction and wear apparatus built directly into scanning-electron-microscope provides both dynamic observation and microscopic view of wear process. Friction and wear tests conducted using this system have indicated that considerable information can readily be gained.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of acrothoracican cypris larvae (Crustacea, Thecostraca, Cirripedia, Acrothoracica, Lithoglyptidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbasov, Gregory A.; Høeg, Jens T.; Elfimov, Alexei S.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to provide a full morphological description of cypris morphology in the acrothoracican species Lithoglyptes milis and L. habei (Lithoglyptidae). Special attention was given to lattice organs, antennules, thorax, thoracopods, abdomen, and furcal rami. Cypris larv

  18. Manufacture and scanning electron microscopic observation of human dermis collagen membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Introduction Collagen is a kind of biomacromolecule and can be used as cover material for burn wounds. In this article,we report the scanning electron microscopic observation of human dermis collagen membrane prepared by three methods.

  19. Surface textures of quartz grains from Goa coast - An application of the scanning electron microscope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ambre, N.V.; Gujar, A.R.; Mislankar, P.G.

    The scanning electron microscopy of quartz grains along the Goa beaches reveals 10 microfeatures. Three types of process response environments viz. Beach (Littoral), subaqueous and low to high-energy chemical environments appears to be active...

  20. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  1. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  2. Nondestructive determination of the depth of planar p-n junctions by scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, J.-Y.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring nondestructively the depth of planar p-n junctions in simple devices as well as in integrated-circuit structures with the electron-beam induced current (EBIC) by scanning parallel to the junction in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by the commonly used destructive method of lapping at an angle to the junction and staining to reveal the junction.

  3. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a Zeiss Sigma HD VP SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    This method describes the characterization of inert and HE materials by the Zeiss Sigma HD VP field emission Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM uses an accelerated electron beam to generate high-magnification images of explosives and other materials. It is fitted with five detectors (SE, Inlens, STEM, VPSE, HDBSD) to enable imaging of the sample via different secondary electron signatures, angles, and energies. In addition to imaging through electron detection, the microscope is also fitted with two Oxford Instrument Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) 80 mm detectors to generate elemental constituent spectra and two-dimensional maps of the material being scanned.

  4. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  5. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keutner, Christoph [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); von Bohlen, Alex [Leibniz-Institut fur Analytische Wissenschaften, Dortmund (Germany); Berges, Ulf [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Espeter, Philipp [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Schneider, Claus M. [Peter Grunberg Institut, Julich (Germany); Westphal, Carsten [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  6. Boundary scan test of Belle II pixel detector electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitl, Philipp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For the upgrade of the Vertex Detector at the Belle II experiment, DEPFET sensors will be used. These sensors need Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for control, readout and data processing. Because of high demands for a low material budget in the sensitive area, there is only little space left for these ASICs. Using state-of-the-art technologies like Ball Grid Array (BGA) chips, which are flip-chip mounted, the requirement of 14 ASICs on each of the 40 half ladders can be fulfilled. However, this highly integrated on-sensor ASIC solution results in a lack of physical access to the electrical connections, which is a problem for traditional testing methods. To overcome these limitations, the JTAG standard IEEE 1149.1 is used to check if the circuit is in working condition. This method provides electrical access to the boundary scan cells implemented in the ASICs. Therefore it is possible to perform connectivity tests and verify if the production of the circuit was successful.

  7. Development of a fast electromagnetic shutter for compressive sensing imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, Armand; Freitag, Bert; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-01-01

    The concept of compressive sensing was recently proposed to significantly reduce the electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) while still maintaining the main features in the image. Here, an experimental setup based on an electromagnetic shutter placed in the condenser plane of a STEM is proposed. The shutter blanks the beam following a random pattern while the scanning coils are moving the beam in the usual scan pattern. Experimental images at both medium scale and high resolution are acquired and then reconstructed based on a discrete cosine algorithm. The obtained results confirm the predicted usefulness of compressive sensing in experimental STEM even though some remaining artifacts need to be resolved.

  8. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  9. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  10. Correlative analysis of immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Unzai, Tomo; Matsuda, Wakoto; Iwai, Haruki; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Uemura, Masanori; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of the brain has been realized with minimal effort by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) milling (FIB-SEM). Application of immunohistochemical staining in electron microscopy (EM) provides a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures. Thus, we applied immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM). Dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively. In contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitations and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were as easily recognizable as those in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Furthermore, in the sites of interest, some appositions displayed synaptic specializations of an asymmetric type. Thus, the present method was useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connections in the central neural circuit.

  11. Some strategies for quantitative scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, R.; Peacock, D. C.; Prutton, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general applicability of power law forms of the background in electron spectra is pointed out and exploited for background removal from under Auger peaks. This form of B(E) is found to be extremely sensitive to instrumental alignment and to fault-free construction - an observation which can be used to set up analyser configurations in an accurate way. Also, differences between N(E) and B(E) can be used to derive a spectrometer transmission function T(E). The questions of information density in an energy-analysing spatially-resolving instrument are addressed after reliable instrumental characterization has been established. Strategies involving ratio histograms, showing the population distribution of the ratio of a pair of Auger peak heights, composition scatter diagrams and windowed imaging are discussed and illustrated.

  12. The current state of electronic consultation and electronic referral systems in Canada: an environmental scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Hogel, Matthew; Blazkho, Valerie; Keely, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Access to specialist care is a point of concern for patients, primary care providers, and specialists in Canada. Innovative e-health platforms such as electronic consultation (eConsultation) and referral (eReferral) can improve access to specialist care. These systems allow physicians to communicate asynchronously and could reduce the number of unnecessary referrals that clog wait lists, provide a record of the patient's journey through the referral system, and lead to more efficient visits. Little is known about the current state of eConsultation and eReferral in Canada. The purpose of this work was to identify current systems and gain insight into the design and implementation process of existing systems. An environmental scan approach was used, consisting of a systematic and grey literature review, and targeted semi-structured key informant interviews. Only three eConsultation/eReferral systems are currently in operation in Canada. Four themes emerged from the interviews: eReferral is an end goal for those provinces without an active eReferral system, re-organization of the referral process is a necessity prior to automation, engaging the end-user is essential, and technological incompatibilities are major impediments to progress. Despite the acknowledged need to improve the referral system and increase government spending on health information technology, eConsultation and eReferral systems remain scarce as Canada lags behind the rest of the developed world.

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-21

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  14. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-08

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  15. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...

  16. Correction of image drift and distortion in a scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, P; Li, X

    2015-12-01

    Continuous research on small-scale mechanical structures and systems has attracted strong demand for ultrafine deformation and strain measurements. Conventional optical microscope cannot meet such requirements owing to its lower spatial resolution. Therefore, high-resolution scanning electron microscope has become the preferred system for high spatial resolution imaging and measurements. However, scanning electron microscope usually is contaminated by distortion and drift aberrations which cause serious errors to precise imaging and measurements of tiny structures. This paper develops a new method to correct drift and distortion aberrations of scanning electron microscope images, and evaluates the effect of correction by comparing corrected images with scanning electron microscope image of a standard sample. The drift correction is based on the interpolation scheme, where a series of images are captured at one location of the sample and perform image correlation between the first image and the consequent images to interpolate the drift-time relationship of scanning electron microscope images. The distortion correction employs the axial symmetry model of charged particle imaging theory to two images sharing with the same location of one object under different imaging fields of view. The difference apart from rigid displacement between the mentioned two images will give distortion parameters. Three-order precision is considered in the model and experiment shows that one pixel maximum correction is obtained for the employed high-resolution electron microscopic system.

  17. Glass for parenteral products: a surface view using the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, T J; Brown, J A; Scothorn, W W

    1976-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was utilized to explore the internal surface of glass ampuls and vials used in parenteral products. The surface topography of USP Type I borosilicate glass containers was viewed after exposure to "sulfur," ammonium bifluoride, and sulfuric acid treatments. The scanning electron micrographs showed startling differences in the appearance of the surface regions. "Sulfur treatment" of ampuls was associated with a pitting of the surface and the presence of sodium sulfate crystals. The sulfur treatment of vials altered the glass surface in a characteristically different manner. The dissimilarity between the surface appearances was attributed to the method of sulfur treatment. Ampuls exposed to sulfuric acid solutions at room temperature did not show the pitting associated with the sulfur treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of ammonium bifluoride-treated ampuls showed a relief effect, suggesting that the glass was affected by the bifluoride solution but that sufficient stripping of the surface layer did not occur to remove the pits associated with the sulfur treatment. Flakes emanating from the glass were identified with the aid of the electron microprobe. Scanning electron micrographs showed that these vitreous flakes resulted from a delamination of a thin layer of the glass surface. It is concluded that the scanning electron microscope, in conjunction with other analytical techniques, is a valuable tool in assessing the quality of glass used for parenteral products. The techniques studied should be of particular importance to the pharmaceutical industry where efforts are being made to reduce the levels of particulate matter in parenteral dosage forms.

  18. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  19. Sub-micron imaging of buried integrated circuit structures using scanning confocal electron microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, S. P.; Levine, Z.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Materials Science Division; Northern Arizona Univ.; NIST

    2002-09-09

    Two-dimensional images of model integrated circuit components were collected using the technique of scanning confocal electron microscopy. For structures embedded about 5 {mu}m below the surface of a silicon oxide dielectric, a lateral resolution of 76{+-}9 nm was measured. Elemental mapping via x-ray emission spectrometry is demonstrated. A parallax analysis of images taken for various tilt angles to the electron beam allowed determination of the spacing between two wiring planes. The results show that scanning confocal electron microscopy is capable of probing buried structures at resolutions that will be necessary for the inspection of next-generation integrated circuit technology.

  20. Thermal Properties of Materials Characterized by Scanning Electron-Acoustic Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chun-Ming; ZHANG Shu-Yi; ZHANG Zhong-Ning; SHUI Xiu-Ji; JIANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified technique of scanning electron-acoustic microscopy is employed to determine thermal diffusivity of materials. Using the dependence of the electron-acoustic signal on modulation frequency of the electron beam,the thermal diffusivity of materials is characterized based on a simplified thermoelastic theory. The thermal diffusivities of several metals characterized by the modified scanning electron-acoustic microscopy are in good agreement with the referential values of the corresponding materials, which proves that the scanning electronacoustic microscopy can be used to characterize the thermal diffusivity of materials effectively. In addition, for micro-inhomogeneous materials, such as biological tissues, the macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities are characterized by the technique.

  1. Monte Carlo modeling of cavity imaging in pure iron using back-scatter electron scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Garner, F. A.; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Backscattered electrons (BSE) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) can produce images of subsurface cavity distributions as a nondestructive characterization technique. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the mechanism of void imaging and to identify key parameters in optimizing void resolution. The modeling explores an iron target of different thicknesses, electron beams of different energies, beam sizes, and scan pitch, evaluated for voids of different sizes and depths below the surface. The results show that the void image contrast is primarily caused by discontinuity of energy spectra of backscattered electrons, due to increased outward path lengths for those electrons which penetrate voids and are backscattered at deeper depths. Size resolution of voids at specific depths, and maximum detection depth of specific voids sizes are derived as a function of electron beam energy. The results are important for image optimization and data extraction.

  2. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy.

  3. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications.

  4. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.

  5. Nanoelectrical probing with multiprobe SPM Systems compatible with scanning electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; Ignatov, Andrey; Taha, Hesham; Zhinoviev, Oleg; Komissar, Anatoly; Krol, Alexander; Lewis, David

    2011-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope compatible platform that permits multiprobe atomic force microscopy based nanoelectrical characterization will be described. To achieve such multiple parameter nanocharacterization with scanning electron microscope compatibility involves a number of innovations both in instrument and probe design. This presentation will focus on how these advances were achieved and the results obtained with such instrumentation on electrical nano-characterization and electrical nano-manipulation. The advances include: 1. Specialized scanners; 2. An ultrasensitive feedback mechanism based on tuning forks with no optical feedback interference that can induce carriers in semiconductor devices; and 3. Unique probes compatible with multiprobe geometries in which the probe tips can be brought into physical contact with one another. Experiments will be described with such systems that will include multiprobe electrical measurements with metal and glass coated coaxial nanowires of platinum. This combination of scanning electron microscopes integrated with multiprobe instrumentation allows for important applications not available today in the field of semiconductor processing technology.

  6. Long range electronic transport in microbial nanowires bridging an electrode and scanned probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Walsh, Kathy; Sun, Jiebing; Zhang, Pengpeng; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    The filament-like appendages known as pili, expressed by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, are believed to act as electrically conductive nanowires. Previously, we used scanning tunneling microscopy to study the local density of states at different positions along the wire. However, the long range electron transfer believed to occur in this protein has not been directly observed. Here we discuss a system for verifying long range transport using a scanning probe technique. Transport at distances of more than a few nanometers would require a novel biological electron transfer process. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (MCB-1021948) and the Michigan State University Foundation (Strategic Partnership Grant).

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of the human endolymphatic sac: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, F R; House, W F

    1980-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine and compare one normal endolymphatic sac with one endolymphatic sac from a patient with Meniere's disease. The surgical procedure for obtaining these specimens and their preparation for scanning electron microscopy are described. The luminal surface of the rugose portion of both specimens was lined with two populations of epithelial cells: one with a dome-shaped apical surface, the other with a flattened polygonal surface. The surface of dome-shaped cells in both specimens was covered with microvilli. Neither specimen had observable loss of epithelial integrity or fibrosis.

  8. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy...... opacification, the findings were calcifications in 2 of the 3 lenses (66.6%) and proteins in 2 lenses (66.6%). Conclusions A marked variation in surface changes was observed by SEM. Findings did not correlate with cause for explantation. Scanning electron microscopy is a useful tool that provides exclusive...

  9. A novel approach to scanning electron microscopy at ambient atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ominami, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shinsuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Ito, Sukehiro

    2015-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing samples at ambient atmospheric pressure is introduced in this study. An additional specimen chamber with a small window is inserted in the main specimen chamber, and the window is separated with a thin membrane or diaphragm allowing electron beam propagation. Close proximity of the sample to the membrane enables the detection of back-scattered electrons sufficient for imaging. In addition to the empirical imaging data, a probability analysis of the un-scattered fraction of the incident electron beam further supports the feasibility of atmospheric SEM imaging over a controlled membrane-sample distance.

  10. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  12. Morphology and deflection properties of bat wing sensory hairs: scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning vibrometry, and mechanics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterbing-D'Angelo, S J; Liu, H; Yu, M; Moss, C F

    2016-08-22

    Bat wings are highly adaptive airfoils that enable demanding flight maneuvers, which are performed with astonishing robustness under turbulent conditions, and stability at slow flight velocities. The bat wing is sparsely covered with microscopically small, sensory hairs that are associated with tactile receptors. In a previous study we demonstrated that bat wing hairs are involved in sensing airflow for improved flight maneuverability. Here, we report physical measurements of these hairs and their distribution on the wing surface of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, based on scanning electron microscopy analyses. The wing hairs are strongly tapered, and are found on both the dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. Laser scanning vibrometry tests of 43 hairs from twelve locations across the wing of the big brown bat revealed that their natural frequencies inversely correlate with length and range from 3.7 to 84.5 kHz. Young's modulus of the average wing hair was calculated at 4.4 GPa, which is comparable with rat whiskers or arthropod airflow-sensing hairs.

  13. Imaging and identifying defects in nitride semiconductor thin films using a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, 6, Caen (France); Gamarra, P.; Lacam, C.; Tordjman, M.; Di Forte-Poisson, M.A. [Thales Research and Technology, III-V Lab, Marcoussis (France); Parbrook, P.J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, High St, Lydney (United Kingdom); England, G. [K. E. Developments Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We describe the use of electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) - in a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) - to reveal and identify defects in nitride semiconductor thin films. In ECCI changes in crystallographic orientation, or changes in lattice constant due to local strain, are revealed by changes in grey scale in an image constructed by monitoring the intensity of backscattered electrons (BSEs) as an electron beam is scanned over a suitably oriented sample. Extremely small orientation changes are detectable, enabling small angle tilt and rotation boundaries and dislocations to be imaged. Images with a resolution of tens of nanometres are obtainable with ECCI. In this paper, we describe the use of ECCI with TEM to determine threading dislocation densities and types in InAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC and sapphire substrates. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Study on the parameters of the scanning system for the 300 keV electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, K. W.; Chulan, R. M., E-mail: leo@nm.gov.my; Hashim, S. A.; Baijan, A. H.; Sabri, R. M.; Mohtar, M.; Glam, H.; Lojius, L.; Zahidee, M.; Azman, A.; Zaid, M. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang. Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This paper describes the method to identify the magnetic coil parameters of the scanning system. This locally designed low energy electron accelerator with the present energy of 140 keV will be upgraded to 300 keV. In this accelerator, scanning system is required to deflect the energetic electron beam across a titanium foil in vertical and horizontal direction. The excitation current of the magnetic coil is determined by the energy of the electron beam. Therefore, the magnetic coil parameters must be identified to ensure the matching of the beam energy and excitation coil current. As the result, the essential parameters of the effective lengths for X-axis and Y-axis have been found as 0.1198 m and 0.1134 m and the required excitation coil currents which is dependenton the electron beam energies have be identified.

  15. Development of electron optical system using annular pupils for scanning transmission electron microscope by focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsutani, Takaomi, E-mail: matutani@ele.kindai.ac.jp [Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yasumoto, Tsuchika; Tanaka, Takeo [Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ikuta, Takashi [Osaka Electro-Communication University, 18-8 Hatsu-cho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8530 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Annular pupils for electron optics were produced using a focused ion beam (FIB), enabling an increase in the depth of focus and allowing for aberration-free imaging and separation of the amplitude and phase images in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Simulations demonstrate that an increased focal depth is advantageous for three-dimensional tomography in the STEM. For a 200 kV electron beam, the focal depth is increased to approximately 100 nm by using an annular pupil with inner and outer semi-angles of 29 and 30 mrad, respectively. Annular pupils were designed with various outer diameters of 40-120 {mu}m and the inner diameter was designed at 80% of the outer diameter. A taper angle varying from 1 Degree-Sign to 20 Degree-Sign was applied to the slits of the annular pupils to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. The fabricated annular pupils were inspected by scanning ion beam microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These annular pupils were loaded into a STEM and no charge-up effects were observed in the scintillator projection images recorded by a CCD camera.

  16. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of th...

  17. Investigation on traceability of 3D Scanning Electron Microscopy based on the Stereo Pair Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) has a big potential as a metrology instrument for micro and nanotechnology due to its unique combination of three imaging properties: • Lateral ultimate resolution down to 2nm • Large range of possible magnification levels ranging from a few hundred times...... that addresses the performance of 3D topography calculation based on surface topography imaging using secondary electrons and the Stereo Pair Technique....

  18. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  19. The mechanism of PTFE and PE friction deposition: a combined scanning electron and scanning force microscopy study on highly oriented polymeric sliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaeben, H.; Vancso, G. Julius

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of friction deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene (PE) was studied by scanning electron (SEM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM) on the worn surfaces of PTFE and PE sliders that were used in friction deposition on glass substrates. These surfaces exhibited a fi

  20. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, E.T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DlC). It is argued that the strength of the met

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  3. Subconjunctival Dirofilaria repens Infestation: A Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsom, Henrik A; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    an outer thick, multi-layered cuticle with longitudinal ridges. Beneath the cuticle, a thick muscle layer was observed and internally the intestine and a single reproductive tube containing spermatozoa were noted. Scanning electron microscopy of the worm showed tapered ends, transverse striations...

  4. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  5. Morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Huss, Hans Henrik; Bresciani, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi in vitro at pH 3.5 and 7.0 is described using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only vegetative growth was observed. At pH 3.5, hyphal growth was seen. The hyphae of I. hoferi are characterized by evacuated hyphal walls with the cytoplasm migrating...

  6. Observation of microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyoshi, Norihito; Kamiya, Yuichi

    2015-06-21

    Heteropolyanions and their arrays in microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid, Cs2.5H1.5[SiW12O40] and Cs4.0[SiW12O40], were observed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Microstructures that form micropores in the polyoxometalates were visualized.

  7. Light and scanning electron microscopic and immunohistochemical studies on permeability of hypertensive rat mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Kawaharada, U; Takatama, M; Ooneda, G

    1985-09-01

    Experimental hypertensive rats were intravenously injected with carbon and iron as tracers, and their mesenteric arteries exhibiting hypertensive arterial lesions were observed by light and scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Early arterial lesions showing intense medial damages, deposition of fibrinoid substance consisting of fibrin in the intima and/or media, and granulation tissue in the adventitia were characterized by marked insudation of intravenously injected tracers. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated numerous leukocytes and platelets adhering to endothelial surface, opened endothelial cell junctions, and desquamation of these cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed laminin and low stainability of fibronectin in the subendothelium. Advanced lesions showed deposition of a large amount of fibrinoid substance and no insudation of tracers in the intima, but scanning electron microscopy manifested opening of endothelial cell junctions, desquamation of endothelial cells, and adherence of leukocytes and platelets. Immunohistochemistry revealed fibronectin in the intima and laminin just beneath the endothelium. In the healed lesions disclosing fibrocellular intimal thickening, there was no insudation of tracers. Scanning electron microscopy showed opened endothelial cell junctions, endothelial cell defects, and adherence of leukocytes and platelets. There were fibronectin in the intima and laminin beneath the endothelium. It was suggested that the opening of endothelial cells junctions and desquamation of endothelial cells would be necessary for the arterial increased permeability in hypertensive rats, and that fibrin-fibronectin complex, fibronectin-acid mucopolysaccharide complex, and basement membrane would together inhibit the increased permeability in the mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats in spite of endothelial cell injuries and their defects.

  8. Comparative study of four species of Trichuris roederer, 1761 (Nematoda, Trichurinae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinalda Marisa Lanfredti

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative morphological study of Trichuris travassosi, T. vulpis, T. discolor and T. suis was perfomed using scanning electron microscopy. Cuticular inflation associated with the bacillar band, vulva and male external genital appendages were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of these structures were made for each species; they are of taxonomic value.

  9. Dental wax impressions of plant tissues for viewing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Anke; Hülskamp, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a valuable method for examining surface structures. Taking wax impressions of plant structures, such as leaves, is a nondestructive procedure that makes it possible to view changes in surface structures over time, such as during development. This protocol describes a method for making dental wax impressions of plant tissues.

  10. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron t

  11. Developments in application of light and scanning electron microscopy techniques for cell wall degradation studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, F.M.

    1996-01-01

    The results of recent technological developments in light and scanning electron microscopy closely used for research on forage cell wall degradation in ruminants, are reviewed. The indigestibility of forages by rumen microorganisms used to be ascribed mainly to an overall presence of lignin in the p

  12. [Depth dose characteristics of electron beams released from a scanning type Racetrack Microtron treatment machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2002-01-01

    The Racetrack Microtron MM50 capable of taking out x-rays and electron beams having a high energy of up to 50 MeV was evaluated by a dosimetry of electron beams in comparison with Microtron MM22. The MM50 flattens the intensity of electron beams by using the beam scanning method while the MM22 utilizes the flattening-filter method. A percentage depth dose (PDD) curve was obtained through the dosimetry of electron beams using a water phantom. As compared with the MM22, the MM50 emits an electron beam that has an energy much closer to the nominal one, that is less contaminated by x-rays, and whose intensity decreases steeply down to near zero on the PDD curve. The MM50 has an electron beam dose distribution that is practically useful since the dose tends to be concentrated on the target volume.

  13. Depth dose characteristics of electron beams released from a scanning type racetrack microtron treatment machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomoharu [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2002-01-01

    The Racetrack Microtron MM50 capable of taking out x-rays and electron beams having a high energy of up to 50 MeV was evaluated by a dosimetry of electron beams in comparison with Microtron MM22. The MM50 flattens the intensity of electron beams by using the beam scanning method while the MM22 utilizes the flattening-filter method. A percentage depth dose (PDD) curve was obtained through the dosimetry of electron beams using a water phantom. As compared with the MM22, the MM50 emits an electron beam that has an energy much closer to the nominal one, that is less contaminated by x-rays, and whose intensity decreases steeply down to near zero on the PDD curve. The MM50 has an electron beam dose distribution that is practically useful since the dose tends to be concentrated on the target volume. (author)

  14. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters, calibrated by means of calorimetry, make possible the determination of absorbed-dose distributions due to low-energy scanned electron beam penetrations in moderately thin coatings and laminar media. For electrons of a few hundred keV, calibrated dosimeters...... of about 30–60 μm thickness may be used in stacks or interleaved between layers of materials of interest and supply a sufficient number of experimental data points throughout the depth of penetration of electrons to provide a depth-dose curve. Depth doses may be resolved in various polymer layers...

  15. A different approach for determining the responsivity of n+p detectors using scanning electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omeime Xerviar Esebamen; G(o)ran Thungstr(o)m; Hans-Erik Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an alternative to the standard method of studying the responsivities(the input-output gain) and other behaviours of detectors at low electron energy The research does not aim to compare the results of differently doped n+p detectors; its purpose is to provide an alternative characterization method (using scanning electron microscopy) to those used in previous studies on the responsivity of n+p doped detectors as a function of the electron radiation energy and other interface parameters.

  16. Correlative in vivo 2 photon and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy of cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohumil Maco

    Full Text Available Correlating in vivo imaging of neurons and their synaptic connections with electron microscopy combines dynamic and ultrastructural information. Here we describe a semi-automated technique whereby volumes of brain tissue containing axons and dendrites, previously studied in vivo, are subsequently imaged in three dimensions with focused ion beam scanning electron microcopy. These neurites are then identified and reconstructed automatically from the image series using the latest segmentation algorithms. The fast and reliable imaging and reconstruction technique avoids any specific labeling to identify the features of interest in the electron microscope, and optimises their preservation and staining for 3D analysis.

  17. A correlative light microscopic, transmission and scanning electron microscopic study of the dorsum of human tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshell, J L; Wilborn, W H; Singh, B B

    1980-01-01

    The dorsum of the human tongue has three types of papillae, filiform, fungiform and circumvallate. Some investigators have studied these by light and transmission electron microscopy. Since knowledge of the morphology through studies by scanning of the morphology through studies by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is scant, this investigation was started with the purpose of studying human tongues at different ages. One fetal tongue and portions of three tongues from newborns were removed. Additional specimens were biopsied from the anterior region of three adult tongues. Samples were processed routinely for light microscopy, transmission electron microscoy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two distinct features were evident on the fetal tongue. The first was that the surface epithelial layer of the tongue appeared to be periderm. The second was that fungiform papillae began their development earlier than filiform. At birth, the putative periderm had disappeared and a few filiform papillae were observed. On the adult tongue, filiform papillae were numerous and were comprised of two cell populations. One cell population contained numerous keratohyalin granules (KHG). The KHG were two types, eosinophilic and basophilic. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophilic granules were less electron dense and larger in size than the basophilic KHG.

  18. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Mark W; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert M; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (EMPAD - electron microscope pixel array detector) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128 x 128 pixel detector consists of a 500 um thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as loc...

  19. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  20. Zinc deficiency in the 11 day rat embryo: a scanning and transmission electron microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, A.J.; Dreosti, I.E.; Tulsi, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Zinc deficient rat embryos were obtained on the 11th day of pregnancy and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an increase in the number of deformed embryos, as well as embryonic growth retardation. In addition, the epithelium of zinc deficient embryos displayed a marked increase in surface microvilli, as well as the presence of blebbing. Transmission electron microscopy indicated extensive cell death in the neural epithelium which was apparently more severely damaged by zinc deficiency than were mesenchymal cells. Mitochondrial cristae were affected to a greater degree than any other membrane of the cell and cristael disintegration appeared to represent the principal cellular lesion preceding necrosis of neural cells and neural tube teratology. 29 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H; Krakhmalev, P; Svensson, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape.

  2. A scanning drift tube apparatus for spatio-temporal mapping of electron swarms

    CERN Document Server

    Korolov, I; Bastykova, N Kh; Donko, Z

    2016-01-01

    A "scanning" drift tube apparatus, capable of mapping of the spatio-temporal evolution of electron swarms, developing between two plane electrodes under the effect of a homogeneous electric field, is presented. The electron swarms are initiated by photoelectron pulses and the temporal distributions of the electron flux are recorded while the electrode gap length (at a fixed electric field strength) is varied. Operation of the system is tested and verified with argon gas, the measured data are used for the evaluation of the electron bulk drift velocity. The experimental results for the space-time maps of the electron swarms - presented here for the first time - also allow clear observation of deviations from hydrodynamic transport. The swarm maps are also reproduced by particle simulations.

  3. Effect of surface mechanical finishes on charging ability of electron irradiated PMMA in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondot, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.rondot@univ-reims.fr [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Jbara, Omar [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Fakhfakh, Slim [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Belkorissat, Redouane; Patat, Jean Marc [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, EA4301, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-10-01

    Charging of Polymethyl Methacrylate insulators (PMMA), in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is studied owing to a time resolved current method. This method allows the evolution of trapped charge versus time and the charging time constant to be deduced. The effect of surface roughness change on the ability of PMMA to trapped charge is highlighted. The results show that the trapped charge at the steady state decreases when the roughness increases in the micrometer range while the time constant of charging increases with surface roughness. This behaviour is due to the increase of leakage current and/or enhanced secondary electron emission (SEE). On the one hand, surface mechanical finishes allows, the build up charge in insulators submitted to an electron bombardment to be lowered. On the other hand this treatment allows the secondary electron emission to be raised for some specific applications.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of the nail plate in onychomycosis patients with negative fungal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xueping; Li, Qing; Wang, Hongwei; Sun, Yilin; Wang, Aiping; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common dermatological problem and can be identified by direct microscopic examination and fungal culture. However, the positive rate of fungal culture is low. This study investigated the application of scanning electron microscopy in the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 20 patients with negative fungal culture. In this study, a routine glutaraldehyde fixation method was used to prepare specimens for electron microscope examination. Results showed that under the scanning electron microscope, significant structural damage was observed in the nail plate in all patients. Hyphaes were seen in 70% of cases. A mixture of scattered hyphaes, pseudohyphaes, and spores was observed in 30% of cases. A mixture of spores and bacteria was observed in 10% of cases. A mixture of hyphaes and bacteria was observed in 20% of cases. The typical hyphae pierced a thin layer or single layer of corneocytes. Hyphaes could be smooth, sleek, and straight with visible separation, or dry, bent, and folded with a smooth surface. The diameter of hyphaes was 1-2 µm. The scattered spores were the main form of spore growth, and the growth of budding spores can be seen attached to the surface of layered armor. Most of the bacteria were gathered in clumps on the ventral surface, especially in grooves. In conclusion, scanning electron microscopy can be used to preliminarily identify the pathogen involved and the degree of damage in cases where onychomycosis is clinically diagnosed, but fungal culture is negative.

