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  1. Thoracic sympathetic block reduces respiratory system compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ely Martins Benseñor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA following thoracic surgery presents known analgesic and respiratory benefits. However, intraoperative thoracic sympathetic block may trigger airway hyperreactivity. This study weighed up these beneficial and undesirable effects on intraoperative respiratory mechanics. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, double-blind clinical study at a tertiary public hospital. METHODS: Nineteen patients scheduled for partial lung resection were distributed using a random number table into groups receiving active TEA (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, n = 9 or placebo (15 ml 0.9% saline, n = 10 solutions that also contained 1:200,000 epinephrine and 2 mg morphine. Under general anesthesia, flows and airway and esophageal pressures were recorded. Pressure-volume curves, lower inflection points (LIP, resistance and compliance at 10 ml/kg tidal volume were established for respiratory system, chest wall and lungs. Student’s t test was performed, including confidence intervals (CI. RESULTS: Bupivacaine rose 5 ± 1 dermatomes upwards and 6 ± 1 downwards. LIP was higher in the bupivacaine group (6.2 ± 2.3 versus 3.6 ± 0.6 cmH2O, p = 0.016, CI = -3.4 to -1.8. Respiratory system and lung compliance were higher in the placebo group (respectively 73.3 ± 10.6 versus 51.9 ± 15.5, p = 0.003, CI = 19.1 to 23.7; 127.2 ± 31.7 versus 70.2 ± 23.1 ml/cmH2O, p < 0.001, CI = 61 to 53. Resistance and chest wall compliance showed no difference. CONCLUSION: TEA decreased respiratory system compliance by reducing its lung component. Resistance was unaffected. Under TEA, positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are advisable.

  2. Blocking of Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP Leads to Reduced Replication of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

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    Tao, Xinrong; Mei, Feng; Agrawal, Anurodh; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections and diseases represents a potential threat for worldwide spread and requires development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we revealed a novel positive function of an exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (cAMP-1; Epac-1) on MERS-CoV replication. Specifically, we have shown that Epac-specific inhibitor treatment or silencing Epac-1 gene expression rendered cells resistant to viral infection. We believe Epac-1 inhibitors deserve further study as potential therapeutic agents for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24453361

  3. Contrasting reduced overshadowing and blocking.

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    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2007-07-01

    Preexposure of a cue without an outcome (X-) prior to compound pairings with the outcome (XZ-->O) can reduce overshadowing of a target cue (Z). Moreover, pairing a cue with an outcome (X-->O) before compound training can enhance its ability to compete with another cue (i.e., blocking). Four experiments were conducted in a conditioned bar-press suppression preparation with rats to determine whether spacing of the X- or X-->O trials would differentially affect reduced overshadowing and blocking. Experiment 1a showed that reduced overshadowing was larger with massed trials than with spaced trials. Experiment 1b found that blocking was larger with spaced trials than with massed trials. Experiments 2a and 2b indicated that these effects of trial spacing were both mediated by the associative status of the context at test. The results are interpreted in the framework of contemporary learning theories.

  4. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

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    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  5. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

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    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  6. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  7. Prolonged sinoatrial block in an infant with respiratory syncytial viral bronchiolitis.

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    Haddad, Wajed; Agoudemous, Melissa; Basnet, Sangita

    2012-10-01

    Complete heart block in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infections has been described. This report describes a prolonged sinoatrial block exceeding 4 s in an infant with RSV, which, to the authors' knowledge, is the longest such event described in the published literature. This block was followed by shorter episodes within the next 24 h. An extensive workup showed no other known cause of bradycardia or sinoatrial block. The infant was discharged home with 48 h Holter monitoring, which was normal. At this writing, the infant has remained asymptomatic since discharge. Respiratory syncytial viral infections may cause prolonged sinoatrial block in an otherwise healthy child.

  8. Idebenone reduces respiratory complications in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    McDonald, Craig M; Meier, Thomas; Voit, Thomas; Schara, Ulrike; Straathof, Chiara S M; D'Angelo, M Grazia; Bernert, Günther; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Finkel, Richard S; Goemans, Nathalie; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Spagnolo, Paolo; Buyse, Gunnar M

    2016-08-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), progressive loss of respiratory function leads to restrictive pulmonary disease and places patients at significant risk for severe respiratory complications. Of particular concern are ineffective cough, secretion retention and recurrent respiratory tract infections. In a Phase 3 randomized controlled study (DMD Long-term Idebenone Study, DELOS) in DMD patients 10-18 years of age and not taking concomitant glucocorticoid steroids, idebenone (900 mg/day) reduced significantly the loss of respiratory function over a 1-year study period. In a post-hoc analysis of DELOS we found that more patients in the placebo group compared to the idebenone group experienced bronchopulmonary adverse events (BAEs): placebo: 17 of 33 patients, 28 events; idebenone: 6 of 31 patients, 7 events. The hazard ratios (HR) calculated "by patient" (HR 0.33, p = 0.0187) and for "all BAEs" (HR 0.28, p = 0.0026) indicated a clear idebenone treatment effect. The overall duration of BAEs was 222 days (placebo) vs. 82 days (idebenone). In addition, there was also a difference in the use of systemic antibiotics utilized for the treatment of BAEs. In the placebo group, 13 patients (39.4%) reported 17 episodes of antibiotic use compared to 7 patients (22.6%) reporting 8 episodes of antibiotic use in the idebenone group. Furthermore, patients in the placebo group used systemic antibiotics for longer (105 days) compared to patients in the idebenone group (65 days). This post-hoc analysis of DELOS indicates that the protective effect of idebenone on respiratory function is associated with a reduced risk of bronchopulmonary complications and a reduced need for systemic antibiotics.

  9. Parallel Sorted Neighborhood Blocking with MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Lars; Thor, Andreas; Rahm, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Cloud infrastructures enable the efficient parallel execution of data-intensive tasks such as entity resolution on large datasets. We investigate challenges and possible solutions of using the MapReduce programming model for parallel entity resolution. In particular, we propose and evaluate two MapReduce-based implementations for Sorted Neighborhood blocking that either use multiple MapReduce jobs or apply a tailored data replication.

  10. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p < 0.001). The area under the force curve was reduced from 6.8 Ns (range: 3.5-21.9 Ns) to 0.54 Ns (range: 0.18-0.86 Ns) (p < 0.01). No change in nerve conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even

  11. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

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    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  12. RPGR mutations might cause reduced orientation of respiratory cilia

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    Bukowy-Bieryllo, Zuzanna; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Loges, Niki Tomas; Wittmer, Mariana; Geremek, Maciej; Olbrich, Heike; Fliegauf, Manfred; Voelkel, Katarzyna; Rutkiewicz, Ewa; Rutland, Jonathan; Morgan, Lucy; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Martin, James; Haan, Eric; Berger, Wolfgang; Omran, Heymut; Witt, Michal

    2013-01-01

    RPGR gene encodes retinitis pigmentosa guanosine triphosphatase regulator protein, mutations of which cause 70% of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) cases. Rarely, RPGR mutations can also cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a multisystem disorder characterized by recurrent respiratory tra

  13. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

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    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  14. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

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    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D

  15. Blocking TRPA1 in Respiratory Disorders: Does It Hold a Promise?

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    Indranil Mukhopadhyay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 ion channel is expressed abundantly on the C fibers that innervate almost entire respiratory tract starting from oral cavity and oropharynx, conducting airways in the trachea, bronchi, terminal bronchioles, respiratory bronchioles and upto alveolar ducts and alveoli. Functional presence of TRPA1 on non-neuronal cells got recognized recently. TRPA1 plays a well-recognized role of “chemosensor”, detecting presence of exogenous irritants and endogenous pro-inflammatory mediators that are implicated in airway inflammation and sensory symptoms like chronic cough, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, allergic rhinitis and cystic fibrosis. TRPA1 can remain activated chronically due to elevated levels and continued presence of such endogenous ligands and pro-inflammatory mediators. Several selective TRPA1 antagonists have been tested in animal models of respiratory disease and their performance is very promising. Although there is no TRPA1 antagonist in advanced clinical trials or approved on market yet to treat respiratory diseases, however, limited but promising evidences available so far indicate likelihood that targeting TRPA1 may present a new therapy in treatment of respiratory diseases in near future. This review will focus on in vitro, animal and human evidences that strengthen the proposed role of TRPA1 in modulation of specific airway sensory responses and also on preclinical and clinical progress of selected TRPA1 antagonists.

  16. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

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    Grosse-Sundrup, Martina; Henneman, Justin P; Sandberg, Warren S; Bateman, Brian T; Uribe, Jose Villa; Nguyen, Nicole Thuy; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18 579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18 579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation 3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  17. Mediation pathways and effects of green structures on respiratory mortality via reducing air pollution

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    Shen, Yu-Sheng; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown both health and environmental benefits of green spaces, especially in moderating temperature and reducing air pollution. However, the characteristics of green structures have been overlooked in previous investigations. In addition, the mediation effects of green structures on respiratory mortality have not been assessed. This study explores the potential mediation pathways and effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality through temperature, primary and secondary air pollutants separately using partial least squares model with data from Taiwan. The measurable characteristics of green structure include the largest patch percentage, landscape proportion, aggregation, patch distance, and fragmentation. The results showed that mortality of pneumonia and chronic lower respiratory diseases could be reduced by minimizing fragmentation and increasing the largest patch percentage of green structure, and the mediation effects are mostly through reducing air pollutants rather than temperature. Moreover, a high proportion of but fragmented green spaces would increase secondary air pollutants and enhance health risks; demonstrating the deficiency of traditional greening policy with primary focus on coverage ratio. This is the first research focusing on mediation effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality, revealing that appropriate green structure planning can be a useful complementary strategy in environmental health management. PMID:28230108

  18. Mediation pathways and effects of green structures on respiratory mortality via reducing air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Sheng; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown both health and environmental benefits of green spaces, especially in moderating temperature and reducing air pollution. However, the characteristics of green structures have been overlooked in previous investigations. In addition, the mediation effects of green structures on respiratory mortality have not been assessed. This study explores the potential mediation pathways and effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality through temperature, primary and secondary air pollutants separately using partial least squares model with data from Taiwan. The measurable characteristics of green structure include the largest patch percentage, landscape proportion, aggregation, patch distance, and fragmentation. The results showed that mortality of pneumonia and chronic lower respiratory diseases could be reduced by minimizing fragmentation and increasing the largest patch percentage of green structure, and the mediation effects are mostly through reducing air pollutants rather than temperature. Moreover, a high proportion of but fragmented green spaces would increase secondary air pollutants and enhance health risks; demonstrating the deficiency of traditional greening policy with primary focus on coverage ratio. This is the first research focusing on mediation effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality, revealing that appropriate green structure planning can be a useful complementary strategy in environmental health management.

  19. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

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    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. Methods: sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or inter-costal block with %0.25 bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hos-pital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was meas-ured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. Results: We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P < 0.004. Changes in the visual Analogue Scale were associated with marked improvement re-garding pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A com-pared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. Conclusion: tho-racic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib frac-tures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  20. Population-wide preventive interventions for reducing the burden of chronic respiratory disease.

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    Abramson, M J; Koplin, J; Hoy, R; Dharmage, S C

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma impose a substantial burden of disease. This narrative review focuses on potential population-wide interventions that are likely to have an impact on these diseases. The developmental origins of adult disease commence in utero, with maternal nutrition being of particular interest. However, to date, trials of maternal allergen avoidance, dietary supplementation or probiotics have not shown consistent protective effects against asthma. Poor indoor air quality, especially from biomass fuels as well as second-hand tobacco smoke, is a well-recognised risk factor for chronic respiratory diseases. This can be modified by cleaner fuels, cooking stoves or heaters, and improved ventilation. Although allergens are a risk factor for childhood asthma, the results of interventions to reduce exposures have been disappointing. Traffic-related air pollution is associated with an increased incidence of asthma in children. Primary prevention of the adverse effects of air pollution has focused on the development of ambient air quality guidelines, but enforcement remains a challenge in many countries. Occupational asthma may be induced by sensitisers or irritants in the workplace. Prevention involves eliminating the agent or reducing exposure as far as possible, which is more effective than respiratory protective equipment. Smoking cessation remains a key proven preventive strategy for chronic respiratory diseases. There is now an international framework for tobacco control, and recent innovations include plain packaging of tobacco. Chronic respiratory diseases can be substantially prevented by the above population-wide interventions.

  1. The usefulness of Al face block fabrication for reducing exposure dose of thyroid glands in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Currently, there are many studies being conducted around the world to reduce exposure dose to radiation for patients to receive medical treatments in a safe environment. We developed and fabricated of this shield that the patients are protected from the radiation and are need of safety control during breast imaging. In this study, for breast imaging, GE Senography 2000D were used and set at SID 65 cm, 28 kVp, and 63 mAs. The measuring instrument was Flukes Victoreen 6000-529. And we performed Face Block on with 30 patients. The chamber on the actual thyroid glands to take CC and MLO and measure the dosage before and after wearing the Face Block. For the results, after wearing the Face Block, exposure was decreased by 53.8%-100% and 65.8% in average in CC View and by 50%-100% and 60.7% in average in MLO View. The development of the Face Block that practically decreased the exposure dose of thyroid glands, crystalline eyes during breast imaging and reduced the patients anxiety during breast imaging. The Face Block is expected to improve patients satisfaction and contribute to reducing patients exposure dose, but more efforts should be made to reduce exposure dose to medical radiation.

  2. Effectiveness of interventions in reducing antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections in ambulatory care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnard, Christopher; Linkin, Darren R; Localio, A Russell; Leonard, Charles E; Teal, Valerie L; Fishman, Neil O; Hennessy, Sean

    2013-02-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of separate interventions on antimicrobial prescribing for uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study with concurrent control groups for each intervention. Academic detailing led to a significant reduction in unnecessary antibiotic prescribing. However, there was no significant change in antibiotic prescribing in response to educational mailings to providers or to provider involvement in patient mailings. Organizations that seek to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics should use proven approaches, even when they are more expensive.

  3. Addition of lidocaine to levobupivacaine reduces intrathecal block duration: randomized controlled trial

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    Dilek Yazicioglu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The duration of the spinal block is a concern for anesthetists. Low dose intrathecal lidocaine has vasodilatory effects and increases the local anesthetic clearance from the intrathecal space. The aim was to investigate whether this effect of lidocaine can be used to increase the resolution of levobupivacaine spinal anesthesia. Method: After obtaining ethical approval and informed patient consent, 40 patients underwent transurethral prostate resection were studied. Patients were randomized into two groups and patients received either levobupivacaine 6.75 mg + 0.3 mL 2% lidocaine (Group L or levobupivacaine 6.75 mg + saline (Group C. The main outcome measures were the difference between groups regarding the duration of the spinal block and PACU stay. Secondary outcome measures were the difference between groups in onset and resolution of the spinal block, adverse events and treatments were also investigated. Results: Spinal block resolved faster in Group L than Group C; 162.43 ± 39.4 min vs 219.73 ± 37.3 min (p = 0.000. PACU time was shorter in Group L (109 ± 49.9 min in Group L vs 148 ± 56.8 min in Group C (p = 0.036. There was no difference between groups with respect to the incidence of adverse events and treatments. Groups were also similar regarding complications. PDPH and TNS were not observed in any group. Conclusion: Addition of low dose lidocaine to hyperbaric levobupivacaine reduces the duration of the intrathecal block provided by hyperbaric levobupivacaine. This technique can be used to reduce the spinal block duration for relatively short procedures like TUR-P.

  4. Identification and characterization of enhancer-blocking insulators to reduce retroviral vector genotoxicity.

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    Amy C Groth

    Full Text Available The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity.

  5. Evaluation by Survival Analysis on Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treating Children with Respiratory Syncytial Viral Pneumonia of Phlegm-Heat Blocking Fei Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕; 汪受传; 白文静; 李瑞丽; 艾军

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To objectively evaluate the clinical effect of traditional Chinese medicine in treating children's respiratory syncytial viral pneumonia(RSVP) of phlegm-heat blocking Fei(肺) syndrome(PHBFS). Methods:A single-blinded multi-center,blocked,randomized and parallel-controlled method was adopted.The clinical study was carried out on 206 children with RSVP-PHBFS who were assigned to two groups,108 in the test group treated through intravenous dripping of Qingkailing Injection(清开灵注射液) in combination of...

  6. COMPLEMENT BLOCK CODING SCHEME FOR REDUCING PEAK-TO-AVERAGE POWER RATIO OF OFDM SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Tao; Zhu Guangxi

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme termed as Complement Block Coding (CBC) technique is proposed to reduce the Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR) of OFDM signals. Utilizing the complement bits which are added to the original information bits,this method can effectively reduce the PAPR of OFDM systems with random frame size N and the coding rate R ≤ (N - k)/N, where kis a positive integer and k ≤ N/2. The performance results obtained with CBC are given and compared with that of some well known schemes, such as Simple Block Coding (SBC), Modified Simple Block Coding (MSBC) and Simple Odd Parity Code (SOPC) for the same purpose. The results show that, at the same coding rate 3/4, the CBC can achieve almost the same performance as SBC, MSBC, but with lower complexity, and that the same performance can be obtained with higher coding rate by using CBC. At the same coding rate (N - 1)/N, the PAPR reduction of CBC is almost the twice as that of SOPC when N ≥ 16. Further more, the PAPR reductions with coding rate (N - 1)/N are almost the same as that with coding rate less than (N - 1)/N,so the proposed scheme CBC is more suitable for the large frame size with high coding rate and can provide error detection.

  7. 5alpha-Reduced androgens block estradiol-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jack D; Song, Yan; Englöf, Ila; Höfle, Simone; Key, Mary; Morris, Mariana

    2003-06-27

    In this study we test the postulate that estradiol conjugated to bovine serum albumin (E-BSA) acts via receptors for the steroid-binding protein sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) by attempting to block E-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin with two antagonists of SHBG receptor actions: the 5alpha-reduced androgens dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 3alpha-diol. Simultaneous superfusion with either DHT or 3alpha-diol significantly blocked E-BSA-stimulated release of oxytocin. We also found that a wide range of free 17beta-estradiol was unable to stimulate oxytocin release, suggesting that E-BSA stimulates receptors other than those for free estradiol to release oxytocin, perhaps SHBG receptors.

  8. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion.

  9. Reducing formation damage with microbubble based drilling fluid : understanding the blocking ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorndalen, N.; Kuru, E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering; Jossy, E.; Alvarez, J.M. [Alberta Research Council, Devon, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Micro-bubble based drilling fluids use gas bubbles to bridge pores in porous media. The microbubbles can be removed during the initial stages of production to reduce costs associated with stimulation processes. This paper provided details of experiments conducted to investigate pore blocking mechanisms. Micromodel cells were used with different pressure rates and fluid compositions. A xanthan gum-water mixture was used as a base drilling fluid. An anionic surfactant was added to the base fluid for aphronization. The resulting stable foam was injected into the micromodel, where it blocked porous media. The analysis demonstrated that an aphron of 60 {mu}m bubble will invade porous media with a pore diameter of 50 {mu} at approximately 10 kPa. The foam was effectively removed by water injection, which indicated that the effects of the foam were irreversible. Less fluid and surfactant was needed to achieve desired flow rates when the foam was used. It was concluded that drilling with aphronized fluid will reduce formation damage. Further research is required to determine maximum flow pressure of the aphronized fluid in porous media. 24 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  10. Impact on the gait time cycle of ischemic stroke in the treatment with yinyang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旗

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference in the efficacy on gait time cycle of ischemic stroke between yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique(yin-yang needling)and the conventional acupuncture.Methods Sixty cases of ischemic stroke between yin-yang

  11. Reduced-density-matrix spectrum and block entropy of permutationally invariant many-body systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Mario; Popkov, Vladislav

    2010-07-01

    Spectral properties of the reduced density matrix (RDM) of permutational invariant quantum many-body systems are investigated. The RDM block diagonalization which accounts for all symmetries of the Hamiltonian is achieved. The analytical expression of the RDM spectrum is provided for arbitrary parameters and rigorously proved in the thermodynamical limit. The existence of several sum rules and recurrence relations among RDM eigenvalues is also demonstrated and the distribution function of RDM eigenvalues (including degeneracies) characterized. In particular, we prove that the distribution function approaches a two-dimensional Gaussian in the limit of large subsystem sizes n>1. As a physical application we discuss the von Neumann entropy (VNE) of a block of size n for a system of hard-core bosons on a complete graph, as a function of n and of the temperature T. The occurrence of a crossover of VNE from purely logarithmic behavior at T=0 to a purely linear behavior in n for T≥Tc, is demonstrated.

  12. BLOCK CODING SCHEME FOR REDUCING PAPR IN OFDM SYSTEMS WITH LARGE NUMBER OF SUBCARRIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Tao; Zhu Guangxi; Zheng Jianbin

    2004-01-01

    The major drawback in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) system is due to the high Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR), so the performance of the system is significantly degraded by the nonlinearity of a High Power Amplifier (HPA) in the transmitter.In order to mitigate distortion, a block coding scheme for reducing PAPR in OFDM systems with large number of subcarriers based on complementary sequences and predistortion is proposed,which is capable of both error correction and PAPR reduction. Computer simulation results show that the proposed scheme significantly improves Bit Error Rate(BER) performance as compared to an uncoded system when an HPA is employed or a coded system without predistortion.