  5. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Harris, Paul G.; Ireland, Terry G., E-mail: terry.ireland@brunel.ac.uk; Fern, George R.; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated. - Highlights: • Contrast enhancement are observed in secondary electron and cathodoluminescent images of phosphor particles sitting on top of others. • Backscattered electrons largely explain the observed contrast enhancement. • After glow effects in CL-micrographs of phosphors enable the determination of decay times. • Phosphor saturation can be used to determine the decay time of individual spectral transitions.

  6. Separation of image-distortion sources and magnetic-field measurement in scanning electron microscope (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jacek; Katcki, Jerzy; Oskwarek, Lukasz; Rak, Remigiusz

    2009-01-01

    The electron-microscope image distortion generated by electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an important problem for accurate imaging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Available commercial solutions to this problem utilize sophisticated hardware for EMI detection and compensation. Their efficiency depends on the complexity of distortions influence on SEM system. Selection of a proper method for reduction of the distortions is crucial. The current investigations allowed for a separation of the distortions impact on several components of SEM system. A sum of signals from distortion sources causes wavy deformations of specimen shapes in SEM images. The separation of various reasons of the distortion is based on measurements of the periodic deformations of the images for different electron beam energies and working distances between the microscope final aperture and the specimen. Using the SEM images, a direct influence of alternating magnetic field on the electron beam was distinguished. Distortions of electric signals in the scanning block of SEM were also separated. The presented method separates the direct magnetic field influence on the electron beam below the SEM final aperture (in the chamber) from its influence above this aperture (in the electron column). It also allows for the measurement of magnetic field present inside the SEM chamber. The current investigations gave practical guidelines for selecting the most efficient solution for reduction of the distortions.

  7. Scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the Oriental scops owl (Otus scops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2009-05-01

    The dorsal lingual surface of an adult owl (Otus scops) was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of the adult owl was about 1 cm long. Three parts were distinguished in the dorsal surface of the tongue: the apex, the body and the root of the tongue. The conical region between the lingual apex and lingual root was very wide area. The conical papillae of the lingual body were inclined toward the posterior of the tongue. At low magnification of scanning electron microscopy, the desquamated cells were observed in the entire dorsal surface of the lingual apex. The connective tissue cores of the epithelium of the lingual apex showed the rod-shaped protrusions. The border between the lingual apex and body was clear and the small conical papillae were observed in the lingual body. The small and large conical papillae were observed on the lingual body. The many openings of the lingual glands existed in the lingual body and lingual root.

  8. Microstructure of the water spider (Argyroneta aquatica using the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to identify the external features of the water spiders (Argyroneta aquatica collected from “The Natural Monument No. 412 Yeoncheon Eundaeri Water Spider Habitat” through observation of their microstructures using a scanning electron microscope. There is no study on the microstructures of the water spiders excluding several studies on protection plans and ecological investigations, thus giving this study considerable academic significance. Based on the scanning electron microscopy analysis, the water spider has eight simple eyes, and both of its lateral simple eyes are stuck together. A lateral bump was confirmed on the upper jaw, and the pedipalps had six joints and the legs had seven joints. The abdomen and sternum of A. aquatica have more hairs compared with those of land spiders, and its structure shows an elongated area of contact with the air bell so that the air bell can become attached to the abdomen better.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of experimental bone hacking trauma of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni-Perret, Véronique; Borg, Cybèle; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Marie-France; Staccini, Pascal; Bolla, Marc; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Muller-Bolla, Michèle

    2010-12-01

    The authors report on a macroscopic and microscopic study of human mandible bone lesions achieved by a single-blade knife and a hatchet. The aim of this work was to complete the previous data (scanning electron microscopy analysis of bone lesions made by a single-blade knife and a hatchet, on human femurs) and to compare the lesions of the femur with those of the mandible. The results indicate that the mandible is a more fragile bone, but the features observed on the mandible are quite similar to those previously observed on the femur. This work spells out the main scanning electron microscopy characteristics of sharp (bone cutting) and blunt (exerting a pressure on the bone) mechanisms on human bone. Weapon characteristics serve to explain all of these features.

  10. Visualization of Aspergillus fumigatus biofilms with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Variable Pressure-Scanning Electron Microscopy: A comparison of processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Ferreira, Jose Ag; Stevens, David A; Nazik, Hasan; Cegelski, Lynette

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus biofilms consist of a three-dimensional network of cellular hyphae and extracellular matrix. They are involved in infections of immune-compromised individuals, particularly those with cystic fibrosis. These structures are associated with persistence of infection, resistance to host immunity, and antimicrobial resistance. Thorough understanding of structure and function is imperative in the design of therapeutic drugs. Optimization of processing parameters, including aldehyde fixation, heavy metal contrasting, drying techniques and Ionic Liquid treatment, was undertaken for an ultrastructural approach to understand cellular and extracellular biofilm components. Conventional and Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy were applied to analyze the structure of biofilms attached to plastic and formed at an air-liquid interface.

  11. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    Several reviews have highlighted a number of applications of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to metals and semiconductors which show that SEAM can provide new information on surface and near-surface features of such materials, but there have been few studies attempting to determine the capabilities of SEAM for characterizing ceramic materials. We have recently observed image contrast in SEAM from residual stress fields induced in brittle materials by Vickers indentations that is strongly dependent on the electron beam chopping frequency. We have also recently developed a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in SEAM, appropriate to the brittle materials studied, that we use as a starting point in this paper for modeling the effect of residual stress fields on the generated electron acoustic signal. The influence of the electron beam chopping frequency is also considered under restrictive assumptions.

  12. Investigation on gradient material fabrication with electron beam melting based on scanning track control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new electron beam control system was developed in a general vacuum electron beam machine by assembling with industrial control computer, programmable logic control (PLC), deflection coil, data acquisition card, power amplifier, etc. In this control system, scanning track and energy distribution of electron beam could be edited off-line, real-time adjusted and controlled on-line. Ti-Mo gradient material (GM) with high temperature resistant was fabricated using the technology of electron beam melting. The melting processes include three steps, such as preheating, melting, and homogenizing. The results show that the GM prepared by melting technology has fine appearance, and it has good integrated interface with the Ti alloy. Mo and Ti elements are gradually distributed in the interface of the gradient material. The microstructure close to the Ti alloy base metal is α+β basket-waver grain, and the microstructure close to the GM is a single phase of β solid solution.

  13. A density-functional theory study of tip electronic structures in scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heesung; Longo, Roberto C; Huang, Min; Randall, John N; Wallace, Robert M; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2013-03-15

    In this work, we report a detailed analysis of the atomic and electronic structures of transition metal scanning tunneling microscopy tips: Rh, Pd, W, Ir, and Pt pyramidal models, and transition metal (TM) atom tips supported on the W surface, by means of ab initio density-functional theory methods. The d electrons of the apex atoms of the TM tips (Rh, Pd, W, Ir, and Pt tetrahedral structures) show different behaviors near the Fermi level and, especially for the W tip, dz(2) states are shown to be predominant near the Fermi level. The electronic structures of larger pyramidal TM tip structures with a single apex atom are also reported. Their obtained density of states are thoroughly discussed in terms of the different d-electron occupations of the TM tips.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of cells and tissues under fully hydrated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiberge, Stephan; Nechushtan, Amotz; Sprinzak, David; Gileadi, Opher; Behar, Vered; Zik, Ory; Chowers, Yehuda; Michaeli, Shulamit; Schlessinger, Joseph; Moses, Elisha

    2004-03-01

    A capability for scanning electron microscopy of wet biological specimens is presented. A membrane that is transparent to electrons protects the fully hydrated sample from the vacuum. The result is a hybrid technique combining the ease of use and ability to see into cells of optical microscopy with the higher resolution of electron microscopy. The resolution of low-contrast materials is approximately 100 nm, whereas in high-contrast materials the resolution can reach 10 nm. Standard immunogold techniques and heavy-metal stains can be applied and viewed in the fluid to improve the contrast. Images present a striking combination of whole-cell morphology with a wealth of internal details. A possibility for direct inspection of tissue slices transpires, imaging only the external layer of cells. Simultaneous imaging with photons excited by the electrons incorporates data on material distribution, indicating a potential for multilabeling and specific scintillating markers.

  15. Differentiation of females in Sergentomyia sensu stricto (Diptera: Psychodidae) using scanning electron microscopy of pharyngeal armatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdennbi, I; Bombard, S; Braverman, Y; Pesson, B

    1996-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of external ornamentation and internal armature of the pharynx was used to identify females of Sergentomyia sensu stricto. Five species from the eastern Mediterranean basin were compared; S. minuta clearly was separated from species of the fallax-group. Within the fallax-group, S. fallax was distinguished readily by its heart-shaped pharynx and the difference in armature between the dorsal and lateral plates.

  16. Endolithic algae and micrite envelope formation in Bahamian oolites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S.; Rex, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of Holocene Bahamian ooelites by scanning electron and light microscopy has revealed the morphology and orientation of aragonite crystals in the lamellar ooelitic envelope, and their modification by the boring activities of endolithic algae. The voids produced by these algae are found in progressive stages of being lined and filled with precipitated microcrystalline aragonite, which is similar to the process of micrite envelope formation in molluscan and other skeletal carbonate grains.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of a pink inclusion from the Allende meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, L.; Fruland, R. M.; Mckay, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope study of a fine-grained, pin, Ca-rich inclusion from the Allende meteorite has revealed strong evidence for direct condensation of its constituent minerals from a vapor. This observation extends to the alkali-bearing phases in addition to the Ca-, Al-silicates and suggests that the feldspathoids as well as the refractory silicates are solar nebular condensates.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoshin, M. K.; Ilin, N. P.; Spivak, G. V.

    1974-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used in studying the morphology and cathodoluminescence of lunar regolith particles. Surface and structure of two groups of particles are differentiated: (1) Crystalline with well defined facets and spalling surfaces, which are grains of minerals and rock fragments: and (2) amorphous, fused, and partially or entirely glazed particles. Local melting of particles and the round openings on their surfaces are attributed to secondary influence on the regolith of factors of lunar weathering and above all micrometeoric impacts.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy and calcification in amelogenesis imperfecta in anterior and posterior human teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M. C.; Ceballos, G.; García, J. M.; Rodriguez, I. A.; Gómez de Ferraris, M. E.; Campos, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Teeth fragments from members of a famil? clinically and genetically diagnosed as having amelogenesis imperfecta were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis to establish the morphological patterns and the quantitative concentration of calcium in the enamel of anterior (canine, incisor) and posterior (premolar and molar) teeth. The prism patterns in the enamel of teeth from both regions were parallel or irregularly decussate, with ...

  20. Scanning electron microscopic study of Prosorhynchoides arcuatus (Linton, 1990 (Bucephalidae: Digenea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C Cohen

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Prosorhynchoides arcuatus (Linton, 1900 from the intestine of Pomatomus saltator (L. from the Atlantic coast of the State of Rio de Janeiro is studied by scanning electron microscopy, with detailed description of tegumental spines. Comments on the synonymy of this species with Bucephalopsis callicotyle Kohn, 1962 are made. The tegument of adult P. arcuatus presents scale like and serrated spines and uniciliated sensory papillae, distributed over the body surface and is compared with other digenetic trematodes.

  1. Ultra structural studies of the surface of Hymenolepis nana by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzakham, A A; Romia, S A; Hegazi, M M

    1990-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of the surface of Hymenolepis nana indicated that dense populations of microtriches occur on scolex proper, suckers and strobila, with an average density of 20/micron2. The excellent preservation of microtriches proves the efficacy of the critical point drying method for preparing cestodes for study of SEM. The cytological structure of the tegument of H. nana corresponds in general to that of other tapeworms.

  2. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autocla...

  3. Focussed Ion Beam Milling and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Brain Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Knott, Graham; Rosset, Stéphanie; Cantoni, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes how biological samples, like brain tissue, can be imaged in three dimensions using the focussed ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM). The samples are fixed with aldehydes, heavy metal stained using osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate. They are then dehydrated with alcohol and infiltrated with resin, which is then hardened. Using a light microscope and ultramicrotome with glass knives, a small block containing the region interest close to the surface is made....

  4. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan P; Prakash H; Shah N

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If foun...

  5. METHOD FOR OBSERVATION OF DEEMBEDDED SECTIONS OF FISH GONAD BY SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a method for examining the intracellular structure of fish gonads using a scanning electron microscope(SEM). The specimen preparation procedure is similar to that for transmission electron microscopy wherein samples cut into semi-thin sections are fixed and embedded in plastic. The embedment matrix was removed by solvents. Risen-free specimens could be observed by SEM. The morphology of matured sperms in the gonad was very clear, and the oocyte internal structures appeared in three-dimensional images. Spheroidal nucleoli and yolk vesicles and several bundles of filaments adhered on the nucleoli could be viewed by SEM for the first time.

  6. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  7. Thirty per cent contrast in secondary-electron imaging by scanning field-emission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, D A; De Pietro, L G; Peter, Q; Kostanyan, A; Cabrera, H; Vindigni, A; Bähler, Th; Pescia, D; Ramsperger, U

    2016-11-01

    We perform scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in a regime where primary electrons are field-emitted from the tip and excite secondary electrons out of the target-the scanning field-emission microscopy regime (SFM). In the SFM mode, a secondary-electron contrast as high as 30% is observed when imaging a monoatomic step between a clean W(110)- and an Fe-covered W(110)-terrace. This is a figure of contrast comparable to STM. The apparent width of the monoatomic step attains the 1 nm mark, i.e. it is only marginally worse than the corresponding width observed in STM. The origin of the unexpected strong contrast in SFM is the material dependence of the secondary-electron yield and not the dependence of the transported current on the tip-target distance, typical of STM: accordingly, we expect that a technology combining STM and SFM will highlight complementary aspects of a surface while simultaneously making electrons, selected with nanometre spatial precision, available to a macroscopic environment for further processing.

  8. Focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in tissue structural research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Vladka; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco; Tkalec, Ziva Pipan; Strus, Jasna; Drobne, Damjana

    2010-10-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) are commonly used in material sciences for imaging and analysis of materials. Over the last decade, the combined FIB/SEM system has proven to be also applicable in the life sciences. We have examined the potential of the focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope system for the investigation of biological tissues of the model organism Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda). Tissue from digestive glands was prepared as for conventional SEM or as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The samples were transferred into FIB/SEM for FIB milling and an imaging operation. FIB-milled regions were secondary electron imaged, back-scattered electron imaged, or energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyzed. Our results demonstrated that FIB/SEM enables simultaneous investigation of sample gross morphology, cell surface characteristics, and subsurface structures. The same FIB-exposed regions were analyzed by EDX to provide basic compositional data. When samples were prepared as for TEM, the information obtained with FIB/SEM is comparable, though at limited magnification, to that obtained from TEM. A combination of imaging, micro-manipulation, and compositional analysis appears of particular interest in the investigation of epithelial tissues, which are subjected to various endogenous and exogenous conditions affecting their structure and function. The FIB/SEM is a promising tool for an overall examination of epithelial tissue under normal, stressed, or pathological conditions.

  9. Design of 220 GHz electronically scanned reflectarrays for confocal imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2012-09-01

    The authors analyze properties of a 220 GHz imaging system that uses a scanned reflectarray to perform electronic beam scanning of a confocal imager for applications including imaging meter-sized fields of view at 50 m standoff. Designs incorporating reflectarrays with confocal imagers have not been examined previously at these frequencies. We examine tradeoffs between array size, overall system size, and number of achievable image pixels resulting in a realistic architecture capable of meeting the needs of our application. Impacts to imaging performance are assessed through encircled energy calculations, beam pointing accuracy, and examining the number and intensity of quantization lobes that appear over the scan ranges of interest. Over the desired scan range, arrays with 1 and 2-bit phase quantization showed similar array main beam energy efficiencies. Two-bit phase quantization is advantageous in terms of pointing angle error, resulting in errors of at most 15% of the diffraction-limited beam size. However, both phase quantization cases considered resulted in spurious returns over the scan range of interest and other array layouts should be examined to eliminate potential imaging artifacts.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  11. Morphological aspects of Angiostrongylus costaricensis by light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Karina M; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Chagas-Moutinho, Vanessa A; Mota, Ester M; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Oliveira-Menezes, Aleksandra; Lenzi, Henrique

    2013-09-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a parasitic nematode that can cause severe gastrointestinal disease, known as abdominal angiostrongiliasis, in humans. This paper presents the characterization of first- and third-stage larvae and male and female adult worms of A. costaricensis by scanning electron and light microscopy. Several novel anatomical structures were identified by scanning electron microscopy, including details of the cuticular striations of the spicules in male worms and a protective flap of the cuticle covering the vulvar aperture in female worms. Other taxonomic features revealed by light microscopy include the gubernaculum and the esophageal-intestinal valve. The use of two microscopy techniques allowed a detailed characterization of the morphology of this nematode. A number of previously identified taxonomic features, such as the striated nature of the spicules and the lateral alae were confirmed; however, the use of scanning electron microscopy resulted in a reassessment of the correct number of papillae distributed around the oral opening and behind the cloacal opening. These observations, in combination with light microscopy-based characterization of the gubernaculum and esophageal valves, have allowed a more detailed description of this nematode taxonomy.

  12. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of incinerated teeth: An aid to forensic identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan A Pol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forensic dental identification of victims involved in fire accidents is often a complex and challenging endeavor. Knowledge of the charred human dentition and residues of restorative material can help in the recognition of bodies burned beyond recognition. Aim: To observe the effects of predetermined temperatures on healthy unrestored teeth and different restorative materials in restored teeth, by scanning electron microscope, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 135 extracted teeth, which were divided into four groups. Group 1-healthy unrestored teeth, group 2-teeth restored with all ceramic crowns, group 3-teeth restored with class I composite resin and group 4-teeth restored with class I glass ionomer cement (GIC. Results: The scanning electron microscope is useful in the analysis of burned teeth, as it gives fine structural details, requires only a small sample and does not destroy the already fragile specimen. Conclusion: Scanning electron microscope can be a useful tool for the characterization and study of severely burnt teeth for victim identification.

  13. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, H., E-mail: henrik.jackman@kau.se [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Krakhmalev, P. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Svensson, K. [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the image formation of free-standing carbon nanotubes in SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electron-probe shape is characterized from SEM-images. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the electron-probe shape to deconvolute SEM-images of carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a simple method for retrieval of intrinsic nanotube dimensions.

  14. Application of low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy for renal biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hiroki; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Tojo, Akihiro; Hirashima, Sayuri; Inaga, Sumire; Sakuma, Kei; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2012-09-15

    Low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) has been developed which enables the observation of soft, moist, and electrically insulating materials without any pretreatment unlike conventional scanning electron microscopy, in which samples must be solid, dry and usually electrically conductive. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of LV-SEM for renal biopsy specimens. We analyzed 20 renal biopsy samples obtained for diagnostic purposes. The sections were stained with periodic acid methenamine silver to enhance the contrast, and subsequently examined by LV-SEM. LV-SEM showed a precise and fine structure of the glomerulus in both formalin fixed paraffin and glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide-fixed epoxy resin sections up to 10,000-fold magnification. The spike formation on the basement membrane was clearly observed in the membranous nephropathy samples. Similarly to transmission electron microscopy, electron dense deposits were observed in the epoxy resin sections of the IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy samples. LV-SEM could accurately show various glomerular lesions at high magnification after a simple and rapid processing of the samples. We consider that this is a novel and useful diagnostic tool for renal pathologies.

  15. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine.

  16. Imaging three-dimensional tissue architectures by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Andrew J; P'ng, Kenneth M Y; Young, Robert D; Pinali, Christian; Knupp, Carlo; Quantock, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    In this protocol, we describe a 3D imaging technique known as 'volume electron microscopy' or 'focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM)' applied to biological tissues. A scanning electron microscope equipped with a focused gallium ion beam, used to sequentially mill away the sample surface, and a backscattered electron (BSE) detector, used to image the milled surfaces, generates a large series of images that can be combined into a 3D rendered image of stained and embedded biological tissue. Structural information over volumes of tens of thousands of cubic micrometers is possible, revealing complex microanatomy with subcellular resolution. Methods are presented for tissue processing, for the enhancement of contrast with osmium tetroxide/potassium ferricyanide, for BSE imaging, for the preparation and platinum deposition over a selected site in the embedded tissue block, and for sequential data collection with ion beam milling; all this takes approximately 90 h. The imaging conditions, procedures for alternate milling and data acquisition and techniques for processing and partitioning the 3D data set are also described; these processes take approxiamtely 30 h. The protocol is illustrated by application to developing chick cornea, in which cells organize collagen fibril bundles into complex, multilamellar structures essential for transparency in the mature connective tissue matrix. The techniques described could have wide application in a range of fields, including pathology, developmental biology, microstructural anatomy and regenerative medicine.

  17. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  18. Dynamic investigation of electron trapping and charge decay in electron-irradiated Al sub 2 O sub 3 in a scanning electron microscope: Methodology and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhfakh, S; Belhaj, M; Fakhfakh, Z; Kallel, A; Rau, E I

    2002-01-01

    The charging and discharging of polycrystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 submitted to electron-irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by means of the displacement current method. To circumvent experimental shortcomings inherent to the use of the basic sample holder, a redesign of the latter is proposed and tests are carried out to verify its operation. The effects of the primary beam accelerating voltage on charging, flashover and discharging phenomena during and after electron-irradiation are studied. The experimental results are then analyzed. In particular, the divergence between the experimental data and those predicted by the total electron emission yield approach (TEEYA) is discussed. A partial discharge was observed immediately after the end of the electron-irradiation exposure. The experimental data suggests, that the discharge is due to the evacuation to the ground, along the insulator surface, of released electrons from shallow traps at (or in the close vicinity of) the insulat...

  19. Tip alignment system in a sextupole-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, S. (The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)); Kapp, O.H. (The Department of Radiology and The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Tip alignment and replacement in ultrahigh vacuum field-emission electron microscopes is traditionally a time-consuming endeavor. A convenient autodrive system for the 200 kV scanning transmission electron microscope was developed to facilitate the alignment of field-emission tips, thus saving a great deal of experimenter time. Under computer control, a series of automatic electrical and mechanical processes are initiated to systematically adjust various parameters to effect passage of the electron beam through the various apertures of the microscope column. The task of finding the beam'' is thus performed automatically. In this process the tip holder is moved in a raster parallel to the first anode. Feedback from various detectors placed throughout the column direct the positioning of the tip for optimal alignment. This process is routinely performed in about 45 min.

  20. Novel method of simultaneous multiple immunogold localization on resin sections in high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesarova, Jana; Wandrol, Petr; Vancova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of multiple immunolabeling that is suitable for a broad spectrum of biomedical applications. The general concept is to label both sides of the ultrathin section with the thickness of 70-80 nm with different antibodies conjugated to gold nanoparticles and to distinguish the labeled side by advanced imaging methods with high resolution scanning electron microscopy, such as by correlating images acquired at different energies of primary electrons using different signals. From the Clinical Editor: The use of transmission electron microscopy has become an indispensible tool in the detection of cellular proteins. In this short but interesting article, the authors described their new method of labeling and the identification of four different proteins simultaneously, which represents another advance in imaging technique.

  1. Investigation of magnetic domains in Ni Mn Ga alloys with a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Y.; Heczko, O.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.; Lindroos, V. K.

    2005-10-01

    The magnetic domains of martensite have been investigated with a scanning electron microscope in three Ni-Mn-Ga alloys with five-layered, seven-layered and non-layered (T) martensite structure. Type I magnetic contrast provides an overview of the domain pattern. This contrast arises from the stray field of the specimen and it is observed in a secondary-electron image. The type II magnetic contrast of a backscattered electron image gives the detailed magnetic microstructure together with the crystal morphology. A stripe domain pattern is formed in all the alloys when there is one dominant martensite variant in the sample. The second minor variant might be distorted due to interaction with the magnetic domain structure of the major variant. The mechanism of the deformation is not entirely clear and a tentative explanation for this deformation is suggested.

  2. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianola, D. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayr, A.; Moenig, R.; Kraft, O. [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Volkert, C. A. [Institute for Materials Physics, Georg-August University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Major, R. C.; Cyrankowski, E.; Asif, S. A. S.; Warren, O. L. [Hysitron, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55344 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  3. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianola, D S; Sedlmayr, A; Mönig, R; Volkert, C A; Major, R C; Cyrankowski, E; Asif, S A S; Warren, O L; Kraft, O

    2011-06-01

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  4. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.Três espécies de Sifomicetas: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus, Rhizopus nigricans e um Septomiceta: Emericella nidulans foram examinados em microscopia de exploração. Esta técnica mostrou detalhes não evidenciáveis ao poder de resolução do microscópio óptico, demonstrando ser útil para o diagnóstico em micologia.

  5. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-05-25

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner.

  6. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  7. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.;

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou......We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry...... and tip. The computational images recast as constant-current-height profiles show that the most favorable molecular orientation is the adsorption of cysteine as a radical in zwitterionic form located on the bridge between the Au(I 10) atomic rows and with the amine and carboxyl group toward the solution...... bulk. The correlation between physical location and electronic contrast of the adsorbed molecules was also revealed by the computational data. The present study shows that cysteine packing in the adlayer on Au(110) from the liquid environment is in contrast to that from the ultrahigh-vacuum environment...

  8. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  9. The design of a scan signal generator for scanning electron microscope%扫描电子显微镜的扫描电路研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂晶晶; 忻云龙; 谢东珠

    2012-01-01

    A scan signal generator for scanning electron microscope is designed based on high speed,low noise digital to analog converter. The scan rate is up to 10 pixels per second. The influence of circuit noise on image resolution is discussed. A method of correcting the current nonlinearity caused by the scanning coil inductance is presented- The developed scanning circuit has been used into the scanning electron microscope DXP - 10 and there are good images have been generated.%报导了采用高速、高精度、低噪声的数模转换器设计扫描电子显微镜的扫描电路,其扫描速率可达到每秒106像素,讨论了电路中的噪声对图像分辨率的影响,提出了一种矫正扫描线圈电感所引起的电流非线性的方法,应用到扫描电子显微镜DXP-10中,得到了较好的扫描图像.

  10. A Novel Contactless Method for Characterization of Semiconductors: Surface Electron Beam Induced Voltage in Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱世秋; E.I.RAU; 杨富华; 郑厚植

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel contactless and nondestructive method called the surface electron beam induced voltage (SEBIV) method for characterizing semiconductor materials and devices. The SEBIV method is based on the detection of the surface potential induced by electron beams of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The core part of the SEBIV detection set-up is a circular metal detector placed above the sample surface. The capacitance between the circular detector and whole surface of the sample is estimated to be about 0.64pf. It is large enough for the detection of the induced surface potential. The irradiation mode of electron beam (e-beam) influences the signal generation. When the e-beam irradiates on the surface of semiconductors continuously, a differential signal is obtained. The real distribution of surface potentials can be obtained when a pulsed e-beam with a fixed frequency is used for irradiation and a lock-in amplifier is employed for detection. The polarity of induced potential depends on the structure of potential barriers and surface states of samples. The contrast of SEBIV images in SEM changes with irradiation time and e-beam intensity.

  11. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  12. Investigations of a Cretaceous limestone with spectral induced polarization and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara; Sparrembom, Charlotte; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    in early time ranges for bedrock characterization. The inverted sections showed variations within the limestone that could be caused by variations in texture and composition. Samples from a deep drilling in the Kristianstad basin were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X...... in the texture of the limestone at different levels, governed by fossil shapes and composition, proportions of calcareous cement and matrix as well as amount of silicate grains. Textural variations may have implications on the variation in Cole–Cole relaxation time and frequency factor. However, more research...

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.Sporothrix schenckii foi estudado em microscopia eletrônica. Foram observados caracteres das hífas e dos esporos, vários elementos da classificação periódica foram postos em evidência graças à micro-análise a raios X.

  14. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... and tip Fermi levels. STM here involves coherent two-step interfacial electron transfer between the redox level and the enclosing substrate and tip. We have also extended previous experimental in situ STM studies of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, adsorbed on Au(111), to cover...

  15. Lanthanum Deposition in the Stomach: Usefulness of Scanning Electron Microscopy for Its Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Tanaka, Takehiro; Ando, Akemi; Nada, Takahiro; Kimura, Kosuke; Yamauchi, Kenji; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Otsuka, Fumio; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    After having been treated with lanthanum carbonate administration for 4 years for hyperphosphatemia, a 75-year-old Japanese woman undergoing hemodialysis was diagnosed with lanthanum phosphate deposition in the stomach. The deposition, seen as white microgranules, was observed using esophagogastroduodenoscopy with magnifying observation. To the best of our knowledge, these are the minutest endoscopy images of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastric mucosa. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation enabled easier identification of the deposited material, which was visible as bright areas. The present case suggests the usefulness of SEM observation in the detection of lanthanum phosphate deposition in the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Compositional analysis of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauko, H.; Helvoort, A. T. J. van [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Zheng, C. L.; Glanvill, S. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Zhu, Y.; Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Munshi, A. M.; Fimland, B. O. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a method for compositional mapping of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As heterostructures with high accuracy and unit cell spatial resolution using quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The method is low dose relative to spectroscopic methods and insensitive to the effective source size and higher order lens aberrations. We apply the method to study the spatial variation in Al concentration in cross-sectioned GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires and quantify the concentration in the Al-rich radial band and the AlGaAs shell segments.

  17. Alcoholic liver injury: defenestration in noncirrhotic livers--a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1987-01-01

    (fractional area of fenestrae) was observed in acinar Zone 3, both in biopsies with and without Zone 3 fibrosis as judged by light microscopy. A significant reduction of porosity as shown in this study may influence the blood hepatocytic exchange and contribute to the alcohol-induced liver injury.......The fenestration of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells in 15 needle biopsies obtained from chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis was studied by scanning electron microscopy. As compared to nonalcoholics, a significant reduction in the number of fenestrae and porosity of the sinusoidal lining wall...