  13. Evaluation of a blocking ELISA for screening of antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Bøtner, Anette; Madsen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa was sens......A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa...

  14. Defining indicators to motorize block valves aiming to reduce potential leakage applied to OSBRA pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F.G. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Sousa, A.G.; Castro, N.C.; Spagnolo, R. [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The discussion about motorizing block valves is a constant point being brought up when it is intended to control or reduce the amount of liquid leaking in the event of a pipe rupture. During the pipeline's project stage the installation of blocking valves along the pipeline must be taken into consideration to meet the operation and maintenance requirements as well as to reduce the potential amounts of volume being leaked. In existing pipelines, the main concern is the definition of which valves are candidates to be motorized. In both situations criteria should be established to define this choice. A math algorithm was developed to define the potential leakage due to gravity along the pipeline profile where the influence of a valve over another is verified, as well as the contribution of the check valves existing in the pipeline. The present work defines a parameter based on the extension protected by the valve and the reduction of the potential leakage. This parameter is then fed to a worksheet where the efficiency indicators are calculated to each valve eligible to be motorized. It also takes into consideration factors relative to the valve location, such as the environmental sensitivity, risk assessment, social diagnosis and device's proximity to contingency resources. Finally, after considering all the above aspects, it's possible to come up with a final classification, recommending specific valves to be prioritized on an eventual process of motorization adequacies. This methodology was applied, experimentally on a pipe segment of TRANSPETRO's Sao Paulo-Brasilia pipeline - OSBRA , where it proved to be an important technological and management tool. (author)

  15. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces leftventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chainactivity and increases oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eKINDO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n=10 for each group. Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilised fibres, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity.Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (-36.7%, P<0.01 and complex IV activity (-57.4%, P<0.05. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production was similar in both LV layers.Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass, associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (-23.6 and -33.3%, increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%, free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3% and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3% in Endo and Epi, respectively.Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (-57.4 vs –12.2%; P=0.02. Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH.

  16. Blocking ELISA's for the distinction between antibodies against European and American strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Bøtner, Anette

    1998-01-01

    A double blocking ELISA was developed in order to satisfy the need for large scale serological screening for PRRS and simultaneous distinction between infection with European and American strains of PRRSV in pig herds. The Immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the double blocking ELISA...

  17. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-22

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection.

  18. Paediatric respiratory nursing posts in secondary care reduce asthma morbidity, but provision is variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, M; Furness, J

    2009-08-01

    British guidelines on asthma recommend nurse delivered structured discharges for all children with asthma. This study carried out a postal and telephone survey to investigate the provision of this service. Twenty out of 34 (59%) hospitals in the Northern and Yorkshire regions do not have a recognised paediatric respiratory nurse post to facilitate this aspect of care.

  19. Anaesthetic management of emergency pacemaker implantation in a case of neonatal lupus erythematosus with complete congenital heart block & severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kiran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-week old 3-kilogram male baby was brought to this tertiary care hospital with respiratory distress, marked tracheal tug, poor feeding and a heart rate of 46/minute. The child had been referred from a peripheral hospital as a case of neonatal lupus with complete congenital heart block. The mother was seropositive for systemic lupus erythematosus with a history of two abortions. Evaluation on admission revealed a heart rate between 40-60/ minute, respiratory rate 40-50/ minute, inspiratory stridor, bilateral crepitations, chest retrac-tion and a marked tracheal tug that improved with prone positioning. Electrocardiography and echocardiography confirmed complete congenital heart block with cardiomegaly and mild left ventricular dysfunction. Keeping in view the impending congestive heart failure, possible early cardiomyopathy and the bad obstetric history ur-gent pacemaker implantation was planned to allow early recovery of the child. The anaesthetic risk was high due to the heart block, ventricular dysfunction, laryngomalacia, severe tracheal tug and anticipated difficult weaning from controlled ventilation. General anaesthesia was administered with endotracheal tube and con-trolled ventilation using ketamine, rocuronium and sufentanil. For patient safety invasive monitoring was pro-vided and external pacing was kept standby. Epicardial pacemaker leads were implanted onto the left ventricu-lar wall through a left anterior 6th intercostal space thoracotomy. The child was electively ventilated for two post operative days. The tracheal tug and secretions gradually subsided over 2 weeks with oxygen, antibiotics, steroids, bronchodilators and physiotherapy. At the time of discharge from hospital 2 weeks after the implant the child was feeding well, tracheal tug was minimal and the lungs were clear.

  20. High-septal pacing reduces ventricular electrical remodeling and proarrhythmia in chronic atrioventricular block dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winckels, Stephan K G; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Oosterhoff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the relevance of ventricular activation patterns for ventricular electrical remodeling after atrioventricular (AV) block in dogs.......This study was designed to analyze the relevance of ventricular activation patterns for ventricular electrical remodeling after atrioventricular (AV) block in dogs....

  1. Effectiveness of Interventions in Reducing Antibiotic Use for Upper Respiratory Infections in Ambulatory Care Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnard, Christopher; Linkin, Darren R.; Localio, A. Russell; Leonard, Charles E; Teal, Valerie L.; Fishman, Neil O.; Hennessy, Sean

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of separate interventions on antimicrobial prescribing for uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study with concurrent control groups for each intervention. Academic detailing led to a significant reduction in unnecessary antibiotic prescribing. However, there was no significant change in antibiotic prescribing in response to educational mailings to providers or to provider involvement in ...

  2. [Experience of using bacteriophages and bitsillin-5 to reduce the incidence of respiratory diseases of bacterial ethiology in military personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimkin, V G; Kalmykov, A A; Aminev, R M; Polyakov, V S; Artebyakin, S V

    2016-02-01

    The authors defined epidemiological efficacy and safety of the use of bacteriophages(streptococcal, staphylococcal, piobakferiophage multipartial) and bitsillin-5 to reduce tonsillitis morbidityand other respiratory diseases with bacterial etiology in groups of servicemen during their formationagainst increase of seasonal morbidity. The results of the use of these preventive agents were evaluatedby a comparative analysis of this disease in experimental and control groups. In total 510 healthy conscriptswere involved into the study. The effectiveness of prophylactic use of bacteriophages and bitsillin-5, whichprovided a reduction in the incidence of respiratory infections of bacterial ethiology, tonsillitis, and otherrespiratory diseases is showed. Recommendations on the choice of drugsfor the prevention of these infections,methods and organization of their application in organized groups are given.

  3. Bilateral Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Acute Postoperative Abdominal Pain as a Rescue After Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Mohamed; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Maheshwari, Kamal; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Soliman, Loran Mounir

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of acute postoperative abdominal pain after proctosigmoidectomy and colorectal anastomosis that was treated by bilateral continuous quadratus lumborum block. The block was performed in the lateral position under ultrasound guidance with a 15-mL bolus of 0.5% bupivacaine injected anterior to the quadratus lumborum muscle followed by bilateral catheter placement. Each catheter received a continuous infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine at 8 mL/h and an on-demand bolus 5 mL every 30 minutes. Sensory level was confirmed by insensitivity to cold from T7 through T12. The block was devoid of hemodynamic side effects or motor weakness. This case demonstrates that bilateral continuous quadratus lumborum catheters can provide extended postoperative pain control.

  4. Zinc or multiple micronutrient supplementation to reduce diarrhea and respiratory disease in South African children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kany-Kany Angelique Luabeya

    Full Text Available Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain.To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence.Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Rural community in South Africa.THREE COHORTS: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers.Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly.Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker.Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852. Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857. Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts.When compared with vitamin A alone, supplementation with zinc, or with zinc and multiple

  5. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  6. Does Prone Positioning Improve Oxygenation and Reduce Mortality in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Henderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of computed tomography imaging more than 25 years ago led to characterization of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS as areas of relatively normal lung parenchyma juxtaposed with areas of dense consolidation and atelectasis. Given that this heterogeneity is often dorsally distributed, investigators questioned whether care for ARDS patients in the prone position would lead to improved mortality outcomes. This clinical review discusses the physiological rationale and clinical evidence supporting prone positioning in treating ARDS, in addition to its complications and contraindications.

  7. Treatment with selectin blocking antibodies after lengthening contractions of mouse muscle blunts neutrophil accumulation but does not reduce damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-01-01

    P- and E-selectins are expressed on the surface of endothelial cells and may contribute to neutrophil recruitment following injurious lengthening contractions of skeletal muscle. Blunting neutrophil, but not macrophage, accumulation after lengthening contractions may provide a therapeutic benefit as neutrophils exacerbate damage to muscle fibers, while macrophages promote repair. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that P- and E-selectins contribute to neutrophil, but not macrophage, accumulation in muscles after contraction-induced injury, and that reducing neutrophil accumulation by blocking the selectins would be sufficient to reduce damage to muscle fibers. To test our hypothesis, we treated mice with antibodies to block P- and E-selectin function and assessed leukocyte accumulation and damage in muscles 2 days after lengthening contractions. Treatment with P/E-selectin blocking antibodies reduced neutrophil content by about half in muscles subjected to lengthening contractions. In spite of the reduction in neutrophil accumulation, we did not detect a decrease in damage 2 days after lengthening contractions. We conclude that P- and/or E-selectin contribute to the neutrophil accumulation associated with contraction-induced muscle damage and that only a portion of the neutrophils that typically accumulate following injurious lengthening contractions is sufficient to induce muscle fiber damage and force deficits. Thus, therapeutic interventions based on blocking the selectins or other adhesion proteins will have to reduce neutrophil numbers by more than 50% in order to provide a benefit.

  8. Testing the bed-blocking hypothesis: does higher supply of nursing and care homes reduce delayed hospital discharges?

    OpenAIRE

    James Gaughan; Hugh Gravelle; Luigi Siciliani

    2014-01-01

    Hospital bed blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which higher supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed blocking. We use new Local Authority level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2010-13. The results suggest that delayed discharges do respond to the availab...

  9. Reducing Respiratory Health Risks to Horses and Workers: A Comparison of Two Stall Bedding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Saastamoinen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stable air quality and the choice of bedding material are an important health issue both in horses and people working or visiting horse stables. Risks of impaired respiratory health are those that can especially be avoided by improving air quality in the stable. The choice of bedding material is particularly important in cold climate conditions; where horses are kept most of the day and year indoors throughout their life. This study examined the effect of two bedding materials; wood shavings and peat; on stable air quality and health of horses. Ammonia and dust levels were also measured to assess conditions in the stable. Ammonia was not detected or was at very low levels (<0.25 ppm in the boxes in which peat was used as bedding; but its concentration was clearly higher (1.5–7.0 ppm in stalls with wood shavings as bedding. Personal measurements of workers revealed quite high ammonia exposure (5.9 ppm8h in the boxes in which wood shavings were used; but no exposure was Animals 2015, 5 966 observed in stalls bedded with peat. The respiratory symptoms in horses increased regardless of the bedding material at the beginning of the study. The health status of the horses in the peat bedding group returned to the initial level in the end of the trial but horses bedded with wood shavings continued to be symptomatic. The hooves of the horses with peat bedding had a better moisture content than those of the horses bedded with wood shavings. The results suggest that peat is a better bedding material for horses than wood shavings regarding the health of both horses and stable workers.

  10. Reduced Activation of Left Orbitofrontal Cortex Precedes Blocked Vocalization: A Magnetoencephalographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowman, Paul F.; Crain, Stephen; Harrison, Elisabeth; Johnson, Blake W.

    2012-01-01

    While stuttering is known to be characterized by anomalous brain activations during speech, very little data is available describing brain activations during stuttering. To our knowledge there are no reports describing brain activations that precede blocking. In this case report we present magnetoencephalographic data from a person who stutters…

  11. Combined anti CXC receptors 1 and 2 therapy is a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases by reducing neutrophil migration and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planagumà, A; Domènech, T; Pont, M; Calama, E; García-González, V; López, R; Aulí, M; López, M; Fonquerna, S; Ramos, I; de Alba, J; Nueda, A; Prats, N; Segarra, V; Miralpeix, M; Lehner, M D

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil infiltration and activation in the lung are important pathophysiological features in COPD, severe asthma and bronchiectasis mostly mediated by CXCL8 and CXCL1 via CXCR1 and CXCR2. No thorough study to date has been performed to compare the anti-inflammatory effect profile of dual CXCR1/2 vs. selective CXCR2 antagonists in relevant human neutrophil assays and pulmonary inflammation models. Dual CXCR1/2 (SCH527123, diaminocyclobutandione-1) and selective CXCR2 (SB265610, thiopyrimidine-1) antagonist activity and receptor residence time were determined by [(35)S]GTPγS binding in human (h)- and guinea pig (gp)-CXCR1 and CXCR2 overexpressing membranes. h-neutrophil chemotaxis, degranulation and ROS production were established using CXCL8 or CXCL1 to evaluate dual CXCR1/2- or selective CXCR2-dependent activities. LPS-induced lung inflammation in gp was selected to assess in vivo potency. Dual CXCR1/2 antagonists blocked both CXCL8 and CXCL1-induced h-neutrophil functions and [(35)S]GTPγS binding. In contrary, selective CXCR2 antagonists displayed significantly reduced potency in CXCL8 -mediated h-neutrophil responses despite being active in CXCR2 assays. Upon LPS challenge in gp, administration of SCH527123 inhibited the increase of neutrophils in BALF, modestly reduced blood neutrophils and induced minor neutrophil accumulation in bone marrow. Differentiation of CXCR1/2 vs. CXCR2 antagonists could not be extended to in vivo due to differences in CXCR1 receptor homology between h and gp. Dual CXCR1/2 therapy may represent a promising anti-inflammatory treatment for respiratory diseases reducing more effectively neutrophil migration and activation in the lung than a CXCR2 selective treatment. However, the in vivo confirmation of this claim is still missing due to species differences in CXCR1.

  12. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: increasing the cohesivity of airway secretions to improve cough interaction and reduce aerosol dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Darryl

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious respiratory diseases are transmitted to non-infected subjects when an infected person expels pathogenic microorganisms to the surrounding environment when coughing or sneezing. When the airway mucus layer interacts with high-speed airflow, droplets are expelled as aerosol; their concentration and size distribution may each play an important role in disease transmission. Our goal is to reduce the aerosolizability of respiratory secretions while interfering only minimally with normal mucus clearance using agents capable of increasing crosslinking in the mucin glycoprotein network. Methods We exposed mucus simulants (MS to airflow in a simulated cough machine (SCM. The MS ranged from non-viscous, non-elastic substances (water to MS of varying degrees of viscosity and elasticity. Mucociliary clearance of the MS was assessed on the frog palate, elasticity in the Filancemeter and the aerosol pattern in a "bulls-eye" target. The sample loaded was weighed before and after each cough maneuver. We tested two mucomodulators: sodium tetraborate (XL"B" and calcium chloride (XL "C". Results Mucociliary transport was close to normal speed in viscoelastic samples compared to non-elastic, non-viscous or viscous-only samples. Spinnability ranged from 2.5 ± 0.6 to 50.9 ± 6.9 cm, and the amount of MS expelled from the SCM increased from 47 % to 96 % adding 1.5 μL to 150 μL of XL "B". Concurrently, particles were inversely reduced to almost disappear from the aerosolization pattern. Conclusion The aerosolizability of MS was modified by increasing its cohesivity, thereby reducing the number of particles expelled from the SCM while interfering minimally with its clearance on the frog palate. An unexpected finding is that MS crosslinking increased "expectoration".

  13. A multi-strain Synbiotic may reduce viral respiratory infections in asthmatic children: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Ansari, Elham; Ganji, Toktam; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Khalesi, Maryam; Momen, Tooba; Kianifar, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Asthma is a growing problem worldwide. Acute exacerbations impose considerable morbidity, mortality, and increased cost. Viral respiratory infections are the most common cause (80–85%) of pediatric asthma exacerbations and admissions to the hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a new synbiotic Lactocare® on viral respiratory infections and asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children. Methods In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 72 children with mild persistent asthma, aged between 6 and 12 years, were randomized to receive either Lactocare®, a Synbiotic containing 1 billion CFU/Capsule of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Fructooligosacharide (Zist Takhmir, Tehran, Iran) or placebo daily for 60 days. The primary outcome was the number of viral respiratory infections, and secondary outcomes were school absence, salbutamol and prednisolone usage, outpatient visits, and hospital admission for asthma. The outcomes were compared among study groups using the SPSS 11.5 program and the Mann Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Results Of the 72 children who were enrolled with mild persistent asthma, 36 were assigned randomly to be treated with synbiotic and 36 with placebo. The number of viral respiratory infections was significantly higher in placebo group than the synbiotic group during the first month of intervention (0.74 ± 0.12 vs. 0.44 ± 0.1, p < 0.007) but not during the second month (0.5 ± 0.8 vs. 0.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.641). Considering the total duration of the study (two months), infection episodes also were significantly lower in the synbiotic group (0.92 ± 0.15 vs. 0.69 ± 0.11, p < 0.046). Salbutamol consumption was significantly lower in the synbiotic group, but there were no significant differences in school absenteeism, oral

  14. A Novel Approach to Detect Duplicate Code Blocks to Reduce Maintenance Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Gupta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It was found in many cases that a code might be a clone for one programmer but not the same for another one. This problem occurs because of inaccurate documentation. According to research, the maintainers are not aware of the original design and thus, face the difficulty of agreeing on the system’s components and their relations or understanding the work of the application. The problem also occurs because of the different team of development and maintenance resulting in more effort and time during maintenance. This paper proposes a novel approach to detect the clones at the programmer side such that if a particular code is a clone then it can be well documented. This approach will provide both the individual duplicate statements as well as the block in which they appear. The approach has been examined on seven open source systems.

  15. Development and application of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to differentiate antibodies against live and inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yanlong; Huang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yixue; Ran, Wei; Zhu, Lisai; Yang, Guilian; Ding, Xuemei; Yang, Zhanqing; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method that could differentiate antibodies against live and inactivated vaccines of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A blocking ELISA (b-ELISA) was established using the PRRSV non-structural protein, Nsp9, as the antigen and a monoclonal antibody, 2D6, against the Nsp9 protein as the capture antibody. The test was validated by using 415 clinical sera in the b-ELISA compared to a commercial kit based on the indirect ELISA using the nucleocapsid (N) protein as antigen. Significant differences were observed for the data obtained by the two detection methods. This may be due to the commercial kit detecting antibodies elicited by live and inactivated virus, whereas the b-ELISA only detects antibodies produced by any active viral replication, such as natural infection or live vaccination. Therefore, the b-ELISA in this study is able to distinguish between antibodies against live and inactivated viruses in pigs.

  16. Intramuscular adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in neonates delivered by elective caesarean section at term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Avlund, O L; Pedersen, B L

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test whether intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline decreased the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in term infants delivered by elective caesarean section before active labour. METHOD: The study was randomised and double-blinded. A total of 270 neonates were...... assigned to intramuscular treatment with saline (0.30 ml) or 30 microg adrenaline (0.30 ml) immediately after birth. The primary endpoint was referral to the neonatal ward because of respiratory distress or a blood glucose level ... of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia was 14% among infants treated with adrenaline compared with 7% in those who received saline injection (p = 0.048). CONCLUSION: Intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress or hypoglycaemia after elective caesarean...

  17. Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis in Infants Is Associated with Reduced Airway Interferon Gamma and Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Malcolm G.; Dankert, Hinke M.; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Correia, Jailson B.; Booth, J. Angela; Stewart, James P.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Hart, C. Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) bronchiolitis in previously well infants may be due to differences in the innate immune response to hRSV infection. Aim: to determine if factors mediating proposed mechanisms for severe bronchiolitis differ with severity of disease. Methodology/Principle Findings 197 infants admitted to hospital with hRSV bronchiolitis were recruited and grouped according to no oxygen requirement (n = 27), oxygen dependence (n = 114) or mechanical ventilation (n = 56). We collected clinical data, nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and if ventilated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), substance P (SP), interleukin 9 (IL-9), urea and hRSV load, were measured in cell free supernatant from NPA and BAL. Multivariate analysis compared independent effects of clinical, virological and immunological variables upon disease severity. IFN-γ and SP concentrations were lower in NPA from infants who required oxygen or mechanical ventilation. Viral load and IL-9 concentrations were high but did not vary with severity of disease. Independent predictors of severe disease (in diminishing size of effect) were low weight on admission, low gestation at birth, low NPA IFN-γ and NPA SP. Nasal airway sampling appears to be a useful surrogate for distal airway sampling since concentrations of IFN-γ, SP, IL-9 and viral load in NPA correlate with the same in BAL. Conclusions Our data support two proposed mechanisms for severe hRSV disease; reduced local IFN-γ response and SP mediated inflammation. We found large amounts of hRSV and IL-9 in airways secretions from the upper and lower respiratory tract but could not associate these with disease severity. PMID:17940602

  18. Professional and home-made face masks reduce exposure to respiratory infections among the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne van der Sande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Governments are preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. Therefore they need data to assess the possible impact of interventions. Face-masks worn by the general population could be an accessible and affordable intervention, if effective when worn under routine circumstances. METHODOLOGY: We assessed transmission reduction potential provided by personal respirators, surgical masks and home-made masks when worn during a variety of activities by healthy volunteers and a simulated patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All types of masks reduced aerosol exposure, relatively stable over time, unaffected by duration of wear or type of activity, but with a high degree of individual variation. Personal respirators were more efficient than surgical masks, which were more efficient than home-made masks. Regardless of mask type, children were less well protected. Outward protection (mask wearing by a mechanical head was less effective than inward protection (mask wearing by healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Any type of general mask use is likely to decrease viral exposure and infection risk on a population level, in spite of imperfect fit and imperfect adherence, personal respirators providing most protection. Masks worn by patients may not offer as great a degree of protection against aerosol transmission.