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of a blister roof in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Monteiro, Luciane; Marques e Silva, Ricardo; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Scheffer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa the genetic defect of anchoring fibrils leads to cleavage beneath the basement membrane, with its consequent loss. We performed scanning electron microscopy of an inverted blister roof of a case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, confirmed by immunomapping and gene sequencing. With a magnification of 2000 times a net attached to the blister roof could be easily identified. This net was composed of intertwined flat fibers. With higher magnifications, different fiber sizes could be observed, some thin fibers measuring around 80 nm and thicker ones measuring between 200 and 300 nm.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of larval instars and imago of Oestrus caucasicus (Grunin, 1948 (Diptera: Oestridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitton C.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Oestrus caucasicus (Grunin, 1948 is a larval parasite of the nasal cavities of Capra caucasica, Capra ibex and Capra pyrenaica. This study is the first description of the parasite using scanning electron microscopy. The first larval instar shows minor differences with Oestrus ovis. The second larval instar shows important synapomorphic features common to Oestrus ovis but, also, distinctive features as the spines-crown or the currycomb-shaped spines. The third larval instar shows many differences with Oestrus ovis, mostly in the ventral and dorsal spines. The imagos of the two species have closely related morphologies. This study is a contribution to a revision of phylogeny of Oestridae family.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of the collodion membrane from a self-healing collodion baby*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Isaacsson, Henrique; Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Self-healing collodion baby is a well-established subtype of this condition. We examined a male newborn, who was covered by a collodion membrane. The shed membrane was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The outer surface showed a very compact keratin without the normal elimination of corneocytes. The lateral view of the specimen revealed a very thick, horny layer. The inner surface showed the structure of lower corneocytes with polygonal contour. With higher magnifications villous projections were seen in the cell membrane. PMID:26375232

  1. A scanning electron microscopic study of impala (Aepyceros melampus sperm from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Ackerman

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Since knowledge of sperm morphological characteristics can play an important role in semen evaluation and fertilisation, baseline data on sperm ultrastructure are required. Live spermatozoa were collected from the cauda epididymis from 64 impala rams in the Kruger National Park and 5082 spermatozoa from 40 of these impala were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The mean length of impala sperm was 59.23 @ 2.7 um. The morphology of normal sperm as well as the occurrence of abnormalities were documented. The morphology of impala sperm were compared with those of other mammals. New findings on appendages of the cytoplasmic droplet are described and interpreted.

  2. Idiopathic calcinosis of the scrotum: Scanning electron microscopic study with x-ray microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuezesi, L.H.; Hollweg, G.; Lagrange, W.; Mittermayer, C. (Technical Univ., Aachen (West Germany))

    1991-03-01

    In a 31-year-old man 12 nodules up to 1 cm in diameter were observed in the scrotum; these had developed over 3 years. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of the dermal foci showed a high content of calcium and phosphorus even in nodules smaller than 1 mm in diameter. No increased mineral deposition was observed in the surrounding connective tissue, however. Scanning electron microscopy revealed finely granulated crystals, and cellular remnants giving rise to development of calcified nodules were disclosed. The results support the hypothesis of a degenerative origin of scrotal calcinosis.

  3. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) evaluation of crystal and plaque formation associated with biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S L; Ross, T J; Barton, L L

    1993-08-01

    The biofilm attributed to Desulfovibrio vulgaris growing in the presence of ferrous metals was examined with an environmental scanning electron microscope. This novel microscope produced images of iron sulfide colloids and other iron containing structures that had not been reported previously. A plaque composed of iron sulfide enveloped the surface of the corroding metal while crystals containing magnesium, iron, sulfur, and phosphorus were present in the culture where corrosion was in progress. A structure resembling the tubercule found in aerobic corrosion was observed on stainless steel undergoing biocorrosion and the elements present in this structure included sulfur, iron, chloride, calcium, potassium, and chromium.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy study of protein immobilized on SIO2 Sol-gel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.B.G. Assis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Uniform attachment of enzymes to solid surfaces is essential in the development of bio and optical sensor devices. Immobilization by adsorption according to hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature is dependent on the charges and defects of the support surfaces. Sol-gel SiO2 densified glass surfaces, frequently used as supports for protein immobilization, are evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. The model protein is globular enzyme lysozyme, deposited by adsorption on functionalized surfaces. Formation of a protein layer is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the SEM images suggest discontinuous adsorption in areas where cracks predominate on the glass surface.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic investigations on MiteStop-treated poultry red mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Nina; Klimpel, Sven; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Al Rasheid, Khaled A S; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies of the neem seed product MiteStop showed that it has a good acaricidal effect against all developmental stages of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae. In vitro tests proved an efficacy at direct contact, as well as by fumigant toxicity. Light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigations showed no clear, morphologically visible signs of an effect caused by fumigant toxicity. Direct contact with the neem product, however, seemed to be of great impact. Chicken mites turned dark brown or even black after being treated with the neem product. SEM analysis showed damages along the body surface of the mites.

  6. Morphological studies of Gross virus-induced lymphoblasts by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichikawa,Hiroyuki

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Gross virus-induced murine lymphoblasts and C-type virus particles budding from these cells were investigated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The cells appeared spindle-shaped or roughly-rounded with extensive surface features consisting of microvilli, blebs and ruffled membranes. C-type virus particles were detected on the cell membrane as small spherical particles, distinguishable from the microvilli. Clustered virions were observed in some cases. However, the distribution of virions appeared to be random. The surface of the virion was smooth and had no globular units at high magnification. These morphological observations were confirmed in ultrathin sections.

  7. Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Ahmet

    Cobalt oxides offer a rich ?eld for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of ful?lling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.

  8. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  9. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, M; Loffhagen, D; Pinhao, N; Donko, Z

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td <= E/N <= 2660Td in a scanning drift tube apparatus. The data obtained in the experiments are also applied to determine the effective steady-state Townsend ionization coefficient. These parameters are compared to the results of previous experimental studies, as well as to results of various kinetic computations: solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation under different approximations (multiterm and density gradient expansions) and Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental data extend the range of E/N compared with previous measurements and are consistent with most of the transport parameters obtained in these earlier studies. The computational results point out the range of applicability of the respective approaches to determine the different measured tr...

  10. Thermal Evolution of Organic Matter in Source Rocks—Experimental and Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜开侠; 潘小明

    1991-01-01

    Five major froms(lamellar,banded,crack-like,dissceminated and segregated encrustation(of organic matter distribution in sourc rocks have been revealed under scanning electron microscope by using the heavy metal staining technique.The degree of organic impregnation is related to the amount of liquied hydrocarbons in the rocks,and from this relationship a rough estimation of organic matter can be made on the basis of electron microscopic observations.In conjunction with experimental studies it has been found that the distribution forms of organic matter are a function of its maturity in the process of thermal evolution and accordingly some microscopic criteria can be developed for the assessment of source rocks.

  11. Prospects for lithium imaging using annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Lugg, N.R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    There is strong interest in lithium imaging, particularly because of its significance in battery materials. However, light atoms only scatter electrons weakly and atomic resolution direct imaging of lithium has proven difficult. This paper explores theoretically the conditions under which lithium columns can be expected to be directly visible using annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy. A detailed discussion is given of the controllable parameters and the conditions most favourable for lithium imaging. -- Highlights: {yields} Optimum conditions to image Li columns in Li-bearing materials with ABF are explored. {yields} Higher accelerating voltages give better contrast at a given resolution. {yields} Aperture size must compromise between resolution and good coupling to the column. {yields} Samples with small along-column interatomic spacing between Li atoms are best. {yields} The trends observed are consistent with prediction based on the s-state model.

  12. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Compact device for cleaning scanner-mounted scanning tunneling microscope tips using electron bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, D.; Worbes, L.; Kittel, A.

    2011-08-01

    Most scanning probe techniques rely on the assumption that both sample and tip are free from adsorbates, residues, and oxide not deposited intentionally. Getting a clean sample surface can be readily accomplished by applying ion sputtering and subsequent annealing, whereas finding an adequate treatment for tips is much more complicated. The method of choice would effectively desorb undesired compounds without reducing the sharpness or the general geometry of the tip. Several devices which employ accelerated electrons to achieve this are described in the literature. To minimize both the effort to implement this technique in a UHV chamber and the overall duration of the cleaning procedure, we constructed a compact electron source fitted into a sample holder, which can be operated in a standard Omicron variable-temperature (VT)-STM while the tip stays in place. This way a maximum of compatibility with existing systems is achieved and short turnaround times are possible for tip cleaning.

  14. Scanning-electron-microscopy observations and mechanical characteristics of ion-beam-sputtered surgical implant alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.; Meyer, M. L.; Ling, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An electron bombardment ion thruster was used as an ion source to sputter the surfaces of orthopedic prosthetic metals. Scanning electron microscopy photomicrographs were made of each ion beam textured surface. The effect of ion texturing an implant surface on its bond to bone cement was investigated. A Co-Cr-W alloy and surgical stainless steel were used as representative hard tissue implant materials to determine effects of ion texturing on bulk mechanical properties. Work was done to determine the effect of substrate temperature on the development of an ion textured surface microstructure. Results indicate that the ultimate strength of the bulk materials is unchanged by ion texturing and that the microstructure will develop more rapidly if the substrate is heated prior to ion texturing.

  15. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging of subgrain boundaries, twins and planar deformation features in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    The study of deformation features has been of great importance to determine deformation mechanisms in quartz. Relevant microstructures in both growth and deformation processes include dislocations, subgrains, subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twins and planar deformation features (PDFs). Dislocations and twin boundaries are most commonly imaged using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), because these cannot directly be observed using light microscopy, in contrast to PDFs. Here, we show that red-filtered cathodoluminescence imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a useful method to visualise subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twin boundaries. Because standard petrographic thin sections can be studied in the SEM, the observed structures can be directly and easily correlated to light microscopy studies. In contrast to TEM preparation methods, SEM techniques are non-destructive to the area of interest on a petrographic thin section.

  16. A new method for measurement of the vitrification rate of earthenware texture by scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun Jung; Kim, Su Kyeong; Han, Min Su; Lee, Eun Woo; Heo, Jun Su; Lee, Han Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    A new method for determining the vitrification rate of pottery depending on the firing temperature was devised using secondary electron images (SEI) of scanning electron microscope (SEM). Several tests were performed to establish the appropriate operating conditions of SEM and reproducibility as well as to examine the applicability of the method. The grayscale values converted from each pixel of SEI were used to determine the vitrification rate of pottery, which in our study were artificially fired specimens composed of three types of clay. A comparison between the vitrification rate value and appearance temperature of minerals shows that mullite formation starts at 1,100°C, during which the vitrification rate rapidly increases by over 10%. In consequence, the result presented here demonstrates that the new method can be applied to estimate the firing temperature of pottery.

  17. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections. PMID:27646194

  18. Formation of Three-Way Scanning Electron Microscope Moiré on Micro/Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-way scanning electron microscope (SEM moiré was first generated using a designed three-way electron beam (EB in an SEM. The spot-type three-way SEM moiré comes from the interference between the three-way EB and the specimen grating in which the periodic cells are arranged in a triangular manner. The deformation and the structure information of the specimen grating in three directions can be simultaneously obtained from the three-way SEM moiré. The design considerations of the three-way EB were discussed. As an illustration, the three-way SEM moiré spots produced on a silicon slide were presented. The proposed three-way SEM moiré method is expected to characterize micro/nanostructures in triangular or hexagonal arrangements in three directions at the same time.

  19. High contrast en bloc staining of neuronal tissue for field emission scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Juan C.; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Hayworth, Kenneth; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Smith, Stephen J; Buchanan, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    Conventional heavy metal post staining methods on thin sections lend contrast but often cause contamination. To avoid this problem, we tested several en bloc staining techniques to contrast tissue in serial sections mounted on solid substrates for examination by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Because FESEM section imaging requires that specimens have higher contrast and greater electrical conductivity than transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples, our technique utilizes osmium impregnation (OTO) to make the samples conductive while heavily staining membranes for segmentation studies. Combining this step with other classic heavy metal en bloc stains including uranyl acetate, lead aspartate, copper sulfate and lead citrate produced clean, highly contrasted TEM and SEM samples of insect, fish, and mammalian nervous system. This protocol takes 7–15 days to prepare resin embedded tissue, cut sections and produce serial section images. PMID:22240582

  20. Scanning transmission electron microscopic tomography of cortical bone using Z-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth; Nan, Feihong; Botton, Gianluigi A; Schwarcz, Henry P

    2013-06-01

    Previously we presented (McNally et al., 2012) a model for the ultrastructure of bone showing that the mineral resides principally outside collagen fibrils in the form of 5 nm thick mineral structures hundreds of nanometers long oriented parallel to the fibrils. Here we use high-angle annular dark-field electron tomography in the scanning transmission electron microscope to confirm this model and further elucidate the composite structure. Views of a section cut parallel to the fibril axes show bundles of mineral structures extending parallel to the fibrils and encircling them. The mineral density inside the fibrils is too low to be visualized in these tomographic images. A section cut perpendicular to the fibril axes, shows quasi-circular walls composed of mineral structures, wrapping around apparently empty holes marking the sites of fibrils. These images confirm our original model that the majority of mineral in bone resides outside the collagen fibrils.

  1. Fabrication of gradient material by electron beam smelting based on scanning track control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shanglei; XUE Xiaohuai; LOU Songnian; LU Fenggui

    2007-01-01

    A new electron beam (EB) control system was developed in a general vacuum EB machine by equipping it with an industrial control computer, programmable logic control (PLC), deflection coil, data acquisition card, power amplifier, etc. In this control system, the scanning track and energy distribution of the EB could be edited off-line,adjusted in real-time, and controlled on-line. Ti-Mo gradient material (GM) with high temperature resistance was fabri-cated using electron beam smelting (EBS) control. The smelting processes include three steps such as preheating,smelting, and homogenizing. The results show that GM pre-pared by using smelting technology has fine appearance, and has good integrated interface with Ti alloy. The Mo and Ti elements are gradual diversification in the interface of the gradient material. The microstructure near the Ti alloy base metal is α + β basket-waver grain, and the microstructure near GM is single phase of β solid solution.

  2. Segmentation of scanning electron microscopy images from natural rubber samples with gold nanoparticles using starlet wavelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Alexandre Fioravante; Cabrera, Flávio Camargo; Pagamisse, Aylton; Job, Aldo Eloizo

    2014-01-01

    Electronic microscopy has been used for morphology evaluation of different materials structures. However, microscopy results may be affected by several factors. Image processing methods can be used to correct and improve the quality of these results. In this article, we propose an algorithm based on starlets to perform the segmentation of scanning electron microscopy images. An application is presented in order to locate gold nanoparticles in natural rubber membranes. In this application, our method showed accuracy greater than 85% for all test images. Results given by this method will be used in future studies, to computationally estimate the density distribution of gold nanoparticles in natural rubber samples and to predict reduction kinetics of gold nanoparticles at different time periods.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy characterization of the geometric and electronic structure of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, W. J.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) methods are used to characterize hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces prepared by a novel method. The surface preparation method is used to expose the Si-SiO2 interface. STM images directly reveal the topographic structure of the Si-SiO2 interface. The dependence of interface topography on oxide preparation conditions observed by STM is compared to the results of conventional surface characterization methods. Also, the electronic structure of the hydrogen-terminated surface is studied by STM spectroscopy. The near-ideal electronic structure of this surface enables direct tunnel spectroscopy measurements of Schottky barrier phenomena. In addition, this method enables probing of semiconductor subsurface properties by STM.

  4. Modification of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Measurement of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Satcher; Hong, Jeongmin; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic memory and logic devices show great promise for integration with, and even replacement of, conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) architectures. In order to characterize materials and deposition techniques for these devices, ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) is used. BEEM is a spatially resolved metrological tool most commonly used for subsurface interface structures at the nanometer scale. We modify a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform BEEM measurement via design and fabrication of a novel sample stage. Furthermore, we design and fabricate an external magnetic field source that encapsulates the sample stage, setting the foundation for future measurement of ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM). Instrumentation of the device and characterization of a sample with an ohmic interface, Ni-Si, are implemented and discussed. With support from National Science Foundation Award ECCS-0939514.

  5. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  6. The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunia (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima as revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muszyński

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunias was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The pollen grain wall is developed into characteristic pattern of convulations.

  7. Antennulary sensory organs in cyprids of Octolasmis and Lepas (Crustacea: Thecostraca: Cirripedia: Thoracica): a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomsterberg, Mikkel; Høeg, Jens T; Jeffries, William B;

    2004-01-01

    Cypris larvae of the pedunculate barnacles Octolasmis angulata (Poecilasmatidae), Lepas australis, L. pectinata, and Dosima fascicularis (Lepadidae) were studied with scanning electron microscopy, focusing on the sensory setae and the attachment disc on the antennules. The antennules of O. angulata...

  8. A scanning electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Jacqueline; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The compound, 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine, was synthesized in the laboratory; an introductory level electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure was conducted using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The structure of these crystals was compared with the macrostructure of the crystal of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridinium bromide, the hydrobromic salt of the compound which was also synthesized in the laboratory. A scanning electron microscopy crystal study was combined with a study of the principle of the electron microscope.

  9. Microcomputer-Assisted Biomass Determination of Plankton Bacteria on Scanning Electron Micrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krambeck, Christiane; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Overbeck, Jürgen

    1981-01-01

    Although biovolume is a better measure of biomass than is cell number, biovolumes have rarely been measured because their evaluation is extremely time-consuming. We developed a microcomputer system that assists cell size measurements on images of filtered plankton: scanning electron micrograph negatives were projected on a digitizer field, bacterial length and width were marked by a cursor, and coordinates were directly transferred to an MOS 6502 microcomputer (KIM 1). The dialogue program BABI organized and controlled the digitizer measurements in cooperation with the user, enabled corrections, and printed out results with 95% confidence limits and sample description. The time for scanning electron micrograph preparation was reduced to 15 min (quick transfer to Freon 113 during filtration and air drying). Altogether, this biovolume determination took about 2.5 h for confidence limits of ±15%. Examples are given for applications of the method: (i) comparison of 10 lakes (with specific activities for glucose uptake and for heterotrophic CO2 fixation); (ii) ranges of biomass parameters in one lake; (iii) diurnal cycles (with synchronizing effects, uptake of algal exudates, and calculation of daily growth). This method is discussed in relation to other biomass methods (epifluorescent microscopy, lipopolysaccharide technique, frequency of dividing cells) and the problem of biovolume-to-carbon conversions. Images PMID:16345807

  10. New Aspidoderidae species parasite of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae): a light and scanning electron microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Moutinho, V A; Sant'anna, V; Oliveira-Menezes, A; De Souza, W

    2014-02-01

    Nematodes of the family Aspidoderidae (Nematoda: Heterakoidea) Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, are widely distributed in the Americas. The family Aspidoderidae includes the subfamilies Aspidoderinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, and Lauroiinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1951. These two subfamilies are delineated by the presence or absence of cephalic cordons at the anterior region. The nematodes in the subfamily Aspidoderinae, which includes the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are represented by nematodes with anterior cephalic cordons at the anterior end. The nematodes of the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are found in the cecum and large intestine of mammals of the orders Edentata, Marsupialia and Rodentia. Species within this genus have many morphological similarities. The use of scanning electron microscopy allows the specific characterization of the species within this genus. In the present work, we describe a new species of Aspidodera parasite of the large intestine of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae) Wied-Neuwied, 1826, collected from Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro. The combination of light and scanning electron microscopy allowed us a detailed analysis of this nematode.

  11. Microfluidic device for a rapid immobilization of zebrafish larvae in environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Jin; Zhu, Feng; Skommer, Joanna; Hall, Chris J; Crosier, Philip S; Cialkowski, Michal; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Small vertebrate model organisms have recently gained popularity as attractive experimental models that enhance our understanding of human tissue and organ development. Despite a large body of evidence using optical spectroscopy for the characterization of small model organism on chip-based devices, no attempts have been so far made to interface microfabricated technologies with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Conventional scanning electron microscopy requires high vacuum environments and biological samples must be, therefore, submitted to many preparative procedures to dehydrate, fix, and subsequently stain the sample with gold-palladium deposition. This process is inherently low-throughput and can introduce many analytical artifacts. This work describes a proof-of-concept microfluidic chip-based system for immobilizing zebrafish larvae for ESEM imaging that is performed in a gaseous atmosphere, under low vacuum mode and without any need for sample staining protocols. The microfabricated technology provides a user-friendly and simple interface to perform ESEM imaging on zebrafish larvae. Presented lab-on-a-chip device was fabricated using a high-speed infrared laser micromachining in a biocompatible poly(methyl methacrylate) thermoplastic. It consisted of a reservoir with multiple semispherical microwells designed to hold the yolk of dechorionated zebrafish larvae. Immobilization of the larvae was achieved by a gentle suction generated during blotting of the medium. Trapping region allowed for multiple specimens to be conveniently positioned on the chip-based device within few minutes for ESEM imaging.

  12. Analysis of acute impact of oleoresin capsicum on rat nasal mucosa using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Tolgahan; Acar, Mustafa; Olgun, Yüksel; Dağ, İlknur; Cengiz, Betül Peker; Cingi, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of acute cellular changes seen in nasal mucosa of Wistar-Albino rats exposed to different doses of oleoresin capsicum for various time periods by means of scanning electron microscopy. Thirty-five Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups of seven rats each. 6-gram oleoresin capsicum per second was sprayed into cages of the groups except group 1. Spray times and duration of exposure to pepper gasses were different for each group. Thirty minutes after the exposure, the animals were killed and specimens from their nasal mucosas were harvested and examined under scanning electron microscope. Mucosal damage was scored from 0-4 points. Mean values of nasal mucosa damage scores of the groups were calculated and compared statistically. Average damage scores of the groups exposed to identical doses of oleoresin capsicum for various exposure times were compared and a statistically significant difference was seen between Groups 2 and 3 (p 0.05). Average damage scores of the groups exposed to various doses for identical exposure times were compared, and statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 2 and 4 and also Groups 3 and 5 (p mucosa. The extent of these destructive changes increases with the prolonged exposure to higher doses. Besides, exposure time also stands out as an influential factor on the extent of the destructive changes.

  13. Anatomical descriptions of silicified woods from Madagascar and Indonesia by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chul Jong; Kim, Ki Woo

    2008-10-01

    Fine structure and tissue substitution by minerals were investigated in silicified woods from Madagascar and Indonesia by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. The silicified woods maintained the exterior morphology of once grown trees and showed typical inner structures of conifers. Radial planes of the silicified wood from Madagascar revealed tracheids as a major component of the axial system in the secondary xylem. Tracheids were mainly characterized by numerous bordered pits where a thickening in the middle (torus) was surrounded with the membrane (margo). The torus appeared to contrast with the fibrillar network of the margo. As a component of the axial system in the secondary phloem, sieve elements were found to have many sieve pores that were filled with seemingly crystalline materials. To correlate the colors of the silicified wood from Indonesia with elemental composition, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry was employed in this study. Silicon was present as a basic component of the silicified wood. Calcium and iron were detected from red-colored regions, whereas magnesium was found in blue-colored regions. These results suggest that tissues of silicified woods had been substituted by minerals over the past period, while retaining the inherent morphology of the tree species. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis could be applied to unravel structural details and composition of plant fossils in palaeobotany.

  14. Analysis of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.M.; Schumacher, J.O.; Zobel, M.; Hebling, C. [Fraunhofer Institute of Solar Energy System, Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-08-18

    To date, the available equipment for characterising the microstructure of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is still not well developed. For example, applying the normal scanning electron microscope (SEM) only provides information on the dry structure of MEAs. This paper presents a microstructure analysis method of MEAs in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The microstructure analysis in this paper utilises the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which shows its advantage on the sample microstructure analysis in wet mode. When water is present, the characteristics of the MEA, especially the hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic properties, are distinguishable on the ESEM images. With proper temperature and pressure control, the water distribution within both the membrane and the catalyst layer can be viewed by ESEM. Based on ESEM measurement and mercury porosity measurement, the distributions of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pores in MEA have been analyzed. By means of ESEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), a degraded MEA is characterized. The microstructure change of the degraded MEA has been discussed. The results provide helpful information for the understanding of MEAs in PEMFC. (author)

  15. The identification of black carbon particles with the analytical scanning electron microscope. Methods and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffyn-Egli, P. [MicroChem, Geochemistry Consultants, East Jeddore, Nova Scotia (Canada); Potter, T.M.; Leonard, J.D.; Pocklington, R. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1997-04-09

    Combustion of fossil fuel and vegetation produces large quantities of black carbon particles (BCP) which are dispersed by winds over large areas. Once deposited in the sediment, BCP constitute an historic record of anthropogenic activities and wildfires. For BCP to be significant environmental indicators, it is necessary to determine their source as precisely as possible. A method has been developed to differentiate BCP from other carbonaceous particles, and to assign them to coal, oil, or biomass combustion using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an elemental detector (Analytical Scanning Electron Microscope, ASEM). BCP were identified in the ASEM as particles with an O/C atomic ratio of less than 0.15. Morphology (shape and surface texture) and trace element content (S and Cl) were used to classify BCP according to source using samples of known origin (oil, coal and wood fly-ash) and marine sediment samples from Halifax Inlet, which has undergone progressive urbanisation and industrialization over the last 250 years. The method is applicable to a wide size range of BCP and complete isolation of the BCP from the rest of the sample is not necessary

  16. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  17. A Quantitative Nanodiffraction System for Ultrahigh Vacuum Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, Gary G.; Koch, Christoph; Spence, John C. H.

    2003-10-01

    Of all the long-lived particles available as probes of condensed matter, and of all the signals available on a modern electron microscope, electron nanodiffraction patterns provide the strongest signal from the smallest volume. The technique is therefore perfectly suited to nanostructural investigations in inorganic chemistry and materials science. The Vacuum Generators HB501S, an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) variant of the HB501 scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), with side-entry double-tilt stage, specimen preparation and analysis chamber, three postspecimen lenses, and cold field-emission tip with integral magnetic gun lens, has therefore been modified to optimize nanodiffraction and quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction (QCBED) performance. A one-micrometer grain-size phosphor screen lying on a fiber-optic faceplate atop the instrument is fiber-optically coupled to a 2048 × 2048 charge-coupled device (CCD), 16-bit camera. This arrangement promises to provide much greater sensitivity, larger dynamic range, and a better modulation transfer function (MTF) than conventional single crystal scintillator (YAG) CCD systems, with noticeable absence of cross talk between pixels. The design of the nanodiffraction detector system is discussed, the gain of the detector is measured, the spherical aberration constant of the objective lens is measured by the Ronchigram method, and preliminary results from the modified instrument are shown.

  18. Is Canada ready for patient accessible electronic health records? A national scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eysenbach Gunther

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to personal health information through the electronic health record (EHR is an innovative means to enable people to be active participants in their own health care. Currently this is not an available option for consumers of health. The absence of a key technology, the EHR, is a significant obstacle to providing patient accessible electronic records. To assess the readiness for the implementation and adoption of EHRs in Canada, a national scan was conducted to determine organizational readiness and willingness for patient accessible electronic records. Methods A survey was conducted of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs of Canadian public and acute care hospitals. Results Two hundred thirteen emails were sent to CEOs of Canadian general and acute care hospitals, with a 39% response rate. Over half (54.2% of hospitals had some sort of EHR, but few had a record that was predominately electronic. Financial resources were identified as the most important barrier to providing patients access to their EHR and there was a divergence in perceptions from healthcare providers and what they thought patients would want in terms of access to the EHR, with providers being less willing to provide access and patients desire for greater access to the full record. Conclusion As the use of EHRs becomes more commonplace, organizations should explore the possibility of responding to patient needs for clinical information by providing access to their EHR. The best way to achieve this is still being debated.

  19. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladár, András E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  20. Sample preparation for scanning electron microscopy of plant surfaces--horses for courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, A K; Bond, J; Gaskin, R E

    2008-12-01

    Plant tissues must be dehydrated for observation in most electron microscopes. Although a number of sample processing techniques have been developed for preserving plant tissues in their original form and structure, none of them are guaranteed artefact-free. The current paper reviews common scanning electron microscopy techniques and the sample preparation methods employed for visualisation of leaves under specific types of electron microscopes. Common artefacts introduced by specific techniques on different leaf types are discussed. Comparative examples are depicted from our lab using similar techniques; the pros and cons for specific techniques are discussed. New promising techniques and microscopes, which can alleviate some of the problems encountered in conventional methods of leaf sample processing and visualisation, are also discussed. It is concluded that the choice of technique for a specific leaf sample is dictated by the surface features that need to be preserved (such as trichomes, epidermal cells or wax microstructure), the resolution to be achieved, availability of the appropriate processing equipment and the technical capabilities of the available electron microscope.

  1. Secretory glands and microvascular systems imaged in aqueous solution by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazawa, Toshiko; Nakamura, Naotoshi; Sato, Mari; Sato, Chikara

    2016-12-01

    Exocrine glands, e.g., salivary and pancreatic glands, play an important role in digestive enzyme secretion, while endocrine glands, e.g., pancreatic islets, secrete hormones that regulate blood glucose levels. The dysfunction of these secretory organs immediately leads to various diseases, such as diabetes or Sjögren's syndrome, by poorly understood mechanisms. Gland-related diseases have been studied by optical microscopy (OM), and at higher resolution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of Epon embedded samples, which necessitates hydrophobic sample pretreatment. Here, we report the direct observation of tissue in aqueous solution by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM). Salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and pancreas were fixed, sectioned into slabs, stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA), and inspected in radical scavenger d-glucose solution from below by an inverted scanning electron microscopy (SEM), guided by optical microscopy from above to target the tissue substructures. A 2- to 3-µm specimen thickness was visualized by the SEM. In secretory cells, cytoplasmic vesicles and other organelles were clearly imaged at high resolution, and the former could be classified according to the degree of PTA staining. In islets of Langerhans, the microvascular system used as an outlet by the secretory cells was also clearly observed. Microvascular system is also critically involved in the onset of diabetic complications and was clearly visible in subcutaneous tissue imaged by ASEM. The results suggest the use of in-solution ASEM for histology and to study vesicle secretion systems. Further, the high-throughput of ASEM makes it a potential tool for the diagnosis of exocrine and endocrine-related diseases.