  19. Respiratory and dissimilatory nitrate-reducing communities from an extreme saline alkaline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of the dissimilatory and respiratory nitrate-reducing communities was studied in two soils of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico). Genes encoding the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (narG) and the periplasmic nitrate reductase (napA) were used as functional markers. To investigate bacterial communities containing napA and narG in saline alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, libraries of the two sites were constructed (soil T3 with pH 11 and electrolytic conductivity in saturated extract (EC(SE)) 160 dS m(-1) and soil T1 with pH 8.5 and EC(SE) 0.8 dS m(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of napA sequences separated the clone families into two main groups: dependent or independent of NapB. Most of napA sequences from site T1 were grouped in the NapB-dependent clade, meanwhile most of the napA sequences from the extreme soil T3 were affiliated to the NapB-independent group. For both sites, partial narG sequences were associated with representatives of the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla, but the proportions of the clones were different. Our results support the concept of a specific and complex nitrate-reducing community for each soil of the former lake Texcoco.

  20. Can guidelines for the treatment of respiratory infections lead to reduced rates of antibiotic resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, M S

    2001-09-01

    Guidelines have been developed for the therapy of both community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), and, potentially, if applied appropriately, could lead to a containment or reduction in the frequency of antibiotic resistance. In the therapy of CAP, guidelines could minimize the use of excessive antibiotic therapy, and if they also improve the accuracy of therapy, they could minimize the emergence of resistant organisms in the community. However, the impact of such guidelines on resistance remains to be shown. In the near future, CAP guidelines could help contain the growing problem of quinolone-resistant pneumococci by advocating the use of the most effective of the new agents, administered at the optimal dosages. When managing HAP, the use of guidelines could improve outcome by leading to a greater percentage of patients receiving adequate empiric antibiotic therapy. It remains uncertain whether such an approach can minimize the emergence of antibiotic resistance, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU), but it is clear that if guidelines are to be accurate, they must account for the resistance patterns that are unique to each individual hospital setting. To date, the use of computer-assisted guidelines for the therapy of nosocomial infections has been successful in minimizing the frequency of inadequate therapy, with no negative impact on antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic restriction policies have been proposed as a way to have an impact on resistance, with variable effects. In the future, antibiotic rotation is likely to be studied as a way to reduce resistance, particularly in the ICU, but a number of practical issues may limit the efficacy of such an approach.

  1. Blocking mineralocorticoid receptors prior to retrieval reduces contextual fear memory in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corticosteroid hormones regulate appraisal and consolidation of information via mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs respectively. How activation of these receptors modulates retrieval of fearful information and the subsequent expression of fear is largely unknown. We tested here whether blockade of MRs or GRs during retrieval also affects subsequent expression of fear memory. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were trained in contextual or tone cue fear conditioning paradigms, by pairing mild foot shocks with a particular context or tone respectively. Twenty-four hours after training, context-conditioned animals were re-exposed to the context for 3 or 30 minutes (day 2; tone-conditioned animals were placed in a different context and re-exposed to one or six tones. Twenty-four hours (day 3 and one month later, freezing behavior to the aversive context/tone was scored again. MR or GR blockade was achieved by giving spironolactone or RU486 subcutaneously one hour before retrieval on day 2. Spironolactone administered prior to brief context re-exposure reduced freezing behavior during retrieval and 24 hours later, but not one month later. Administration of spironolactone without retrieval of the context or immediately after retrieval on day 2 did not reduce freezing on day 3. Re-exposure to the context for 30 minutes on day 2 significantly reduced freezing on day 3 and one month later, but freezing was not further reduced by spironolactone. Administration of spironolactone prior to tone-cue re-exposure on day 2 did not affect freezing behavior. Treatment with RU486 prior to re-exposure did not affect context or tone-cue fear memories at any time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that MR blockade prior to retrieval strongly reduces the expression of contextual fear, implying that MRs, rather than GRs, play an important role in retrieval of emotional information and subsequent fear expression.

  2. Reduced glutathione level and gsh-dependent enzyme activities in corticonuclear blocks of lenses in patients with senile cataract

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    Kisić Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reduced compound glutathione (GSH in the lens has the function to protect the thiol group of lens proteins, and as a substrate of glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione S-transferase (GST. Protein containing thiol groups is significant for the normal function of lens epithelium, i.e. enzymes Na-K-ATP-ase, thus influencing cell permeability. The relationship GSH/GSSG (oxidized glutathione is normally high in the lens and other ocular tissue owing to the glutathioneredox cycle, which is localized in the lens epithelium and cortex surface. Objective. The aim of the study was to investigate non-enzymic factors of the antioxidant protection of non-protein and protein tiol, as well as to determine glutathione-dependent enzyme activity in the corticonuclear blocks of lenses in patients with senile cataract. Methods. Biochemical studies of lens were carried on 101 patients with senile cataract. According to cataract maturity degree, the patients were classified into two groups: senile incipient cataract (N=41 and mature senile cataract (N=60. GSH concentration was determined by Ellman’s reagent. GPx activity was assayed with cumene hydroperoxide, and that of glutathione S-transferase by follow-up of glutathione conjugation and 1-chloro-2.4-dinitrobenzene rates. Results. A significantly higher GSH concentration was found in the corticonuclear blocks of lenses with initial as related to mature cataract (p<0.001. The activity of enzyme GPx and GST was considerably higher in the corticonuclear blocks of lenses with initial cataract (p<0.001. With cataract progression, the quantity of available GSH, necessary for GPx and GST functioning, declined, so that the activity of these enzymes was also significantly decreased in mature cataract. Conclusion. The determined lower GSH concentration and antioxidant enzyme activity in corticonuclear blocks of lenses, particularly in cataract with a nuclear component, indicate the weakened antioxidant

  3. Diffusion Barriers Block Defect Occupation on Reduced CeO2(111 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustemberg, P. G.; Pan, Y.; Shaw, B.-J.; Grinter, D.; Pang, Chi; Thornton, G.; Pérez, Rubén; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Nilius, N.

    2016-06-01

    Surface defects are believed to govern the adsorption behavior of reducible oxides. We challenge this perception on the basis of a combined scanning-tunneling-microscopy and density-functional-theory study, addressing the Au adsorption on reduced CeO2 -x(111 ) . Despite a clear thermodynamic preference for oxygen vacancies, individual Au atoms were found to bind mostly to regular surface sites. Even at an elevated temperature, aggregation at step edges and not decoration of defects turned out to be the main consequence of adatom diffusion. Our findings are explained with the polaronic nature of the Au-ceria system, which imprints a strong diabatic character onto the diffusive motion of adatoms. Diabatic barriers are generally higher than those in the adiabatic regime, especially if the hopping step couples to an electron transfer into the ad-gold. As the population of O vacancies always requires a charge exchange, defect decoration by Au atoms becomes kinetically hindered. Our study demonstrates that polaronic effects determine not only electron transport in reducible oxides but also the adsorption characteristics and therewith the surface chemistry.

  4. Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor contribute to synaptic imbalance during the critical period of respiratory development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Ping; Liu, Qiuli; Nair, Bindu; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-07-01

    Previously, our electrophysiological studies revealed a transient imbalance between suppressed excitation and enhanced inhibition in hypoglossal motoneurons of rats on postnatal days (P) 12-13, a critical period when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, ventilatory and physiological changes occur in the respiratory system. The mechanism underlying the imbalance is poorly understood. We hypothesised that the imbalance was contributed by a reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which normally enhances excitation and suppresses inhibition. We also hypothesised that exogenous BDNF would partially reverse this synaptic imbalance. Immunohistochemistry/single-neuron optical densitometry, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were done on hypoglossal motoneurons in brainstem slices of rats during the first three postnatal weeks. Our results indicated that: (1) the levels of BDNF and its high-affinity tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor mRNAs and proteins were relatively high during the first 1-1.5 postnatal weeks, but dropped precipitously at P12-13 before rising again afterwards; (2) exogenous BDNF significantly increased the normally lowered frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents but decreased the normally heightened amplitude and frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) during the critical period; (3) exogenous BDNF also decreased the normally heightened frequency of miniature IPSCs at P12-13; and (4) the effect of exogenous BDNF was partially blocked by K252a, a TrkB receptor antagonist. Thus, our results are consistent with our hypothesis that BDNF and TrkB play an important role in the synaptic imbalance during the critical period. This may have significant implications for the mechanism underlying sudden infant death syndrome.

  5. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindh Magnus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit and after 10 days (follow-up visit. Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days. The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202 of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204 (P = 0.005 of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202 in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204 in the delayed result group (P

  6. Gabapentin reduces CX3CL1 signaling and blocks spinal microglial activation in monoarthritic rats

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    Yang Jia-Le

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal glia, particularly microglia and astrocytes, are of the utmost importance in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. A recent study from our laboratory revealed that gabapentin, a recommended first-line treatment for multiple neuropathic conditions, could also efficiently antagonize thermal hyperalgesia evoked by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-induced monoarthritis (MA. In the present study, we investigated whether the spinal glia are involved in the anti-hyperalgesic effect of gabapentin and how this event occurs. Results Unilateral intra-articular injection of CFA produced a robust activation of microglia and astrocytes. These cells exhibited large cell bodies, thick processes and increases in the ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1, a microglial marker or the glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocytic marker. These cells also displayed immunoreactive signals, and an upregulation of the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs α2/δ-1 subunit, CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 expression levels in the spinal cord. These changes were associated with the development of thermal hyperalgesia. Immunofluorescence staining showed that VGCC α2/δ-1 subunit, a proposed gabapentin target of action, was widely distributed in primary afferent fibers terminals and dorsal horn neurons. CX3CL1, a potential trigger to activate microglia, colocalized with VGCC α2/δ-1 subunits in the spinal dorsal horn. However, its receptor CX3CR1 was mainly expressed in the spinal microglia. Multiple intraperitoneal (i.p. gabapentin injections (100 mg/kg, once daily for 4 days with the first injection 60 min before intra-articular CFA suppressed the activation of spinal microglia, downregulated spinal VGCC α2/δ-1 subunits decreased CX3CL1 levels and blocked the development of thermal hyperalgesia in MA rats. Conclusions Here we provide the first evidence that gabapentin diminishes CX3CL1 signaling and spinal microglia

  7. Methodology for Constructing Reduced-Order Power Block Performance Models for CSP Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.

    2010-10-01

    The inherent variability of the solar resource presents a unique challenge for CSP systems. Incident solar irradiation can fluctuate widely over a short time scale, but plant performance must be assessed for long time periods. As a result, annual simulations with hourly (or sub-hourly) timesteps are the norm in CSP analysis. A highly detailed power cycle model provides accuracy but tends to suffer from prohibitively long run-times; alternatively, simplified empirical models can run quickly but don?t always provide enough information, accuracy, or flexibility for the modeler. The ideal model for feasibility-level analysis incorporates both the detail and accuracy of a first-principle model with the low computational load of a regression model. The work presented in this paper proposes a methodology for organizing and extracting information from the performance output of a detailed model, then using it to develop a flexible reduced-order regression model in a systematic and structured way. A similar but less generalized approach for characterizing power cycle performance and a reduced-order modeling methodology for CFD analysis of heat transfer from electronic devices have been presented. This paper builds on these publications and the non-dimensional approach originally described.

  8. A novel anti-EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody reduces T cell proliferation and neurotoxicity: relevance to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Smriti M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN; CD147, basigin is an inducer of the expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. We reported previously that blocking EMMPRIN activity reduced neuroinflammation and severity of disease in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods To improve upon EMMPRIN blockade, and to help unravel the biological functions of EMMPRIN in inflammatory disorders, we have developed several anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibodies. Results Of these monoclonal antibodies, a particular one, clone 10, was efficient in binding mouse and human cells using several methods of detection. The specificity of clone 10 was demonstrated by its lack of staining of EMMPRIN-null embryos compared to heterozygous and wild-type mouse samples. Functionally, human T cells activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 elevated their expression of EMMPRIN and the treatment of these T cells with clone 10 resulted in decreased proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase- 9 (MMP-9 production. Activated human T cells were toxic to human neurons in culture and clone 10 pretreatment reduced T cell cytotoxicity correspondent with decrease of granzyme B levels within T cells. In vivo, EAE mice treated with clone 10 had a markedly reduced disease score compared to mice treated with IgM isotype control. Conclusions We have produced a novel anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibody that blocks several aspects of T cell activity, thus highlighting the multiple roles of EMMPRIN in T cell biology. Moreover, clone 10 reduces EAE scores in mice compared to controls, and has activity on human cells, potentially allowing for the testing of anti-EMMPRIN treatment not only in EAE, but conceivably also in MS.

  9. Azimilide causes reverse rate-dependent block while reducing both components of delayed-rectifier current in canine ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, G A

    1998-06-01

    Most class III antiarrhythmic drugs reduce the rapidly activating component of delayed-rectifier current (IKr) without affecting the slowly activating component (IKs). Recently the novel antiarrhythmic agent azimilide (NE-10064) was reported to enhance IKs at low (nanomolar) concentrations and to block both IKr and IKs at higher (micromolar) concentrations. Further to understand the electrophysiologic effects of azimilide, we compared its effects on IKr and IKs (by using whole cell clamp techniques) and action potentials (microelectrode and perforated-patch techniques) on canine ventricular myocytes. A lower azimilide concentration (50 nM) did not enhance IKs. In contrast, a therapeutic azimilide concentration (2 microM) was equieffective in reducing IKr (300-ms isochrones) and IKs (3-s isochrones) by approximately 40% during depolarizing test pulses, as well as reducing IKr (38% decrease) and IKs (33% decrease) tail currents on repolarization. Block of IKs was independent of voltage at positive test potentials. In action-potential studies, 50 nM azimilide had no effect on the action-potential duration (APD), whereas 2 microM azimilide delayed repolarization and caused reverse rate-dependent effects on the APD. Whereas the extent of APD prolongation by azimilide was not correlated with the drug-free APD, azimilide preferentially exaggerated the APD-rate relationship of myocytes displaying the steepest APD-rate relationship under drug-free conditions. In conclusion, therapeutic concentrations of azimilide that cause comparable reduction of canine ventricular IKr and IKs exert reverse rate-dependent effects, which are dependent on the steepness of the APD-rate relationship.

  10. Improved algorithm for reducing blocking artifacts of Tetrolet transform%Tetrolet变换方块效应改善算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌晓; 刘克成; 李财莲

    2014-01-01

    In order to reduce the blocking artifacts resulted from Ttetrolet transform algorithm, Tetrolet transform was improved and Cycle Spinning was employed to avoid the blocking artifacts in this paper. And thus the improved Tetrolet transform was introduced and performed for image denoising. Some numerical experiments show the effectiveness and superiority of our technique. Compared with typical Tetrolet transform, the denoised images by our method are smoother, and the blocking artifacts is improved to some extent and inhibition. At the same time it can preserve more significant information of original images, such as local features, including image edges and image details. In addition, the proposed method gives better performance in Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) and improves the quality of subjective and objective of image. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and feasible, and can perform better on most data sets.%针对Tetrolet变换算法对图像去噪后存在方块效应的缺陷,文中对Tetrolet变换算法进行了扩展和改进,并引入移位(Cycle Spinning)来有效消除Tetrolet变换算法中的方块效应。仿真结果表明,所提出的算法不仅能有效去除噪声,而且可得到更高的峰值信噪比,提高了图像的主客观质量。去噪后图像保留了原始图像的边缘和细节等局部特征,较为平滑,且方块效应得到了一定的改善和抑制,因而该算法是有效可行的。

  11. Architecturally sensitive retrofitting of PV to a residential block in Greece to reduce its carbon footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulou, Ismini

    different factors influencing the feasibility of the PV investment was carried out and as it was expected it had significant effect on the initially calculated the payback period value. The expected future increase of fuel prices and the reduction of the investment's initial cost due to government grants, added to the prospect of new future tax incentive and subsidies, have made the prospect of the project more attractive while significantly reducing the payback period.

  12. SiO2-nanocomposite film coating of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks improves surface hardness and reduces susceptibility to bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonwanon, Pranithida; Hirose, Nanako; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Kitagawa, Ranna; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Srikhirin, Toemsak; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-01-31

    Composite resin blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications have recently become available. However, CAD/CAM composite resins have lower wear resistance and accumulate more plaque than CAD/CAM ceramic materials. We assessed the effects of SiO2-nanocomposite film coating of four types of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks: Cerasmart, Katana Avencia block, Lava Ultimate, and Block HC on surface hardness and bacterial attachment. All composite blocks with coating demonstrated significantly greater Vickers hardness, reduced surface roughness, and greater hydrophobicity than those without coating. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to the coated specimens was significantly less than those for the uncoated specimens. These reduced levels of bacterial adherence on the coated surface were still evident after treatment with saliva. Surface modification by SiO2-nanocomposite film coating has potential to improve wear resistance and susceptibility to plaque accumulation of CAD/CAM composite resin restorations.

  13. Does suprascapular nerve block reduce shoulder pain following stroke: a double-blind randomised controlled trial with masked outcome assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crotty Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common complication of a stroke which can impede participation in rehabilitation programs and has been associated with poorer outcomes. The evidence base for current medical and therapeutic management options of hemiplegic shoulder pain is limited. This study will evaluate the use of suprascapular nerve block injection as part of an interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of shoulder pain following stroke. The technique has previously been proven safe and effective in the treatment of shoulder pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative shoulder conditions but its usefulness in a stroke population is unclear. Methods/Design A double blind randomised placebo controlled trial will assess the effect of a suprascapular nerve block compared with placebo in a population of 66 stroke patients. The trial will measure effect of injection on the primary outcome of pain, and secondary outcomes of function and quality of life. Measurements will take place at baseline, and 1, 4 and 12 weeks post intervention. Both groups will continue to receive routine physiotherapy and standard ward care. Discussion The results of this study could reduce pain symptoms in persons with mechanical shoulder pain post stroke and provide improvement in upper limb function. Trial Registration This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR - ACTRN12609000621213.

  14. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a long-lasting decrease in the CO2 threshold for apnea in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, N A; Baker, T L

    2017-01-01

    Two critical parameters that influence breathing stability are the levels of arterial pCO2 at which breathing ceases and subsequently resumes - termed the apneic and recruitment thresholds (AT and RT, respectively). Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a chemoreflex-independent, long-lasting increase in phrenic burst amplitude, a form of plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). The physiological significance of iPMF is unknown. To determine if iPMF and neural apnea have long-lasting physiological effects on breathing, we tested the hypothesis that patterns of neural apnea that induce iPMF also elicit changes in the AT and RT. Phrenic nerve activity and end-tidal CO2 were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, ventilated rats to quantify phrenic nerve burst amplitude and the AT and RT before and after three patterns of neural apnea that differed in their duration and ability to elicit iPMF: brief intermittent neural apneas, a single brief "massed" neural apnea, or a prolonged neural apnea. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that patterns of neural apnea that elicited iPMF also resulted in changes in the AT and RT. Specifically, intermittent neural apneas progressively decreased the AT with each subsequent neural apnea, which persisted for at least 60min. Similarly, a prolonged neural apnea elicited a long-lasting decrease in the AT. In both cases, the magnitude of the AT decrease was proportional to iPMF. In contrast, the RT was transiently decreased following prolonged neural apnea, and was not proportional to iPMF. No changes in the AT or RT were observed following a single brief neural apnea. Our results indicate that the AT and RT are differentially altered by neural apnea and suggest that specific patterns of neural apnea that elicit plasticity may stabilize breathing via a decrease in the AT.

  15. In situ spectroscopy on intact Leptospirillum ferrooxidans reveals that reduced cytochrome 579 is an obligatory intermediate in the aerobic iron respiratory chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Blake

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer reactions among colored biomolecules in intact bacterial cells were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scatter light. The aerobic iron respiratory chain of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans was dominated by the redox status of an abundant cellular cytochrome that had an absorbance peak at 579 nanometers in the reduced state. Intracellular cytochrome 579 was reduced within the time that it took to mix a suspension of the bacteria with soluble ferrous iron at pH 1.7. Steady state turnover experiments were conducted where the initial concentrations of ferrous iron were less than or equal to that of the oxygen concentration. Under these conditions, the initial absorbance spectrum of the oxidized bacterium was always regenerated from that of the iron-reduced bacterium. The kinetics of aerobic respiration on soluble iron by intact L. ferrooxidans conformed to the Michaelis-Menten formalism, where the reduced intracellular cytochrome 579 represented the Michaelis complex whose subsequent oxidation appeared to be the rate-limiting step in the overall aerobic respiratory process. The velocity of formation of ferric iron at any time point was directly proportional to the concentration of the reduced cytochrome 579. Further, the integral over time of the concentraton of the reduced cytochrome was directly proportional to the total concentration of ferrous iron in each reaction mixture. These kinetic data obtained using whole cells were consistent with the hypothesis that reduced cytochrome 579 is an obligatory steady state intermediate in the iron respiratory chain of this bacterium. The capability of conducting visible spectroscopy in suspensions of intact cells comprises a powerful post-reductionist means to study cellular respiration in situ under physiological conditions for the organism.

  16. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: christoph.binkert@ksw.ch [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hirzel, Florian C. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland); Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hess, Thomas [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  17. Blocking ELISA’s for the destinction between antibodies against European and American strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K. J.; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Bøtner, Anette

    1998-01-01

    A double blocking ELISA was developed in order to satisfy the need for large scale serological screening for PRRS and simultaneous distinction between infection with European and American strains of PRRSV in pig herds. The Immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the double blocking ELISA...

  18. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data.Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure.The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.62).Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases.

  19. The study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a family-centred tobacco control program about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to reduce respiratory illness in Indigenous infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segan Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illness (ARI is the most common cause of acute presentations and hospitalisations of young Indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand (NZ. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS from household smoking is a significant and preventable contributor to childhood ARI. This paper describes the protocol for a study which aims to test the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program about ETS to improve the respiratory health of Indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when referring to Australian Indigenous populations. In New Zealand, the term 'Indigenous' refers to Māori. Methods/Design This study will be a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. Participants will be Indigenous women and their infants, half of whom will be randomly allocated to an 'intervention' group, who will receive the tobacco control program over three home visits in the first three months of the infant's life and half to a control group receiving 'usual care' (i.e. they will not receive the tobacco control program. Indigenous health workers will deliver the intervention, the goal of which is to reduce or eliminate infant exposure to ETS. Data collection will occur at baseline (shortly after birth and when the infant is four months and one year of age. The primary outcome is a doctor-diagnosed, documented case of respiratory illness in participating infants. Discussion Interventions aimed at reducing exposure of Indigenous children to ETS have the potential for significant benefits for Indigenous communities. There is currently a dearth of evidence for the effect of tobacco control interventions to reduce children's exposure to ETS among Indigenous populations. This study will provide high-quality evidence of the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program on ETS to reduce respiratory illness. Outcomes of

  20. Identification of dynein light chain road block-1 as a novel interaction partner with the human reduced folate carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ma, Thomas Y; Said, Hamid M

    2009-09-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC) is a major folate transport system in mammalian cells. RFC is highly expressed in the intestine and believed to play a role in folate absorption. Studies from our laboratory and others have characterized different aspects of the intestinal folate absorption process, but little is known about possible existence of accessory protein(s) that interacts with RFC and influences its physiology and/or cell biology. We investigated this issue by employing a bacterial two-hybrid system to screen a BacterioMatch II human intestinal cDNA library using the large intracellular loop between transmembrane domains 6 and 7 of the human RFC (hRFC) as bait. Our screening has resulted in the identification of dynein light chain road block-1 (DYNLRB1) as an interacting partner with hRFC. Existence of a direct protein-protein interaction between hRFC and DYNLRB1 was confirmed by in vitro pull-down assay and in vivo mammalian two-hybrid luciferase assay and coimmunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, confocal imaging of live human intestinal epithelial HuTu-80 cells demonstrated colocalization of DYNLRB1 with hRFC. Coexpression of DYNLRB1 with hRFC led to a significant (P < 0.05) increase in folate uptake. On the other hand, inhibiting the endogenous DYNLRB1 with gene-specific small interfering RNA or pharmacologically with a specific inhibitor (vanadate) led to a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in folate uptake. This study demonstrates for the first time the identification of DYNLRB1 as an interacting protein partner with hRFC. Furthermore, DYNLRB1 appears to influence the function and cell biology of hRFC.

  1. TH-C-BRD-08: Reducing the Effect of Respiratory Motion On the Delivered Dose in Proton Therapy Through Proper Field Angle Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, J [UNC Health Care, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Park, P [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Court, L; Zhu, X; Li, H; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigated a novel planning strategy of selecting radiotherapy beam angles that minimizes the change in water equivalent thickness (dWET) during respiration in order to reduce the effects of respiratory motion in passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods: In a clinical trial treating locally-advanced lung cancer with proton therapy, 2–4 co-planar beams were previously selected by dosimetrists in the design of physician-approved PSPT treatment plans. The authors identified a cohort of patients in which respiratory motion affected the planned PSPT dose delivery. For this cohort, this work analyzed dWET during respiration over a 360 degree arc of potential treatment angles around the patient: the dWET was defined as the difference in WET between the full-exhale (T50) and full-inhale (T0) phases of the simulation 4DCT. New PSPT plans were redesigned by selecting new beam angles that demonstrated significant reduction in the value of dWET. Between the T50 and T0 phases, the root-mean-square deviation of dose and the change in dose-volume histogram curves (dAUC) for anatomical structures were calculated to compare the original to dWET reduction plans. Results: To date, three plans were retrospectively redesigned based on dWET analysis. In the dWET reduction plan, the root mean square dose (T50-T0) was reduced by 15–35% and the DVH dAUC values were reduced by more than 60%.The PSPT plans redesigned by selecting appropriate field angles to minimize dWET demonstrated less dosimetric variation due to respiration. Conclusion: We have introduced the use of a new metric to quantify respiratory motion in proton therapy: dWET. The use of dWET allows us to minimize the impact of respiratory motion of the entire anatomy in the beam path. This work is a proof of principle that dWET could suggest field angles in proton therapy that are more robust to the effects of respiratory motion.

  2. 探究双管鼻塞式CPAP对新生儿呼吸衰竭的治疗效果观察%To explore two pipe blocked nose type CPAP therapeutic effect observation of neonatal respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹏

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the double tube block type CPAP therapeutic effect observation of neonatal respiratory failure.MethodsFrom April 2013 to January 2014, the selection of our new pediatric in 46 patients with respiratory failure of nasal congestion using double tube CPAP treatment, observation of treatment before and after 24 h of blood gas index.Results The patients with neonatal respiratory failure after two pipe blocked nose type CPAP treatment before and after the blood gas index, pH, PaO2, SaO2 were signiifcantly increased (P < 0.05), and PaCO2 dropped signiifcantly (P < 0.05), the more close to normal.ConclusionDouble tube nasal CPAP type has a good effect in the treatment of neonatal respiratory failure, is worth further promotion in the clinical practice.%目的:探究双管闭塞式CPAP对新生儿呼吸衰竭的治疗效果观察。方法从2013年4月到2014年1月,选取我院新生儿科的46例呼吸衰竭患者使用双管鼻塞式CPAP进行治疗,观察治疗前和治疗24h后的血气指标状况。结果新生儿呼吸衰竭患者在经过双管鼻塞式CPAP治疗前后的血气指标比较,pH、PaO2以及SaO2均有明显升高(P<0.05), PaCO2显著下降(P<0.05),更接近正常水平。结论双管鼻塞式CPAP在新生儿呼吸衰竭的治疗中疗效显著,结构简单方便,治疗价格低廉,值得临床进一步推广。

  3. Respiratory cytochrome c oxidase can be efficiently reduced by the photosynthetic redox proteins cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, José A; Durán, Raúl V; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Hervás, Manuel

    2005-07-04

    Plastocyanin and cytochrome c6 are two small soluble electron carriers located in the intrathylacoidal space of cyanobacteria. Although their role as electron shuttle between the cytochrome b6f and photosystem I complexes in the photosynthetic pathway is well established, their participation in the respiratory electron transport chain as donors to the terminal oxidase is still under debate. Here, we present the first time-resolved analysis showing that both cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin can be efficiently oxidized by the aa3 type cytochrome c oxidase in Nostoc sp. PCC 7119. The apparent electron transfer rate constants are ca. 250 and 300 s(-1) for cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin, respectively. These constants are 10 times higher than those obtained for the oxidation of horse cytochrome c by the oxidase, in spite of being a reaction thermodynamically more favourable.

  4. High-Rate Pacing Reduces Variability of Repolarization and Prevents Repolarization-Dependent Arrhythmias in Dogs With Chronic AV Block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterhoff, Peter; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Maas, Joep N;

    2010-01-01

    rates (60–65 bpm vs 100–110 bpm) in 7 dogs with chronic atrioventricular block, while recording right and left ventricular (LV) monophasic action potential (MAP) and LV electrogram (EGM). Simulations showed a sampling frequency of 500 Hz is sufficient to capture relevant STV values. High-rate pacing...

  5. Blocking-out auditory distracters while driving : A cognitive strategy to reduce task-demands on the road

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, Ayca Berfu; Platteel, Samantha; Steg, Linda; Epstude, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined how drivers handle task-demands induced by listening to the radio while driving. In particular, we explored the traces of a possible cognitive strategy that might be used by drivers to cope with task-demands, namely blocking-out auditory distracters. In Study 1 (N = 15)

  6. Ditch blocking, water chemistry and organic carbon flux: evidence that blanket bog restoration reduces erosion and fluvial carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lorraine; Wilson, Jared; Holden, Joseph; Johnstone, Ian; Armstrong, Alona; Morris, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The potential for restoration of peatlands to deliver benefits beyond habitat restoration is poorly understood. There may be impacts on discharge water quality, peat erosion, flow rates and flood risk, and nutrient fluxes. This study aimed to assess the impact of drain blocking, as a form of peatland restoration, on an upland blanket bog, by measuring water chemistry and colour, and loss of both dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). The restoration work was designed to permit the collection of a robust experimental dataset over a landscape scale, with data covering up to 3 years pre-restoration and up to 3 years post-restoration. An information theoretic approach to data analyses provided evidence of a recovery of water chemistry towards more 'natural' conditions, and showed strong declines in the production of water colour. Drain blocking led to increases in the E4:E6 ratio, and declines in specific absorbance, suggesting that DOC released from blocked drains consisted of lighter, less humic and less decomposed carbon. Whilst concentrations of DOC showed slight increases in drains and streams after blocking, instantaneous yields of both DOC and POC declined markedly in streams over the first year post-restoration. Attempts were made to estimate total annual fluvial organic carbon fluxes for the study site, and although errors around these estimates remain considerable, there is strong evidence of a large reduction in aquatic organic carbon flux from the peatland following drain-blocking. Potential mechanisms for the observed changes in water chemistry and organic carbon release are discussed, and we highlight the need for more detailed information, from more sites, to better understand the full impacts of peatland restoration on carbon storage and release.

  7. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  8. Stellate Ganglion Block Reduces the Radicular Pain and Salivary Alpha-Amylase Activity in Patients with Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Egashira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB on radicular pain associated with cervical spondylosis remain to be clarified. So we measured salivary alpha-amylase which reflects sympathetic nerve activity under psychological stress after SGB block or trigger points injection (TPI. Study Design A randomized, prospective, controlled trial Setting After institutional approval and informed consent, 40 patients who was suffered from neck-shoulder pain associated with cervical radiculopathy were randomly divided into two groups according to nerve block treatment. Group A (n=20, male 10 patients, female 10 patients, 50±8yr, mean±SD received SGB and group B (n=20, male 10 patients, female 10 patients, 52±6yr received TPI. SGB or TPI was produced by 6 ml of 1% mepivacaine a total of 5 times (twice per week. Visual analogue scale (VAS and the concentration of salivary alpha-amylase were measured before (T0 each nerve block and 3 days (T1, 6 days (T2, 9 days (T3, 12 days (T4 and 15days (T5 after each nerve block. The consumption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID was measured at T0 and T5 in each group. Results In group A, VAS was median 74 (range 60, 78 at T0 and showed a significant decrease at T3 [53 (48, 65, p<0.05], T4 [50 (42, 66, p<0.05] and T5 [48 (26,57, p<0.05]. The concentration of salivary alpha-amylase was median 116 (range 96, 144 KU/ml at T0 and showed a significant decrease at T3 [86 (79, 105, p<0.05], T4 [79 (68, 88] and T5 [70 (55, 84, p<0.05]. In group B, VAS and the concentration of salivary alpha-amylase showed no change throughout the time course. VAS in group A was significant lower than that in group B at T3, T4 and T5. The concentration of salivary alpha-amylase was significant lower than that in group B at T4 and T5. The consumption of NSAID in group A was significantly lower than that in group B at T5. Limitations Subjects are out patients. Patients include radicular pain due to different pathogenesis, e

  9. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs.

  10. Respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea improves ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination, and reduces oxygen desaturation during endurance exercise testing in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardi E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bernardi,1 Luca Pomidori,1 Faisy Bassal,1 Marco Contoli,2 Annalisa Cogo11Biomedical Sport Studies Center, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 2Respiratory Section, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Cona (FE, ItalyBackground: Few data are available about the effects of respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea (NH in COPD. The aim is to evaluate the effects of 4 weeks of NH (Spirotiger® on ventilatory pattern, exercise capacity, and quality of life (QoL in COPD patients.Methods: Twenty-six COPD patients (three females, ages 49–82 years, were included in this study. Spirometry and maximal inspiratory pressure, St George Respiratory Questionnaire, 6-minute walk test, and symptom-limited endurance exercise test (endurance test to the limit of tolerance [tLim] at 75%–80% of peak work rate up to a Borg Score of 8–9/10 were performed before and after NH. Patients were equipped with ambulatory inductive plethysmography (LifeShirt® to evaluate ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination (phase angle [PhA] during tLim. After four supervised sessions, subjects trained at home for 4 weeks – 10 minutes twice a day at 50% of maximal voluntary ventilation. The workload was adjusted during the training period to maintain a Borg Score of 5–6/10.Results: Twenty subjects completed the study. After NH, maximal inspiratory pressure significantly increased (81.5±31.6 vs 91.8±30.6 cmH2O, P<0.01; exercise endurance time (+150 seconds, P=0.04, 6-minute walk test (+30 meters, P=0.03, and QoL (-8, P<0.01 all increased. During tLim, the ventilatory pattern changed significantly (lower ventilation, lower respiratory rate, higher tidal volume; oxygen desaturation, PhA, and dyspnea Borg Score were lower for the same work intensity (P<0.01, P=0.02, and P<0.01, respectively; one-way ANOVA. The improvement in tidal volume and oxygen saturation after NH were significantly related (R2=0.65, P<0.01.Conclusion: As

  11. Radiation protection: an analysis of thyroid blocking. [Effectiveness of KI in reducing radioactive uptake following potential reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D C; Blond, R M

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to provide guidance to policymakers concerning the effectiveness of potassium iodide (KI) as a thyroid blocking agent in potential reactor accident situations, the distance to which (or area within which) it should be distributed, and its relative effectiveness compared to other available protective measures. The analysis was performed using the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) consequence model. Four categories of accidents were addressed: gap activity release accident (GAP), GAP without containment isolation, core melt with a melt-through release, and core melt with an atmospheric release. Cost-benefit ratios (US $/thyroid nodule prevented) are given assuming that no other protective measures are taken. Uncertainties due to health effects parameters, accident probabilities, and costs are assessed. The effects of other potential protective measures, such as evacuation and sheltering, and the impact on children (critical population) are evaluated. Finally, risk-benefit considerations are briefly discussed.

  12. Improved scaling of Time-Evolving Block-Decimation algorithm through Reduced-Rank Randomized Singular Value Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tamascelli, D; Plenio, M B

    2015-01-01

    When the amount of entanglement in a quantum system is limited, the relevant dynamics of the system is restricted to a very small part of the state space. When restricted to this subspace the description of the system becomes efficient in the system size. A class of algorithms, exemplified by the Time-Evolving Block-Decimation (TEBD) algorithm, make use of this observation by selecting the relevant subspace through a decimation technique relying on the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). In these algorithms, the complexity of each time-evolution step is dominated by the SVD. Here we show that, by applying a randomized version of the SVD routine (RRSVD), the power law governing the computational complexity of TEBD is lowered by one degree, resulting in a considerable speed-up. We exemplify the potential gains in efficiency at the hand of some real world examples to which TEBD can be successfully applied to and demonstrate that for those system RRSVD delivers results as accurate as state-of-the-art deterministi...

  13. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  14. Ultrasound-Assisted Thoracic Paravertebral Block Reduces Intraoperative Opioid Requirement and Improves Analgesia after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Center Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijian Pei

    Full Text Available The contribution of ultrasound-assisted thoracic paravertebral block to postoperative analgesia remains unclear. We compared the effect of a combination of ultrasound assisted-thoracic paravertebral block and propofol general anesthesia with opioid and sevoflurane general anesthesia on volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain in patients having breast cancer surgery.Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block with propofol general anesthesia (PPA group, n = 121 or fentanyl with sevoflurane general anesthesia (GA group, n = 126. Volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain intensity were compared between the groups using noninferiority and superiority tests.Patients in the PPA group required less sevoflurane than those in the GA group (median [interquartile range] of 0 [0, 0] vs. 0.4 [0.3, 0.6] minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]-hours, less intraoperative fentanyl requirements (100 [50, 100] vs. 250 [200, 300]μg,, less intense postoperative pain (median visual analog scale score 2 [1, 3.5] vs. 3 [2, 4.5], but more propofol (median 529 [424, 672] vs. 100 [100, 130] mg. Noninferiority was detected for all four outcomes; one-tailed superiority tests for each outcome were highly significant at P<0.001 in the expected directions.The combination of propofol anesthesia with ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block reduces intraoperative volatile anesthetic and opioid requirements, and results in less post operative pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery.ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00418457.

  15. Structures of reduced and ligand-bound nitric oxide reductase provide insights into functional differences in respiratory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nozomi; Ishii, Shoko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hino, Tomoya; Fukumori, Yoshihiro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the generation of nitrous oxide (N2O) via the reductive coupling of two nitric oxide (NO) molecules at a heme/non-heme Fe center. We report herein on the structures of the reduced and ligand-bound forms of cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a resolution of 2.3-2.7 Å, to elucidate structure-function relationships in NOR, and compare them to those of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) that is evolutionarily related to NOR. Comprehensive crystallographic refinement of the CO-bound form of cNOR suggested that a total of four atoms can be accommodated at the binuclear center. Consistent with this, binding of bulky acetaldoxime (CH3-CH=N-OH) to the binuclear center of cNOR was confirmed by the structural analysis. Active site reduction and ligand binding in cNOR induced only ∼0.5 Å increase in the heme/non-heme Fe distance, but no significant structural change in the protein. The highly localized structural change is consistent with the lack of proton-pumping activity in cNOR, because redox-coupled conformational changes are thought to be crucial for proton pumping in CCO. It also permits the rapid decomposition of cytotoxic NO in denitrification. In addition, the shorter heme/non-heme Fe distance even in the bulky ligand-bound form of cNOR (∼4.5 Å) than the heme/Cu distance in CCO (∼5 Å) suggests the ability of NOR to maintain two NO molecules within a short distance in the confined space of the active site, thereby facilitating N-N coupling to produce a hyponitrite intermediate for the generation of N2O.

  16. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    10.1 Respiratory failure2003068 Evaluation of non-invasive ventilation in a-cute respiratory failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. GU Jianyong(顾俭勇), et al. Dept E-mergen, Zhongshan Hosp, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Shanghai J Med 2002; 25 (12): 741 - 743.Objective:To observe the effect of non-invasive venti-lation(NIV) in acute respiratory failure with chronic

  17. In children undergoing umbilical hernia repair is rectus sheath block effective at reducing post-operative pain? Best evidence topic (bet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwani, Kapil M; Butler, Sarah; Mahomed, Anies

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In children undergoing umbilical hernia repair is a rectus sheath block (RSB) better than local anaesthetic infiltration of the surgical site, at reducing post-operative pain? From a total of 34 papers, three studies provided the best available evidence on this topic. One randomised clinical trial showed RSB had a better analgesic effect in the immediate post-operative period. In another randomised trial opioid consumption in the peri-operative period was found to be significantly lower in patients administered RSB. These improvements in pain and analgesia consumption need to be balanced against the expertise, training, equipment required, time implications and complications of performing a RSB.