  2. Fibrous architecture of cementodentinal junction in disease: A scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cementodentinal junction (CDJ forms a biological and structural link between cementum and dentin. This biological link is regarded as a distinct tissue in its own right. Certain important proteins responsible for periodontal regeneration are said to be present in this tissue. Few studies have described the structure and composition of this layer by light and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic studies pertaining to CDJ in health and disease are few and documentation of periodontal pathological changes of CDJ is unclear. In the first phase of our study, the collagenous architecture of CDJ of healthy teeth has been reported. Aim: The objective of this study is to observe and report periodontal pathological changes in the fibrous or collagenous architecture of CDJ of periodontitis-affected teeth and discuss the probable clinical implications of CDJ in disease.Materials and Methods: Twenty periodontitis-affected teeth were collected and processed for observing under a scanning electron microscope. Results: The results are as follows: Increased width of interface at CDJ in periodontitis samples (7.1 μ compared to that of healthy samples; fewer areas of fiber intermingling at CDJ in periodontitis samples as compared to healthy samples; frequent detachment of cementum from dentin during sodium hydroxide maceration of samples. Conclusion: It may be inferred from results that there is a possibility of a definite weakening of CDJ in periodontally affected root surfaces and we believe that clinical procedures such as scaling and root planning may have a detrimental effect on the cementodentinal attachment of periodontally involved root surfaces.

  3. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L. D.; Rivas, J.; José-Yacamán, M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS2 will be discussed. MoS2-based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important.

  4. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of lateral and vertical size of nanoparticles using transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, E.; Bug, M. U.; Bergmann, D.; Cizmar, P.; Frase, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) enables both the measurement of the lateral and vertical size (thickness) of nanoparticles. The lateral size is measured with a previously described technique where the particle boundary is determined in the TSEM image. Particle thickness is deduced from the TSEM signal level measured at the centre of the particle, which requires prior knowledge of the expected TSEM signal level. We applied different and well-known Monte-Carlo based simulation tools (Geant4 and MCSEM) to describe the electron diffusion in solid states and to calculate the expected TSEM signals taking into account particle and instrument properties. The simulation results of the different simulation models differ slightly revealing current limits of small-angle and low-energy electron scattering modelling in solid states. Nonetheless, the method allows one to correlate lateral and vertical particle thickness and thus to obtain additional information about the 3D morphology of nanoparticles. We demonstrate the method for silica particles with sizes in the range of about 10 nm–100 nm.

  6. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B Peckys

    Full Text Available Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7 were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM laboratory.

  7. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of residual stresses in ceramics - Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional mathematical model of signal generation and contrast in brittle materials and uses the model to simulate the effect of residual stress fields on the scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM)-generated electron acoustic signal. According to the model, a positive (tensile) strain produces an increase in the output signal, whereas a negative (compressive) strain produces a decrease in the ouput signal. Dark field contrast conditions occur at a chopping frequency at which V2 - V1 is greater than 0 (where V2 = V is the SEAM output in a region of residual stresses, and V1 is the output in a stress-free region of the sample). Under ideal conditions (maximum contrast) V1 approaches zero. It was found that tensile strains of the order 0.2-0.3 percent, possible in brittle materials, would produce a variation of the acoustic output signal of the order 10 nV (about 1 percent), well within the image contrast and signal processing capability of the SEAM electronics.

  8. Direct imaging of defect formation in strained organic flexible electronics by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Tobias; Travaglini, Lorenzo; Lai, Stefano; Patruno, Luca; de Miranda, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Cosseddu, Piero; Fraboni, Beatrice

    2016-12-01

    The development of new materials and devices for flexible electronics depends crucially on the understanding of how strain affects electronic material properties at the nano-scale. Scanning Kelvin-Probe Microscopy (SKPM) is a unique technique for nanoelectronic investigations as it combines non-invasive measurement of surface topography and surface electrical potential. Here we show that SKPM in non-contact mode is feasible on deformed flexible samples and allows to identify strain induced electronic defects. As an example we apply the technique to investigate the strain response of organic thin film transistors containing TIPS-pentacene patterned on polymer foils. Controlled surface strain is induced in the semiconducting layer by bending the transistor substrate. The amount of local strain is quantified by a mathematical model describing the bending mechanics. We find that the step-wise reduction of device performance at critical bending radii is caused by the formation of nano-cracks in the microcrystal morphology of the TIPS-pentacene film. The cracks are easily identified due to the abrupt variation in SKPM surface potential caused by a local increase in resistance. Importantly, the strong surface adhesion of microcrystals to the elastic dielectric allows to maintain a conductive path also after fracture thus providing the opportunity to attenuate strain effects.

  9. Signal generation in an isotropic medium in scanning electron acoustic microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Menglu; PENG Ruolong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the research in Ref. [5][Materials Science and Engineering, 1989; A122:57-63], an improved model of heat source is set up, the different modes of Lamb wave in an isotropic sample generated by a chopped electron beam at frequency f are obtained with integral transform and normal function expansion method, and the output signal of PZT coupled at the back surface of the sample is found out. The generation mechanism of SEAM (Scanning Electron Acoustic Microscopy) signal is discussed. It shows that the SEAM is a near field imaging technique with high spatial resolution and its best lateral spatial resolution is about 2√2a (a is the radius of the focused electron beam).Some of experimental results of SEAM images are presented in the paper and it shows that the spatial resolution of SEAM is better than 0.5 μm and smaller than the thermal diffusion length of the sample. Therefore the character of near field imaging in SEAM is also proved experimentally.

  10. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Maschmann, Matthew R., E-mail: MaschmannM@missouri.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Kim, Sanha; Hart, A. John [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Slinker, Keith [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RX, Air Force Research Lab, Ohio 45433 (United States); Universal Technology Corporation, Beavercreek, Ohio 45424 (United States); Ehlert, Gregory J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RX, Air Force Research Lab, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0–100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm{sup 3}/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  11. A scanning electron microscope method for automated, quantitative analysis of mineral matter in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Ward, C.R. [R.A. Creelman and Associates, Epping, NSW (Australia)

    1996-07-01

    Quantitative mineralogical analysis has been carried out in a series of nine coal samples from Australia, South Africa and China using a newly-developed automated image analysis system coupled to a scanning electron microscopy. The image analysis system (QEM{asterisk}SEM) gathers X-ray spectra and backscattered electron data from a number of points on a conventional grain-mount polished section under the SEM, and interprets the data from each point in mineralogical terms. The cumulative data in each case was integrated to provide a volumetric modal analysis of the species present in the coal samples, expressed as percentages of the respective coals` mineral matter. Comparison was made of the QEM{asterisk}SEM results to data obtained from the same samples using other methods of quantitative mineralogical analysis, namely X-ray diffraction of the low-temperature oxygen-plasma ash and normative calculation from the (high-temperature) ash analysis and carbonate CO{sub 2} data. Good agreement was obtained from all three methods for quartz in the coals, and also for most of the iron-bearing minerals. The correlation between results from the different methods was less strong, however, for individual clay minerals, or for minerals such as calcite, dolomite and phosphate species that made up only relatively small proportions of the mineral matter. The image analysis approach, using the electron microscope for mineralogical studies, has significant potential as a supplement to optical microscopy in quantitative coal characterisation. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Scanning electron microscope studies of bone samples: Influence of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rahul; Chowdhury, Parimal; Ali, Nawab

    2007-08-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with backscatter and secondary electron emission detectors plus a Si(Li) detector for photon yield measurements was used to study bone samples from skull and leg of mice and rats. These animals were either suspended by their tail to induce simulated microgravity, characterized as hind-limb suspension (HLS) or not suspended (control). Analyses of the SEM images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra using Si(Li) detector indicate variation in the lattice structures, and in intensities of the characteristics X-rays, produced from the exposed bone surface due to its interaction with the electron beam. Using Flame software, the X-ray spectra were analyzed and normalized ratios of the elements determined. The elemental analysis indicated a variation in the density of calcium, potassium, and oxygen near the knee joints and near the sutures in the skull bones. The comparison of simulated microgravity subjected samples of the rat skull bones with that of the control samples revealed that in the suture region there was a large increase in the ratio of calcium, and to some degree for phosphorus, suggesting simulated microgravity affects distribution of these elements. Elemental composition for control samples with depth (within the cross section of the leg bones) revealed decrease of oxygen and increase of calcium in the first millimeter of the bone depth after which the relative percentage of elements stayed constant.

  13. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses of the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGeros, R Z; Orly, I; LeGeros, J P; Gomez, C; Kazimiroff, J; Tarpley, T; Kerebel, B

    1988-03-01

    A review of the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalyses in the study of dental calculus showed that such studies provided confirmatory and supplementary data on the morphological features of human dental calculi but gave only limited information on the identity of the crystalline or inorganic components. This study aimed to explore the potential of combined SEM and microanalyses in the identification of the crystalline components of the human and animal dental calculi. Human and animal calculi were analyzed. Identification of the crystalline components were made based on the combined information of the morphology (SEM) and Ca/P molar ratios of the crystals with the morphology and Ca/P molar ratio of synthetic calcium phosphates (brushite or DCPD; octacalcium phosphate, OCP; Mg-substituted whitlockite, beta-TCMP; CO3-substituted apatite, (CHA); and calcite. SEM showed similarities in morphological features of human and animal dental calculi but differences in the forms of crystals present. Microanalyses and crystal morphology data suggested the presence of CaCO3 (calcite) and CHA in the animal (cat, dog, tiger) and of OCP, beta-TCMP and CHA in human dental calculi. X-ray diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption analyses confirmed these results. This exploratory study demonstrated that by taking into consideration what is known about the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi, combined SEM and microanalyses can provide qualitative identification.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses of the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGeros, R.Z.; Orly, I.; LeGeros, J.P.; Gomez, C.; Kazimiroff, J.; Tarpley, T.; Kerebel, B.

    1988-03-01

    A review of the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalyses in the study of dental calculus showed that such studies provided confirmatory and supplementary data on the morphological features of human dental calculi but gave only limited information on the identity of the crystalline or inorganic components. This study aimed to explore the potential of combined SEM and microanalyses in the identification of the crystalline components of the human and animal dental calculi. Human and animal calculi were analyzed. Identification of the crystalline components were made based on the combined information of the morphology (SEM) and Ca/P molar ratios of the crystals with the morphology and Ca/P molar ratio of synthetic calcium phosphates (brushite or DCPD; octacalcium phosphate, OCP; Mg-substituted whitlockite, beta-TCMP; CO/sub 3/-substituted apatite, (CHA); and calcite. SEM showed similarities in morphological features of human and animal dental calculi but differences in the forms of crystals present. Microanalyses and crystal morphology data suggested the presence of CaCO/sub 3/ (calcite) and CHA in the animal (cat, dog, tiger) and of OCP, beta-TCMP and CHA in human dental calculi. X-ray diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption analyses confirmed these results. This exploratory study demonstrated that by taking into consideration what is known about the crystalline components of human and animal dental calculi, combined SEM and microanalyses can provide qualitative identification.

  16. Cytogenetic Characterization of the TM4 Mouse Sertoli Cell Line. II. Chromosome Microdissection, FISH, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Guttenbach, Martina; Steinlein, Claus; Wanner, Gerhard; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomes and interphase cell nuclei of the permanent mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 were examined by chromosome microdissection, FISH, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The already known marker chromosomes m1-m5 were confirmed, and 2 new large marker chromosomes m6 and m7 were characterized. The minute heterochromatic marker chromosomes m4 and m5 were microdissected and their DNA amplified by DOP-PCR. FISH of this DNA probe on TM4 metaphase chromosomes demonstrated that the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes have derived from the centromeric regions of normal telocentric mouse chromosomes. Ectopic pairing of the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes with the centromeric region of any of the other chromosomes (centromeric associations) was apparent in ∼60% of the metaphases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed DNA-protein bridges connecting the centromeric regions of normal chromosomes and the associated m4 and m5 marker chromosomes. Interphase cell nuclei of TM4 Sertoli cells did not exhibit the characteristic morphology of Sertoli cells in the testes of adult mice as shown by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of damage to the cecal mucosa of turkeys infected with Eimeria adenoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemrick, W J; Hammer, R F

    1979-01-01

    White Wrolstad turkeys were each inoculated with 100,000 Eimeria adenoides oocysts and killed on days 4-14 postinoculation. Tissue samples, obtained from 4 areas of the ceca comparable to areas examined in chickens infected with E. tenella in previous studies, were processed by a modification of the osmium-thiocarbo-hydrazide-osmium technique and examined with a scanning electron microscope. The pathologic situation found in turkeys was slightly different from that in the ceca of chickens infected with E. tenella. The mucosal lesions are most severe at the proximal end of an infected cecum. Surface disruption was far less severe than with cecal coccidiosis in chickens of the same age exposed to an equal number of infective oocysts. Rupture of the epithelial cell often caused the mucosal surface to present a honeycomb appearance. Some specific stages of the life cycle were identified, including schizonts and oocysts.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation on Morphologic Characteristics of Sperms in Uremic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-gen XU; Shi-fang SHI; Hai-zhen ZHONG; Xiao-feng HUANG; Xiao-ping QI; Qi-zhe SONG; Xin-hong WANG; Li YAN; Zong-fu SHAO

    2004-01-01

    Objective To observe the morphologic characteristics of spermatozoon ultramicro scopic structure in uremic subjects Method Semen sample from 10 patients with uremia and 5 healthy men were observed under light microscope and scanning electronic microscope.Results Abnormalities were found in sperms of uremic patients either in the sperm head (acrosome, acrosomic deficit, nuclear abnormality, pointed head, headless and double head of spermatozoon), neck (rupture, separation and enlargement), or tail (mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial deficit, tailless, double tail, short tail and curled tail); whereas none of the above-mentioned abnormalities was observed in healthy men.Conclusion Sperms of uremic patients had many morphologic and structural abnor malities in the head, neck and tail.

  19. Fundamentals of overlay measurement and inspection using scanning electron-microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Okagawa, Y.; Inoue, O.; Arai, K.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2013-04-01

    Scanning electron-microscope (SEM) has been successfully applied to CD measurement as promising tools for qualifying and controlling quality of semiconductor devices in in-line manufacturing process since 1985. Furthermore SEM is proposed to be applied to in-die overlay monitor in the local area which is too small to be measured by optical overlay measurement tools any more, when the overlay control limit is going to be stringent and have un-ignorable dependence on device pattern layout, in-die location, and singular locations in wafer edge, etc. In this paper, we proposed new overlay measurement and inspection system to make an effective use of in-line SEM image, in consideration of trade-off between measurement uncertainty and measurement pattern density in each SEM conditions. In parallel, we make it clear that the best hybrid overlay metrology is in considering each tool's technology portfolio.

  20. Applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in inner ear pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anniko, M.; Lim, D.J.; Sobin, A.; Wroblewski, R.

    1985-01-01

    Surface pathology of inner ear structures so far described in detail concern cochlear and vestibular hair cells and the stria vascularis. In man, surgical intervention into the inner ear is very uncommon and when performed is in general with the primary objective of destroying the diseased peripheral end organs. The vast majority of inner ear tissue available for use with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is therefore obtained from animals. The present paper reviews the progression of surface pathology caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics, acoustic overstimulation and in a guinea pig strain with genetic inner ear disease. The primary site of onset of surface pathology differs, depending on the underlying cause. Advanced surface pathology shows a similar type of morphological degeneration independent of cause. The combination of SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) of inner ear pathology has as yet been reported in only three studies, all concerning inner ear fluids or otoconia.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of the tegumental surface of adult Schistosoma spindale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruatrachue, M; Riengrojpitak, S; Upatham, E S; Sahaphong, S

    1983-09-01

    The tegumental surfaces of adult male and female of Schistosoma spindale were studied by scanning electron microscopy. In general, the body surface of the male appears to be fairly uniform from anterior end to posterior end. It is characterized by the presence of transverse ridges and papillae of various types. These papillae are distributed fairly regularly over the whole body surface of the worm. The tegument lining the gynecophoral canal of the male worm is covered with numerous spines interspersed with papillae, some without cilia and some with crater-like holes in the centres and apical cilia. The tegument of the female worm is covered with smooth and perforated ridges and sensory bulbs with apical nodules.

  2. Scanning electron microscopic observations of the development of the chicken caecum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatakou, O; Paraskevakou, E; Tseleni-Balafouta, S; Athanasiadis, A; Fasseas, C

    2003-10-01

    The surface pattern of the caeca of the chicken was examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in stages ranging from 11th day of foetal development to 60 days of post-natal life. During incubation the proximal region (basis) of the caecum presented a few irregular elevations, which were later regarded as villi and after hatching, gradually, became longer and wider. These structures were found to be similar to those of the small intestine. The middle (corpus) and distal (apex) regions of caecum presented ridges/folds with short and blunt villi that were even shorter in the apex. The ridges/folds were running longitudinally the inner surface of the corpus while those of the apex were not so well developed.

  3. Investigation of electron transfer across the ice/liquid interface by scanning electro-chemical microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study of interfacial electron transfer (ET) reaction between ferricinium (Fc+) produced in situ in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) and ferrocyanide in ice matrix under low temperatures by the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is reported. Tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) is used as the common ion (potential-determining ion) in both phases to control the interfacial potential difference. The potential drop across the liquid/liquid interface can be quantitatively adjusted by changing the ratio of concentrations of TBA+ between the two phases. The apparent heterogeneous rate constants for Fc+ reduction by at the interface under different temperatures have been obtained by a best-fit analysis, where the experimental approach curves are fitted to the theoretical simulated curves. A sharp change has been observed for heterogeneous rate constants around the freezing point of the aqueous phase, which reflects the phase transition process.

  4. Fretting wear in titanium, Monel-400, and cobalt 25-percent-molybdenum using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Damage scar volume measurements taken from like metal fretting pairs combined with scanning electron microscopy observations showed that three sequentially operating mechanisms result in the fretting of titanium, Monel-400, and cobalt - 25-percent molybdenum. Initially, adhesion and plastic deformation of the surface played an important role. This was followed after a few hundred cycles by a fatigue mechanism which produced spall-like pits in the damage scar. Finally, a combination of oxidation and abrasion by debris particles became most significant. Damage scar measurements made on several elemental metals after 600,000 fretting cycles suggested that the ratio of oxide hardness to metal hardness was a measure of the susceptibility of a metal to progressive damage by fretting.

  5. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  6. Characterization of defect growth structure in ion plated films by scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1979-01-01

    Copper and gold films (0.2 to 2 microns) were ion plated onto polished 304-stainless-steel surfaces. These coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy for coating growth defects. Three types of defects were distinguished: nodular growth, abnormal or runaway growth, and spits. The cause and origin for each type of defect was traced. Nodular growth is primarily due to inherent substrate microdefects, abnormal or runaway growth is due to external surface inclusions, and spits are due to nonuniform evaporation. All these defects have adverse effects on the coatings. They induce stresses and produce porosity in the coatings and thus weaken their mechanical properties. Friction and wear characteristics are affected by coating defects, since the large nodules are pulled out and additional wear debris is generated.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigation of a Sample Depth Profile Through the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, Jan; Steele, Andrew; Westall, Frances; McKay, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The ongoing scientific debate as to whether or not the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contained evidence of possible biogenic activities showed the need to establish consistent methods to ascertain the origin of such evidence. To distinguish between terrestrial organic material/microbial contaminants and possible indigenous microbiota within meteorites is therefore crucial. With this in mind a depth profile consisting of four samples from a new sample allocation of Martian meteorite Nakhla was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. SEM imaging of freshly broken fractured chips revealed structures strongly recent terrestrial microorganisms, in some cases showing evidence of active growth. This conclusion was supported by EDX analysis, which showed the presence of carbon associated with these structures, we concluded that these structures represent recent terrestrial contaminants rather than structures indigenous to the meteorite. Page

  8. A novel and compact nanoindentation device for in situ nanoindentation tests inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In situ nanomechanical tests provide a unique insight into mechanical behaviors of materials, such as fracture onset and crack propagation, shear band formation and so on. This paper presents a novel in situ nanoindentation device with dimensions of 103mm×74mm×60mm. Integrating the stepper motor, the piezoelectric actuator and the flexure hinge, the device can realize coarse adjustment of the specimen and precision loading and unloading of the indenter automatically. A novel indenter holder was designed to guarantee that the indenter penetrates into and withdraws from the specimen surface vertically. Closed-loop control of the indentation process was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator and to enrich the loading modes. The in situ indentation test of Indium Phosphide (InP inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM was carried out and the experimental result indicates the feasibility of the developed device.

  9. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species.

  10. Sub-0.1 nm-resolution quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy without adjustable parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Maunders, C. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C. L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Tiemeijer, P. C. [FEI Electron Optics, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-05-07

    Atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) constitutes a powerful tool for nanostructure characterization. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative interpretation of atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field (ADF) STEM images using an approach that does not rely on adjustable parameters. We measure independently the instrumental parameters that affect sub-0.1 nm-resolution ADF images, quantify their individual and collective contributions to the image intensity, and show that knowledge of these parameters enables a quantitative interpretation of the absolute intensity and contrast across all accessible spatial frequencies. The analysis also provides a method for the in-situ measurement of the STEM's effective source distribution.

  11. An assessment of the formation of electrodeposited scales using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizot, A. P.; Neville, A.; Taylor, J. D.

    2002-04-01

    The deposition of insoluble salts onto surfaces in process systems represents an important operational problem. Mineral scale formation (e.g. CaCO 3 and BaSO 4) can result from fluid streams becoming supersaturated when incompatible waters combine (e.g. in oil recovery) or can be formed when cathodic protection is applied and electrodeposition occurs. In this study, electrodeposition is studied on metal rotating disk electrodes (RDE) in artificial seawater under static conditions and under rotation at 400 rpm. Also, a Ca-free brine and a Mg-free brine of the same dissolved solids level were used in static tests. The focus of the study is the assessment of the electrochemical response of the system under potentiostatic control and correlation of the current versus time measurements to the characteristics of the scale determined via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis.

  12. Evaluation of vermicompost maturity using scanning electron microscopy and paper chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, D; Satheesh Kumar, P; Rajendran, N M; Uthaya Kumar, V; Anbuganapathi, G

    2014-04-02

    Vermicompost was produced from flower waste inoculated with biofertilizers using the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were carried out on the basis of physicochemical parameters of vermicomposted samples. From the results of the PCA and CA, it was possible to classify two different groups of vermicompost samples in the following categories: E2 and E5; and E1, E3, E4, and control. Scanning electron microscopy and biodynamic circular paper chromatography analysis were used to investigate the changes in surface morphology and functional groups in the control and vermicompost products. SEM analysis of E1-E5 shows more fragment and pores than the control. Chromatographic analysis of vermicompost indicated the mature condition of the compost materials.

  13. A morphological study of molecularly imprinted polymers using the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: gpaniagua@pas.uned.es; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Durand Alegria, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-31

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique for producing polymers with applications in affinity-based separation, in biomimetic sensors, in catalysis, etc. This variety of uses relies upon the production of polymers with different affinities, specificities, sensitivities and loading capacities. Research into the development of molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with new or improved morphologies - which involves modification of the polymerisation process - is therefore underway. This paper reports a comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by 'bulk' polymerisation using digoxin as template. These were synthesised under different conditions, i.e., changing the functional monomers employed (methacrylic acid or 2-vinylpyridine), the porogens (acetonitrile or dichloromethane) used, and by altering the volume of the latter. The polymerisation process was allowed to proceed either under UV light or in a thermostat-controlled waterbath. The surface morphology (was determined by scanning electron microscopy) and the ability of the different polymers to selectively rebind the template was then evaluated.

  14. Determination of the coalescence temperature of latexes by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Edurne; Tollan, Christopher; Chuvilin, Andrey; Barandiaran, Maria J; Paulis, Maria

    2012-08-01

    A new methodology for quantitative characterization of the coalescence process of waterborne polymer dispersion (latex) particles by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is proposed. The experimental setup has been developed to provide reproducible latex monolayer depositions, optimized contrast of the latex particles, and a reliable readout of the sample temperature. Quantification of the coalescence process under dry conditions has been performed by image processing based on evaluation of the image autocorrelation function. As a proof of concept the coalescence of two latexes with known and differing glass transition temperatures has been measured. It has been shown that a reproducibility of better than 1.5 °C can be obtained for the measurement of the coalescence temperature.

  15. The effect of cleaning soft contact lenses. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, S A; Allansmith, M R

    1981-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the effectiveness of surfactant and enzyme cleaners in removing coatings from soft contact lenses. We examined ten continuously worn lenses and 15 lenses worn and cleaned regularly for at six months. About 30% of the surface of continuously worn lenses cleaned with surfactant or enzyme was uncoated; smooth, matted coating covered the remainder. Continuously worn lenses cleaned with the combination surfactant and enzyme cleaner had similar deposits covering 50% of the surface. Lenses worn and cleaned regularly had more deposits after cleaning with surfactant or enzyme cleaner than after cleaning with combination cleaner. Approximately 25% of the surface of lenses cleaned with the combination was coated with deposits. The deposits on both types of lenses were about 30% less thick after use of the combination cleaner than with either single cleaner. The coating on worn contact lenses is not completely removed by any method we tested.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF REFINED HEMP FIBERS USING NIR FT RAMAN MICRO SPECTROSCOPY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Kumar Kovur

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The research was focused on the separation of single hemp (Cannabis sativa L. fibre cells with low fineness from mechanically extracted fibre bundles of high fineness. The fiber bundles were treated with enzymes, namely panzym, pectinase, hemicellulase, and cellulase, along with a combination of panzym and ultrasonic treatments. Changes in the fiber structure were followed at molecular and microscopic levels by means of NIR FT Raman spectroscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM. Buffer-panzym treatments of hemp fibers had a prominent effect in loosening of the fiber cells. The best of refining was achieved when the fiber bundles were treated with buffer-panzym solution in combination with ultrasonic treatment.

  17. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO; Manjun(邵曼君); JIANG; Lei(姜蕾); CONG; Wei(丛威); OUYANG; Fan(欧阳藩)

    2002-01-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage.

  18. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  19. Donkey dental anatomy. Part 2: Histological and scanning electron microscopic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, N; Kempson, S A; Dixon, P M

    2008-06-01

    Ten normal cheek teeth (CT) were extracted at post mortem from donkeys that died or were euthanased for humane reasons. Decalcified histology was performed on three sections (sub-occlusal, mid-tooth and pre-apical) of each tooth, and undecalcified histology undertaken on sub-occlusal sections of the same teeth. The normal histological anatomy of primary, regular and irregular secondary dentine was found to be similar to that of the horse, with no tertiary dentine present. Undecalcified histology demonstrated the normal enamel histology, including the presence of enamel spindles. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on mid-tooth sections of five maxillary CT, five mandibular CT and two incisors. The ultrastructural anatomy of primary and secondary dentine, and equine enamel types-1, -2 and -3 (as described in horses) were identified in donkey teeth. Histological and ultrastructural donkey dental anatomy was found to be very similar to equine dental anatomy with only a few quantitative differences observed.

  20. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  1. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  2. Devolatilization Studies of Oil Palm Biomass for Torrefaction Process through Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, D.; Abd. Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, palm oil biomass consisting of empty fruit bunch (EFB), mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell (PKS) were chosen as raw material for torrefaction process. Torrefaction process was conducted at various temperatures of 240 °C, 270 °C and 300 °C with a residence time of 60 minutes. The morphology of the raw and torrefied biomass was then observed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. Also, through this experiment the correlation between the torrefaction temperatures with the volatile gases released were studied. From the observation, the morphology structure of the biomass exhibited inter-particle gaps due to the release of volatile gases and it is obviously seen more at higher temperatures. Moreover, the change of the biomass structure is influenced by the alteration of the lignocellulose biomass.

  3. Scanning electron microscopic study of trophozoite and cyst stages of Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonios, Sanaa N

    2010-04-01

    Whole trophozoites and cysts of axenically cultivated Naegleria fowleri were prepared for study of their surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Trophozoites and cyst stages were studied from Chang's culture media. Some trophozoites were examined after animal inoculation and brain isolation to compare the changes in surface features. Photomicrographs of freeze-dried and critical point-dried organisms fixed with glutaraldehyde were presented along with views of both isolates of trophozoites to compare the surface features. SEM revealed the surface of trophozoites to be undulating, wrinkled and covered at irregular intervals by protruding vesicles. There were also surface extensions which were long and thin in brain isolates which may help in the contact and cytolysis of host cells at some distance from the trophozoite. Some cysts appeared wrinkled while others smooth, and empty cysts were also seen with many pores on the surface.

  4. The study on foliar micromorphology of Hippobromus pauciflorus using scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendota, S C; Grierson, D S; Afolayan, A J

    2008-07-15

    Foliar micromorphology of Hippobromus pauciflorus (L.f.) Radlk (Sapindaceae) was investigated by scanning electron microscope examination. The leaves were characterized by anisocytic stomata which were found only on the abaxial surface. The leaves have long unicellular non-glandular trichomes which were distributed over the mid rib and densely populated at the edges of the upper and lower surfaces. Crystal deposits were also observed on the abaxial surface of the leaves. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy SEM of the crystals showed predominant mineral components of Na, Al, Si, K and Ca ions. These micro (Si, Na and Al) and macro (K and Ca) elements are very essential to plant growth. Their presence in the trichomes could contribute to the mechanical stability of the leaf appendages.

  5. Equalization of Ti-6Al-4 V alloy welded joint by scanning electron beam welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The equalization of Ti-6Al-4V alloy welded joint with base metal on corrosion resistance, strength and ductility was studied. The solidification microstructure is transformed from 650 μm columnar grains to 100 μm equiaxed grains by scanning electron beam welding. The anodic polarization curve of 150 μm equiaxed grains coincides with that of base metal. Equal corrosion resistance between weld metal and base metal was ob tained. Uniform microstructure and solutedistribution are the basis of equalization. Corrosion rate of weld with 150 μm equiaxed grains is the lowest, 2.45 times lower than that of 650 μm columnar grains. Weld strength is 98% as much as that of base metal, yield-strength ratio is 99.5%, which is 3.6% higher than that of base metal.