  18. Cinanserin is an inhibitor of the 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and strongly reduces virus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Gui, Chunshan; Luo, Xiaomin; Yang, Qingang; Günther, Stephan; Scandella, Elke; Drosten, Christian; Bai, Donglu; He, Xichang; Ludewig, Burkhard; Chen, Jing; Luo, Haibin; Yang, Yiming; Yang, Yifu; Zou, Jianping; Thiel, Volker; Chen, Kaixian; Shen, Jianhua; Shen, Xu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2005-06-01

    The 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is one of the most promising targets for anti-SARS-CoV drugs due to its crucial role in the viral life cycle. In this study, a database containing structural information of more than 8,000 existing drugs was virtually screened by a docking approach to identify potential binding molecules of SARS-CoV 3CLpro. As a target for screening, both a homology model and the crystallographic structure of the binding pocket of the enzyme were used. Cinanserin (SQ 10,643), a well-characterized serotonin antagonist that has undergone preliminary clinical testing in humans in the 1960s, showed a high score in the screening and was chosen for further experimental evaluation. Binding of both cinanserin and its hydrochloride to bacterially expressed 3CLpro of SARS-CoV and the related human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance technology. The catalytic activity of both enzymes was inhibited with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 5 microM, as tested with a fluorogenic substrate. The antiviral activity of cinanserin was further evaluated in tissue culture assays, namely, a replicon system based on HCoV-229E and quantitative test assays with infectious SARS-CoV and HCoV-229E. All assays revealed a strong inhibition of coronavirus replication at nontoxic drug concentrations. The level of virus RNA and infectious particles was reduced by up to 4 log units, with IC50 values ranging from 19 to 34 microM. These findings demonstrate that the old drug cinanserin is an inhibitor of SARS-CoV replication, acting most likely via inhibition of the 3CL proteinase.

  19. Evaluation of a national programme to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: effects on consumer awareness, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutzke, Sonia E; Artist, Margaret A; Kehoe, Linda A; Fletcher, Miriam; Mackson, Judith M; Weekes, Lynn M

    2007-03-01

    The over-use of antibiotics, in particular, inappropriate use to treat upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), is a global public health concern. In an attempt to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for URTIs, and, in particular, to modify patient misconceptions about the effectiveness of antibiotics for URTIs, Australia's National Prescribing Service Ltd (NPS) has undertaken a comprehensive, multistrategic programme for health professionals and the community. Targeted strategies for the community, via the NPS common colds community campaign, commenced in 2000 and have been repeated annually during the winter months. Community strategies were closely integrated, using the same tagline, key messages and visual images, and were delivered in numerous settings including general practice, community pharmacy, child-care centres and community groups. Strategies included written information via newsletters and brochures, mass media activity using billboards, television, radio and magazines and small grants to promote local community education. The evaluation used multiple methods and data sources to measure process, impact and outcomes. Consistent with intervention messages, the integrated nationwide prescriber and consumer programme is associated with modest but consistent positive changes in consumer awareness, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour to the appropriate use of antibiotics for URTIs. These positive changes among the community are corroborated by a national decline in total antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in the community (from 23.08 million prescriptions in 1998-99 to 21.44 million in 2001-02) and, specifically, by a decline among the nine antibiotics commonly used for URTI such that by 2003 nationally 216,000 fewer prescriptions for URTI are written each year by general practitioners.

  20. The Respiratory Exchange Ratio is Associated with Fitness Indicators Both in Trained and Untrained Men: A Possible Application for People with Reduced Exercise Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Jiménez, Arnulfo; Hernández-Torres, Rosa P.; Torres-Durán, Patricia V.; Romero-Gonzalez, Jaime; Mascher, Dieter; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Juárez-Oropeza, Marco A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) indirectly shows the muscle’s oxidative capacity to get energy. Sedentarism, exercise and physically active lifestyles modify it. For that reason, this study evaluates the associations between RER during sub-maximum exercise and other well established fitness indicators (body fat, maximum heart rate, maximum O2 uptake, workload, and lactate threshold), in physically active trained and untrained men. Methods: The RER, O2 uptake and blood lactate were measured in eight endurance trained and eight untrained men (age, 22.9 ± 4.5 vs. 21.9 ± 2.8 years; body mass, 67.1 ± 5.4 vs. 72.2 ± 7.7 kg; body fat, 10.6 ± 2.4% vs. 16.6 ± 3.8% and maximum O2 uptake, 68.9 ± 6.3 vs. 51.6 ± 5.8 ml•kg−1•min−1), during maximum exercise test and during three different sub-maximum exercises at fixed workload: below, within or above the lactate threshold. Results: Endurance trained men presented higher O2 uptake, lower blood lactate concentrations and lower RER values than those in untrained men at the three similar relative workloads. Even though with these differences in RER, a strong association (p < 0.05) of RER during sub-maximum exercise with the other well established fitness indicators was observed, and both maximum O2 uptake and lactate threshold determined more than 57% of its variance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that RER measurement under sub-maximum exercise conditions was well correlated with other established physical fitness indicators, despite training condition. Furthermore, the results suggest that RER could help obtain an easy approach of fitness status under low exercise intensity and could be utilized in subjects with reduced exercise tolerance. PMID:21157516

  1. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  2. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  3. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004494 Respiratory control in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. WANG Wei (王玮), et al. Instit Respir Dis, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Limy, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Intern Med 2004; 43 (9): 647-650.

  4. The use of neuromuscular blocking agents in the ICU: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steven B; Vender, Jeffery

    2013-05-01

    Intensivists use neuromuscular blocking agents for a variety of clinical conditions, including for emergency intubation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, status asthmaticus, elevated intracranial pressure, elevated intra-abdominal pressure, and therapeutic hypothermia after ventricular fibrillation-associated cardiac arrest. The continued creation and use of evidence-based guidelines and protocols could ensure that neuromuscular blocking agents are used and monitored appropriately. A collaborative multidisciplinary approach coupled with constant review of the pharmacology, dosing, drug interactions, and monitoring techniques may reduce the adverse events associated with the use of neuromuscular blocking agents.

  5. A peptide mimic of a protective epitope of respiratory syncytial virus selected from a combinatorial library induces virus-neutralizing antibodies and reduces viral load in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chargelegue, D.; Obeid, O.E.; Hsu, S.C.; Shaw, M.D.; Denbury, A.N.; Taylor, G.; Steward, M.W.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. As yet, there is no effective vaccine against RSV infection, and previous attempts to develop a formalin-inactivated vaccine resulted in exacerbated disease in recipi

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome leads to reduced ratio of ACE/ACE2 activities and is prevented by angiotensin-(1-7) or an angiotensin II receptor antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woesten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lutter, Rene; Specht, Patricia A.; Moll, Gert N.; van Woensel, Job B.; van der Loos, Chris M.; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; Florquin, Sandrine; Bos, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating clinical syndrome. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its effector peptide angiotensin (Ang) II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ARDS. A counter-regulatory enzyme of ACE, ie ACE2 that degrades Ang II to Ang-(1-7), offers a p

  7. [Respiratory distress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, D; Garfunkel, A; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Findler, M; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually conducted in the oral cavity and in very close proximity to the upper respiratory airway. The possibility of unintentionally compromising this airway is high in the dental environment. The accumulation of fluid (water or blood) near to the upper respiratory airway or the loosening of teeth fragmentations and fallen dental instruments can occur. Also, some of the drugs prescribed in the dental practice are central nervous system depressants and some are direct respiratory drive depressors. For this reason, awareness of the respiratory status of the dental patient is of paramount importance. This article focuses on several of the more common causes of respiratory distress, including airway obstruction, hyperventilation, asthma, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and cardiac insufficiency. The common denominator to all these conditions described here is that in most instances the patient is conscious. Therefore, on the one hand, valuable information can be retrieved from the patient making diagnosis easier than when the patient is unconscious. On the other hand, the conscious patient is under extreme apprehension and stress under such situations. Respiratory depression which occurs during conscious sedation or following narcotic analgesic medication will not be dealt with in this article. Advanced pain and anxiety control techniques such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia should be confined only to operators who undergo special extended training.

  8. Intramuscular adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in neonates delivered by elective caesarean section at term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Avlund, O L; Pedersen, B L

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test whether intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline decreased the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in term infants delivered by elective caesarean section before active labour. METHOD: The study was randomised and double-blinded. A total of 270 neonates were...... assigned to intramuscular treatment with saline (0.30 ml) or 30 microg adrenaline (0.30 ml) immediately after birth. The primary endpoint was referral to the neonatal ward because of respiratory distress or a blood glucose level ... with pulse oximetry to disclose potential side effects. RESULTS: Pulse-oximetry recordings revealed a modest systemic effect by intramuscular adrenaline as the heart rate and the haemoglobin oxygen saturation were significantly higher in infants who received adrenaline. In contrast, the incidence...

  9. Access to Point-of-Care Tests Reduces the Prescription of Antibiotics Among Antibiotic-Requesting Subjects With Respiratory Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) often feel uncomfortable when patients request an antibiotic when there is likely little benefit. This study evaluates the effect of access to point-of-care tests on decreasing the prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in subjects who...... of interventions were performed: the full intervention group received prescriber feedback with discussion of the results of the first registry, courses for GPs, guidelines, patient information leaflets, workshops, and access to point-of-care tests (rapid streptococcal antigen detection test and C-reactive protein...... test); and the partial intervention group underwent all of the above interventions except for the workshop and access to point-of-care tests. RESULTS: A total of 210 GPs were assigned to the full intervention group and 71 to the partial intervention group. A total of 25,479 subjects with respiratory...

  10. Prophylactic antibody treatment and intramuscular immunization reduce infectious human rhinovirus 16 load in the lower respiratory tract of challenged cotton rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C.G. Blanco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRV represent the single most important etiological agents of the common cold and are the most frequent cause of acute respiratory infections in humans. Currently the performance of available animal models for immunization studies using HRV challenge is very limited. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus is a well-recognized model for the study of human respiratory viral infections. In this work we show that, without requiring any genetic modification of either the host or the virus, intranasal infection of cotton rats with HRV16 resulted in measurable isolation of infective virus, lower respiratory tract pathology, mucus production, and expression of interferon-activated genes. Intramuscular immunization with live HRV16 generated robust protective immunity that correlated with high serum levels of neutralizing antibodies. In addition, cotton rats treated prophylactically with hyperimmune anti-HRV16 serum were protected against HRV16 intranasal challenge. Finally, protection by immunization was efficiently transferred from mothers to newborn animals resulting in a substantial reduction of infectious virus loads in the lung following intranasal challenge. Overall, our results demonstrate that the cotton rat provides valuable additional model development options for testing vaccines and prophylactic therapies against rhinovirus infection.

  11. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  12. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  13. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    6.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004073 A study on the heterogenous apoptosis of lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils from peripheral blood of asthmatic patients. LIU Chuntao (刘春涛), et al. West China Hosp, Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003; 26(10):610 - 614.

  14. Zitongdong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Zitongdong Block (Eastern Zitong Block) is located in the northwest of the Sichuan Basin. Tectonically, it is situated in the east part of Zitong Depression, southeast of mid-Longmenshan folded and faulted belt( as shown on Fig. 8 ), covering an area of 1 730 km2. The traffic is very convenient, the No. 108 national highway passes through the north of the block. Topographically, the area belongs to low hilly land at the elevation of 500-700 m.

  15. Olmesartan Reduces New-onset Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Burden after Dual-chamber Pacemaker Implantation in Atrioventricular Block Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang Zhang; Chang Pan; Juan Zhang; Lin-Lin Zhu; Kai Huang; Yun Zhong; Zuo-Ying Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent tachyarrhythmia in patients with a permanent pacemaker.Angiotensin II receptor antagonists have a protective effect against the occurrence of AF in patients with heart diseases.This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of olmesartan in the prevention of new-onset AF and AF burden in atrioventricular block (AVB) patients with dual-chamber (DDD) pacemaker implantation.Methods:This was a single-center,prospective,randomized,single-blind,controlled clinical study.A total of 116 AVB patients,who received DDD pacemakers implantation with the percentage of ventricular pacing (VP%) ≥40% from April 22,2011 to December 24,2012,were prospectively randomized to olmesartan group (20 mg per day;n =57) or control group (n =59).Patients were followed up using pacemaker programming,12-lead electrocardiography in the intrinsic sinus rhythm,laboratory examinations,and transthoracic echocardiography at 24 months.Atrial high rate events (AHREs) were defined as 180 beats/min over a minimum of 5 min.AF burden was calculated by the number of hours with AHREs divided by the number of measurement hours.Results:Ten (17.5%) patients in the olmesartan group and 24 patients (40.7%) in the control group occurred new-onset AF,and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P =0.04).AF burden was lower in olmesartan group than that in control group (8.02 ± 3.10% vs.13.66 ± 6.14%,P =0.04).There were no significant differences in mean days to the first occurrence of AHREs and mean cumulative numbers of AHREs between two groups (P =0.89 and P=0.42,respectively).Moreover,olmesartan group had smaller values of maximal P-wave durations and P-wave dispersion (PD) after 24 months follow-up compared with the control group (109.5 ± 7.4 ms vs.113.4 ± 7.1 ms,P =0.00;and 40.6 ± 4.5 ms vs.43.3 ± 4.4 ms,P =0.02,respectively).Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and left ventricular ejection fraction were not

  16. Respiratory Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  17. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    7.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2003306 Effects of vaccae on airway contraction and inflammation in asthmatic guinea pigs. ZHAO Xiao(赵晓燕), et al. Zhejiang Respir Drug Res Lab Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310031. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003;26(4):218-222.Objective: To study the effects of Mycobacterium vaccae(M. vaccae)on the lung function, airway hyper-

  18. The Block Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We define the block neighborhood of a reversible CA, which is related both to its decomposition into a product of block permutations and to quantum computing. We give a purely combinatorial characterization of the block neighborhood, which helps in two ways. First, it makes the computation of the block neighborhood of a given CA relatively easy. Second, it allows us to derive upper bounds on the block neighborhood: for a single CA as function of the classical and inverse neighborhoods, and for the composition of several CAs. One consequence of that is a characterization of a class of "elementary" CAs that cannot be written as the composition of two simpler parts whose neighborhoods and inverse neighborhoods would be reduced by one half.

  19. SU-D-17A-07: Development and Evaluation of a Prototype Ultrasonography Respiratory Monitoring System for 4DCT Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, P; Cheng, S; Chao, C [Columbia University Medical Center, NY, NY (United States); Jain, A [New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion artifacts are commonly seen in the abdominal and thoracic CT images. A Real-time Position Management (RPM) system is integrated with CT simulator using abdominal surface as a surrogate for tracking the patient respiratory motion. The respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is then reconstructed by GE advantage software. However, there are still artifacts due to inaccurate respiratory motion detecting and sorting methods. We developed an Ultrasonography Respiration Monitoring (URM) system which can directly monitor diaphragm motion to detect respiratory cycles. We also developed a new 4DCT sorting and motion estimation method to reduce the respiratory motion artifacts. The new 4DCT system was compared with RPM and the GE 4DCT system. Methods: Imaging from a GE CT scanner was simultaneously correlated with both the RPM and URM to detect respiratory motion. A radiation detector, Blackcat GM-10, recorded the X-ray on/off and synchronized with URM. The diaphragm images were acquired with Ultrasonix RP system. The respiratory wave was derived from diaphragm images and synchronized with CT scanner. A more precise peaks and valleys detection tool was developed and compared with RPM. The motion is estimated for the slices which are not in the predefined respiratory phases by using block matching and optical flow method. The CT slices were then sorted into different phases and reconstructed, compared with the images reconstructed from GE Advantage software using respiratory wave produced from RPM system. Results: The 4DCT images were reconstructed for eight patients. The discontinuity at the diaphragm level due to an inaccurate identification of phases by the RPM was significantly improved by URM system. Conclusion: Our URM 4DCT system was evaluated and compared with RPM and GE 4DCT system. The new system is user friendly and able to reduce motion artifacts. It also has the potential to monitor organ motion during

  20. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Upper Respiratory Tract Diesase And Bronchial Asthma 2007072 Dysfunction of releasing adrenaline in asthmatic adrenaline medullary chromaffin cells due to functional redundancy primed by nerve growth factor. WANG Jun(汪俊), et al. Dept Resp Dis Xiangya Hosp Central South Univ, Changsha 410008. Chin J Tuberc Dis 2006;29(12):812-815. Objective To investigate the possible causes of the dysfunction of adrenaline release in asthma rats and to identify the role of nerve growth factor(NGF) in this process.

  1. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  2. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  3. INGUINAL NERVE BLOCK FOR PATIENTS UNDERGOING INGUINAL HERNIOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirthagadeswar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal hernia repair is the most common elective surgical procedure performed under general, regional or local anesthesia. The advantages of day case surgery include greater patient satisfaction and reduced financial costs to the health service. Inguinal nerve b locks may be particularly helpful for patients with cardiovascular or respiratory disease, for whom there may be advantages in avoiding general anesthesia. The absence of post - operative sedation or drowsiness allows early ambulation and diminishes the requirement for recovery facilities with inguinal nerve block.

  4. Improvement in the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy using a respiratory guiding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Hee; Kim, Dong-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho; Suh, Tae-Suk; Yoon, Jai-Woong

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) depends on the respiratory regularity because external respiratory signals are used for gating the radiation beam at particular phases. Many studies have applied a respiratory guiding system to improve the respiratory regularity. This study aims to evaluate the effect of an in-house-developed respiratory guiding system to improve the respiratory regularity for RGRT. To verify the effectiveness of this system, we acquired respiratory signals from five volunteers. The improvement in respiratory regularity was analyzed by comparing the standard deviations of the amplitudes and the periods between free and guided breathing. The reduction in residual motion at each phase was analyzed by comparing the standard deviations of sorted data within each corresponding phase bin as obtained from free and guided breathing. The results indicate that the respiratory guiding system improves the respiratory regularity, and that most of the volunteers showed significantly less average residual motion at each phase. The average residual motion measured at phases of 40, 50, and 60%, which showed lower variation than other phases, were, respectively, reduced by 41, 45, and 44% during guided breathing. The results show that the accuracy of RGRT can be improved by using the in-house-developed respiratory guiding system. Furthermore, this system should reduce artifacts caused by respiratory motion in 4D CT imaging.

  5. Chengzikou Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Chengzikou Block is located in the north of Hekou district, Dongying City, Shandong Province, adjacent to Bohai Bay. It can be geographically divided into three units: onshore, transitional zone and offshore ultrashallow zone, totally covering an area of 470 km2. The southern onshore area is low and gentle in topography;the northern shallow sea is at water depths of 2-8 m below sea level, and the transitional zone occupies more than 60% of the whole block. The climate belongs to temperate zone with seasonal wind. Highways are welldeveloped here, and the traffic is very convenient. The Chengzikou Block is about 80 km away from Dongying City and 290 km from Jinan City in the south. The northern offshore area of the block is 160 km away from Longkou port in the east and only 38 km away in the west from Zhuangxi port.

  6. Longmenshan Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Longmenshan Block is located in Jiange County of Jiangyou City in the northwest of Sichuan Basin. covering an area of 2 628 km2. Geologically, it is situated in the Mid-Longmenshan fault and fold belt, neighbouring Zitong Depression in its southeast. There are mountains surrounding its northwest , the rest area being hilly land,with the elevation of 500-700 m. The BaoCheng railway and the No. 108 highway run through the block, the traffic is very convenient.

  7. Respiratory function in handicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, C; Fujita, M; Umemoto, H; Taneda, M; Sanae, N; Tazaki, T

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate respiratory function of severely handicapped children. Tidal volumes and respiratory rates were determined in a total of 130 children with different clinical motor abilities. Tidal volume of non-sitters (n = 39) was significantly lower than ambulators (n = 49) or sitters (n = 42) (p less than 0.01). There was no difference in respiratory rate among the three groups. Among 45 children whose vital capacity could be determined, the tidal volumes showed a significant correlation with vital capacity (r = 0.56, p less than 0.001). Among four children whose tidal volume was less than 200 ml and respiratory rate was more than 30 cpm, blood gas analysis revealed hypoxia in three of them. The tidal volumes, therefore, would be a useful guide to estimate respiratory functions. It was concluded that the respiratory function in a non-sitter with reduced tidal volume is impaired, and that preventive measures must be taken against respiratory infection.

  8. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  9. Occupational Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Occupational Respiratory Disease Occupational Respiratory Disease Condition Occupational HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share ...

  10. Chadong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Chadong Block, located in the east of Qaidam Basin, Qinghai Province, covers an area of 12 452 km2. It is bounded by Kunlum Mountains in the south and the northwest is closely adjacent to Aimunike Mountain.Rivers are widely distributed, which always run in NWSE direction, including the Sulunguole, Qaidam and Haluwusu Rivers. The traffic condition is good, the Qinghai-Tibet highway stretching through the whole area and the Lan-Qing railway, 20-50 km away from the block, passing from north to west. A lot of Mongolia minority people have settled there, of which herdsmen always live nearby the Qaidam River drainage area.