  6. Effects of acetylcysteine on rabbit conjunctival and corneal surfaces. A scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermes, F; Molon-Noblot, S; Grove, J

    1991-10-01

    Conjunctival and corneal epithelial surfaces of normal rabbit eyes with their associated mucus were studied by scanning electron microscopy before and after treatment with the mucolytic agent N-acetylcysteine (AC). Four groups received topically one 50-microliters drop of either (Group A) 0.1 MAC, (Group B) 0.1 M AC every 5 min for 1 hr, (Group C) 0.1 M AC every 5 min for 2 hr, or (Group D) three drops of 20% AC over 15 min. The effects of the instillation of AC on mucus removal and cellular lesions increased in the order (A) less than (B) less than (C) less than (D). Treatment A had no effect on cornea and conjunctiva. Treatment B cleaned away mucosal debris without alteration of either conjunctival or corneal epithelium. Treatment C had a similar effect on the mucus but was associated with focal necrosis, and treatment D produced widespread necrosis, desquamation of epithelial cells, and inflammation.

  7. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  8. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  9. Computer morphing of scanning electron micrographs: an adjunct to embryology teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, M E; McDonald, S W; Watt, A

    1996-01-01

    Traditional embryology courses demand considerable expenditure of time and effort from students to master the spatial awareness skills necessary to create three-dimensional mental images from two-dimensional serial sections. Then students must imagine a movie sequence of the changes which take place during normal development. Further steps are required to relate this information to the clinical situation. As more medical and dental schools move towards problem-based curricula, more efficient methods of improving understanding of embryology are needed. The development of many organs can be studied using scanning electron micrographs of embryos at different ages. These high quality images are more easily interpreted by our students than histological sections and the understanding achieved more readily applied to clinical problems. Still more beneficial would be the provision of moving images showing the actual changes happening. We decided to use computer morphing techniques to prepare movie sequences showing development of the face and plate. For each, four scanning electron micrographs of appropriately-sized sheep embryo heads were taken at the same magnification and orientation to use as start and end points of morphing sequences. After using retouching techniques to colour the separate processes, further sequences were prepared. The discipline of maintaining the same magnification throughout and the possibility of directly observing changes between stages revealed some surprising growth patterns. This technique is adaptable to any area of biological development where pre- and post-illustrations are available. Animations can be presented on computer or on video and incorporated into programs. Student feedback has been very favourable.

  10. Scanning electron microscopic observation: three-dimensional architecture of the collagen in hepatic fibrosis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hong; ZHAO Jing; ZHANG Wei-guang; ZHANG Li-ying; MA Rui-qiong; WANG Li-qin; ZHANG Shu-yong; TIAN Long

    2007-01-01

    Background In the process of hepatic fibrosis, the accumulation of collagen fibers is strongly related to the hepatic function. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional architecture of the collagen network in the liver of rats with hepatic fibrosis.Methods Healthy adult male Wistar rats (n=32) were randomly divided into a control group (n=16) and a hepatic fibrosis group (n=16). In the control group, the rats were treated with peanut oil while the rats in hepatic fibrosis group were treated for 10 weeks with 60% CCl4 diluted in peanut oil. The quantity of collagen fibers was detected by Western blotting; distribution of the collagen was detected by sirius red staining and polarized microscope; the three-dimensional architecture of collagen in the liver was observed under the scanning electron microscope after fixed tissues were treated with cell-maceration using NaOH. Statistical analysis was performed using the u test.Results The quantity of collagen fibers increased significantly in the hepatic fibrosis group. With the aggravation of hepatic fibrosis, collagen fibers gradually accumulated. They interlaced the reticulation compartment and formed a round or ellipse liver tissue conglomeration like a grape framework that was disparate and wrapped up the normal liver Iobule.The deposition of collagen fibers was obvious in adjacent hepatic parenchyma, especially around the portal tracts.Conclusion Our experiment showed the collagen proliferation and displays clearly the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibers in rat liver with hepatic fibrosis by scanning electron microscope. It can provide a morphological foundation for the mechanisms of changed haemodynamics and portal hypertension in hepatic fibrosis.

  11. Direct observation of unstained wet biological samples by scanning-electron generation X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Analytical tools of nanometre-scale resolution are indispensable in the fields of biology, physics and chemistry. One suitable tool, the soft X-ray microscope, provides high spatial resolution of visible light for wet specimens. For biological specimens, X-rays of water-window wavelength between carbon (284 eV; 4.3 nm) and oxygen (540 eV; 2.3 nm) absorption edges provide high-contrast imaging of biological samples in water. Among types of X-ray microscope, the transmission X-ray microscope using a synchrotron radiation source with diffractive zone plates offers the highest spatial resolution, approaching 15-10nm. However, even higher resolution is required to measure proteins and protein complexes in biological specimens; therefore, a new type of X-ray microscope with higher resolution that uses a simple light source is desirable. Here we report a novel scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM) that demonstrates direct imaging of unstained wet biological specimens. We deposited wet yeasts in the space between two silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) films. A scanning electron beam of accelerating voltage 5 keV and current 1.6 nA irradiates the titanium (Ti)-coated Si(3)N(4) film, and the soft X-ray signal from it is detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. The SGXM can theoretically achieve better than 5 nm resolution. Our method can be utilized easily for various wet biological samples of bacteria, viruses, and protein complexes.

  12. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  13. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were

  14. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers.

  15. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  17. Novel scanning electron microscopy methods for analyzing the 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the Golgi apparatus has been extensively examined by light and electron microscopy, but details of its three-dimensional (3D) structure have remained unclear because of the technical limitations of conventional microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem, we have developed several novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods for observing the 3D structure of subcellular organelles including the Golgi apparatus: (1) an osmium maceration method that facilitates SEM observation of membranous organelles, including the Golgi apparatus, by selectively removing soluble cytoplasmic proteins, (2) an osmium impregnation/maceration method that combines an osmium impregnation method with the osmium maceration method to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus by SEM, (3) a correlative light and SEM method that combines a cryosectioning technique with the osmium maceration method to enable correlation of the immunocytochemical distribution of molecules with the 3D ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus, and (4) array tomography based on the systematic collection and integration of SEM images of serial ultrathin sections on glass slides for revealing the 3D ultrastructure of the entire Golgi apparatus. Together, the novel SEM techniques listed above can reveal the complete 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types.

  18. Influence of acceleration voltage on scanning electron microscopy of human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, E

    2010-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to view a variety of surface structures, molecules, or nanoparticles of different materials, ranging from metals, dental and medical instruments, and chemistry (e.g. polymer analysis) to biological material. Traditionally, the operating conditions of the SEM are very important in the material sciences, particularly the acceleration voltage. However, in biological sciences, it is not typically seen as an important parameter. Acceleration voltage allows electrons to penetrate the sample; thus, the higher the acceleration voltage the more penetration into the sample will occur. As a result, ultrastructural information from deeper layers will interfere with the actual surface morphology that is seen. Therefore, ultimately, if acceleration voltage is lower, a better quality of the surface molecules and structures will be produced. However, in biological sciences, this is an area that is not well-documented. Typically, acceleration voltages of between 5 and 20 kV are used. This manuscript investigates the influence of acceleration voltages ranging from 5 kV to as low as 300 V, by studying surface ultrastructure of a human platelet aggregate. It is concluded that, especially at higher magnifications, much more surface detail is visible in biological samples when using an acceleration voltage between 2 kV and 300 V.

  19. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production.

  20. Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5 nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Nelson, Edward M; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Damiano, John; Timp, Gregory

    2016-02-23

    It is now possible to visualize at nanometer resolution the infection of a living biological cell with virus without compromising cell viability using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To provide contrast while preserving viability, Escherichia coli and P1 bacteriophages were first positively stained with a very low concentration of uranyl acetate in minimal phosphate medium and then imaged with low-dose STEM in a microfluidic liquid flow cell. Under these conditions, it was established that the median lethal dose of electrons required to kill half the tested population was LD50 = 30 e(-)/nm(2), which coincides with the disruption of a wet biological membrane, according to prior reports. Consistent with the lateral resolution and high-contrast signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) inferred from Monte Carlo simulations, images of the E. coli membrane, flagella, and the bacteriophages were acquired with 5 nm resolution, but the cumulative dose exceeded LD50. On the other hand, with a cumulative dose below LD50 (and lower SNR), it was still possible to visualize the infection of E. coli by P1, showing the insertion of viral DNA within 3 s, with 5 nm resolution.

  1. An optimized methodology to analyze biopolymer capsules by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforto, Egle; Joguet, Nicolas; Buisson, Pierre; Vendeville, Jean-Eudes; Chaigneau, Carine; Maugard, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an optimized methodology to study the surface characteristics and internal structure of biopolymer capsules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in environmental mode. The main advantage of this methodology is that no preparation is required and, significantly, no metallic coverage is deposited on the surface of the specimen, thus preserving the original capsule shape and its surface morphology. This avoids introducing preparation artefacts which could modify the capsule surface and mask information concerning important feature like porosities or roughness. Using this method gelatin and mainly fatty coatings, difficult to be analyzed by standard SEM technique, unambiguously show fine details of their surface morphology without damage. Furthermore, chemical contrast is preserved in backscattered electron images of unprepared samples, allowing visualizing the internal organization of the capsule, the quality of the envelope, etc... This study provides pointers on how to obtain optimal conditions for the analysis of biological or sensitive material, as this is not always studied using appropriate techniques. A reliable evaluation of the parameters used in capsule elaboration for research and industrial applications, as well as that of capsule functionality is provided by this methodology, which is essential for the technological progress in this domain.

  2. Accessing nuclear structure for field emission, in lens, scanning electron microscopy (FEISEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T D; Bennion, G R; Rutherford, S A; Reipert, S; Ramalho, A; Kiseleva, E; Goldberg, M W

    1996-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has had a shorter time course in biology than conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) but has nevertheless produced a wealth of images that have significantly complemented our perception of biological structure and function from TEM information. By its nature, SEM is a surface imaging technology, and its impact at the subcellular level has been restricted by the considerably reduced resolution in conventional SEM in comparison to TEM. This restriction has been removed by the recent advent of high-brightness sources used in lensfield emission instruments (FEISEM) which have produced resolution of around 1 nanometre, which is not usually a limiting figure for biological material. This communication reviews our findings in the use of FEISEM in the imaging of nuclear surfaces, then associated structures, such as nuclear pore complexes, and the relationships of these structures with cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic elements. High resolution SEM allows the structurally orientated cell biologist to visualise, directly and in three dimensions, subcellular structure and its modulation with a view to understanding, its functional significance. Clearly, intracellular surfaces require separation from surrounding structural elements in vivo to allow surface imaging, and we review a combination of biochemical and mechanical isolation methods for nuclear surfaces.

  3. Determination of the Elastic Behavior of Silicon Nanowires within a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Wollschläger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending tests were performed on double-anchored, 110 silicon nanowire samples in the vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM via a micromanipulator equipped with a piezoresistive force sensor. Nanowires with widths of 35 nm and 74 nm and a height of 168 nm were fabricated. The nanowires were obtained monolithically along with their 10 μm tall supports through a top-down fabrication approach involving a series of etching processes. The exact dimension of wire cross sections was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Conducting the experiments in an SEM chamber further raised the opportunity of the direct observation of any deviation from ideal loading conditions such as twisting, which could then be taken into consideration in simulations. Measured force-displacement behavior was observed to exhibit close resemblance to simulation results obtained by finite element modeling, when the bulk value of 169 GPa was taken as the modulus of elasticity for 110 silicon. Hence, test results neither show any size effect nor show evidence of residual stresses for the considered nanoscale objects. The increased effect of the native oxide with reduced nanowire dimensions was captured as well. The results demonstrate the potential of the developed nanowire fabrication approach for the incorporation in functional micromechanical devices.

  4. Master curves for gas amplification in low vacuum and environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Bradley L

    2004-02-01

    The concept of universal amplification profiles for gas cascade amplification of signals in low vacuum and environmental scanning electron microscopes is demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically using water vapor. For a given gas, cascade amplification gain profiles can be plotted onto a single master curve where the independent reduced parameter is the ratio of pressure to amplification field strength. When plotted in this fashion, both desired secondary electron and spurious background signal components fall onto respective master curves, with the amplitude being a function of anode bias only. These master curves can be described by simple Townsend Gas Capacitor equations using only two gas-specific parameters. As long as single scattering conditions apply, this approach allows for simplified, direct comparison of the gain characteristics of different gases and allows more intelligent selection of imaging conditions. The utility of treating signal amplification in this manner is demonstrated through a series of images collected under a variety of conditions, but with the ratio of pressure to amplification field strength kept constant. In practice, the range of operational parameter space in which this description can be applied to imaging is limited, as images typically have a mixture of secondary and backscattered contributions.

  5. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat S; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-03-17

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser's relatively large penetration depth and consequently these techniques record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and subpicosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample's surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystal and its powder film. We also discuss the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  6. Instrumental Developments for In-situ Breakdown Experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    Electrical discharges in accelerating structures are one of the key issues limiting the performance of future high energy accelerators such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Fundamental understanding of breakdown phenomena is an indispensable part of the CLIC feasibility study. The present work concerns the experimental study of breakdown using Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEMs). A SEM gives us the opportunity to achieve high electrical gradients of 1\\,kV/$\\mu$m which corresponds to 1\\,GV/m by exciting a probe needle with a high voltage power supply and controlling the positioning of the needle with a linear piezo motor. The gap between the needle tip and the surface is controlled with sub-micron precision. A second electron microscope equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to create surface corrugations and to sharpen the probe needle to a tip radius of about 50\\,nm. Moreover it is used to prepare cross sections of a voltage breakdown area in order to study the geometrical surface damages as w...

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of food-poisoning bacterium Bacillus cereus using a variable-pressure SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masako; Wada, Masao; Akiba, Tsuneo; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    A variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) with a cooling stage permits long hours of observation of water-containing specimens in their natural or close to natural state, without the conventional specimen preparations of fixation, dehydration, drying and metal coating. It reduces water vaporization and beam damage by keeping the specimens at a low temperature. We observed Bacillus cereus colonies on nutrient agar, which would shrink significantly if any conventional specimen preparation technique were used. We also studied the growing process of the bacteria on raw and steamed rice using the VP-SEM without conventional preparation techniques. Original specimens were directly mounted onto specimen holders and their backscattered electron images observed under the following conditions: specimen stage temperature, -10 degrees C; specimen chamber vacuum level, 30-70 Pa; and accelerating voltage, 15-20 kV. We recognized that the VP-SEM minimized deformation of the colonies due to shrinkage of the nutrient agar, and successfully imaged the morphology of the colonies and bacteria without a decline in bacteria number, which is apt to occur during fixation and dehydration. Also, the growth process of the bacteria on raw or steamed rice could be observed promptly, since there is no specimen preparation step.

  8. Nano-Tomography of Porous Geological Materials Using Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution serves as an introduction and overview of FIB-SEM tomography applied to porous materials. Using two different porous Earth materials, a diatomite specimen, and an experimentally produced amorphous silica layer on olivine, we discuss the experimental setup of FIB-SEM tomography. We then focus on image processing procedures, including image alignment, correction, and segmentation to finally result in a three-dimensional, quantified pore network representation of the two example materials. To each image processing step we consider potential issues, such as imaging the back of pore walls, and the generation of image artefacts through the application of processing algorithms. We conclude that there is no single image processing recipe; processing steps need to be decided on a case-by-case study.

  9. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of self-organized perylenetetracarboxdiimide nanostructures at surfaces: structural and electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Liscio, Andrea; Gentilini, Desirée; Nolde, Fabian; Müllen, Klaus; Samorì, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscopy investigation of the self-organization and local electronic properties of spin-coated ultrathin films of N-alkyl substituted perylenetetracarboxdiimide (PDI) is described. By carefully balancing the interplay between molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate interactions, PDI is able to form highly ordered supramolecular architectures on flat surfaces from solution. On an electrically insulating yet highly polar surface (mica) PDI forms strongly anisotropic architectures with needlelike structures with lengths of up to a few micrometers. On a conductive yet apolar surface (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), the competition between the strong molecule-substrate interactions and the intermolecular forces leads to the generation of more disordered structures. The local electronic properties of these architectures are studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy by estimating their surface potential (SP). Quantitative measurements of the SP are obtained by analyzing the experimentally estimated SP data with a computational model, which discriminates between the intrinsic SP and the effect of long-range tip-surface interactions. The SP of PDI aggregates depends on the structural order at the supramolecular level. Narrow needles of constant width reveal identical SPs independent of length. Wider needles with a polydisperse width distribution exhibit a greater SP.

  10. Electronic, vibrational, Raman, and scanning tunneling microscopy signatures of two-dimensional boron nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Meunier, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    Compared to graphene, the synthesis of large area atomically thin boron materials is particularly challenging, owing to the electronic shell structure of B, which does not lend itself to the straightforward assembly of pure B materials. This difficulty is evidenced by the fact that the first synthesis of a pure two-dimensional boron was only very recently reported, using silver as a growing substrate. In addition to experimentally observed 2D boron allotropes, a number of other stable and metastable 2D boron materials are predicted to exist, depending on growth conditions and the use of a substrate during growth. This first-principles study based on density functional theory aims at providing guidelines for the identification of these materials. To this end, this report presents a comparative description of a number of possible 2D B allotropes. Electronic band structures, phonon dispersion curves, Raman scattering spectra, and scanning tunneling microscopy images are simulated to highlight the differences between five distinct realizations of these B systems. The study demonstrates the existence of clear experimental signatures that constitute a solid basis for the unambiguous experimental identification of layered B materials.

  11. Focussed ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Graham; Rosset, Stéphanie; Cantoni, Marco

    2011-07-06

    This protocol describes how biological samples, like brain tissue, can be imaged in three dimensions using the focussed ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM). The samples are fixed with aldehydes, heavy metal stained using osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate. They are then dehydrated with alcohol and infiltrated with resin, which is then hardened. Using a light microscope and ultramicrotome with glass knives, a small block containing the region interest close to the surface is made. The block is then placed inside the FIB/SEM, and the ion beam used to roughly mill a vertical face along one side of the block, close to this region. Using backscattered electrons to image the underlying structures, a smaller face is then milled with a finer ion beam and the surface scrutinised more closely to determine the exact area of the face to be imaged and milled. The parameters of the microscope are then set so that the face is repeatedly milled and imaged so that serial images are collected through a volume of the block. The image stack will typically contain isotropic voxels with dimenions as small a 4 nm in each direction. This image quality in any imaging plane enables the user to analyse cell ultrastructure at any viewing angle within the image stack.

  12. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  13. Imaging of bacterial multicellular behaviour in biofilms in liquid by atmospheric scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Miyakawa, Reina; Sato, Mari; Arita-Morioka, Ken-ichi; Chiba, Akio; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ogura, Teru; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microbes that attach to biotic or abiotic surfaces causing chronic infectious diseases. Within a biofilm, microbes are embedded in a self-produced soft extracellular matrix (ECM), which protects them from the host immune system and antibiotics. The nanoscale visualisation of delicate biofilms in liquid is challenging. Here, we develop atmospheric scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) to visualise Gram-positive and -negative bacterial biofilms immersed in aqueous solution. Biofilms cultured on electron-transparent film were directly imaged from below using the inverted SEM, allowing the formation of the region near the substrate to be studied at high resolution. We visualised intercellular nanostructures and the exocytosis of membrane vesicles, and linked the latter to the trafficking of cargos, including cytoplasmic proteins and the toxins hemolysin and coagulase. A thick dendritic nanotube network was observed between microbes, suggesting multicellular communication in biofilms. A universal immuno-labelling system was developed for biofilms and tested on various examples, including S. aureus biofilms. In the ECM, fine DNA and protein networks were visualised and the precise distribution of protein complexes was determined (e.g., straight curli, flagella, and excreted cytoplasmic molecular chaperones). Our observations provide structural insights into bacteria-substratum interactions, biofilm development and the internal microbe community. PMID:27180609

  14. The formation and interpretation of defect images from crystalline materials in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, D M; Joy, D C

    1976-06-01

    The technique of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been employed usefully in studies of amorphous materials, and the theory of image formation and interpretation in this case has been well developed. Less attention has been given to the practical and theoretical problems associated with the use of STEM for the examination of crystalline materials. In this case the contrast mechanisms are dominated by Bragg diffraction and so they are quite different from those occurring in amorphous substances. In this paper practical techniques for the observation and interpretation of contrast from defects in crystalline materials are discussed. It is shown that whilst images of defects are obtained readily under all typical STEM operating conditions, the form of the image and the information it contains varies with the angle subtended at the specimen by the detector. If this angle is too large significant image modifications relative to the "conventional" transmission electron microscope case may occur and the resolution of the image may degrade. If this angle is too small, then signal to noise considerations make an interpretation of the image difficult. In this paper we indicate how the detector angle may be chosen correctly, and also present techniques for setting up a STEM instrument for imaging a crystalline material containing lattice defects.

  15. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  16. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis of calcific deposits on intrauterine contraceptive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.R.; Wilkinson, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Deposits found on intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All seven devices, including five plastic and two copper IUDs, were coated with a crust containing cellular, acellular, and fibrillar material. The cellular material was composed of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cells of epithelial origin, sperm, and bacteria. Some of the bacteria were filamentous, with acute-angle branching. The fibrillar material appeared to be fibrin. Most of the acellular material was amorphous; calcite was identified by x-ray diffraction, and x-ray microanalysis showed only calcium. Some of the acellular material, particularly that on the IUD side of the crust, was organized in spherulitic crystals and was identified as calcium phosphate by x-ray microanalysis. The crust was joined to the IUD surface by a layer of fibrillar and amorphous material. It is suggested that the initial event in the formation of calcific deposits on IUD surfaces is the deposition of an amorphous and fibrillar layer. Various types of cells present in the endometrial environment adhere to this layer and then calcify. Thus, the deposition of calcific material on the IUDs is a calcification phenomenon, not unlike the formation of plaque on teeth.

  17. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic (stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy) features of bone lesions due to hatchet hacking trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luísa; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Bertrand, Marie-France; Rallon, Christophe; Ceinos, Romain; du Jardin, Philippe; Adalian, Pascal; Alunni, Véronique

    2017-03-01

    This experimental study examined the lesions produced by a hatchet on human bones (tibiae). A total of 30 lesions were produced and examined macroscopically (naked eye) and by stereomicroscopy. 13 of them were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The general shape of the lesion, both edges, both walls, the kerf floor and the extremities were described. The length and maximum width of the lesions were also recorded. The microscopic analysis of the lesions led to the description of a sharp-blunt mechanism. Specific criteria were identified (lateral pushing back, fragmentation of the upraising, fossa dug laterally to the edge and vertical striae) enabling the forensic expert to conclude that a hacking instrument was used. These criteria are easily identifiable using scanning electron microscopy, but can also be observed with stereomicroscopy. Overall, lateral pushing back and vertical striae visible using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy signal the use of a hacking tool.

  18. A systematic investigation of the charging effect in scanning electron microscopy for metal nanostructures on insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatabø, R; Coste, A; Greve, M M

    2017-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is perhaps the most important method for investigating and characterizing nanostructures. A well-known challenge in scanning electron microscopy is the investigation of insulating materials. As insulating materials do not provide a path to ground they accumulate charge, evident as image drift and image distortions. In previous work, we have seen that sample charging in arrays of metal nanoparticles on glass substrates leads to a shrinkage effect, resulting in a measurement error in the nanoparticle dimension of up to 15% at 10 kV and a probe current of 80 ± 10 pA. In order to investigate this effect in detail, we have fabricated metal nanostructures on insulating borosilicate glass using electron beam lithography. Electron beam lithography allows us to tailor the design of our metal nanostructures and the area coverage. The measurements are carried out using two commonly available secondary electron detectors in scanning electron microscopes, namely, an InLens- and an Everhart-Thornley detector. We identify and discriminate several contributions to the effect by varying microscope settings, including the size of the aperture, the beam current, the working distance and the acceleration voltage. We image metal nanostructures of various sizes and geometries, investigating the influence of scan-direction of the electron beam and secondary electron detector used for imaging. The relative measurement error, which we measure as high as 20% for some settings, is found to depend on the acceleration voltage and the type of secondary electron detector used for imaging. In particular, the Everhart-Thornley detectors lower sensitivity to SE1 electrons increase the magnitude of the shrinkage of up to 10% relative to the InLens measurements. Finally, a method for estimating charge balance in insulating samples is presented.

  19. Characterization of the electronic properties of magnetic and semiconductor devices using scanning probe techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaadt, Daniel Maria

    In the first part of this dissertation, scanning probe techniques are used in the study of localized charge deposition and subsequent transport in Co nanoclusters embedded in a SiO2 matrix are presented, and the application of this material in a hybrid magneto-electronic device for magnetic field sensing is described. Co nanoclusters are charged by applying a bias voltage pulse between a conductive tip and the sample, and electrostatic force microscopy is used to image charged areas. An exponential decay in the peak charge density is observed with decay times dependent on the nominal Co film thickness and on the sign of the deposited charge. The results are interpreted as a consequence of Coulomb-blockade effects. This study leads to the design of a hybrid magneto-electronic device, in which Co nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 are incorporated into the gate of a Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. Current flow through the Co nanoclusters leads to a buildup of electronic charge within the gate, and consequently to a transistor threshold voltage shift that varies with applied external magnetic field. The shift in threshold voltage results in an exponential change in subthreshold current and a quadratic change in saturation current. A detailed analysis of the device operation is presented. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the characterization of electronic properties of GaN-based heterostructure devices. Scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and spectroscopy (SCS) are used to investigate lateral variations in the transistor threshold voltage and the frequency-dependent response of surface charges and of charge in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The technique is described in detail, electrostatic simulations performed to study the influence of the probe tip geometry on the measured dC/dV spectra are presented, and the limitations of the SCS technique in a variety of applications are evaluated. Features in SCM images and maps of

  20. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.;

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  1. Sperm attributes and morphology on Rusa timorensis: light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahre, M B; Wahid, H; Rosnina, Y; Jesse, F F A; Azlan, C A; Khumran, A M; Jaji, A Z

    2014-08-01

    This study provides standard information on the attributes of sperm and describes the surface structure of normal and abnormal spermatozoa of Rusa timorensis. Two fertile stags were used as the source of semen collected during the first breeding season commencing from April 5 to July 2, 2012. Another five stags were used as the source of semen collected during the second breeding season commencing from April 1 to June 27, 2013. Semen samples were collected from the stags using an electro-ejaculator. The ejaculate was processed and samples prepared for light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) according to standard methods. No significant difference (P>0.05) was found between sperm attributes in comparison between different stags and different months of the fertile seasons. The results of this study have also demonstrated that there are no differences in size, shape and surface structure between spermatozoa of the different stags and different months of the fertile seasons. Sperm attributes (volume, pH, sperm concentration, general motility, progressive motility and viability) were 2.2±0.29 ml, 7.2±0.17, 886.3±39.7×10(6) spermatozoa/ml, 78.7±2.01%, 80.8±1.85% and 83.2±0.85%, respectively. Morphological analysis showed low percentage of abnormal spermatozoa 13.9±2.88%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spermatozoa which consisted of a flat paddle-shaped head, short neck and a tail, which was subdivided into midpiece, principal piece and endpiece. The average spermatozoon was 66.2±0.69 μm in total length. The flat paddle-shaped head was 7.8±0.28 μm long, 4.2±0.15 μm at its widest width, 2.4±0.18 μm basal width and 0.7±0.0 2μm thick. As for the tail, the midpiece length was 13.2±0.14 μm, 0.6±0.04 μm in diameter; the principal piece was 42.6±0.04μm, and 2.8±0.06 μm for the endpiece. Abnormal spermatozoa such as tapered head, microcephalic head, decapitated spermatozoa and bent tails were observed. Results provide standard information

  2. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages.

  3. In vitro comparison of epidural bacteria filters permeability and screening scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysin Sener

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epidural catheter bacteria filters are barriers in the patient-controlled analgesia/anaesthesia for preventing contamination at the epidural insertion site. The efficiency of these filters varies according to pore sizes and materials. METHOD: The bacterial adhesion capability of the two filters was measured in vitro experiment. Adhesion capacities for standard Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 strains of the two different filters (Portex and Rusch which have the same pore size were examined. Bacterial suspension of 0.5 Mc Farland was placed in the patient-controlled analgesia pump, was filtered at a speed of 5 mL/h. in continuous infusion for 48 h and accumulated in bottle. The two filters were compared with colony counts of bacteria in the filters and bottles. At the same time, the filters and adhered bacteria were monitored by scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination of filters showed that the Portex filter had a granular and the Rusch filter fibrillary structure. Colony counting from the catheter and bottle showed that both of the filters have significant bacterial adhesion capability (p < 0.001. After the bacteria suspension infusion, colony countings showed that the Portex filter was more efficient (p < 0.001. There was not any difference between S. aureus and P. aeruginosa bacteria adhesion. In the SEM monitoring after the infusion, it was physically shown that the bacteria were adhered efficiently by both of the filters. CONCLUSION: The granular structured filter was found statistically and significantly more successful than the fibrial. Although the pore sizes of the filters were same - of which structural differences shown by SEM were the same - it would not be right to attribute the changes in the efficiencies to only structural differences. Using microbiological and physical proofs with regard to efficiency at the same time has been

  4. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudo Jacome, L., E-mail: leonardo.agudo@bam.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eggeler, G., E-mail: gunther.eggeler@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dlouhy, A., E-mail: dlouhy@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  5. An optimized methodology to analyze biopolymer capsules by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conforto, Egle, E-mail: egle.conforto@univ-lr.fr [LaSIE UMR 7356 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Joguet, Nicolas [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Buisson, Pierre [INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Vendeville, Jean-Eudes; Chaigneau, Carine [IDCAPS, filiale R and D INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Maugard, Thierry [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France)

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an optimized methodology to study the surface characteristics and internal structure of biopolymer capsules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in environmental mode. The main advantage of this methodology is that no preparation is required and, significantly, no metallic coverage is deposited on the surface of the specimen, thus preserving the original capsule shape and its surface morphology. This avoids introducing preparation artefacts which could modify the capsule surface and mask information concerning important feature like porosities or roughness. Using this method gelatin and mainly fatty coatings, difficult to be analyzed by standard SEM technique, unambiguously show fine details of their surface morphology without damage. Furthermore, chemical contrast is preserved in backscattered electron images of unprepared samples, allowing visualizing the internal organization of the capsule, the quality of the envelope, etc.… This study provides pointers on how to obtain optimal conditions for the analysis of biological or sensitive material, as this is not always studied using appropriate techniques. A reliable evaluation of the parameters used in capsule elaboration for research and industrial applications, as well as that of capsule functionality is provided by this methodology, which is essential for the technological progress in this domain. - Highlights: • We optimized a methodology using ESEM to analyze biopolymer capsules. • This methodology allows analyzing original surface samples without any preparation. • No preparation artefact are introduced which would mask important surface details. • Morphological details and chemical contrast from the original surface are preserved. • Capsule shape, volume, surface roughness and coating quality were reliably evaluated.