  11. 一种改进的基于后处理去除块效应算法%An Improved Algorithm for Reducing Blocking Effects Based on Post-processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨弋; 王冠宇

    2012-01-01

    In the compression system based on DCT(Discrete Cosine Transform),the DCT is based on the block.Images are first broken down into 8×8 pixels pieces,then it gets 64 DCT coefficients through DCT for each block.Since each block gets DCT respectively,the correlation between blocks are ignored,thus the "Blocking Effects".This paper proposes an improved method for reducing blocking effect based on post-processing.When the images are reconstructed,four modes are proposed for the corner of four blocks,including three frequency-related modes(smooth mode,non-smooth mode,and intermediate mode) and a corner mode.A low computational deblocking filter is then adopted for different mode,and images are reconstructed.Both visual effect and image quality are improved.%在基于DCT压缩编码系统中,DCT都是基于模块的。即首先将图像分成8×8的像素块,然后对每块进行DCT得到64个DCT系数。但由于是分别对每块进行DCT,块与块之间的相关性被忽略,导致所谓的"块效应"。文中提出了一种改进的基于后处理的去块效应方法。在图像重建时,首先在块与块之间提出了4种模式,包括了3个与频率相关的模式和4个块拐角处的拐角模式。然后对不同模式下采用低复杂度的去块效应滤波器,最后重建图像。不论是视觉效果还是图像质量都有所提升。

  12. Bubble CPAP - a primary respiratory support for respiratory distress syndrome in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urs, Prashanth S; Khan, Firdose; Maiya, P P

    2009-05-01

    In preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is associated with benefits in terms of reduced respiratory failure and reduced mortality. We conducted this prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of bubble-CPAP as primary mode of respiratory support. Bubble CPAP was found to be safe and effective means of treating mild and moderate grade RDS, it was also observed to be more successful in babies born to mothers who had received antenatal steroids.

  13. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  14. Adductor Canal Block versus Femoral Nerve Block and Quadriceps Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Pia Therese; Nielsen, Zbigniew Jerzy Koscielniak; Henningsen, Lene Marianne;

    2013-01-01

    : The authors hypothesized that the adductor canal block (ACB), a predominant sensory blockade, reduces quadriceps strength compared with placebo (primary endpoint, area under the curve, 0.5-6 h), but less than the femoral nerve block (FNB; secondary endpoint). Other secondary endpoints were...

  15. Aminoglycosides block the Kv3.1 potassium channel and reduce the ability of inferior colliculus neurons to fire at high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Qiong J; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2005-03-01

    The Kv3.1 potassium channel is expressed at high levels in auditory nuclei and contributes to the ability of auditory neurons to fire at high frequencies. We have tested the effects of streptomycin, an agent that produces progressive hearing loss, on the firing properties of inferior colliculus neurons and on Kv3.1 currents in transfected cells. We found that in inferior colliculus neurons, intracellular streptomycin decreased the current density of a high threshold, noninactivating outward current and reduced the rate of repolarization of action potentials and the ability of these neurons to fire at high frequencies. Furthermore, potassium current in CHO cells transfected with the Kv3.1 gene was reduced by 50% when cells were cultured in the presence of streptomycin or when streptomycin was introduced intracellularly in the pipette solution. In the presence of intracellular streptomycin, the activation rate of Kv3.1 current increased and inhibition by extracellular TEA become voltage-dependent. The data indicate that streptomycin inhibits Kv3.1 currents by inducing a conformational change in the Kv3.1 channel. The hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics may be partially mediated by their inhibition of Kv3.1 current in auditory neurons.

  16. Superoxide produced by activated neutrophils efficiently reduces the tetrazolium salt, WST-1 to produce a soluble formazan: a simple colorimetric assay for measuring respiratory burst activation and for screening anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A S; Berridge, M V

    2000-04-21

    Activation of the respiratory burst of granulocytes and macrophages by invading microorganisms is a key first line cellular defence against infection. Failure to generate this response leads to persistent life-threatening infection unless appropriate antibiotic treatment is given. The respiratory burst of neutrophils is usually measured spectrophotometrically by following ferricytochrome c reduction, and histologically by using the tetrazolium salt, nitroblue tetrazolium, which is reduced intracellularly to an insoluble formazan. In both assays, reduction is mediated by superoxide generated via NADPH oxidase. Because ferricytochrome c has a high molecular mass and high background absorbance at 550 nm, the assay lacks sensitivity and is not ideally suited to microplate measurement. We have circumvented these limitations by using the cell-impermeable, sulfonated tetrazolium salt, WST-1, which exhibits very low background absorbance and is efficiently reduced by superoxide to a stable water-soluble formazan with high molar absorptivity. This has permitted adaptation of the WST-1 assay to microplate format while retaining sensitivity. Reduction of WST-1 by activated human peripheral blood neutrophils correlated closely with ferricytochrome c reduction across a range of PMA concentrations and with time of activation by PMA and fMLP. Reduction of WST-1 was inhibited by 98% by superoxide dismutase (20 microg/ml) and by 88% by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodinium (10 microM) but was resistant to catalase, azide and the NADH oxidase inhibitor, resiniferatoxin. WST-1 and ferricytochrome c reduction were also compared using xanthine/xanthine oxidase to generate superoxide. Under optimised assay conditions, both WST-1 and ferricytochrome c reduction were directly proportional to added xanthine. WST-1 generated approximately 2-fold greater increase in absorbance than ferricytochrome c at their respective wavelengths, and this translated into increased assay

  17. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Pozdzik

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target.In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ inhibition in a rat model of AAN.Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11 and its control isotype (13C4 were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p. at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc was injected daily.At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro.The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation.

  18. Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Verges, S; Lenherr, O; Haner, A C; Schulz, C.; Spengler, C M

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects...

  19. Respiratory monitoring with an acceleration sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Takegawa, Hideki; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Takashina, Masaaki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Matsumoto, Masao; Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 1-7, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Respiratory gating radiotherapy is used to irradiate a local area and to reduce normal tissue toxicity. There are certain methods for the detection of tumor motions, for example, using internal markers or an external respiration signal. However, because some of these respiratory monitoring systems require special or expensive equipment, respiratory monitoring can usually be performed only in limited facilities. In this study, the feasibility of using an acceleration sensor for respiratory monitoring was evaluated. The respiratory motion was represented by means of a platform and measured five times with the iPod touch (registered) at 3, 4 and 5 s periods of five breathing cycles. For these three periods of the reference waveform, the absolute means {+-} standard deviation (SD) of displacement were 0.45 {+-} 0.34 mm, 0.33 {+-} 0.24 mm and 0.31 {+-} 0.23 mm, respectively. On the other hand, the corresponding absolute means {+-} SD for the periods were 0.04 {+-} 0.09 s, 0.04 {+-} 0.02 s and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 s. The accuracy of respiratory monitoring using the acceleration sensor was satisfactory in terms of the absolute means {+-} SD. Using the iPod touch (registered) for respiratory monitoring does not need special equipment and makes respiratory monitoring easier. For these reasons, this system is a viable alternative to other respiratory monitoring systems.

  20. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: A randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this by delivering key elements of the intervention in a simulation that approximates clinical practice by, for example, presenting general practitioners (GPs with a clinical scenario about making a treatment decision. Methods The current proposal will run a full, web-based IME involving 250 GPs that will advance the methodology of IMEs by directly comparing results with an earlier paper-based IME. Moreover, the web-based IME will evaluate an intervention that can be put into a full-scale trial that aims to reduce antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in primary care. The study will also include a trial of email versus postal invitations to participate. Discussion More effective behaviour change interventions are needed and this study will develop one such intervention and a system to model and test future interventions. This system will be applicable to any situation in the National Health Service where behaviour needs to be modified, including interventions aimed directly at the public. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT01206738

  1. Respiratory Development and Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Quinn, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory development is crucial for all newborn infants. Premature infants may be born at an early stage of development and lack sufficient surfactant production. This results in respiratory distress syndrome. This article reviews the normal fetal development of the lung as well as the disorder that develops because of an early birth.

  2. Methoxypolyethylene glycol-block-polycaprolactone diblock copolymers reduce P-glycoprotein efflux in the absence of a membrane fluidization effect while stimulating P-glycoprotein ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastre, Jason; Jackson, John K; Wong, Wesley; Burt, Helen M

    2007-04-01

    We have previously shown that amphiphilic diblock copolymers composed of methoxypolyethylene glycol-b-polycaprolactone (MePEG-b-PCL) increased the cellular accumulation and reduced the basolateral to apical flux of the P-glycoprotein substrate, rhodamine 123 (R-123) in caco-2 cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate membrane perturbation effects of MePEG-b-PCL diblock copolymers with erythrocyte membranes and caco-2 cells and the effect on P-gp ATPase activity. The diblock copolymer MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) induced increasing erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations which correlated with increasing accumulation of R-123 into caco-2 cells. However, no increase in cellular accumulation of R-123 by non-P-gp expressing cells was observed, suggesting that diblock did not enhance the transmembrane passive diffusion of R-123, but that the accumulation enhancement effect of the diblock in caco-2 cells was likely mediated primarily via P-gp inhibition. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of membrane fluidity and P-gp ATPase activity demonstrated that MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) decreased caco-2 membrane fluidity while stimulating ATPase activity approximately threefold at concentrations that maximally enhanced R-123 caco-2 accumulation. These results suggest that inhibition of P-gp efflux by MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) does not appear to be related to increases in membrane fluidity or through inhibition in P-gp ATPase activities, which are two commonly reported cellular effects for P-gp inhibition mediated by surfactants.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that ...

  4. Patient-ventilator interaction during acute lung injury, and the role of spontaneous breathing: part 1: respiratory muscle function during critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H

    2011-02-01

    Since the early 1970s there has been an ongoing debate regarding the wisdom of promoting unassisted spontaneous breathing throughout the course of critical illness in patients with severe respiratory failure. The basis of this debate has focused on the clinical relevance of opposite problems. Historically, the term "disuse atrophy" has described a situation wherein sustained inactivity of the respiratory muscles (ie, passive ventilation) results in deconditioning and weakness. More recently it has been referred to as "ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction." In contrast, "use atrophy" describes a situation where chronic high-tension inspiratory work causes structural damage to the diaphragm and weakness. Both laboratory and clinical studies demonstrated that relatively brief periods of complete respiratory muscle inactivity, as well as intense muscle loading, result in acute inflammation, loss of muscle mass, and weakness. Yet in critical illness other factors also affect respiratory muscle function, including prolonged use of neuromuscular blocking agents, administration of corticosteroids, and sepsis. This makes the attribution of acquired respiratory muscle weakness and ventilator-dependence to either ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction or loaded breathing extremely difficult. Regardless, the clinical implications of this research strongly suggest that passive mechanical ventilation should be avoided whenever possible. However, promotion of unassisted spontaneous breathing in the acute phase of critical illness also may carry a substantial risk of respiratory muscle injury and weakness. Use of mechanical ventilation modes in a manner that induces spontaneous breathing effort, while simultaneously reducing the work load on the respiratory muscles, is probably sufficient to minimize both problems.

  5. Probiotic Supplements Beneficially Affect Tryptophan–Kynurenine Metabolism and Reduce the Incidence of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Trained Athletes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged intense exercise has been associated with transient suppression of immune function and an increased risk of infections. In this context, the catabolism of amino acid tryptophan via kynurenine may play an important role. The present study examined the effect of a probiotic supplement on the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI and the metabolism of aromatic amino acids after exhaustive aerobic exercise in trained athletes during three months of winter training. Methods: Thirty-three highly trained individuals were randomly assigned to probiotic (PRO, n = 17 or placebo (PLA, n = 16 groups using double blind procedures, receiving either 1 × 1010 colony forming units (CFU of a multi-species probiotic (Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, Bifidobacterium lactis W51, Enterococcus faecium W54, Lactobacillus acidophilus W22, Lactobacillus brevis W63, and Lactococcus lactis W58 or placebo once per day for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of tryptophan, phenylalanine and their primary catabolites kynurenine and tyrosine, as well as the concentration of the immune activation marker neopterin were determined at baseline and after 12 weeks, both at rest and immediately after exercise. Participants completed a daily diary to identify any infectious symptoms. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, post-exercise tryptophan levels were lowered by 11% (a significant change in the PLA group compared to the concentrations measured before the intervention (p = 0.02, but remained unchanged in the PRO group. The ratio of subjects taking the placebo who experienced one or more URTI symptoms was increased 2.2-fold compared to those on probiotics (PLA 0.79, PRO 0.35; p = 0.02. Conclusion: Data indicate reduced exercise-induced tryptophan degradation rates in the PRO group. Daily supplementation with probiotics limited exercise-induced drops in tryptophan levels and reduced the incidence of URTI, however, did not benefit athletic

  6. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N.; Mehta, Jaideep H.; Brayanov, Jordan B.; Mullen, Gary J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation—a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)—commonly referred to as “respiratory compromise or respiratory depression.” Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Methods Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Results Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pbenzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety. PMID:28235069

  7. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  8. Burden of respiratory disease in Thailand: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Aeumjaturapat, Songklot; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) was a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of respiratory disease in adults across 6 Asia-Pacific countries.This article reports symptoms, healthcare resource utilization (HCRU), work impairment and cost burden associated with allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis in Thailand.Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of AR, asthma, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled at 4 hospitals in Thailand during October 2012 and October 2013. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Locally sourced unit costs were used in the calculation of total costs.The study enrolled 1000 patients. The most frequent primary diagnosis was AR (44.2%), followed by rhinosinusitis (24.1%), asthma (23.7%), and COPD (8.0%). Overall, 316 (31.6%) of patients were diagnosed with some combination of the 4 diseases. Blocked nose or congestion (17%) and cough or coughing up phlegm (16%) were the main reasons for the current medical visit. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$1495 (SD 3133) per patient. Costs associated with work productivity loss were the principal contributor for AR and rhinosinusitis patients while medication costs were the highest contributor for asthma and COPD patients.The study findings highlight the burden associated with 4 prevalent respiratory diseases in Thailand. Thorough investigation of concomitant conditions and improved disease management may help to reduce the burden of these respiratory diseases.

  9. Respiratory diseases and the impact of cough in Taiwan: Results from the APBORD observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Cahill, Camilla L; Hamrosi, Kim K; Wang, De Yun

    2016-07-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and rhinosinusitis are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Asia-Pacific region. The Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) study was a cross-sectional, observational study which examined the disease and economic burden of AR, asthma, COPD, and rhinosinusitis across Asia-Pacific using 1 standard protocol. Here we report symptoms, healthcare resource use (HCRU), work impairment, and associated cost in Taiwan.Consecutive participants aged ≥ 18 years presenting to a physician with symptoms meeting the diagnostic criteria for a primary diagnosis of asthma, AR, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants and their treating physician completed surveys detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity, and activity impairment. Costs including direct medical costs and indirect costs associated with lost work productivity were calculated.The study enrolled 1001 patients. AR was the most frequent primary diagnosis (31.2%). A quarter of patients presented with a combination of respiratory diseases, with AR and asthma being the most frequent combination (14.1%). Cough or coughing up phlegm was the primary reason for the medical visit for patients with asthma and COPD, whereas nasal symptoms (watery runny nose, blocked nose, and congestion) were the primary reasons for AR and rhinosinusitis. Specialists were the most frequently used healthcare resource by patients with AR (26.1%), asthma (26.4%), COPD (26.6%), and rhinosinusitis (47.3%). The mean annual cost per patient with a respiratory disease was US$4511 (SD 5395). The cost was almost double for employed patients (US$8047, SD 6175), with the majority attributable to lost productivity.Respiratory diseases have a significant impact on disease burden in Taiwan. Treatment strategies that prevent lost work productivity could greatly reduce the economic burden of these diseases.

  10. Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Li, Long-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome and the pathology of acute respiratory insufficiency in the preterm infant, including the current therapy modalities on disposition are presented. Since the therapeutical challenge and primary clinical goal are to normalize ventilation ratio and lung perfusion, when respiratory insufficiency occurs, it is very important to introduce the respiratory support as soon possible, in order to reduce development of pulmonary cyanosis and edema, and intrapulmonary or intracardial shunts. A characteristic respiratory instability that reflects through fluctuations in gas exchange and ventilation is often present in premature infants. Adapting the respiratory support on a continuous basis to the infant's needs is challenging and not always effective. Although a large number of ventilation strategies for the neonate are available, there is a need for additional consensus on management of acute respiratory distress syndrome in pediatric population lately redefined by Berlin definition criteria, in order to efficiently apply various modes of respiratory support in daily pediatrician clinical use.

  11. Orexin, cardio-respiratory function, and hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Aihua eLi; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we focus on the role of orexin in cardio-respiratory functions and its potential link to hypertension. (1) Orexin, cardiovascular function, and hypertension. In normal rats, central administration of orexin can induce significant increases in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which can be blocked by orexin receptor antagonists. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), antagonizing orexin receptors can significantly lower blood pressure under ...

  12. Respiratory Protection against Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Burak; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Although the respiratory (breathing) system tolerates exposure to a limited degree, some chemicals can impair or destroy portions of it. For many pesticides, the respiratory system is the quickest and most direct route into the circulatory system, allowing rapid transport throughout the body. Thus, it is important to follow the pesticide label and follow directions for control of exposure, especially when respiratory protection is specified. A respirator is a safety device covering at least t...

  13. Managing access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  14. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  15. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  16. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  17. Respiratory Response of Dormant Nectarine Floral Buds on Chilling Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Yue; GAO Dong-sheng; LI Ling; CHEN Xiu-de; XU Ai-hong

    2010-01-01

    Changes in main biochemical respiratory pathways in dormant nectarine floral buds were studied with nectarine trees (Prunus persica.var,nectariana cv.Shuguang) in order to determine the function of respiration in dormancy release.Oxygen-electrode system and respiratory inhibitors were used to measure total respiratory rates and rates of respiratory pathways.Results showed that chilling deficiency blocked the transition of respiratory mode,and made buds stay in a state of high level pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and low level tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA).The decline of PPP and activation of TCA occurred synchronously with the release of dormancy.In addition,the inhibition of PPP stimulated a respiration increase related with TCA.It could be concluded that the function of PPP activation in dormancy release might be limited and PPP declination inducing TCA activation might be part of respiration mode transition mechanism during bud sprouting.

  18. 神经肌肉阻滞剂在ICU的应用%Neuromuscular blocking agents in ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春峰; 杨雨航

    2014-01-01

    神经肌肉阻滞剂在ICU用于很多疾病的辅助治疗,如急性呼吸窘迫综合征、哮喘持续状态、颅内高压等,重症医学科的医生在使用神经肌肉阻滞剂时要根据循证医学证据及指南合理使用,以减少相关并发症的发生.%Neuromuscular blocking agents have been used for a variety of clinical conditions such as emergency intubation,acute respiratory distress syndrome,status asthmaticus,elevated intracranial pressure,etc.Neuromuscular blocking agents should be used and monitored appropriately according to evidence-based guidelines to reduce the adverse events associated with the use of neuromuscular blocking agents.

  19. Block Cipher Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miolane, Charlotte Vikkelsø

    Block ciphersarecryptographicprimitivesthatoperateon fixed sizetexts(blocks). Mostdesigns aim towards secure andfastencryption oflarge amounts ofdata. Block ciphers also serve as the building block of a number of hash functions and message authentication codes(MAC).Thetask of cryptanalysisisto en...... on small scale variants of AES. In the final part of the thesis we present a new block cipher proposal Present and examine its security against algebraic and differential cryptanalysis in particular.......Block ciphersarecryptographicprimitivesthatoperateon fixed sizetexts(blocks). Mostdesigns aim towards secure andfastencryption oflarge amounts ofdata. Block ciphers also serve as the building block of a number of hash functions and message authentication codes(MAC).Thetask of cryptanalysisisto...... ensurethat no attack violatesthe securitybounds specifiedbygeneric attack namely exhaustivekey search and table lookup attacks. This thesis contains a general introduction to cryptography with focus on block ciphers and important block cipher designs, in particular the Advanced Encryption Standard...

  20. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  1. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Guro Hospital, Korea Univeristy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    guidance system than free breathing or breathing with auditory guidance alone. In particular, the above system was excellent at the reproduction of respiratory cycles in care units. Such a system enables to reduce time due to unstable breathing and to perform more precise and detailed treatment.

  2. Flu Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People With Heart Failure Doctors should consider high-dose vaccine for those ... HealthDay News) -- Flu and pneumonia vaccines may reduce heart failure patients' risk of dangerous respiratory infections, a new ...

  3. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen.

  4. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Kaufman, Randal J; Osten, Pavel; Vassar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ), the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1) a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV) system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2) a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3) a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and APP elevation

  5. Structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Two models exist of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: the model of a random organization of the individual respiratory enzyme complexes and that of a super-complex assembly formed by stable association between the individual complexes. Recently Schägger, using digitonin solubilization and Blue Native PAGE produced new evidence of preferential associations, in particular a Complex I monomer with a Complex III dimer, and suggested a model of the respiratory chain (the respirasome) based on direct electron channelling between complexes. Discrimination between the two models is amenable to kinetic testing using flux control analysis. Experimental evidence obtained in beef heart SMP, according to the extension of the Metabolic Control Theory for pathways with metabolic channelling, showed that enzyme associations involving Complex I and Complex III take place in the respiratory chain while Complex IV seems to be randomly distributed, with cytochrome c behaving as a mobile component. Flux control analysis at anyone of the respiratory complexes involved in aerobic succinate oxidation indicated that Complex II and III are not functionally associated in a stable supercomplex. A critical appraisal of the solid-state model of the mitochondrial respiratory chain requires its reconciliation with previous biophysical and kinetic evidence that CoQ behaves as a homogeneous diffusible pool between all reducing enzyme and all oxidizing enzymes: the hypothesis can be advanced that both models (CoQ pool and supercomplexes) are true, by postulating that supercomplexes physiologically exist in equilibrium with isolated complexes depending on metabolic conditions of the cell.