  6. Superhydrophobic and adhesive properties of surfaces: testing the quality by an elaborated scanning electron microscopy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensikat, Hans J; Mayser, Matthias; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2012-10-09

    In contrast to advancements in the fabrication of new superhydrophobic materials, the characterization of their water repellency and quality is often coarse and unsatisfactory. In view of the problems and inaccuracies, particularly in the measurement of very high contact angles, we developed alternative methods for the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces. It was found that adhering water remnants after immersion are a useful criterion in determining the repellency quality. In this study, we introduce microscopy methods to detect traces of water-resembling test liquids on superhydrophobic surfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or fluorescence light microscopy (FLM). Diverse plant surfaces and some artificial superhydrophobic samples were examined. Instead of pure water, we used aqueous solutions containing a detectable stain and glycerol in order to prevent immediate evaporation of the microdroplets. For the SEM examinations, aqueous solutions of lead acetate were used, which could be detected in a frozen state at -90 °C with high sensitivity using a backscattered electron detector. For fluorescence microscopy, aqueous solutions of auramine were used. On different species of superhydrophobic plants, varying patterns of remaining microdroplets were found on their leaves. On some species, drop remnants occurred only on surface defects such as damaged epicuticular waxes. On others, microdroplets regularly decorated the locations of increased adhesion, particularly on hierarchically structured surfaces. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the method is suitable for testing the limits of repellency under harsh conditions, such as drop impact or long-enduring contact. The supplementation of the visualization method by the measurement of the pull-off force between a water drop and the sample allowed us to determine the adhesive properties of superhydrophobic surfaces quantitatively. The results were in good agreement with former studies of the water

  7. The importance of scanning electron microscopy (sem in taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kownacki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the value of scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the taxonomy and morphology of Chironomidae. This method has been relatively rarely used in Chironomidae studies. Our studies suggest that the SEM method provides a lot of new information. For example, the plastron plate of the thoracic horn of Macropelopia nebulosa (Meigen under light microscopy is visible as points, while under SEM we have found that it consists of a reticular structure with holes. By using SEM a more precise picture of the body structure of Chironomidae can be revealed. It allows researchers to explain inconsistencies in the existing descriptions of species. Another advantage of the SEM method is obtaining spatial images of the body and organs of Chironomidae. However, the SEM method also has some limitations. The main problem is dirt or debris (e.g. algae, mud, secretions, mucus, bacteria, etc., which often settles on the external surface of structures, especially those which are uneven or covered with hair. The dirt should be removed after collection of chironomid material because if left in place it can become chemically fixed to various surfaces. It unnecessarily remains at the surface and final microscopic images may contain artifacts that obscure chironomid structures being investigated. In this way many details of the surface are thus unreadable. The results reported here indicate that SEM examination helps us to identify new morphological features and details that will facilitate the identification of species of Chironomidae and may help to clarify the function of various parts of the body. Fast development of electron microscope technique allows us to learn more about structure of different organisms.

  8. Scanning electron microscopic and electrophoretic observations on barium sulphate used to absorb clotting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, R M; Deacon, S L

    1975-04-30

    Electron microscopy and particle electrophoresis were found to be complementary techniques with which to complete the physical data from an earlier study on barium sulphates used to absorb clotting factors from serum. The differences revealed by scanning electron microscopy (S. E. M) in the physical shape of low and high density grades of barium sulphate particles appear to be of greater significance than charge as expressed by electrophoretic mobility, in determining whether or not precursor or performed factor Xa is eluted. This conclusion was based on the finding that at pH values close to 7, where the adsorption from serum occurs, all samples with the exception of natural barytes were uncharged. However as the high-density, or soil-grade, was found by S. E. M. to consist of large solid crystals it was suggested that this shape might induce activiation of factor X as a result of partial denaturation and consequent unfolding of the adsorbed protein. In contrast, uptake of protein into the centre of the porous aggregates revealed by S. E. M. pictures of low-density or X-ray grade barium sulphate may afford protection against denaturation and exposure of the enzyme site. The porous nature of particles of low-density barium sulphate compared with the solid crystalline forms of other grades accounts not only for its lower bulk density but also for its greater surface/gram ratio which is reflected by an ability to adsorb more protein from serum. Neither technique produced evidence from any of the samples to indicate the presence of stabilising agents sometimes used to coat particles in barium meals.

  9. Ultrastructure of spermatozoa of tench Tinca tinca observed by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psenicka, M; Rodina, M; Nebesarova, J; Linhart, O

    2006-09-15

    Structure of tench (Tinca tinca L.) spermatozoa was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Spermatozoa of 26.1+/-3.8 microm total length possessed typical primitive simple structure, called "aqua sperm", without acrosomal head structures. It was probably the smallest spermatozoon described among cyprinid fishes. Heads were mostly composed of dense and slightly granular material, which appeared to be fairly homogeneous except for the occasional appearance of vacuoles. The midpiece remained separated from the flagellum by the cytoplasmic channel; it was cylindric/cone-shaped, 0.86+/-0.27 microm in length and 1.17+/-0.24 microm in width at proximal part. The proximal centriole was located in the "implantation fossa". The distal centriole appeared almost tangential to the nucleus and it functioned as a basal body for the flagellum. It had an orientation of 140 degrees with respect to the distal centriole. The sperm flagellum with 25.45+/-2.47 microm of total length had no any fin. The diameter of the flagellum perpendicular to the plane of the doublet of central microtubules was 173.67+/-20.45 nm and horizontal plane of the central microtubules was 200.71+/-20.45 nm. Peripheral doublets and the central doublet of microtubules measured 23.39+/-3.18 and 35.88+/-4.44 nm in width, respectively. The diameter of a microtubule was only 9.14+/-2.97 nm. A vesicle was attached to the most basal region of the flagellum and located just under plasma membrane of the flagellum.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of ion implanted SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, Johan B., E-mail: johan.malherbe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Kuhudzai, R.J.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Thabethe, T.T.; Odutemowo, O.S.; Theron, C.C.; Friedland, E. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Botha, A.J. [Laboratory for Microscopy & Microanalysis, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives a brief review of radiation damage caused by particle (ions and neutrons) bombardment in SiC at different temperatures, and its annealing, with an expanded discussion on the effects occurring on the surface. The surface effects were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) with an in-lens detector and EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction). Two substrates were used, viz. single crystalline 6H-SiC wafers and polycrystalline SiC, where the majority of the crystallites were 3C-SiC. The surface modification of the SiC samples by 360 keV ion bombardment was studied at temperatures below (i.e. room temperature), just at (i.e. 350 °C), or above (i.e. 600 °C) the critical temperature for amorphization of SiC. For bombardment at a temperature at about the critical temperature an extra step, viz. post-bombardment annealing, was needed to ascertain the microstructure of bombarded layer. Another aspect investigated was the effect of annealing of samples with an ion bombardment-induced amorphous layer on a 6H-SiC substrate. SEM could detect that this layer started to crystalize at 900 °C. The resulting topography exhibited a dependence on the ion species. EBSD showed that the crystallites forming in the amorphized layer were 3C-SiC and not 6H-SiC as the substrate. The investigations also pointed out the behaviour of the epitaxial regrowth of the amorphous layer from the 6H-SiC interface.

  11. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  12. Morphology of the Lingual and Buccal Papillae in Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goździewska-Harłajczuk, K; Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Janeczek, M; Zawadzki, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the description of the lingual and buccal papillae in adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos) by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongue consisted of apex, body and root. Four types of lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvallate) in addition to two types of buccal papillae were observed. The filiform papillae, some with secondary papillae, were distributed on both the corpus and apex of the tongue, with stratified epithelium, and layer of keratin coat were recognized. The short (small) cone papillae had pointed top, while bunoform papillae were wide with smooth apex. The much less numerous circumvallate papillae with pseudopapillae on the each rim of the caudal lingual body were present with weak layer of keratin and intra-epithelial taste buds. The small fungiform papillae were found on the dorsal lingual surface, while the large fungiform papillae were situated on the ventral surface of the tongue, especially, in rostral part and were round in shape with numerous gustatory pores and very thin keratin coat. Pseudopapillae were present on the buccal conical 'bunoform' papillae surface, while 'elongate' buccal papillae surface was rather softly folded with thin coat of keratin. Microridges were observed in the less keratinized parts of each type of papillae. The orientation of either lingual or buccal papillae into the throat side facilitates the emptying of oral cavity from nutrient and swallowing of food. In conclusion, the anatomical features of the alpaca tongue are an adaptation to the feeding habits.

  13. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar Ojha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Settings and Design: Forty extracted clinically healthy premolars were grouped in two groups. Group A comprising of teeth that were subjected to toothbrush bristles and group B to velcro fasteners (hook and loop. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing

  14. Opisthorchiasis-associated biliary stones:Light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Banchob Sripa; Pipatphong Kanla; Poonsiri Sinawat; Melissa R. Haswell-Elkins

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Biliary stones are frequentty encountered in areas endemic for opisthorchiasis in Thailand. The present study was to describe the prevalence and pathogenesis of these stones.METHODS: Gallstones and/or common bile duct stones and bile specimens from 113 consecutive cholecystectomies were included. Bile samples, including sludge and/or microcalculi, were examined for Opisthorchis viverrini eggs,calcium and bilirubin. The stones were also processed for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study.RESULTS: Of the 113 cases, 82 had pigment stones, while one had cholesterol stones. The other 30 cases had no stones. Most of the stone cases (76%, 63/83) had multiple stones, while the remainder had a single stone. Stones were more frequently observed in females. Bile examination was positive for O. viverrini eggs in 50% of the cases studied. Aggregates of calcium bilirubinate precipitates were observed in all cases with sludge. Deposition of calcium bilirubinate on the eggshell was visualized by special staining. A SEM study demonstrated the presence of the parasite eggs in the stones. Numerous crystals,morphologically consistent with calcium derivatives and cholesterol precipitates, were seen.CONCLUSION: Northeast Thailand has a high prevalence of pigment stones, as observed at the cholecystectomy, and liver fluke infestation seems involved in the pathogenesis of stone formation.

  15. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  16. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kohno, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Cardamone, L.A. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO{sub 3}. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH{sub 2} and lithium columns in Al{sub 3}Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles. - Author-Highlights: • We present a method for enhancing the visibility and reliability of imaging light elements in STEM. • The method involves taking the difference between signals on separate bright field detectors. • Experimental data for LaAlO{sub 3} are presented, and are shown to compare favourably with simulation. • Optimum imaging parameters are explored through simulation.

  17. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Serrao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM. Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5. In addition, five manual CCC (n=5 were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA. Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq, were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P<0.05 than the FS laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  18. Effect of praziquantel on adult Echinococcus granulosus in vitro: scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, G A; Marchiondo, A A; Andersen, F L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of praziquantel in vitro at concentrations of 5, 50 and 500 ppm for 1 h resulted in the progressive breakdown of the tegument and in morphologic distortion of adult Echinococcus granulosus when compared to controls. Scanning electron microscopy of all specimens treated in the various concentrations of praziquantel showed loss of most, if not all of the rostellar hooks and changes in the structure of the suckers. Many of the tapeworms immediately detached from the host's gut upon being placed in the drug, and all treated cestodes exhibited contraction or swelling, particularly in the penultimate proglottid. Intense contraction was apparent in the worms exposed to the higher drug concentrations. Characteristic conical microtriches on the terminal proglottid, as observed in the control specimens, became fused and matted when exposed to 5 ppm of praziquantel. At a drug concentration of 50 ppm, the tegumental surface developed grooves or furrows between clumps of fused microtriches, while 500 ppm caused production of holes within the denuded tegument of the parasite. Ovoid bodies, presumed to be eggs, were observed on the outer surfaces and just below the tegument of tapeworms treated with concentrations of 50 ppm. These structures also appeared to adhere to the outer surfaces of specimens exposed to 500 ppm. In view of the foregoing, special care should be taken in handling and disposing of feces from infected or suspect dogs after praziquantel treatment, since the breakdown in the tegumental surface of E. granulosus presumably results in the release of potentially infective eggs.

  19. Antioxidant mix: A novel pulpotomy medicament: A scanning electron microscopy evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ajay Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and histological success rate of antioxidant mix as a new pulpotomy agent for primary teeth. Settings and Design: Commercially available antioxidants, namely Antioxidants plus trace elements (OXIn-Xt tm , India were used. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out on 36 primary molar teeth in 32 children, with age that ranged from 6 to 9 years. Regular conventional pulpotomy procedure followed by placement of antioxidant mix over the radicular orifice was done. Recall was scheduled for 3, 6, and 9 months, respectively, after treatment. Results: Thirty-six pulpotomized primary molars were available for follow-up evaluations. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of samples showing convex shaped hard tissue barrier formation may be proof of the role of antioxidant material in localization and direction and morphology of the hard tissue barrier. One tooth which presented with pain was assessed as unsuccessful. Conclusion: Quite promising clinical, radiographic, and histological results of antioxidants in the present study shows their potential to be an ideal pulpotomy agent.

  20. Structural characterization of the capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) tongue by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Dos Santos Haemmerle, Carlos Alexandre; Dias, Fernando José; Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Sosthines, Marcia Consentino Kronka; Dos Santos, Tatiana Carlesco; Guimarães, Juliana Plácido; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-02-01

    Capybara is the largest rodent in the world and displays a seasonally dependent herbivore feeding behavior. Here, we present an anatomical contribution for understand this fact, by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy methodologies for tongue tissue analysis. The histological preparations revealed filiform, fungiform, vallate, and foliate papillae on the dorsal mucosa of the capybara tongue. The epithelial layer exhibited a lining of keratinized stratified squamous epithelial cells. The lamina propria was characterized by a dense connective tissue composed of the primary and secondary papillar projections. We also revealed the original aspects of the connective papillae. The shapes of the papillae varied by region of the tongue, and filiform, fungiform, vallate, and foliate papillae and subjacent layers of muscular fibers were observed. Pyriform taste buds occupying the epithelial layer of fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae were identified and the intracellular components of the taste buds and the intracorpuscular amyelinated nerve fibers were observed. The taste buds were characterized by the distribution of granular endoplasmic reticulum throughout the perinuclear area, the Golgi apparatus, and mitochondrial assemblies of various distinct diameters. Mitochondrial accumulation was also observed in the collagen bundle-surrounded amyelinated nerve fibers beside the basal cells. Therefore, these peculiar anatomical descriptions may contribute to understanding the adaptation of the feeding behavior of capybaras in a seasonally changing environment.

  1. In situ tensile testing of individual Co nanowires inside a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dongfeng; Breguet, Jean-Marc; Clavel, Reymond [Laboratory of Robotic Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Phillippe, Laetitia; Utke, Ivo; Michler, Johann [Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures Laboratory, EMPA-Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2009-09-09

    Uniaxial quasi-static tensile testing on individual nanocrystalline Co nanowires (NWs), synthesized by electrochemical deposition process (EDP) in porous templates, was performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) using a microfabricated tensile stage consisting of a comb drive actuator and a clamped-clamped beam force sensor. A 'three-beam structure' was fabricated by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID) on the stage, from which the specimen elongation and the tensile force could be measured simultaneously from SEM images at high magnification. A novel strategy of modifying device topography, e.g. in the form of trenches and pillars, was proposed to facilitate in situ SEM pick-and-place nanomanipulation, which could achieve a high yield of about 80% and reduce the difficulties in specimen preparation for tensile testing at the nanoscale. The measured apparent Young's modulus (75.3 {+-} 14.6) GPa and tensile strength (1.6 {+-} 0.4) GPa are significantly lower than the bulk modulus and the theoretical strength of monocrystalline samples, respectively. This result is important for designing Co NW-based devices. The origins of these distinctions are discussed in terms of the stiffnesses of the soldering portions, specimen misalignment, microstructure of the NWs and the experimental measurement uncertainty.

  2. Differentiation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) eggs using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Katherine J; Williams, Craig R

    2016-05-01

    Aedes notoscriptus and Aedes aegypti are both peri-domestic, invasive container-breeding mosquitoes. While the two potential arboviral vectors are bionomically similar, their sympatric distribution in Australia is limited. In this study, analyses of Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus eggs were enabled using scanning electron microscopy. Significant variations in egg length to width ratio and outer chorionic cell field morphology between Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus enabled distinction of the two species. Intraspecific variations in cell field morphology also enabled differentiation of the separate populations of both species, highlighting regional and global variation. Our study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of inter- and intraspecific egg morphological and morphometric variation between two invasive container-breeding mosquitoes. The results indicate a high degree of intraspecific variation in Ae. notoscriptus egg morphology when compared to the eggs of Ae. aegypti. Comparative morphological analyses of Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus egg attributes using SEM allows differentiation of the species and may be helpful in understanding egg biology in relation to biotope of origin.

  3. Scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue in the scarlet macaw (Ara macao).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal lingual surface of scarlet macaw (Ara macao) was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Macroscopically, the lingual apex of the scarlet macaw had a lip-like shape. Three parts were distinguished in the dorsal surface of the tongue: the apex, body, and root of the tongue. The surface of the lingual apex had many grooves toward lingual root. The surface of the lingual apex was relatively smooth. The central surface of the papillary layer in the lingual apex after removal of the epithelium consisted of numerous dermal papillae, but the papillae were not observed in the lateral region. A pair of openings of the lingual glands was observed in the posterolateral region of the lingual body. The opening of the lingual gland after removal of the epithelium showed more clear structure than before removal. Many conical papillae in the posterior region of the lingual body were observed. The structure of the tongue of the scarlet macaw was different from that of the rainbow lorikeet.

  4. Light and scanning electron microcopy study of the tongue in Rhea americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso Santos, Tatiana; Yuri Fukuda, Katia; Plácido Guimarães, Juliana; Franco Oliveira, Moacir; Angelica Miglino, Maria; Watanabe, Li-Sei

    2011-01-01

    Morphological characteristics of the tongue were studied in adult rhea (Rhea americana). The lingual surface and the surface of epithelium-connective tissue interface of rhea tongue were examined macroscopically and by light and scanning electron microscopy. The rhea tongue revealed a triangular aspect, without adjustment of the inferior bill formation, occupying approximately ¼ of the length of the oral cavity. Lingual papilla-like structures were not observed over the lingual surface. The tongue mucosa was composed of a thick non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in the dorsal and ventral part, supported by a connective tissue core. The submucosa contained numerous glands with cytoplasmic granules, and luminal secretion was positive for histochemical reaction to Alcian Blue in pH 2.5 and PAS, and negative to Alcian Blue in pH 0.5. Despite the rudimentary characteristic of the tongue in rhea, our results suggest an important role of tongue secretions in food lubrication and humidification during the swallowing process, based on the enormous quantity of lingual glands in the submucosa and the histochemical characteristics of their secretions.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Phalacrocoracidae, Aves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Andrzejewski, Wojciech; Godynicki, Szymon

    2006-02-01

    The tongue of the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo is a small, immobile structure with a length of 1.4 cm, situated in the middle part of the elongated lower bill. The uniquely shaped tongue resembles a mushroom, with a short base and an elongated dorsal part with sharpened anterior and posterior tips. A median crest can be observed on the surface of the tongue. Examination by light and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the whole tongue is formed by a dense connective tissue with many bundles of elastic fibers. The lingual mucosa is covered by a multilayered keratinized epithelium. The thickest, horny layer of the lingual epithelium was observed on the surface of the median crest and on the posterior tip of the tongue. Lingual glands are absent in cormorants. The framework of the tongue is composed of a hyoid cartilage incorporated into the base. The localization and structure of the tongue in the cormorant show that it is a rudimentary organ and that the lingual body, usually well-developed in birds, is conserved.

  6. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  7. Scanning transmission electron microscopy through-focal tilt-series on biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe; Marco, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Since scanning transmission electron microscopy can produce high signal-to-noise ratio bright-field images of thick (≥500 nm) specimens, this tool is emerging as the method of choice to study thick biological samples via tomographic approaches. However, in a convergent-beam configuration, the depth of field is limited because only a thin portion of the specimen (from a few nanometres to tens of nanometres depending on the convergence angle) can be imaged in focus. A method known as through-focal imaging enables recovery of the full depth of information by combining images acquired at different levels of focus. In this work, we compare tomographic reconstruction with the through-focal tilt-series approach (a multifocal series of images per tilt angle) with reconstruction with the classic tilt-series acquisition scheme (one single-focus image per tilt angle). We visualised the base of the flagellum in the protist Trypanosoma brucei via an acquisition and image-processing method tailored to obtain quantitative and qualitative descriptors of reconstruction volumes. Reconstructions using through-focal imaging contained more contrast and more details for thick (≥500 nm) biological samples.

  8. Drying techniques for the visualisation of agarose-based chromatography media by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nweke, Mauryn C; Turmaine, Mark; McCartney, R Graham; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2017-03-01

    The drying of chromatography resins prior to scanning electron microscopy is critical to image resolution and hence understanding of the bead structure at sub-micron level. Achieving suitable drying conditions is especially important with agarose-based chromatography resins, as over-drying may cause artefact formation, bead damage and alterations to ultrastructural properties; and under-drying does not provide sufficient resolution for visualization under SEM. This paper compares and contrasts the effects of two drying techniques, critical point drying and freeze drying, on the morphology of two agarose based resins (MabSelect™/dw ≈85 µm and Capto™ Adhere/dw ≈75 µm) and provides a complete method for both. The results show that critical point drying provides better drying and subsequently clearer ultrastructural visualization of both resins under SEM. Under this protocol both the polymer fibers (thickness ≈20 nm) and the pore sizes (diameter ≈100 nm) are clearly visible. Freeze drying is shown to cause bead damage to both resins, but to different extents. MabSelect resin encounters extensive bead fragmentation, whilst Capto Adhere resin undergoes partial bead disintegration, corresponding with the greater extent of agarose crosslinking and strength of this resin. While freeze drying appears to be the less favorable option for ultrastructural visualization of chromatography resin, it should be noted that the extent of fracturing caused by the freeze drying process may provide some insight into the mechanical properties of agarose-based chromatography media.

  9. Multi-resolution correlative focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy: applications to cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Kedar; Danielson, Cindy M; Lagarec, Ken; Lowekamp, Bradley C; Coffman, Phil; Laquerre, Alexandre; Phaneuf, Michael W; Hope, Thomas J; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    Efficient correlative imaging of small targets within large fields is a central problem in cell biology. Here, we demonstrate a series of technical advances in focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to address this issue. We report increases in the speed, robustness and automation of the process, and achieve consistent z slice thickness of ∼3 nm. We introduce "keyframe imaging" as a new approach to simultaneously image large fields of view and obtain high-resolution 3D images of targeted sub-volumes. We demonstrate application of these advances to image post-fusion cytoplasmic intermediates of the HIV core. Using fluorescently labeled cell membranes, proteins and HIV cores, we first produce a "target map" of an HIV infected cell by fluorescence microscopy. We then generate a correlated 3D EM volume of the entire cell as well as high-resolution 3D images of individual HIV cores, achieving correlative imaging across a volume scale of 10(9) in a single automated experimental run.

  10. A light, transmission and scanning electron microscope study of snuff-treated hamster cheek pouch epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, S H; Das, A; Worowongvasu, R; Mehdinejad, B; Waterhouse, J P

    1992-03-01

    The effects of smokeless tobacco (snuff) on hamster cheek mucosa were studied by light microscopy, transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two grams of commercially available smokeless tobacco were placed into the blind end of the right cheek pouch of each experimental animal, once a day and five days a week for 24 months. The control animals did not receive smokeless tobacco. After 24 months treatment with smokeless tobacco, hamster cheek mucosal epithelium lost its translucency and had become whitish in color. By light microscopy hyperorthokeratosis, prominent granular cell layers with increased keratohyalin granules and hyperplasia were seen. At the ultrastructural level, wider intercellular spaces filled with microvilli, numerous shorter desmosomes, many thin tonofilament bundles, increased number of mitochondria, membrane coating granules and keratohyalin granules were seen in snuff-treated epithelium. The changes in the surface of the epithelium as seen by SEM were the development of an irregular arrangement of the microridges and the disappearance of the normal honeycomb pattern. The microridges were irregular, widened and surrounded the irregular elongated pits. Some smooth areas without microridges and pits were also seen. The long-term histological, TEM and SEM changes induced by smokeless tobacco treatment of the epithelium are well correlated with each other and were similar to those reported in human leukoplakia without dyskeratosis. They imply changes of pathological response resulting from topically applied snuff.

  11. Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of (Ca , Sr)Fe2O5 Brownmillerite superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debangshu; Stone, Greg; Moon, Eun Ju; Young, Joshua; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Rondinelli, James; May, Steven; Alem, Nasim

    The brownmillerite phase A2B2O5 consists of ordered oxygen vacancies in alternate perovskite layers forming chiral tetrahedral chains. The handedness of these tetrahedral chains control the polarization of the structure. The current study focuses on 1-1 brownmillerite superlattices grown on a SrTiO3 substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The B-site in this structure is iron throughout the superlattice film, while the A-site alternates between calcium and strontium in the superlattice layers. In this study, we use atomic resolution aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to investigate the structure and chemistry of the film-substrate interface as well as the chemical structure of the superlattice. Atom positions are determined to measure displacement vectors of A-site cations in the superlattice structure. D.M., G.A.S., V.G. and N.A. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1420620. E.J.M. and S.J.M. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1151649.

  12. A simple cryo-holder facilitates specimen observation under a conventional scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Nan; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Kuo, Tai-Chih; Yang, Ya-Yun; Lin, Ching-Yeh; Jane, Wann-Neng; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun

    2012-02-01

    A pre-cryogenic holder (cryo-holder) facilitating cryo-specimen observation under a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) is described. This cryo-holder includes a specimen-holding unit (the stub) and a cryogenic energy-storing unit (a composite of three cylinders assembled with a screw). After cooling, the cryo-holder can continue supplying cryogenic energy to extend the observation time for the specimen in a conventional SEM. Moreover, the cryogenic energy-storing unit could retain appropriate liquid nitrogen that can evaporate to prevent frost deposition on the surface of the specimen. This device is proved feasible for various tissues and cells, and can be applied to the fields of both biology and material science. We have employed this novel cryo-holder for observation of yeast cells, trichome, and epidermal cells in the leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana, compound eyes of insects, red blood cells, filiform papillae on the surface of rat tongue, agar medium, water molecules, penicillium, etc. All results suggested that the newly designed cryo-holder is applicable for cryo-specimen observation under a conventional SEM without cooling system. Most importantly, the design of this cryo-holder is simple and easy to operate and could adapt a conventional SEM to a plain type cryo-SEM affordable for most laboratories.

  13. Chromosomes and karyotype analysis of a liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Choochote, Wej; Kanla, Pipatpong; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M; Wongkham, Sopit; Wongkham, Chaisiri

    2012-09-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini, a human liver fluke, has been categorized as the carcinogenic organism according to the strong association with carcinogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The infection of this food-borne parasite is a major impact on the health of humans, especially CCA patients in the northeast of Thailand. Taxonomy, morphology, epidemiology and molecular study of O. viverrini have been publicized increasingly but the precise karyotypic study is still incomplete. In this study, the chromosomes of O. viverrini were prepared from the testes of adult worms retrieved from metacercariae infected-hamsters. The chromosomes of O. viverrini were identified in haploid (n=6) meiotic metaphase and in diploid (2n=12) mitotic metaphase by light microscopy. The chromosome number, length and nomenclature of each chromosome were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The six chromosomes consist of one large-sized metacentric, one medium-sized metacentric, two small-sized metacentric, one small-sized submetacentric and one small-sized acrocentric chromosomes with the lengths of 2.84±0.03, 2.12±0.10, 1.71±0.13, 1.44±0.04, 1.23±0.03 and 0.84±0.13 μm, respectively. This is the first karyotype analysis of O. viverrini with defined complete nomenclature.

  14. Correlation between auditory brainstem recordings and morphology as seen through the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultcrantz, M.

    1988-09-01

    Pregnant CBA/CBA mice were exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 Grey (Gy), (1 Gy = 100 rad) in single doses with whole body gamma-irradiation on the 12th, 13th and 16th gestational days, respectively. The animals were tested at an age of one month for vestibular and cochlear function. Thereafter the inner ears were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. A morphological analysis with cytocochleograms was performed. Morphological changes in the vestibular part showed gross malformations in the cristae ampullares. Hair cells of type I seemed to be more severely changed than hair cells type II. The macula utriculi also showed malformations of the otoconia. All these changes were more pronounced when the irradiation was given early during pregnancy and with the highest doses used, except the otoconia which were more injured when irradiated day 16 of gestation. No disturbances of the equilibrium reflexes were noted. In the cochlea a dose-dependent, time-related damage pattern was demonstrated with pathological changes of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells. When tested electrophysiologically for auditory function with auditory brainstem recordings (ABR), elevated thresholds were revealed different in shape depending on when during pregnancy irradiation took place. A good correlation existed between the morphological changes as seen in the cytocochleograms and the functional changes documented with the ABR.

  15. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  16. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  17. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ba, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species. PMID:27597893

  18. Scanning electron microscopic description of cellular activity and mineral changes in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, O; Boudigues, S; Pilet, P; Aguado, E; Heymann, D; Daculsi, G

    2001-12-01

    The cellular activity and changes in mineral composition of dental tissues involved in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions were investigated. Teeth with at least 1 lesion (n = 10) were extracted from 10 different cats that were presented primarily for chronic gingivostomatitis and/or severe periodontal disease. Scanning electron microscopic methods were used to determine the presence of resorptive cells in 8 teeth while 2 teeth were evaluated for pathologic changes in dental mineral composition. Observations were complicated by the presence of organic wear on the dental surfaces, however resorptive cells could be clearly identified in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions. Resorptive cells had morphologic features indicative of "osteoclast-like" cells or odontoclasts. Resorptive cell activity created a resorption area of darker dentin continuous with physiologic dentin. The darker dentin area seemed poorly mineralized and showed a significantly lower calcium/phosphorous ratio compared with adjacent physiologic denting in 1 tooth. A significantly higher level of magnesium combined with available carbonate ions may have increased the solubility in areas of darker dentin.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy studies on the first-instar larva of Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippis, T; Leite, A C

    1997-04-01

    First-instar larvae of Dermatobia hominis collected 1, 4 and 7 days after having penetrated experimentally infected rats, were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. On the pseudocephalon there are basiconic and trichoid sensilla (antennal sensory complex), and basiconic, coeloconic and campaniform sensilla (maxillary sensory complex). The thoracic segments bear several rows of small, backwardly pointed, spines, and trichoid, campaniform, coeloconic and pit sensilla. The anterior spiracle is a minute opening. Both small and large spines directed posteriorly are on the first to fourth abdominal segments, which also bear coeloconic and companiform sensilla. These sensilla are present on the unarmed (fifth and sixth) and armed (seventh) abdominal segments. The seventh and the last (eight) abdominal segments have forwardly directed spines. Each spiracular plate has two spiracular openings and four spatulate-like structures called sun rays. The anus and the coeloconic sensilla are proeminent on the last segment. The results are compared with other parasitic dipteran larvae, and emphasize that the multiple types of sensilla on D.hominis larva may have importance in establishing the parasitic phase of the life cycle of this insect.

  20. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  1. Evaluation of different methods to clean titanium abutments. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, J A; Collaert, B; Klinge, B

    1992-09-01

    The cleaning effectiveness of different treatment methods for titanium abutments was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the mandible of 4 beagle dogs, 25 titanium abutments were installed (modum Brånemark). After 16 weeks of plaque accumulation, mineralized deposits had formed on 23 abutments. Each of these abutments was subjected to one of the following treatment methods: scaling with (1) metal, (2) plastic, or (3) ultrasonic instruments; (4) air-polishing, (5) weekly rubber cup polishing or (6) daily brushing with a conventional toothbrush. Fourteen abutments were removed immediately after treatment. On 9 abutments, the scaling procedures and air-polishing were repeated after another 16 weeks of plaque accumulation. The abutments were prepared for SEM, and each of them was viewed and photographed at 3 different magnifications. The photomicrographs were evaluated by 3 examiners who, guided by reference pictures, gave each abutment a "cleanliness" score, ranking from 0 to 5. Regular rubber cup polishing and regular brushing resulted in the highest surface cleanliness, while the air-polishing procedure showed the lowest cleanliness score. None of the 3 scaling methods created a cleanliness score better than 3. The 3 scaling methods were considered equal in their cleaning effectiveness. No differences could be observed between surfaces treated 1 x or 2 x. Taken the present findings and those of other studies concerning the effects of scaling on the surface roughness and biocompatibility into consideration, it was concluded that plastic scalers may be the instruments of choice for debridement of titanium implant surfaces.

  2. Scanning electron microscopic and X-ray micro analysis on tooth enamel exposed to alkaline agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubee, Fabian; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    The background of this study comprises two clinical cases, where patients exposed to aerosols of an alkaline and surface active cleaning agent developed loss of enamel substance on their teeth, further resulting in loss of teeth and partially destroyed soft tissues. The alkaline cleaning agent consisted of potassium hydroxide and various surfactants. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible changes in morphology and composition in human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions, by means of X-ray micro analysis (XRMA), FTIR-spectroscopic analyses and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extracted premolars, exposed to potassium hydroxide solutions and alkaline cleaning solution,were analyzed by means of XRMA and SEM. Enamel powder, exposed to cleaning solution, was analyzed by means of FTIR. The SEM analysis revealed an increased porosity of the enamel surface and partially loss of enamel substance after exposure to alkaline solutions. The XRMA analyses revealed a decrease in carbon concentration while phosphorous and calcium showed no marked changes. The FTIR analyses showed no significant changes in peak heights or peak positions for phosphate, carbonate or hydroxide. It was concluded that human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions showed loss of organic substance, marked pores in enamel surface and loss of substance in the enamel surface.

  3. The Effect of Fragaria vesca Extract on Smear Layer Removal: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Razavi, Sayed Alireza; Mosaddeghmehrjardi, Mohammad Hossein; Tabrizizadeh, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Successful endodontic treatment depends on elimination of the microorganisms through chemomechanical debridement. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fragaria vesca (wild strawberry) extract (FVE) on the removal of smear layer (SL). Methods and Materials: In this analytical-observational study, 40 extracted mandibular and maxillary human teeth were selected. After canal preparation with standard step-back technique, the teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the irrigation solution: saline (negative control), 5.25% NaOCl+EDTA (positive control), FVE and FVE+EDTA. The teeth were split longitudinally so that scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs could be taken to evaluate the amount of remnant SL in coronal, middle and apical thirds. The data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the groups (P<0.001). The use of NaOCl+EDTA was the most effective regimen for removing the SL followed by FVE+EDTA. FVE alone was significantly more effective than saline (P<0.001). Conclusion: FVE with and without EDTA could effectively remove the smear layer; however, compared to NaOCl group it was less effective. PMID:26526069

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of antennal sensory organs of the cattle grub, Hypoderma lineatum (Diptera: Oestridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X Y; Liu, X H; Ge, Y Q; Zhang, D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoderma lineatum (Villers, 1789) (Diptera: Oestridae) is a hypodermosis fly that has resulted in great economic losses worldwide. The antennae of cattle grub males and females were examined through stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to reveal the general morphology, combined with distribution, type, size, and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. All of the three antennal segments (antennal scape, pedicel, and funiculus) possess microtrichiae on their surface. Mechanoreceptors only exist on the antennal scape and pedicel. The antennal funiculus presents four types of antennal sensilla: trichoid, basiconic, coeloconic, and clavate sensilla. Three distinctive characters of H. lineatum are obvious: (1) the relatively slender, flexible, and equal-height mechanoreceptors; (2) the enlarged antennal pedicel, and numerous antennal sensory pits and pit sensilla on the antennal funiculus; and (3) all types of antennal sensilla clustered in sensory pits, respectively. Additionally, the enlarged antennal pedicel and abundant sensory pits and pit sensilla might facilitate odor detection, enhance olfactory sensitivity and accuracy, and also protect the fragile antennal sensilla from mechanical irritation or damage.

  5. Cellulose microfibril-water interaction as characterized by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman K. Sen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillated celluloses, liberated from macroscopic lignocellulosic fibers by mechanical means, are sub-fiber elements with lengths in the micron scale and diameters ranging from 10 to a few hundred nanometers. These materials have shown strong water interactions. This article describes an investigation and quantification of the ‘hard-to-remove (HR water content’ in cellulose fibers and microfibrillated structures prepared from fully bleached softwood pulp (BSW. The fiber/fibril structure was altered by using an extended beating process (up to 300 minutes, and water interactions were determined with isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Isothermal TGA is shown to be a convenient and insightful characterization method for fiber-water interactions for fibers and microfibrils at small sample size. In addition, scanning electron microscopic (SEM images depict the differences between fibers and microfibrils with respect to beating time in the dried consolidated structures. Highly refined pulps with microfibrils were determined to have two critical drying points, i.e., two minima in the second derivative of weight versus time, not before reported in the literature. Also in this study, hard-to-remove (HR water content is related to the area above the first derivative curve in the constant rate and falling rate drying zones. This measure of HR water correlates with a previous measurement method of HR water but is less ambiguous for materials that lack a constant drying rate zone. Blends of unbeaten fibers and microfibril containing samples were prepared and show potential as composite materials.

  6. Fine structure of Delia platura (Meigen) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Ke; Yang, Yan-Zhi; Liu, Mei-Qin; Zhang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Delia platura (Meigen) is a phytophagous fly that can cause significant crop losses. To obtain a better understanding of the external morphology of this species, adult D. platura is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Organs or structures that are important for taxonomy, such as the compound eyes, spiracles, pulvilli, wings, and genitalia are highlighted to complement previous description based on light microscope. Mesothoracic and metathoracic spiracles of D. platura that provide efficiency in preventing entrance of fine materials or dust into the tracheal system are morphologically different. In addition, the elongate-oval pulvillus is densely covered with tenent setae with spoon-like tip, which can increase the number of contact points for attachment to a surface. Four types of sensilla are observed on the male genitalia of D. platura including: trichoid sensilla, chaetic sensilla, three subtypes of campaniform sensilla, and basiconic sensilla. Long bristles and microtrichiae are observed on the female genitalia of D. platura. The possible function of sensilla located in the genitalia of D. platura is discussed. Microsc. Res. Tech. 77:619-630, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A scanning electron microscopy study of the embryonic development of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machner, Jakob; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2010-11-01

    The phylogenetic position of the enigmatic Pycnogonida (sea spiders) is still controversial. This is in part due to a lack of detailed data about the morphology and ontogenesis of this, in many aspects, aberrant group. In particular, studies on the embryonic development of pycnogonids are rare and in part contradictory. Here, we present the first embryological study of a pycnogonid species using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We describe the late embryogenesis of Pycnogonum litorale from the first visible appendage anlagen to the hatchling in 11 embryonic stages. The three pairs of appendage anlagen gain in length by growth, as well as by extension of furrows into the embryo. The opening of the stomodaeum is located far in front of the anlagen of the chelifores and has a Y-shaped lumen from the onset. During further embryogenesis, the position of the mouth shifts ventrally, until it is located between the chelifores. The proboscis anlage grows out as a circumoral wall-like structure, which is initially more pronounced ventrally. Hypotheses about the evolution of the proboscis by fusion of originally separated components are critically discussed, because the proboscis anlage of P. litorale shows no indications of a composite nature. In particular, a participation of post-cheliforal elements in proboscis formation is rejected by our data. Further, no preoral structure and no stage in proboscis formation was found, which could plausibly be homologized with the labrum of othereuarthropods. Thus, our study supports the assumption of a complete lack of a labrum in Pycnogonida.

  8. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE RAT ADRENAL GLAND AFTER SURGICAL LASER EXPOSURE

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    K. G. Kemoklidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied via low vacuum scanning electron microscopy the effects of a surgical laser exposure to adrenal glands and results of regeneration processes after. Materials and methods.Purpose of this work is modeling of effects of the removal with a surgical laser a pathological focus in the adrenal glands. For this Wistar male rat (n = 19 adrenal glands were researched without the laser exposure, immediately after it and 1 month later. Results. Immediately after exposure occurs laser ablation crater with rough edges and melted surface penetrated by equidistant pores, which are footprints of blood vessels. Beneath of the surface are numerous vaporizationbubbles. Around the crater, the surface wrinkles and sags due to decreased ability to retain water. 1 month after the laser damage, the affected area tightened by a scar. Its coarse bundles of collagen fibers braid shapeless lumps of coal and caverns. Tissues with normal appearance are close to the scar, both outside and inside of the organ. The wrinkling and the sagging are absent. The undamaged organ part has retained the previous shape, without hypertrophies. The damaged part has shrunk. The nature of the regeneration processes indicates a low probability of a relapse after the destruction of a pathological focus via the surgical laser exposure.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (ESEM OF Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae COLLETERS

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    Sergimar Kennedy de Paiva PINHEIRO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the colleters of Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae by using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Two different developmental stages were characterized as well as the chemical composition of secretion. Colleters are secretory structures that produce mucilage protecting the meristems and leaf primordia against desiccation and/or pathogens. Although these secretory structures are common on Rubiaceae, the results reported here is to the best of our knowledge the first record of colleters on Morinda genus. Colleters are present at the stipule adaxial surface, distributed in lines. These secretory structures are standard type and have no base constriction, differently from all studied species until now. In order to better understand the colleters structure and secretion, two phases were distinguished: a secretory phase and a senescence one. On secretory phase standard type colleters were visualized between leaf primordia and stipule, emerge on secretion. They present smooth surface, however was also possible to observe the contours of secretory cells anticlinal walls. In senescent phase colleters morphology was alternated exhibiting rough surface and blunt to point tips. The surface was rough and on stipule sections was possible to observe idioblasts with raphides bundles. The secretion process of M. citrifolia colleters occurs with the disruption of cuticle and the chemical elements are mostly dominated by carbon and oxygen.

  10. Morphological Study of Adult Male Worms of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 by Scanning Electron Microscopy

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    José Roberto Machado-Silva

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubercles, spines and sensory receptors are the most studied structures of adult male worms of Schistosoma mansoni isolated in other countries. The purpose of this investigation was to properly define these structures in Brazilian worms. Specimens 7-8 weeks after infection were recovered from albino SW mice and from a wild rodent (Nectomys squamipes and processed for scanning electron microscopy studies. Photomicrographs of the anterior region with the aspects related to the outer and inner regions of both suckers were considered. The ventral portion of the middle region was represented by the anterior of gynaecophoric canal while the dorsal surface was studied in its ventral and dorsal regions mainly focusing the aspect of the tubercles, spines and sensorial papillae. The outer surface of the oral sucker is spiny and spines are bigger, sharp with sensory receptors in their posterior edge. Tubercles with spines or receptors are more concentrated in the middle region and in one of the margins of the gynaecophoric canal. An excretory pore-like structure in the posterior portion was observed. The gynaecophoric canal has few sensory structures, spines broadned in their mid-region and are sharp pointed at the distal end. It was concluded that the presently studied characters are similar to those previously reported

  11. Pulmonary vascular response during phases of canine heartworm disease: scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, R G; Rawlings, C A

    1980-07-01

    Pulmonary arteries and veins of 14 dogs in phases of heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis infection) were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Two dogs were infected with D immitis microfilaria only, whereas 12 dogs were infected with adult D immitis. Seven of the dogs infected with adult worms were untreated. Two of these 7 dogs had natural infections of unknown duration introduced by mosquito bite, whereas 5 were experimentally infected for 30 days. The remaining five dogs were experimentally infected for 1 year and had worms removed by drug therapy. These five dogs were maintained 12 months after treatment. Arteries and veins from dogs infected with microfilaria had a continuous sheet of endothelial cells. Arterial endothelium from the seven nontreated dogs infected with adult heartworms exhibited swirling patterns, pore formation, and separation of intercellular junctions. Arteries from all dogs had numerous endothelialized villus protrusions; veins had similar, less extensive changes. Arteries and veins from experimentally infected dogs were similar to naturally infected dogs, indicating the infection procedure produced lesions similar to that normally seen in heartworm disease. The extent of vascular lesions was reduced in four of the five treated dogs that had been infected with adult worms. Adult worms, not microfilaria, may produce the vascular lesions seen in heartworm disease. Lesions will regress if worms are removed from the circulation. Lesions may be caused by generation of humoral factors initiated by the presence of adult worms.

  12. Scanning electron microscopic study of human neuroblastoma cells affected with Naegleria fowleri Thai strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiewcharoen, Supathra; Rabablert, Jundee; Chetanachan, Pruksawan; Junnu, Virach; Worawirounwong, Dusit; Malainual, Nat

    2008-10-01

    In order to understand the pathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri in primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, the human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) and African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells were studied in vitro. Amoeba suspension in cell-culture medium was added to the confluent monolayer of SK-N-MC and Vero cells. The cytopathic activity of N. fowleri trophozoites in co-culture system was elucidated by scanning electron microscope at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h. Two strains of N. fowleri displayed well-organized vigorous pseudopods in Nelson's medium at 37 degrees C. In co-culture, the target monolayer cells were damaged by two mechanisms, phagocytosis by vigorous pseudopods and engulfment by sucker-like apparatus. N. fowleri trophozoites produced amoebostomes only in co-culture with SK-N-MC cells. In contrast, we could not find such apparatus in the co-culture with Vero cells. The complete destruction time (100%) at 1:1 amoeba/cells ratio of SK-N-MC cells (1 day) was shorter than the Vero cells (12 days). In conclusion, SK-N-MC cells were confirmed to be a target model for studying neuropathogenesis of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

  13. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallé Ndom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species.

  14. Ultra-morphology of root surface subsequent to periodontal instrumentation: A scanning electron microscope study

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    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristic following root planing with various hand and power driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single rooted teeth were used in this study, of which two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette (2 Ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing was measured. After treatment, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope and surface roughness was measured by using Roughness and loss of tooth substance index (RLTSI. Results: The mean RLTSI scores for Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667 respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50. Conclusion: All the three instruments namely Gracey curette, Ultrasonic tip and Rotary bur were effective in mechanical debridement of root surface. The results favoured the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve smooth clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  15. Big data and deep data in scanning and electron microscopies: deriving functionality from multidimensional data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belianinov, Alex; Vasudevan, Rama; Strelcov, Evgheni; Steed, Chad; Yang, Sang Mo; Tselev, Alexander; Jesse, Stephen; Biegalski, Michael; Shipman, Galen; Symons, Christopher; Borisevich, Albina; Archibald, Rick; Kalinin, Sergei

    The development of electron and scanning probe microscopies in the second half of the twentieth century has produced spectacular images of the internal structure and composition of matter with nanometer, molecular, and atomic resolution. Largely, this progress was enabled by computer-assisted methods of microscope operation, data acquisition, and analysis. Advances in imaging technology in the beginning of the twenty-first century have opened the proverbial floodgates on the availability of high-veracity information on structure and functionality. From the hardware perspective, high-resolution imaging methods now routinely resolve atomic positions with approximately picometer precision, allowing for quantitative measurements of individual bond lengths and angles. Similarly, functional imaging often leads to multidimensional data sets containing partial or full information on properties of interest, acquired as a function of multiple parameters (time, temperature, or other external stimuli). Here, we review several recent applications of the big and deep data analysis methods to visualize, compress, and translate this multidimensional structural and functional data into physically and chemically relevant information.

  16. Assessment of fluidity of different invasomes by electron spin resonance and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic-Curic, Nina; Friedrich, Manfred; Petersen, Silvia; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Douroumis, Dennis; Plass, Winfried; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of membrane-softening components (terpenes/terpene mixtures, ethanol) on fluidity of phospholipid membranes in invasomes, which contain besides phosphatidylcholine and water, also ethanol and terpenes. Also mTHPC was incorporated into invasomes in order to study its molecular interaction with phospholipids in vesicular membranes. Fluidity of bilayers was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) using spin labels 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Addition of 1% of a single terpene/terpene mixture led to significant fluidity increase around the C16 atom of phospholipid acyl chains comprising the vesicles. However, it was not possible to differentiate between the influences of single terpenes or terpene mixtures. Incorporation of mTHPC into the bilayer of vesicles decreased fluidity near the C16 atom of acyl chains, indicating its localization in the inner hydrophobic zone of bilayers. These results are in agreement with DSC measurements, which showed that terpenes increased fluidity of bilayers, while mTHPC decreased fluidity. Thus, invasomes represent vesicles with very high membrane fluidity. However, no direct correlation between fluidity of invasomes and their penetration enhancing ability was found, indicating that besides fluidity also other phenomena might be responsible for improved skin delivery of mTHPC.

  17. Imaging with low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy: A quantitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisari, L. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Grillo, V., E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@unimore.it [Istituto Nanoscienze-S3 CNR, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); IMEM-CNR Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Jabeen, F.; Rubini, S. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Menozzi, C. [Istituto Nanoscienze-S3 CNR, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia Via G. Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Rossi, F. [IMEM-CNR Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Martelli, F. [TASC, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14, km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    A dedicated specimen holder has been designed to perform low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy in dark field mode. Different test samples, namely InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells, InGaAs nanowires and thick InGaAs layers, have been analysed to test the reliability of the model based on the proportionality to the specimen mass-thickness, generally used for image intensity interpretation of scattering contrast processes. We found that size of the probe, absorption and channelling must be taken into account to give a quantitative interpretation of image intensity. We develop a simple procedure to evaluate the probe-size effect and to obtain a quantitative indication of the absorption coefficient. Possible artefacts induced by channelling are pointed out. With the developed procedure, the low voltage approach can be successfully applied for quantitative compositional analysis. The method is then applied to the estimation of the In content in the core of InGaAs/GaAs core-shell nanowires. -- Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of the composition by low-voltage STEM annular dark field. {yields} First evidence of channelling effects in low-voltage STEM in SEM. {yields} Comparison between low-voltage and high-voltage STEM. {yields} Evaluation of the absorption effects on the STEM intensity.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Macerated Tissue to Visualize the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Matthew K; Lenihan, Sean; Covarrubias, Roman; Huttinger, Ryan M; Gumina, Richard J; Sawyer, Douglas B; Galindo, Cristi L

    2016-06-14

    Fibrosis is a component of all forms of heart disease regardless of etiology, and while much progress has been made in the field of cardiac matrix biology, there are still major gaps related to how the matrix is formed, how physiological and pathological remodeling differ, and most importantly how matrix dynamics might be manipulated to promote healing and inhibit fibrosis. There is currently no treatment option for controlling, preventing, or reversing cardiac fibrosis. Part of the reason is likely the sheer complexity of cardiac scar formation, such as occurs after myocardial infarction to immediately replace dead or dying cardiomyocytes. The extracellular matrix itself participates in remodeling by activating resident cells and also by helping to guide infiltrating cells to the defunct lesion. The matrix is also a storage locker of sorts for matricellular proteins that are crucial to normal matrix turnover, as well as fibrotic signaling. The matrix has additionally been demonstrated to play an electromechanical role in cardiac tissue. Most techniques for assessing fibrosis are not qualitative in nature, but rather provide quantitative results that are useful for comparing two groups but that do not provide information related to the underlying matrix structure. Highlighted here is a technique for visualizing cardiac matrix ultrastructure. Scanning electron microscopy of decellularized heart tissue reveals striking differences in structure that might otherwise be missed using traditional quantitative research methods.

  19. Different patterns of collagen-proteoglycan interaction: a scanning electron microscopyand atomic force microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ruggeri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix of unfixed, unstained rat corneal stroma, visualized with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after minimal preliminary treatment, appears composed of straight, parallel, uniform collagen fibrils regularly spaced by a three-dimensional, irregular network of thin, delicate proteoglycan filaments. Rat tail tendon, observed under identical conditions, appears instead made of heterogeneous, closely packed fibrils interwoven with orthogonal proteoglycan filaments. Pre-treatment with cupromeronic blue just thickens the filaments without affecting their spatial layout. Digestion with chondroitinase ABC rids the tendon matrix of all its interconnecting filaments while the corneal stroma architecture remains virtually unaffected, its fibrils always being separated by an evident interfibrillar spacing which is never observed in tendon. Our observations indicate that matrix proteoglycans are responsible for both the highly regular interfibrillar spacing which is distinctive of corneal stroma, and the strong interfibrillar binding observed in tendon. These opposite interaction patterns appear to be distinctive of different proteo- glycan species. The molecular details of proteoglycan interactions are still incompletely understood and are the subject of ongoing research.

  20. Saphenous vein graft thrombus findings by scanning electron microscopy in a patient with acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Marcela Dias; Aguillera, André Haraguti [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brilhante, José Joaquim; Caixeta, Adriano [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An eighty-year-old male patient with a history of prior (19 years) coronary artery bypass graft surgery was admitted to the hospital with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). During the hospital stay he was taking acetylsalicylic acid 100mg per day, a loading dose of 600mg clopidogrel, and low molecular weight heparin 1mg/kg twice a day. Twenty-four hours later the patient underwent coronary angiography, which showed a 90% obstruction in the mid portion of the saphenous vein graft to obtuse marginal with signs of degeneration and local thrombus (Figure 1). Thrombus aspiration was performed with a 6-Fr Export{sup ™} catheter (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA, USA), which removed small reddish colored fragments. They were fixed in 2,5% glutaraldehyde in a 0.1M sodium cacodilate buffer. The material was processed following the GOTO protocol in which the fragments were washed with osmium tetroxide and titanic acid, after which they were dried in a critical-point device and a golden bath. Scanning electron microscopy and high definition photos (3,000 to 27,221x magnification) were obtained by the FEI Quanta{sup ™} FEG SEM device (FEI Company, Hillsboro, OR, USA). The images showed that the thrombus was rich in activated platelets, with few erythrocytes or inflammatory cells. Many cholesterol crystals were observed (Figures 2 to). The fibrin networks were sparse and thin, which is compatible with a short ischemic time and recent thrombus formation.

  1. Automated defect review of the wafer bevel with a defect review scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Steve; Kanezawa, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    One of the few remaining bastions of non-regulated Integrated Circuit defectivity is the wafer bevel. Recent internal Integrated Circuit Manufacturing studies have suggested that the edge bevel may be responsible for as much as a two to three percent yield loss during a defect excursion on the manufacturing line and a one to two percent yield loss during ongoing wafer manufacturing. A new generation of defect inspection equipment has been introduced to the Research and Development, Integrated Circuit, MEM's and Si wafer manufacturing markets that has imparted the ability for the end equipment user to detect defects located on the bevel of the wafer. The inherent weakness of the current batch of wafer bevel inspection equipment is the lack of automatic discrete defect classification data into multiple, significant classification bins and the lack of discrete elemental analysis data. Root cause analysis is based on minimal discrete defect analysis as a surrogate for a statistically valid sampling of defects from the bevel. This paper provides a study of the methods employed with a Hitachi RS-5500EQEQ Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM) to automatically capture high resolution/high magnification images and collect elemental analysis on a statistically valid sample of the discrete defects that were located by a bevel inspection system.

  2. Antennal fine morphology of the threatened beetle Osmoderma eremita (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauli, Agnese; Maurizi, Emanuela; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M; Chiari, Stefano; Svensson, Glenn P; Di Giulio, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the antennal morphology of Osmoderma eremita, a threatened scarab beetle inhabiting tree hollows. O. eremita males produce a sex pheromone, (R)-(+)-γ-decalactone, responsible mainly for the attraction of females but also other males. Gross and fine morphology of microstructures including sensilla, microsculpture and pores were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The antenna of O. eremita showed the typical lamellicorn shape of scarab beetles, with a basal scape, a pedicel, a funicle composed of five antennomeres and a club composed of three lamellae. Six different subtypes of sensilla chaetica (Ch.1 - 6), Böhm sensilla (Bo), one subtype of sensilla basiconica (Ba.1), two subtypes of sensilla coeloconica (Co.1 - 2), two subtypes of sensilla placodea (Pl.1 - 2), pores and peculiar folds were described. The two sexes did not show any significant differences in the occurrence and number of the sensilla placodea, known to be responsible for the pheromone reception. Instead, some sexual differences were found on the occurrence and topology of three different microstructures: (1) one subtype of sensillum chaeticum (Ch.2) occurring on the pedicel only in males; (2) a characteristic pore occurring on the funicle only in males; (3) a peculiar fold occurring on different antennomeres of the funicle in the two sexes, on the fourth in males and on the fifth in females. A comparison between sensilla of O. eremita and those of other Scarabaeoidea is provided.

  3. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacks with HfO2 dielectrics and TiN electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Agustin, Melody P.; Fonseca, Leo R. C.; Hooker, Jacob C.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    High-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate HfO2 gate dielectrics grown by atomic layer deposition on Si substrates, and their interfaces with TiN electrodes and silicon, as a function of annealing temperature. Annealing at high temperatures (900 °C) caused significant roughening of both bottom (substrate) and top (electrode) interface. At the bottom interface, HAADF images s...

  4. Visualization of carrier dynamics in p(n)-type GaAs by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Hwang, Taek Yong; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2014-02-11

    Four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy is used to investigate doping- and carrier-concentration-dependent ultrafast carrier dynamics of the in situ cleaved single-crystalline GaAs(110) substrates. We observed marked changes in the measured time-resolved secondary electrons depending on the induced alterations in the electronic structure. The enhancement of secondary electrons at positive times, when the electron pulse follows the optical pulse, is primarily due to an energy gain involving the photoexcited charge carriers that are transiently populated in the conduction band and further promoted by the electron pulse, consistent with a band structure that is dependent on chemical doping and carrier concentration. When electrons undergo sufficient energy loss on their journey to the surface, dark contrast becomes dominant in the image. At negative times, however, when the electron pulse precedes the optical pulse (electron impact), the dynamical behavior of carriers manifests itself in a dark contrast which indicates the suppression of secondary electrons upon the arrival of the optical pulse. In this case, the loss of energy of material's electrons is by collisions with the excited carriers. These results for carrier dynamics in GaAs(110) suggest strong carrier-carrier scatterings which are mirrored in the energy of material's secondary electrons during their migration to the surface. The approach presented here provides a fundamental understanding of materials probed by four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy, and offers possibilities for use of this imaging technique in the study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in heterogeneously patterned micro- and nanostructured material surfaces and interfaces.

  5. LOW-VOLTAGE FIELD-EMISSION SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY OF NON-COATED GUINEA-PIG HAIR CELL STEREOCILIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUNNEBIER, EA; SEGENHOUT, JM; KALICHARAN, D; JONGEBLOED, WL; WIT, HP; ALBERS, FWJ

    1995-01-01

    The stereociliar structures of the guinea-pig cochlear organ of Corti were studied at low-voltage (1-5 kV) with field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) using various pre- and post-fixation methods, such as OTOTO (OsO4/thiocarbohydrazide/OsO4/thiocarbohydrazide/OsO4) and TAO (tannic acid/ar

  6. Adherence of Escherichia coli in pathogenesis of endometritis and effects of estradiol examined by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Y

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli was inoculated into the uterine lumen of ovariectomized rats, and the endometrial surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Adherence of E. coli to the epithelium and destruction of the surface leading to purulent endometritis were noticed. When rats were treated previously with estradiol, adherence of E. coli was not detected.

  7. Analysis of aerospace nickel-cadmium battery cells. [cadmium migration as seen by scanning electron microscopy and metallographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Various steps followed in analyzing the electrolyte, separator, and electrodes are reviewed. Specific emphasis is given to scanning electron microscopic and metallographic analysis of the plates. Cadmium migration is defined, its effects and causes are examined, and methods for its reduction in cells are suggested.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization of experimental Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli infection in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Møller, Kristian; Boye, Mette

    2000-01-01

    Two groups of six 8-week-old pigs were challenged with 1X10(9) cfu Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli or Serpulina intermedia daily for 3 consecutive days to study the pathology of porcine colonic spirochetosis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH...

  9. A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Hans Ulrik; Thomsen, J.S.; Hougen, Hans Petter

    1999-01-01

    . EXPERIMENTAL SETTING AND DESIGN: A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopic analysis of cartilage characteristics and bone remodelling activity. The Departments of Orthodontics and Cell Biology at Aarhus University, Denmark. An autopsy sample of condyles from 20 individuals, 18-31 years of age...

  10. Study of Electron Transfer Reactions Between a Water/1,2-Dichloroethane Interface by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Quan LU; Li Na HU; Xiao Qiang WANG; Jing CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) from ascorbic acid (AA) in aqueous to ferrocene (Fc) in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) was probed by the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The rate constants were extracted from the dependence of the steady-state current at ultramicro- electrode (UME, tip) on the distance between the tip and the phase boundary by comparison to theoretical working cures.