  6. System Synthesis for Networks of Programmable Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Mannion, Ryan; Cotterell, Susan; Vahid, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The advent of sensor networks presents untapped opportunities for synthesis. We examine the problem of synthesis of behavioral specifications into networks of programmable sensor blocks. The particular behavioral specification we consider is an intuitive user-created network diagram of sensor blocks, each block having a pre-defined combinational or sequential behavior. We synthesize this specification to a new network that utilizes a minimum number of programmable blocks in place of the pre-defined blocks, thus reducing network size and hence network cost and power. We focus on the main task of this synthesis problem, namely partitioning pre-defined blocks onto a minimum number of programmable blocks, introducing the efficient but effective PareDown decomposition algorithm for the task. We describe the synthesis and simulation tools we developed. We provide results showing excellent network size reductions through such synthesis, and significant speedups of our algorithm over exhaustive search while obtaining...

  7. Advances in respiratory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Bach, Jonathan F; Shaw, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    Effective respiratory therapy depends on obtaining a definitive diagnosis and following established recommendations for treatment. Unfortunately, many respiratory conditions are idiopathic in origin or are attributable to nonspecific inflammation. In some situations, disorders are controlled rather than cured. Recent advances in pulmonary therapeutics include the use of new agents to treat common diseases and application of local delivery of drugs to enhance drug effect and minimize side effects.

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  9. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Budweiser

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy.Keywords: respiratory failure, COPD, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation long-term oxygen therapy, chronic

  10. RESPIRATORY REEDUCATION IN THORACIC CONTUSION RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia PREDA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory reeducation is a way to recover the thoracic contusion. Correcting dyspnea induced by pain, decreases the required postcontuzional recovery time and, therefore, the required social reintegration time. This is achieved an increasing of the pacient life quality, and significant savings of human and material resources: reducing medical and somato-functional recovery costs, reducing the sick leave payment and the work days off to. The „TES” device has been designed in order to improve respiratory reeducation and to recover the thoracic contusion. A study showed that the postcontuzional recovery was significantly increased by using the physical exercises of respiratory reeducation. The „TES” device demonstrated his role in this.

  11. Sudden endotracheal tube block in a patient of Achalasia Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube block due to various mechanical causes such as mucous, blood clot, denture, and ampoules have been reported. A patient of achalasia cardia with chronic passive aspiration pneumonitis developed mucoid mass in the respiratory passage which dislodged during the surgical procedure. The episode occurred almost an hour after induction of anesthesia and the dislodged mucoid mass blocked the lumen of endotracheal tube, leading to hypoxia and impending cardiac arrest. However, the patient was salvaged by replacing the tube.

  12. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  13. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  14. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external...... were described by medians and standard deviations (SDs) of position distributions of the markers. Gating windows (35% duty cycle) were retrospectively applied to the respiratory data for each session, mimicking the use of commercially available gating systems. Medians and SDs of gated data were......PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. MATERIALS/METHODS: The study is based on data...

  15. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB.

  16. Current issues in the respiratory care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orsini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neuromuscular disease, resulting in respiratory muscle weakness, reduced pulmonary volumes, ineffective cough, secretion retention, and respiratory failure. Measures as vital capacity, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, cough peak flow and pulse oximetry are recommended to monitor the respiratory function. The patients should be followed up by a multidisciplinary team, focused in improving the quality of life and deal with the respiratory symptoms. The respiratory care approach includes airway clearance techniques, mechanically assisted cough and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Vaccination and respiratory pharmacological support are also recommended. To date, there is no enough evidence supporting the inspiratory muscle training and diaphragmatic pacing.

  17. Respiratory Motion Prediction in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Sastry

    Active respiratory motion management has received increasing attention in the past decade as a means to reduce the internal margin (IM) component of the clinical target volume (CTV)—planning target volume (PTV) margin typically added around the gross tumor volume (GTV) during radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Engineering and technical developments in linear accelerator design and respiratory motion monitoring respectively have made the delivery of motion adaptive radiation therapy possible through real-time control of either dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion (gantry based linear accelerator design) or robotic arm motion (robotic arm mounted linear accelerator design).

  18. Respiratory infections precede adult-onset asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of asthma (n = 521 during a 2.5-year study period and randomly selected controls (n = 932 in a geographically defined area in South Finland. Information on respiratory infections was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The diagnosis of asthma was based on symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction in lung function measurements. The risk of asthma onset was strongly increased in subjects who had experienced in the preceding 12 months lower respiratory tract infections (including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted odds ratio (OR 7.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.16-9.99, or upper respiratory tract infections (including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97. Individuals with personal atopy and/or parental atopy were more susceptible to the effects of respiratory infections on asthma onset than non-atopic persons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new evidence that recently experienced respiratory infections are a strong determinant for adult-onset asthma. Reducing such infections might prevent onset of asthma in adulthood, especially in individuals with atopy or hereditary propensity to it.

  19. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  20. The New Kid on the Block--Incorporating Buprenorphine into a Medical Toxicology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Buprenorphine represents a safe and effective therapy for treating opioid dependence, alleviating craving and withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent patients. Buprenorphine has a "blocking" effect against the action of other opioids at the mu-receptor, preventing not only opioid-induced euphoria, but CNS and respiratory depressant effects as well. Buprenorphine was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002 after the passage of Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA 2000) which allowed clinicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with specifically named opioid agonist therapies in an office setting. Buprenorphine programs reduce the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C and reduce criminal behaviors associated with illicit drug use. Patients stabilized on buprenorphine have increased employment, enhanced engagement with social services, and better overall health and well-being.

  1. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  2. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory Issues in Osteogenesis Imperfecta 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981-2663 (301) 947-0083 Fax: (301) 947-0456 ... www.oif.org Email: bonelink@oif.org The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, Inc. is the only voluntary national health ...

  3. Obesity and respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-10-20

    The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.

  4. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  5. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  6. Block TERM factorization of block matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Yiyuan; HAO Pengwei

    2004-01-01

    Reversible integer mapping (or integer transform) is a useful way to realize Iossless coding, and this technique has been used for multi-component image compression in the new international image compression standard JPEG 2000. For any nonsingular linear transform of finite dimension, its integer transform can be implemented by factorizing the transform matrix into 3 triangular elementary reversible matrices (TERMs) or a series of single-row elementary reversible matrices (SERMs). To speed up and parallelize integer transforms, we study block TERM and SERM factorizations in this paper. First, to guarantee flexible scaling manners, the classical determinant (det) is generalized to a matrix function, DET, which is shown to have many important properties analogous to those of det. Then based on DET, a generic block TERM factorization,BLUS, is presented for any nonsingular block matrix. Our conclusions can cover the early optimal point factorizations and provide an efficient way to implement integer transforms for large matrices.

  7. Respiratory Resistance In Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Patients' respiratory problems may interfere with their talking in therapy sessions. Interventions by the therapist must be based on an understanding of the underlying dynamics which produced the respiratory problem. (Author)

  8. American Association for Respiratory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBRC Credentials Congress News & Highlights Clinician Training on Tobacco Dependence for Respiratory Therapists Increase your skill with ... 12 Dad’s Struggle with ALS Inspires Respiratory Therapy Student Read More Oct 12 RSV Experience Leads Member ...

  9. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4......BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...

  10. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  11. Cardio-respiratory effects of systemic neurotensin injection are mediated through activation of neurotensin NTS₁ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the cardio-respiratory pattern exerted by the systemic injection of neurotensin, contribution of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors and the neural pathways mediating the responses. The effects of an intravenous injection (i.v.) of neurotensin were investigated in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats in following experimental schemes: (i) control animals before and after midcervical vagotomy; (ii) in three separate subgroups of rats: neurally intact, vagotomized at supranodosal level and initially midcervically vagotomized exposed to section of the carotid sinus nerves (CSNs); (iii) in the intact rats 2 minutes after blockade of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors with SR 142948. Intravenous injection of 10 μg/kg of neurotensin in the intact rats evoked prompt increase in the respiratory rate followed by a prolonged slowing down coupled with augmented tidal volume. Midcervical vagotomy precluded the effects of neurotensin on the frequency of breathing, while CSNs section reduced the increase in tidal volume. In all the neural states neurotensin caused significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure preceded by prompt hypertensive response. The cardio-respiratory effects of neurotensin were blocked by pre-treatment with NTS(1) receptor antagonist. The results of this study showed that neurotensin acting through NTS(1) receptors augments the tidal component of the breathing pattern in a large portion via carotid body afferentation whereas the respiratory timing response to neurotensin depends entirely on the intact midcervical vagi. Blood pressure effects evoked by an intravenous neurotensin occur outside vagal and CSNs pathways and might result from activation of the peripheral vascular NTS(1) receptors.

  12. Lesson Thirteen Trifascicular Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2005-01-01

    @@ A complete trifascicular block would result in complete AV block. The idio ventricular rhythm has a slower rate and a wide QRS complex because the pacemaker is located at the peripheral part of the conduction system distal to the sites of the block1. Such a rhythm may be difficult to differentiate from bifascicular or bundle branch block combined with complete block at a higher level such as the AV node or His bundle2. Besides a slower ventricular rate, a change in the morphology of the QRS complex from a previous known bifascicular pattern would be strongly suggestive of a trifascicular origin of the complete AV block3. A His bundle recording is required for a definitive diagnosis, however.

  13. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Pia; Zaric, Dusanka; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm;

    2013-01-01

    Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps...... muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability....

  14. Perioperative modifications of respiratory function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, Michelle

    2012-01-31

    Postoperative pulmonary complications contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality, especially after major thoracic or abdominal surgery. Clinically relevant pulmonary complications include the exacerbation of underlying chronic lung disease, bronchospasm, atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation. Risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications include patient-related risk factors (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tobacco smoking and increasing age) as well as procedure-related risk factors (e.g., site of surgery, duration of surgery and general vs. regional anaesthesia). Careful history taking and a thorough physical examination may be the most sensitive ways to identify at-risk patients. Pulmonary function tests are not suitable as a general screen to assess risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Strategies to reduce the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications include smoking cessation, inspiratory muscle training, optimising nutritional status and intra-operative strategies. Postoperative care should include lung expansion manoeuvres and adequate pain control.

  15. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  16. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  17. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  18. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors.

  19. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blocked Urethral Valves Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Blocked Urethral Valves Page Content Article Body Urine leaves the bladder through a tube called the urethra, which in boys passes through the penis. Rarely, small membranes form across the urethra in ...

  20. Types of Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... P wave as it normally would. If an electrical signal is blocked before it reaches the ventricles, they won't contract and pump blood to the lungs and the rest of the body. Second-degree heart block is divided into two ...

  1. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix. Inde

  2. Respiratory diseases in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases are one of the major indirect causes of maternal deaths. Pregnancy is a unique physiological state during which changes occur in all systems of the body to meet metabolic needs of both the mother and growing foetus. Enlarging uterus and increasing hormonal levels cause changes in volumes and mechanics of lungs. Understanding the basic physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory changes during pregnancy along with the pathology of disease processes are vital in makin...

  3. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  4. A POCS-Based Algorithm for Blocking Artifacts Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yi-hong; CHENG Guo-hua; YU Song-yu

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm for blocking artifacts reduction in DCT domain for block-based image coding was developed. The algorithm is based on the projection onto convex set (POCS) theory. Due to the fact that the DCT characteristics of shifted blocks are different caused by the blocking artifacts, a novel smoothness constraint set and the corresponding projection operator were proposed to reduce the blocking artifacts by discarding the undesired high frequency coefficients in the shifted DCT blocks. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the conventional algorithms in terms of objective quality, subjective quality, and convergence property.

  5. Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verges, Samuel; Lenherr, Oliver; Haner, Andrea C; Schulz, Christian; Spengler, Christina M

    2007-03-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects performed a constant-load cycling test at 85% maximal power output to exhaustion (PRE(EXH), POST(EXH)). A further posttraining test was stopped at the pretraining duration (POST(ISO)) i.e., isotime. Before and after cycling, transdiaphragmatic pressure was measured during cervical magnetic stimulation to assess diaphragm contractility, and gastric pressure was measured during thoracic magnetic stimulation to assess abdominal muscle contractility. Overall, RMT did not reduce respiratory muscle fatigue. However, in subjects who developed >10% of diaphragm or abdominal muscle fatigue in PRE(EXH), fatigue was significantly reduced after RMT in POST(ISO) (inspiratory: -17 +/- 6% vs. -9 +/- 10%, P = 0.038, n = 9; abdominal: -19 +/- 10% vs. -11 +/- 11%, P = 0.038, n = 9), while sham training had no significant effect. Similarly, cycling endurance in POST(EXH) did not improve after RMT (P = 0.071), while a significant improvement was seen in the subgroup with >10% of diaphragm fatigue after PRE(EXH) (P = 0.017), but not in the sham training group (P = 0.674). However, changes in cycling endurance did not correlate with changes in respiratory muscle fatigue. In conclusion, RMT decreased the development of respiratory muscle fatigue during intensive exercise, but this change did not seem to improve cycling endurance.

  6. Potential impact of fireworks on respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gouder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The world-wide use of fireworks with their consequent detrimental effect on the air quality is widely recognized with elevated ambient air levels of particulate matter and its several metallic components and gases identified in several studies carried out during such events. Exposed individuals may be at risk following inhalation of such produced pollutants. This review focuses on the impact of fireworks on air quality and the potential effect of fireworks on the respiratory system of healthy individuals as well as those suffering from underlying respiratory diseases, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This applies not only to spectators including children but also to pyrotechnicians themselves. An extensive Medline search revealed that a strong evidence of the impact of fireworks on respiratory health is lacking in susceptible as well as healthy individuals with no formal studies on COPD or asthma, other than a few case reports in the latter. The implementation of global strategies to control the use of fireworks and hence improve air quality could possibly reduce their likely detrimental effect on human respiratory health in exposed individuals, but clearly a more targeted research is needed.

  7. Block copolymer battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  8. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups...

  9. Steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, JMKH; Mori, K; Ohmura, A; Toyooka, H; Hatano, Y; Shingu, K; Fukuda, K

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964 approximately 20 steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents have been evaluated clinically. Pancuronium, a bisquaternary compound designed on the drawingboard, was the first steroidal relaxant introduced into clinical practice worldwide in the 1970's. Although a major improvement, pancuroniu

  10. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  11. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabeticketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidityand mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requiresfocused clinical monitoring, careful interpretationof arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditionsthat can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions thatcompromise respiratory function caused by DKA can bedetected at presentation but are usually more prevalentduring treatment. These conditions include deficits ofpotassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic ornon-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not causedby DKA that can worsen respiratory function under theadded stress of DKA include infections of the respiratorysystem, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular diseaseand miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognitionand management of the conditions that can lead torespiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failureand improve mortality from DKA.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality healthcare contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by their full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. The ERS and the ATS have strong international commitments and work with leaders from governments, academia, and other organisational bodies to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of healthcare systems and health equality. Both the ATS and the ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organisations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members

  13. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight loss may reverse many adverse physiological consequences of severe obesity on the respiratory system. PMID:19700043

  14. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, S; Talboys, R; Paspula, C; Prempeh, E M; Fanous, R; Ail, D

    2017-01-01

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has now been described as a sequela to such diverse conditions as burns, amniotic fluid embolism, acute pancreatitis, trauma, sepsis and damage as a result of elective surgery in general. Patients with ARDS require immediate intubation, with the average patient now being ventilated for between 8 and 11 days. While the acute management of ARDS is conducted by the critical care team, almost any surgical patient can be affected by the condition and we believe that it is important that a broader spectrum of hospital doctors gain an understanding of the nature of the pathology and its current treatment.

  15. mprA, an Escherichia coli gene that reduces growth-phase-dependent synthesis of microcins B17 and C7 and blocks osmoinduction of proU when cloned on a high-copy-number plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, I; Gómez, J M; Moreno, F

    1990-01-01

    Microcins B17 and C7 are plasmid-determined, peptide antibiotics produced by Escherichia coli when cells enter the stationary phase of growth. Microcinogenic strains are immune to the action of the microcin they synthesize. A well-characterized deficient-immunity phenotype is exhibited by microcin B17-producing cells in the absence of the immunity gene mcbG (M.C. Garrido, M. Herrero, R. Kolter, and F. Moreno, EMBO J. 7:1853-1862, 1988). A 14.6-kilobase-pair EcoRI chromosomal fragment was isolated by its ability to suppress this phenotype when cloned into a multicopy vector. This fragment was mapped to 57.5 min on the E. coli genetic map. The position of the gene responsible for suppression, designated mprA, was determined by insertional mutagenesis and deletion analysis. mprA was shown to be transcribed clockwise on the E. coli chromosome, and its product was identified as a 19-kilodalton polypeptide. Suppression was shown to be achieved by decreasing microcin B17 production. Increased mprA gene dosage also caused a decrease in microcin C7 production and blocked the osmoinduction of the proU locus in high-osmolarity media. Our results suggest that the mprA gene product could play a regulatory role on expression of several E. coli genes, this control being exerted at the transcriptional level.

  16. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  17. Progressive muscle weakness with respiratory insufficiency in a young patient with tetanus during magnesium sulfate infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Preethy Joseph; Muthurajan, Narayanan; Wig, Jyotsna

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium sulfate administered as an intravenous infusion is considered safe. However, there have been concerns about the neuromuscular blocking properties of magnesium that can cause respiratory insufficiency. We report a patient with mild tetanus who, after being started on magnesium infusion, developed progressive respiratory insufficiency, proximal muscle weakness and ptosis. On discontinuation of magnesium infusion, the muscular weakness improved and respiration became normal. The safety of magnesium sulfate infusion for the management of tetanus needs to be re-evaluated.

  18. Perioperative Management of Interscalene Block in Patients with Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Schwenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interscalene nerve block impairs ipsilateral lung function and is relatively contraindicated for patients with lung impairment. We present a case of an 89-year-old female smoker with prior left lung lower lobectomy and mild to moderate lung disease who presented for right shoulder arthroplasty and insisted on regional anesthesia. The patient received a multimodal perioperative regimen that consisted of a continuous interscalene block, acetaminophen, ketorolac, and opioids. Surgery proceeded uneventfully and postoperative analgesia was excellent. Pulmonary physiology and management of these patients will be discussed. A risk/benefit discussion should occur with patients having impaired lung function before performance of interscalene blocks. In this particular patient with mild to moderate disease, analgesia was well managed through a multimodal approach including a continuous interscalene block, and close monitoring of respiratory status took place throughout the perioperative period, leading to a successful outcome.

  19. Respiratory Therapy and Respiratory Therapy Technician. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of respiratory therapy and respiratory therapy technician programs. An occupational description and program content are presented. The curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content,…

  20. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction.

  1. New Blocking Artifacts Reduction Method Based on Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Min; YI Qing-ming

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that a block discrete cosine transform compressed image exhibits visually annoying blocking artifacts at low-bit-rate. A new post-processing deblocking algorithm in wavelet domain is proposed. The algorithm exploits blocking-artifact features shown in wavelet domain. The energy of blocking artifacts is concentrated into some lines to form annoying visual effects after wavelet transform. The aim of reducing blocking artifacts is to capture excessive energy on the block boundary effectively and reduce it below the visual scope. Adaptive operators for different subbands are computed based on the wavelet coefficients. The operators are made adaptive to different images and characteristics of blocking artifacts. Experimental results show that the proposed method can significantly improve the visual quality and also increase the peak signal-noise-ratio(PSNR) in the output image.

  2. Investigating the complexity of respiratory patterns during the laryngeal chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Aidan K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laryngeal chemoreflex exists in infants as a primary sensory mechanism for defending the airway from the aspiration of liquids. Previous studies have hypothesized that prolonged apnea associated with this reflex may be life threatening and might be a cause of sudden infant death syndrome. Methods In this study we quantified the output of the respiratory neural network, the diaphragm EMG signal, during the laryngeal chemoreflex and eupnea in early postnatal (3–10 days piglets. We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm EMG activity corresponding to reflex-related events involved in clearance (restorative mechanisms such as cough and swallow exhibit lower complexity, suggesting that a synchronized homogeneous group of neurons in the central respiratory network are active during these events. Nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using the approximate entropy to asses the complexity of respiratory patterns. Results Diaphragm EMG, genioglossal activity EMG, as well as other physiological signals (tracheal pressure, blood pressure and respiratory volume were recorded from 5 unanesthetized chronically instrumented intact piglets. Approximate entropy values of the EMG during cough and swallow were found significantly (p p Conclusion Reduced complexity values of the respiratory neural network output corresponding to coughs and swallows suggest synchronous neural activity of a homogeneous group of neurons. The higher complexity values exhibited by eupneic respiratory activity are the result of a more random behaviour, which is the outcome of the integrated action of several groups of neurons involved in the respiratory neural network.