  11. Scanning electron microscope examination of scale-like spines on the rostellumm of five Davaineinae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâ, C T; Sene, T; Marchand, B

    1995-03-01

    The study by scanning electron microscope of the scolex of Cotugnia polyacantha, Raillietina (R.) echinobothrida, R (R.) tetragona, R. (R.) tunetensis and R. (Skrjabinia) cesticillus allowed us to demonstrate the presence, on the rostellum of each individual, of scale-like spines. We believe that these scale-like spines represent a new character of diagnosis for the whole of the Davaineidae.

  12. The morphology of the stigma surface of Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima as seen in scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muszyński

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of stigma surface in allotetraploid petunias was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The stigma forms a bilobed structure with. a distinct central depression. The stigma surface is covered with numerous. papillate hairs of ununiform sizes and shapes.

  13. The early development of inflorescences and flowers of the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) seen through the scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.; Breure, C.J.; Menendez, T.

    1987-01-01

    The development of inflorescences and flowers of the African Oil Palm up to anthesis is illustrated by scanning electron microscopy images. The time of origin relative to the development of the foliage leaves of the basipetalous succession of flowering rachillae is determined, as well as the time of

  14. Investigation of microstructures in naturally and experimentally deformed reference clay rocks using innovative methods in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Hemes, Susanne; Laurich, Ben; Houben, M.E.; Klaver, J.; Hohne, N.; Urai, Janos L.; Viggiani, G.; Bésuelle, P.

    2016-01-01

    The application of ion-beam milling techniques to clays allows investigation of the porosity at nm resolution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Imaging of pores by SEM of surfaces prepared by broad ion beam (BIB) gives both qualitative and quantitative insights into the porosity and mineral

  15. Advantages of indium-tin oxide-coated glass slides in correlative scanning electron microscopy applications of uncoated cultured cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluk, H.; Stokes, D.J.; Lich, B.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A method of direct visualization by correlative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence light microscopy of cell structures of tissue cultured cells grown on conductive glass slides is described. We show that by growing cells on indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass slides, secondary elect

  16. Electronic properties of conductive pili of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart H.

    2011-12-01

    The metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces conductive protein appendages known as “pilus nanowires” to transfer electrons to metal oxides and to other cells. These processes can be harnessed for the bioremediation of toxic metals and the generation of electricity in bioelectrochemical cells. Key to these applications is a detailed understanding of how these nanostructures conduct electrons. However, to the best of our knowledge, their mechanism of electron transport is not known. We used the capability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to probe conductive materials with higher spatial resolution than other scanning probe methods to gain insights into the transversal electronic behavior of native, cell-anchored pili. Despite the presence of insulating cellular components, the STM topography resolved electronic molecular substructures with periodicities similar to those reported for the pilus shaft. STM spectroscopy revealed electronic states near the Fermi level, consistent with a conducting material, but did not reveal electronic states expected for cytochromes. Furthermore, the transversal conductance was asymmetric, as previously reported for assemblies of helical peptides. Our results thus indicate that the Geobacter pilus shaft has an intrinsic electronic structure that could play a role in charge transport.

  17. Discretization of Electronic States in Large InAsP/InP Multilevel Quantum Dots Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, B.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A.; David, C.; Wang, Z. Z.; Sagnes, I.; Girard, J. C.

    2012-03-01

    The topography and the electronic structure of InAsP/InP quantum dots are probed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The study of the local density of states in such large quantum dots confirms the discrete nature of the electronic levels whose wave functions are measured by differential conductivity mapping. Because of their large dimensions, the energy separation between the discrete electronic levels is low, allowing for quantization in both the lateral and growth directions as well as the observation of the harmonicity of the dot lateral potential.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy in liver biopsy interpretation in children: a mini atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mocci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have extensively studied the ultrastructural picture of the liver by scanning electron microscopy (SEM but these studies were not used, up to now, in clinical practice because they were considered to be mainly a means of research in the 3D structure of liver specimens. Our new technique allows us to introduce ourselves to the 3D structure of intracellular organelles, making it possible to study them in normal and pathologic conditions. We used a very small part of the liver biopsies from 5 children aged 3 to 8 years old, who underwent a liver biopsy for diagnostic purposes. The specimens were fixed and processed according to our modification of the OsO4 maceration method of Tanaka and Mitsushima. Liver biopsies fixed for 20’ in a mixture of glutaraldehyde and paraformaldehyde, postfixed in 1% OsO4 for 2 h, cut with a tissue sectioner and then macerated in 0.1% OsO4 for 60 h at room temperature. Specimens were dehydrated in graded acetone, critical point dried and coated with gold palladium. To selectively remove cell components, some specimens were subjected to ultrasound treatment (25 Hz for 1’ prior to dehydration. To demonstrate the hepatic stroma, some aldehyde-fixed specimens were submitted to maceration with NaOH 1N according to Ohtani method. With this method, all cells were removed, allowing the visualization of collagen fibers. Observation was carried out by an Hitachi S4000 Field Emission SEM (Hitachi High-Technologies Co., Tokyo, Japan operated at 20 kV. We are showing the results of our new technique applied to the liver tissue. These data open, in our opinion, a new field in the research of nuclear pathology, with possible intriguing data on pathological nuclear pore changes in the setting of different liver diseases.

  19. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of the Sealer-Dentine Interface of Three Sealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Fatemeh; Farahanimastary, Farzad; Dibaji, Fatemeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the dentine-sealer interface in three different sealers using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Thirty extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared using ProTaper rotary files and were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) including BC Sealer, AH-Plus and Dorifill. The root canals were filled with cold lateral condensation technique and stored for 7 days in 100% humidity at 37°C. Cross sections were prepared from the coronal, middle, and apical sections of the roots. Then SEM images were taken and the width of gaps was measured by software. Sectional images were evaluated by two endodontists. Data were analyzed using two- and one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: The mean gap width was significantly lower in coronal area in BC Sealer group compared to Dorifill (P=0.043) and likewise in AH-Plus group compared to Dorifill (P=0.018). There was no significant difference between BC Sealer and AH-Plus group in this area (P=0.923). No significant difference was detected in apical and middle zones among three sealers (P=0.367 and 0.643, respectively). Dentine-sealer interface showed no significant difference in three sealers in the apical area (P=0.051), but dentine-BC Sealer interface was better than AH-Plus in middle and coronal areas, and both outperformed Dorifill (P=0.001). Conclusion: BC Sealer and AH-Plus had less gaps than Dorifill in coronal area. In addition, BC Sealer had better dentine interface in middle and coronal area compared to AH-Plus, and both performed better than Dorifill. Reverse relationship was observed between the mean gap width and dentine-sealer interface quality. PMID:28179922

  1. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy reveals severe external root resorption in the large periapical lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookubo, Kensuke; Ookubo, Atsushi; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between clinicopathological findings and the resorptive conditions of root apices of teeth with periodontitis. The samples included 21 root apices with large periapical radiolucent lesions. The preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative findings were correlated with the presence, extension, and the progression pattern of periapical resorption using a scanning electron microscope. The subjects' age, gender, chief complaint, type of tooth, percussion test results, size of periapical lesion using CT, and intraoperative findings were recorded. All apicoectomies were performed under an operative microscope for endodontic microsurgery. A significant large size was observed in cystic lesions compared with granulomatous lesions. The cementum surface at the periphery of the lesion was covered with globular structures (2-3 μm in diameter). Cementum resorption started as small defect formations at the surface. As the defect formation progressed, a lamellar structure appeared at the resorption area, and the size of globular structures became smaller than that of globules at the surface. Further resorption produced typical lacuna formation, which was particularly observed in fracture cases. The most morphologically severe destructive pattern of dentin resorption was observed in large cystic lesions. This study is the first report to elucidate the relationships between three clinical types of undesirable periapical lesions: (1) undertreatment, (2) periapical fracture, (3) macro-level resorption, and the microstructure of external root resorption including from small defects at the cementum surface to a significant destructive pattern inside the dentin. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:495-500, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Morphology and ultrastructure of Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Shao, Jian; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinming; Wei, Qiwei

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate Brachymystax lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa cell morphology and ultrastructure through scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Findings revealed that the spermatozoa can be differentiated into three major parts: a spherical head without an acrosome, a short mid-piece, and a long, cylindrical flagellum. The mean length of the spermatozoa was 36.11±2.84μm, with a spherical head length of 2.78±0.31μm. The mean anterior and posterior head widths were 2.20±0.42μm and 2.55±0.53μm, respectively. The nuclear fossa was positioned at the base of the nucleus that contained the anterior portion of flagellum and a centriolar complex (proximal and distal centrioles). The short mid-piece was located laterally to the nucleus and possessed just one spherical mitochondrion with a mean diameter of 0.65±0.14μm. The spermatozoa flagellum was long and cylindrical, and could be separated into two parts: a long main-piece and a short end-piece. The main piece of the flagellum had short irregular side-fins. The axoneme composed the typical '9+2' microtubular doublet structure and was enclosed by the cell membran e. This study confirmed that B. lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa can be categorized as teleostean "Type I" spermatozoa; 'primitive' or 'ect-aquasperm type' spermatozoa. To the best of the authers knowledge, this was the first study conducted on the morphology and ultrastructure of B. lenok tsinlingensis spermatozoa.

  4. The dimension of Trichomonas vaginalis as measured by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Seung Ryong; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-04-01

    It is known that physicochemical conditions (e.g., pH, temperature, and ionic strength) affect the size of trichomonads. In this study, the sizes of 4 isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis cultured for more than a year (called "old T") and 3 isolates freshly isolated from vaginitis cases (called "fresh T") were compared by scanning electron microscopy. Although the fresh T had shorter body length, body width, and flagellar length than old T, total length (about 26 µm), including body length, flagella length, and axostyle length was almost the same in the 2 groups. A striking difference was observed between the axostyles of the 2 groups; the axostyle length of the fresh T (8.2 µm) was more than twice as long as that of the old T (4.0 µm). However, in several parasitology textbooks, the length of T. vaginalis is said to vary widely from 7 to 32 µm, and its undulating membrane is said to extend about half way (53.5%) to the posterior end of the body. On the other hand, in our study, the undulating membrane was observed to extend more than 3/4 of the body length (72.1%) in old T, whereas in fresh T it could not be measured. Taken together, we suggest that T. vaginalis averages 26 (21-32) µm in total length, with 9.5 (7.4-11.4) µm of body length and 6.8 (5.3-7.7) µm of width, and its undulating membrane extending 3/4 of its body length. Therefore, these findings may provide useful information for morphological characteristics of T. vaginalis.

  5. Scanning Electron Microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175

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    Zubaidah Haji Abdul Rahim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. OBJECTIVES: In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and on partially purifed cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. MATERIAL AND METHODS: S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1; with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. RESULTS: It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (p<0.001. S. mutans adhering to 100 µm² glass surfaces (with/without sucrose exhibited reduced cell surface area, fuffy extracellular appearance and cell population in the presence of the Piper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL-1 corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL-1 of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. CONCLUSION: The SEM analysis confrmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are

  6. Chlorhexidine as a root canal irrigant: Antimicrobial and scanning electron microscopic evaluation

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    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selection of irrigant is very important for longterm success of root canal therapy. Objective. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution (CHX against five selected microorganisms and to evaluate its efficacy in root canal cleaning. Methods. In this study, by agar diffusion test, were evaluated antimicrobial effects of three root canal irrigants: 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX. The microorganisms tested in this study were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. A scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate root canal cleaning ability of 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX and 15% EDTA. Twelve extracted single-root human teeth were divided into four groups depending on the irrigant used during instrumentation. Mechanical preparation was performed with Step back technique and K files. Data were analyzed statistically by Student’s t-test. Results 5.25% NaOCl was the most effective against all tested microorganisms. 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed antimicrobial effects against all tested microorganisms but zones of inhibition were smaller. The best results in root canal walls cleaning were obtained in the group where the irrigant was 15% EDTA (score 2.33. In 5.25% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX groups, there was more smear layer (score 4 and 5. Conclusion. 2% chlorhexidine digluconate showed strong antimicrobial effect on the tested microorganisms, but was not effective in cleaning root canal walls.

  7. Bioresorption mechanisms of chitosan physical hydrogels: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaise, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.malaise@gmail.com [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Rami, Lila [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Montembault, Alexandra; Alcouffe, Pierre [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Burdin, Béatrice [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre Technologique des Microstructure, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bordenave, Laurence [Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Inserm U1026, Bioingénierie Tissulaire, Bordeaux 33000 (France); CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Delmond, Samantha [CHU de Bordeaux, CIC-IT Biomaterials, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); David, Laurent [Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères (IMP-UMR 5223), 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered biodegradable medical devices are widely studied and systems must present suitable balance between versatility and elaboration simplicity. In this work, we aim at illustrating that such equilibrium can be found by processing chitosan physical hydrogels without external cross-linker. Chitosan concentration, degree of acetylation, solvent composition, and neutralization route were modulated in order to obtain hydrogels exhibiting different physico-chemical properties. The resulting in vivo biological response was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. “Soft” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan of high degree of acetylation (35%) and by the neutralization with gaseous ammonia of a chitosan acetate aqueous solutions presenting low polymer concentration (Cp = 1.6% w/w). “Harder” hydrogels were obtained from chitosan with lower degree of acetylation (5%) and after neutralization in sodium hydroxide bath (1 M) of hydro-alcoholic chitosan solutions (50/50 w/w water/1,2-propanediol) with a polymer concentration of 2.5% w/w. Soft and hard hydrogels exhibited bioresorption times from below 10 days to higher than 60 days, respectively. We also evidenced that cell colonization and neo-vascularization mechanisms depend on the hydrogel-aggregated structure that is controlled by elaboration conditions and possibly in relation with mechanical properties. Specific processing conditions induced micron-range capillary formation, which can be assimilated to colonization channels, also acting on the resorption scenario. - Highlights: • We elaborated physical chitosan hydrogels presenting tuneable biological properties. • Cell colonization mechanism depends on biological and mechanical hydrogel properties. • Increasing the degree of acetylation will reduce the bioresorption time. • Capillaries played a role of cell colonization pathways.

  8. Description of the egg of Anopheles (Anopheles intermedius (Peryassu, 1908 (Diptera: Culicidae by scanning electron microscopy

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    Oswaldo Paulo Forattini

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The egg of Anopheles (Anopheles intermedius (Peryassu, 1908 is described and illustrated with scanning electron micrographs. Literature data on An. (Ano. maculipes (Theobald, 1903 is providedOs ovos de An. intermedius foram descritos e ilustrados por Costa Lima (1929. Este autor, baseando-se nos desenhos de Peryassu (1908 para An. maculipes, chamou atenção para o fato do ovo desta espécie ser semelhante ao de An. maculipes. Posteriormente, Causey e col. (1944, estudando os ovos de An. intermedius e An. maculipes ao estereomicroscópio, diferenciou-os por caracteres da franja. Em An. intermedius a franja é oblíqua ao eixo longitudinal do ovo, mas perpendicular em An. maculipes. Causey e col. (1944 ilustraram as variações morfológicas que encontraram na franja do ovo de An. intermedius. Os autores observaram que a franja apresentava-se descotínua em alguns espécimens de An. intermedius, tornando-se em pequenos círculos nessa região. Embora semelhante ao de An. maculipes, os ovos de An. intermedius podem ser facilmente reconhecidos por características da franja, flutuadores e tubérculos lobados, como pode ser observado na descrição. Contudo, será necessário estudar a morfologia dos ovos de outras espécies do subgênero para que se possa estabelecer as diferenças e fazer comparações precisas entre as espécies

  9. Morphological changes of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum after photodynamic treatment: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smijs, Threes G M; Mulder, Aat A; Pavel, Stan; Onderwater, Jos J M; Koerten, Henk K; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-06-01

    Treatment strategies for superficial mycosis caused by the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum consist of the use of topical or oral antifungal preparations. We have recently discovered that T. rubrum is susceptible to photodynamic treatment (PDT), with 5,10,15-tris(4-methylpyridinium)-20-phenyl-[21H,23H]-porphine trichloride (Sylsens B) as a photosensitizer. The susceptibility appeared to depend on the fungal growth stage, with PDT efficacy higher with microconidia when compared to mycelia. The aim of this study was to investigate, with the use of scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes caused by a lethal PDT dose to T. rubrum when grown on isolated human stratum corneum. Corresponding dark treatment and light treatment without photosensitizer were used as controls. A sub-lethal PDT dose was also included in this investigation The morphologic changes were followed at various time points after the treatment of different fungal growth stages. Normal fungal growth was characterized by a fiber-like appearance of the surface of the hyphae and microconidia with the exception of the hyphal tips in full mycelia and the microconidia shortly after attachment to the stratum corneum. Here, densely packed globular structures were observed. The light dose (108 J/cm2) in the absence of Sylsens B, or the application of the photosensitizer in the absence of light, caused reversible fungal wall deformations and bulge formation. However, after a lethal PDT, a sequence of severe disruptions and deformations of both microconidia and the mycelium were observed leading to extrusion of cell material and emptied fungal elements. In case of a non-lethal PDT, fungal re-growth started on the remnants of the treated mycelium.

  10. Elaphostrongylus spp. from Scandinavian cervidae - a scanning electron microscope study (SEM

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    Margareta Stéen

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes of the genus Elaphostrongylus collected from moose (Alces alces L., reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L., and red deer (Cervus elaphus L., respectively, were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences in the ribs of the genital bursa were demonstrated. The Elaphostrongylus species from reindeer and red deer differed from each other in four ribs of the genital bursa. These results agree with the morphological characters of E. cervi and E. rangiferi described by Cameron (1931 and Mitskevitch (1960. The genital bursa of Elaphostrongylus sp. from moose, in accordance with the description of E. alces by Steen et al. (1989 showed characteristics differing from those found in Elaphostrongylus spp. from reindeer and red deer respectively. These results support the hypothesis that there are three separate species of Elaphostrongylus present in Scandinavian Cervidae. Svep-elektroniska studier på Elaphostrongylus spp. hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.Abstract in Swedish / Sammandrag: Rundmaskar inom slaktet Elaphostrongylus funna hos alg (Alces alces L., ren (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. och kronhjort(Cervus elaphus L. studerades med hjalp av svepelelektronmikroskop. De hanliga bursorna med sin a stodjeribbor uppvisade variationer i utseende, langd och placering mellan dessa rundmaskar. De arter av Elaphostrongylus funna hos ren och kronhjort skilde sig åt avseende fyra stodjeribbor på de hanliga bursorna. Dessa resultat stammer val overens med de karaktarer som tidigare ar beskrivna av Cameron(1931 och av Mitskevich (1960. Den hanliga bursan hos arten Elaphostrongylus funnen hos alg, vilken tidigare ar beskriven av Steen et al. (1989, visade upp ett utseende som skilde sig från bursorna hos de Elaphostrongylus-arter funna hos ren och kronhjort. Dessa resultat stoder hypotesen om tre skilda arter av Elaphostrongylus hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.

  11. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

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    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  12. Effects of adhesion promoter on orthodontic bonding in fluorosed teeth: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Tariq, Mohd.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the present study were to elucidate the effects of fluorosis in orthodontic bonding and to evaluate the efficiency of an adhesion promoter (Assure Universal Bonding Resin) in bonding to fluorosed teeth. Materials and Methods: Extracted premolars were divided into two groups on the basis of Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index. Ten samples from each group were etched and evaluated for etching patterns using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The remaining samples were subdivided into four groups of 20 each on the basis of adhesives used: IA, IIA - Transbond XT and IB, IIB - Transbond XT plus Assure Universal Bonding Resin. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h using the universal testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were recorded using SEM. Statistical analysis was conducted using a two-way analysis of variance, and Tukey's post hoc test was performed on SBS and ARI scores. Results: Similar etching patterns were observed in both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth. No significant differences were found in the SBS values observed in both groups (8.66 ± 3.19 vs. 8.53 ± 3.44, P = 1.000). Increase in SBS was observed when Assure Universal Bonding Resin was used. Higher ARI scores were observed when adhesion promoter was used for bonding. Conclusions: Mild-moderately fluorosed teeth etch in a manner similar to the nonfluorosed teeth. Similar bond strengths were achieved in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth when conventional composite was used. Use of adhesion promoter increases the bond strengths in both groups of teeth. PMID:27556020

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Smear Layer Removal Using Isolated or Interweaving EDTA with Sodium Hypochlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Beraldo, Ângelo José; Silva, Rogério Vieira; da Gama Antunes, Alberto Nogueira; Silveira, Frank Ferreira; Nunes, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to verify the effect of alternating 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the smear layer removal from root canal surfaces. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 single-rooted human teeth, instrumented with ProTaper files, were randomly distributed in 3 groups. In group 1 (n=7) the canals were irrigated with 1 mL of 2.5% NaOCl between files and final irrigation was done with 1 mL of 2,5% NaOCl, followe by 1 mL of 17% EDTA, for a perio of 15 sec with new irrigtion of 1 mL of 2,5% NaOCl at each change of files. In group 3 (control group) (n=1), saline solution was used. All samples were cleaved into two sections, metalized and analyzed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence or absence of smear layer in the cervical, middle and apical thirds, with scores varying from 1 to 3, respectively were evaluated. The data were submitted to nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: It was observed that there was a greater discrepancy between groups with respect to the apical third. In the other areas there was a greater similarity between the scores attributed to the groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups only in the apical third, when group 1 presented the higher median (P<0.05). Conclusion: The alternating use of EDTA during instrumentation with NaOCl was the most effective irrigation method to remove the apical smear layer. Both forms of irrigation were effective on removal of the smear layer in the coronal and middle thirds of the canals. PMID:28179925

  14. Early development of Betta splendens under stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Fernanda Nogueira; do Nascimento, Nivaldo Ferreira; da Silva, Regiane Cristina; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; Giannecchini, Luiz Gustavo; Nakaghi, Laura Satiko Okada

    2015-04-01

    Betta splendens is a very important ornamental species. The current paper describes the embryonic and larval development of B. splendens under stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Eggs and larvae from natural spawning were collected at different developmental stages at previously established intervals and analysed. The eggs of B. splendens are yellowish, clear, spherical, demersal, translucent and telolecithal with a large amount of yolk. Between 0-2 h post-initial collection (hpIC), the eggs were at the egg cell, first cleavage and morula stages. The blastula stage was identified at 2-3 hpIC and the early gastrula phase was observed at 3-4 hpIC with 20% epiboly, which was finalized after 13-18 hpIC. When the pre-larvae were ready to hatch, the appearance of somites and the free tail were observed, at 23-25 hpIC. At 29 hpIC, the majority of larvae had already hatched at an average temperature of 28.4 ± 0.2°C. The newly hatched larvae measured 2.47 ± 0.044 mm total length. The mouth opened at 23 h post-hatching (hPH) and the yolk sac was totally absorbed at 73 hPH. After 156 hPH, the heart was pumping blood throughout the entire larval body. The caudal fin, operculum and eyes were well developed at 264 hPH. When metamorphosis was complete at 768 hPH, the larvae became juveniles. The current study presents the first results about early development of B. splendens and provides relevant information for its reproduction, rearing and biology.

  15. Comparative study of dental enamel loss after debonding braces by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Chávez, Jacqueline Adelina; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesús; Belio-Reyes, Irma Araceli

    2017-02-05

    Clinical procedures when shear forces are applied to brackets suggest adhesion forces between 2.8 and 10.0 MPa as appropriate. In this study dental enamel was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after removing the brackets. Thirty bicuspids (previous prophylaxis) with metallic brackets (Roth Inovation 0.022 GAC), Transbond Plus SEP 3M Unitek adhesive and Transbond XT 3M resin were used. The samples were preserved to 37°C during 24 hr and submited to tangential forces with the Instron Universal machine 1.0 mm/min speed load strength resistance debonding. Also the Adhesive Remanent Index (ARI) test was made, evaluating the bracket base and the bicuspid surface. All the bracket SEM images were processed with AutoCAD to determine the enamel detached area. The average value was 6.86 MPa (SD ± 3.2 MPa). ARI value 1= 63.3%, value 2= 20%, value 3= 13.3% and 33% presented value 0. All those samples with dental enamel loss, presented different situations as fractures, ledges, horizontal, and vertical loss in some cases, and some scratch lines. There is no association between the debonding resistance and enamel presence. Less than half of the remanent adhesive on the dental enamel was present in most of the samples when the ARI test was applied. When the resin area increases, the debonding resistance also increases, and when the enamel loss increases, the resin free metallic area of the bracket base decreases in the debonding.

  16. A scanning electron microscopy comparison of enamel polishing methods after air-rotor stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, C; Sfondrini, G

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years, orthodontic literature has shown particular interest in the interproximal enamel reduction technique described as stripping or slenderizing. Most researchers have shown, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies, the difficulties encountered while attempting to remove coarse abrasions left after stripping with the first instrument. The objective of this SEM study was to compare the different polishing methods proposed in the literature and to assess the efficiency of our own procedure. For this purpose, 48 healthy human teeth (premolars and molars) were used after removal for orthodontic or periodontal reasons. The teeth were divided into eight groups of six teeth each (two molars and four premolars), and mounted on a typodont to simulate a clinical situation. Each group underwent stripping according to one of the following techniques: 16-blade tungsten carbide bur and fine and ultrafine diamond burs; coarse diamond bur and fine and ultrafine diamond burs; coarse diamond disk and Sof-Lex disks (Dental products/3M, St. Paul, Minn.); 16-blade tungsten carbide bur and phosphoric acid on finishing strip; and 8-straight blade tungsten carbide diamond bur and Sof-Lex disks. The SEM investigations demonstrated that it is not possible to eliminate, with normal polishing and cleaning methods, the furrows left on the enamel both by the diamond burs and the diamond disks and the 16-blade tungsten carbide burs. Mechanical and chemical stripping as well did not prove to be effective. By contrast, with the use of a 8-straight blade tungsten carbide bur followed by Sof-Lex disks for polishing the enamel, it is possible to obtain well-polished surfaces that many times appear smoother than the intact or untreated enamel.

  17. Comparative scanning electron microscopic study of the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susin, Alexandre Henrique; Alves, Luana Severo; Melo, Gliciana Piovesan de; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated comparatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology, when used according to the same protocol. Forty dentin sticks were obtained from 20 caries-free third human molars and were assigned to 4 groups corresponding to 3 conditioners (phosphoric acid 37%, Clearfil SE Bond and iBond) and an untreated control group. After application of the conditioners, the specimens were immersed in 50% ethanol solution during 10 s, chemically fixed and dehydrated to prepare them to SEM analysis. In the control group, dentin surface was completely covered by smear layer and all dentinal tubules were occluded. In the phosphoric acid-etched group, dentin surface was completely clean and presented exposed dentinal tubule openings; this was the only group in which the tubules exhibited the funnel-shaped aspect. In the groups conditioned with Clearfil SE Bond primer and iBond, which are less acidic than phosphoric acid, tubule openings were occluded or partially occluded, though smear layer removal was observed. SE Bond was more efficient in removing the smear layer than iBond. In the Clearfil SE Bond group, the cuff-like aspect of peritubular dentin was more evident. It may be concluded all tested conditioners were able to change dentin morphology. However, it cannot be stated that the agent aggressiveness was the only cause of the micromorphological alterations because a single morphological pattern was not established for each group, but rather an association of different aspects, according to the aggressiveness of the tested conditioner.

  18. Light microscopic evaluation and scanning electron microscopic analysis of horse eyes following deep anterior lamellar keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Bianca C; Brooks, Dennis E; Plummer, Caryn E; Samuelson, Don A; Mangan, Brendan G; Laus, José L

    2013-07-01

    OBJECTIVE  To describe the technique of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) with Descemet's membrane (DM) exposure in horse eyes. Also, to compare the efficacy and safety of viscodissection and big-bubble techniques for DALK. ANIMALS STUDIED  Thirty-four ex vivo horse eyes. PROCEDURE  Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty was performed in 34 ex vivo horse eyes. Two groups (Group V--viscodissection--2% sodium hyaluronate; Group A--air--big-bubble) of 17 eyes were studied. Other than the substance used, the surgical technique was similar for both groups. Nonperforated eyes were submitted for light microscopic histologic evaluation and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. RESULTS  Group V--Perforations occurred in 18% of the eyes during surgery. Light microscopy revealed exposure of DM in 28% of the eyes with mean thickness of the remaining stroma being 70.4 μm. Group A--Perforations occurred in 42% of the eyes. Light microscopy revealed exposure of DM in 60% of the eyes with mean thickness of the remaining stroma being 23.3 μm. No significant differences in safety, efficacy and thickness of the remaining stroma (including all eyes or excluding those with DM exposure) were observed. SEM of the surgical site revealed a more even surface in those eyes with DM exposure compared to eyes with thicker remaining stroma in both groups. CONCLUSIONs  We describe two DALK techniques (viscodissection and big-bubble) for use in horses. No significant differences in safety, efficacy and thickness of the remaining stroma were observed. However, a nonsignificant trend toward the big-bubble technique being more efficacious but less safe was observed.

  19. Comparative scanning electron microscopic study of the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated comparatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology, when used according to the same protocol. Forty dentin sticks were obtained from 20 caries-free third human molars and were assigned to 4 groups corresponding to 3 conditioners (phosphoric acid 37%, Clearfil SE Bond and iBond and an untreated control group. After application of the conditioners, the specimens were immersed in 50% ethanol solution during 10 s, chemically fixed and dehydrated to prepare them to SEM analysis. In the control group, dentin surface was completely covered by smear layer and all dentinal tubules were occluded. In the phosphoric acid-etched group, dentin surface was completely clean and presented exposed dentinal tubule openings; this was the only group in which the tubules exhibited the funnel-shaped aspect. In the groups conditioned with Clearfil SE Bond primer and iBond, which are less acidic than phosphoric acid, tubule openings were occluded or partially occluded, though smear layer removal was observed. SE Bond was more efficient in removing the smear layer than iBond. In the Clearfil SE Bond group, the cuff-like aspect of peritubular dentin was more evident. It may be concluded all tested conditioners were able to change dentin morphology. However, it cannot be stated that the agent aggressiveness was the only cause of the micromorphological alterations because a single morphological pattern was not established for each group, but rather an association of different aspects, according to the aggressiveness of the tested conditioner.

  20. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.