  3. High flow nasal oxygen in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J-D

    2012-07-01

    Use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is increasingly popular in adult ICUs for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. This is the result of the successful long-term use of HFNC in the neonatal field and recent clinical data in adults indicating beneficial effects of HFNC over conventional facemask oxygen therapy. HFNC rapidly alleviates symptoms of respiratory distress and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including deadspace washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and in inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. Indications of HFNC are broad, encompassing most if not all causes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. HFNC can also provide oxygen during invasive procedures, and be used to prevent or treat post-extubation respiratory failure. HFNC may also alleviate respiratory distress in patients at a palliative stage. Although observational studies suggest that HFNC might reduce the need for intubation in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure; such a reduction has not yet been demonstrated. Beyond this potential additional effect on outcome, the evidence already published argues in favor of the large use of HFNC as first line therapy for acute respiratory failure.

  4. Reduction of Transmitted Information Using Similarities between Range Blocks in Fractal Image Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaotong; Qiu, Shuping; Kuroda, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Fractal image coding uses the similarities between the best matching domain blocks and range blocks to reconstruct image. In the transmitted information, the information about the best matching domain blocks occupies a large percentage, so the reduction of information about the best matching domain blocks is the most effective method to reduce the quality of transmitted information. On the other hand, there are similarities between range blocks from each other. So, when range blocks are simil...

  5. Active Block Layout: A High Performance Block Layout Mechanism%Active Block Layout:一种高性能磁盘布局机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢军; 卢显良; 罗光春; 韩宏; 魏青松

    2003-01-01

    The access frequency of different files in file system is dissimilar. If file system can optimize the block lay-out of these hot files which are frequently accessed,the performance of file system will be improved. This paper pre-sents a high performance block layout mechanism: Active Block Layout (ABL). ABL can record the access frequencyof every file in file system and actively optimize the block layout of these hot files by block duplicating. The duplicatedblocks can be placed in the special zone of track,which is called "Cooling Zone". ABL can automatically determine theplacing position and the copy count of the blocks which need to be duplicated. In order to reduce the overhead of blockduplication,this paper also presents a mechanism which uses the potential disk bandwidth to realize the block duplica-tion,and does not obviously degrade the performance of file system.

  6. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  7. Coded MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songze; Maddah-Ali, Mohammad Ali; Avestimehr, A. Salman

    2015-01-01

    MapReduce is a commonly used framework for executing data-intensive jobs on distributed server clusters. We introduce a variant implementation of MapReduce, namely "Coded MapReduce", to substantially reduce the inter-server communication load for the shuffling phase of MapReduce, and thus accelerating its execution. The proposed Coded MapReduce exploits the repetitive mapping of data blocks at different servers to create coding opportunities in the shuffling phase to exchange (key,value) pair...

  8. Prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and postbronchiolitic wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimpen Jan LL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the primary cause of hospitalization for acute respiratory tract illness in general and specifically for bronchiolitis in young children. The link between RSV bronchiolitis and reactive airway disease is not completely understood, even though RSV bronchiolitis is frequently followed by recurrent episodes of wheezing. Therapy with ribavirin does not appear to significantly reduce long-term respiratory outcome of RSV lower respiratory tract infection, and corticosteroid or bronchodilator therapy may possibly improve outcomes only on a short-term basis. No vaccine against RSV is yet available. It is not known whether prophylaxis with RSV intravenous immune globulin or palivizumab can reduce postbronchiolitic wheezing.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  10. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse;

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly.......60-1.62). The presence of IRBBB was not associated with any adverse outcome.ConclusionIn this cohort study, RBBB and IRBBB were two to three times more common among men than women. Right bundle branch block was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality, whereas IRBBB was not. Contrary...

  11. Ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, Andrew William; Romer, Lee M

    2012-04-01

    During dynamic exercise, the healthy pulmonary system faces several major challenges, including decreases in mixed venous oxygen content and increases in mixed venous carbon dioxide. As such, the ventilatory demand is increased, while the rising cardiac output means that blood will have considerably less time in the pulmonary capillaries to accomplish gas exchange. Blood gas homeostasis must be accomplished by precise regulation of alveolar ventilation via medullary neural networks and sensory reflex mechanisms. It is equally important that cardiovascular and pulmonary system responses to exercise be precisely matched to the increase in metabolic requirements, and that the substantial gas transport needs of both respiratory and locomotor muscles be considered. Our article addresses each of these topics with emphasis on the healthy, young adult exercising in normoxia. We review recent evidence concerning how exercise hyperpnea influences sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and the effect this might have on the ability to perform muscular work. We also review sex-based differences in lung mechanics.

  12. Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r neck pain and disability (r Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment.

  13. Anatomy and physiology of respiratory system relevant to anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apeksh Patwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of respiratory system improves patient's safety during anaesthesia. It also optimises patient's ventilatory condition and airway patency. Such knowledge has influence on airway management, lung isolation during anaesthesia, management of cases with respiratory disorders, respiratory endoluminal procedures and optimising ventilator strategies in the perioperative period. Understanding of ventilation, perfusion and their relation with each other is important for understanding respiratory physiology. Ventilation to perfusion ratio alters with anaesthesia, body position and with one-lung anaesthesia. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an important safety mechanism, is inhibited by majority of the anaesthetic drugs. Ventilation perfusion mismatch leads to reduced arterial oxygen concentration mainly because of early closure of airway, thus leading to decreased ventilation and atelectasis during anaesthesia. Various anaesthetic drugs alter neuronal control of the breathing and bronchomotor tone.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and its propensity for causing bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Raymond J; DeVincenzo, John P

    2015-01-01

    Infants and young children with acute onset of wheezing and reduced respiratory airflows are often diagnosed with obstruction and inflammation of the small bronchiolar airways, ie bronchiolitis. The most common aetological agents causing bronchiolitis in young children are the respiratory viruses, and of the commonly encountered respiratory viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has a propensity for causing bronchiolitis. Indeed, RSV bronchiolitis remains the major reason why previously healthy infants are admitted to hospital. Why RSV infection is such a predominant cause of bronchiolitis is the subject of this review. By reviewing the available histopathology of RSV bronchiolitis, both in humans and relevant animal models, we identify hallmark features of RSV infection of the distal airways and focus attention on the consequences of columnar cell cytopathology occurring in the bronchioles, which directly impacts the development of bronchiolar obstruction, inflammation and disease.

  15. Respiratory inflammation and infections in high-performance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Maree; Pyne, David B

    2016-02-01

    Upper respiratory illness is the most common reason for non-injury-related presentation to a sports medicine clinic, accounting for 35-65% of illness presentations. Recurrent or persistent respiratory illness can have a negative impact on health and performance of athletes undertaking high levels of strenuous exercise. The cause of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) in athletes can be uncertain but the majority of cases are related to common respiratory viruses, viral reactivation, allergic responses to aeroallergens and exercise-related trauma to the integrity of respiratory epithelial membranes. Bacterial respiratory infections are uncommon in athletes. Undiagnosed or inappropriately treated asthma and/or allergy are common findings in clinical assessments of elite athletes experiencing recurrent URS. High-performance athletes with recurrent episodes of URS should undergo a thorough clinical assessment to exclude underlying treatable conditions of respiratory inflammation. Identifying athletes at risk of recurrent URS is important in order to prescribe preventative clinical, training and lifestyle strategies. Monitoring secretion rates and falling concentrations of salivary IgA can identify athletes at risk of URS. Therapeutic interventions are limited by the uncertainty of the underlying cause of inflammation. Topical anti-inflammatory sprays can be beneficial for some athletes. Dietary supplementation with bovine colostrum, probiotics and selected antioxidants can reduce the incidence or severity of URS in some athletes. Preliminary studies on athletes prone to URS indicate a genetic predisposition to a pro-inflammatory response and a dysregulated anti-inflammatory cytokine response to intense exercise as a possible mechanism of respiratory inflammation. This review focuses on respiratory infections and inflammation in elite/professional athletes.

  16. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  17. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In ord

  18. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  19. Concrete Block Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    1967, Cedergren 1974, Federal Highway .’,U .. V,47 -’":: 37 Administration 1980). Block pavements have essentially the same prob- lems with moisture...Vicksburg, Miss. Cedergren , H. R. 1974. Drainage of Highway and Airfield Pavements, John Wiley and Sons, New VOk. I Cement and Concrete Association

  20. Block That Pain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... along with the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). This finding shows that a specific combination of two molecules can block only pain-related neurons. It holds the promise of major ...

  1. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao, E-mail: hchuang@mail.ntut.edu.tw; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Number 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Road, Taipei 10608, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien [Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Number 95, Wen-Chang Road, Shih-Lin District, Taipei 11101, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. Methods: This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. Results: The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81–2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm

  2. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms.

  3. Dietary cholesterol modulates pathogen blocking by Wolbachia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Caragata

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This "pathogen blocking" could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV, a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2-5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking.

  4. EFFICACY OF ADDING FENTANYL TO LIGNOCAINE – ADRENALINE COMBINATION IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK FOR UPPER LIMB ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES A MULTI - CENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus block is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for surgeries of upper limb and it can be performed even in patients who are not adequately fit for general anesthesia. The significance of brachial plexus block has increased in recent years due to renewed interest in day care surgery. Lignocaine hydrochloride has been used extensively for brachial plexus block and it has the disadvantage of having short duration of action. Opioids when added to anesthetic mixtures may improve and prolo ng the action of local anesthetics during peripheral nerve blocks. Such postoperative pain control can reduce both narcotic requirements and narcotic induced side effects. Studies have shown the efficacy of opioids as analgesic adjuvants in prolonging the duration of brachial plexus block. With this background in mind, this study was conducted to compare the onset and duration of sensory and motor block produced by a mixture of lignocaine and adrenaline with that produced by a mixture of fentanyl, lignocain e and adrenaline. Aims: To assess the effectiveness of addition of fentanyl to a mixture of lignocaine and adrenaline in prolonging the duration of analgesia and motor block for upper limb orthopedic surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This multi - center rand omized control study was conducted in two tertiary care centers in 80 patients underwent elective upper limb orthopedic surgeries and they were allocated into two groups of 40 each group L and group F. the classical approach of supraclavicular brachial ple xus block. Drug used were 30 ml of lignocaine 1.5%+adrenaline 5mcg/ml + 0.5ml normal saline in group L and 30ml of lignocaine 1.5% + adrenaline 5mcg/ml + fentanyl 50 mcg in group F. Adequacy of block was assessed by the pin prick test and temperature test. Motor power was assessed by the modified Lowett scale. Sedation was monitored using the modified Ramsay scale. An assessment was made for onset of analgesia, onset of

  5. Antagonism of non-depolarising neuromuscular block: current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Eikermann, M

    2009-03-01

    There is now mounting evidence that even small degrees of postoperative residual neuromuscular block increases the incidence of adverse respiratory events in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit and may increase longer-term morbidity as well. In the absence of quantitative neuromuscular monitoring, residual block is easily missed. A very strong case can be made for the routine administration of a non-depolarising antagonist unless it can be objectively demonstrated that complete recovery has occurred spontaneously. However, the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is associated with the potential for cardiovascular and respiratory side-effects, so there are cogent reasons for using low doses when the level of neuromuscular block is not intense. As little as 0.015-0.025 mg.kg(-1) of neostigmine is required at a train-of-four count of four with minimal fade, whereas 0.04-0.05 mg.kg(-1) is needed at a train-of-four count of two or three. If only a single twitch or none at all can be evoked, neostigmine should not be expected to promptly reverse neuromuscular block, and antagonism is best delayed till a train-of-four-count of two is achieved.

  6. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  7. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the respiratory therapy technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation; Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  8. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  9. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Tai Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method.

  10. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR, parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses.

  11. Use of a respiratory clinical score among different providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lenna L; Gallaher, Margaret M; Davis, Robert L; Rutter, Carolyn M; Lewis, Toby C; Marcuse, Edgar K

    2004-03-01

    Respiratory assessment of children with asthma or bronchiolitis is problematic because both the components of the assessment and their relative importance vary among care providers. Use of a systematic standard assessment process and clinical score may reduce interobserver variation. Our objective was to determine observer agreement among physicians (MD), nurses (RN), and respiratory therapists (RT), using a standard respiratory clinical score. A clinical score was developed incorporating four physiologic parameters: respiratory rate, retractions, dyspnea, and auscultation. One hundred and sixty-five provider pairs (e.g., MD-MD, RN-RT) independently assessed a total of 55 patients admitted for asthma, bronchiolitis, or wheezing at an urban tertiary-care hospital. A weighted kappa statistic measured agreement beyond chance. Rater pairs had high observed agreement on total score of 82-88% and weighted kappas ranging from 0.52 (MD-RN; 95% CI, 0.19, 0.79) to 0.65 (RN-RN; 95% CI, 0.46, 0.87). Observed agreement on individual components of the score ranged from 58% (auscultation) to 74% (dyspnea), with unweighted kappas of 0.36 (respiratory rate; 95% CI, 0.26, 0.46) to 0.53 (dyspnea; 95% CI, 0.41, 0.65). In conclusion, this respiratory clinical score demonstrates good interobserver agreement between MDs, RNs, and RTs. Future research is needed to examine validity and responsiveness in clinical settings. By standardizing respiratory assessments, use of a clinical score may facilitate care coordination by physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists and thereby improve care of children hospitalized with asthma and bronchiolitis.

  12. Urgencias respiratorias Respiratory emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias respiratorias en un paciente con cáncer pueden tener su origen en patologías de la vía aérea, del parénquima pulmonar o de los grandes vasos. La causa puede ser el propio tumor o complicaciones concomitantes. La obstrucción de la vía aérea debería ser inicialmente evaluada con procedimientos endoscópicos. En situaciones severas, la cirugía raramente es posible. El emplazamiento endobronquial de stents e isótopos radiactivos (braquiterapia, la ablación tumoral por láser o la terapia fotodinámica, pueden aliviar de forma rápida los síntomas y reestablecer el flujo aéreo. El manejo de la hemoptisis depende de la causa que la provoque y de la cuantía de la misma. La broncoscopia sigue siendo el procedimiento de primera línea en la mayor parte de los casos; aporta información diagnóstica y puede interrumpir el sangrado mediante lavados con suero helado, taponamiento endobronquial o inyecciones tópicas de adrenalina o trombina. La radioterapia externa sigue siendo un procedimiento extraordinariamente útil para tratar la hemoptisis de causa tumoral y en situaciones bien seleccionadas la terapia endobronquial con láser o braquiterapia y la embolización arterial bronquial pueden proporcionar un gran rendimiento paliativo. Las urgencias respiratorias por enfermedad del parénquima pulmonar en un paciente oncológico, pueden tener causa tumoral, iatrogénica o infecciosa. El reconocimiento precoz de cada una de ellas determina la administración del tratamiento específico y las posibilidades de éxito.Respiratory emergencies in a patient with cancer can have their origin in pathologies of the airway, of the pulmonary parenchyma or the large vessels. The cause can be the tumour itself or concomitant complications. Obstruction of the airway should be initially evaluated with endoscopic procedures. Surgery is rarely possible in serious situations. The endobronchial placement of stents or radioactive isotopes

  13. Trigger Factors of Residual Neuromuscular Block (RNMB)at Extubation in Colorectal Surgery and Its Effects on Respiratory Function%结直肠手术全麻患者拔管时肌松药残余阻滞的引发因素及其对拔管早期呼吸功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓峰; 刘学连; 王淑荣; 魏玲; 马显亮; 史雪梅

    2015-01-01

    【目的】探讨结直肠手术全麻患者拔管时肌松药残余阻滞(RNMB)的发生率以及引发 RNMB 的因素和 RNMB 对患者术后拔管早期呼吸功能的影响。【方法】选择2013年1月至2014年5月在本院行择期结直肠手术全麻患者124例,术毕保留气管内导管转入麻醉后恢复室(PACU),用4个成串刺激(TOF)监测肌松,按临床指征拔管并根据拔管后即刻测量的 TOF 值将患者分成非 RNMB 组(TOF>0.9)和 RNMB 组(TOF 0.7~0.9且 TOF 0.9)and muscle relaxants residual group (TOF0.7-0.9 + TOF <0.7),in accordance with TOF value measured immediately after extubation rel-evant trigger RNMB factors and the impact on the incidence of respiratory function were recorded.[Results]The incidence rate of RNMB at extubation was 62.9%.Body mass index (BMI),type of muscle relaxants and age were the influencing factors of RNMB(P <0.05);RNMB patients incidence of pharyngeal function injury ,hypoxemia,hypercapnia and FVC,FEVl,MVV 10 min recovery degree after extubation had significant difference compared with those of non RNMB group (P <0.05).[Conclusion]The incidence of RNMB was higher and BMI was higher in patients with colorectal surgery under general anesthesia.Long-term muscle re-laxants senior age were the influence factors of RNM.The early respiratory function was significantly impaired after extubation.

  14. Block Transfer Handbook: Constructing and Negotiating Block Transfer Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Finola

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide resources for institutions or articulation committees who are engaged in the task of investigating the feasibility of block transfer agreements. Block transfer is the process whereby a block of credits is granted to students who have successfully completed a certificate, diploma, or cluster of courses…

  15. Postoperative pain management of liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis: Is it time to start US-guided neuraxial blocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, M; Martucci, G; Arcadipane, A

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasians. Declining lung function is the principal cause of death, but liver involvement can lead to the need for liver transplantation. General anesthesia has detrimental effects on pulmonary function, increasing perioperative morbidity and mortality in CF patients. Regional anesthetic techniques improve outcomes by reducing anesthetic drugs and administration of opioids, and hastening extubation, awakening, and restarting respiratory of physiotherapy. There is a growing evidence that thoracic epidural anesthesia is feasible in pediatric patients. Concerns about coagulopathy and immunosuppression have limited its use in liver transplantation. Ultrasonography is becoming an adjunct tool in neuraxial blocks, allowing faster and easier recognition of the epidural space, and reducing vertebral touch and number of attempts. In pediatric patients, it is still debated whether anesthesia has detrimental effects on cognitive development. Efforts to make regional techniques easier and safer by ultrasonography are ongoing. We report the first case of continuous thoracic epidural analgesia after pediatric liver transplantation in a 10-year-old boy affected with CF with macronodular cirrhosis. Despite a challenging coagulation profile, the echo-assisted procedure was safely performed and allowed extubation in the odds ratio, postoperative awakening and comfort, and quick resumption of respiratory physiotherapy. PMID:27833495

  16. Postoperative pain management of liver transplantation in cystic fibrosis: Is it time to start US-guided neuraxial blocks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Piazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasians. Declining lung function is the principal cause of death, but liver involvement can lead to the need for liver transplantation. General anesthesia has detrimental effects on pulmonary function, increasing perioperative morbidity and mortality in CF patients. Regional anesthetic techniques improve outcomes by reducing anesthetic drugs and administration of opioids, and hastening extubation, awakening, and restarting respiratory of physiotherapy. There is a growing evidence that thoracic epidural anesthesia is feasible in pediatric patients. Concerns about coagulopathy and immunosuppression have limited its use in liver transplantation. Ultrasonography is becoming an adjunct tool in neuraxial blocks, allowing faster and easier recognition of the epidural space, and reducing vertebral touch and number of attempts. In pediatric patients, it is still debated whether anesthesia has detrimental effects on cognitive development. Efforts to make regional techniques easier and safer by ultrasonography are ongoing. We report the first case of continuous thoracic epidural analgesia after pediatric liver transplantation in a 10-year-old boy affected with CF with macronodular cirrhosis. Despite a challenging coagulation profile, the echo-assisted procedure was safely performed and allowed extubation in the odds ratio, postoperative awakening and comfort, and quick resumption of respiratory physiotherapy.

  17. The Effects of Swim Training on Respiratory Aspects of Speech Production in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amanda Faith; Emes, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Reduced respiratory muscle strength in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) may affect speech respiratory variables such as maximum phonation duration (MPD), initiation volume, and expired mean airflow. Researchers randomly assigned adolescents with DS (N = 28) to either 12 weeks of swim training (DS-ST) or a control group (DS-NT). Repeated…

  18. Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadbakhsh, Manizhe; Khanjani, Narges; Bahrampour, Abbas; Haghighi, Pegah Shoae

    2016-07-01

    Some studies have suggested that the number of deaths increases as temperatures drops or rises above human thermal comfort zone. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relation between respiratory-related mortality and temperature in Shiraz, Iran. In this ecological study, data about the number of respiratory-related deaths sorted according to age and gender as well as average, minimum, and maximum ambient air temperatures during 2007-2011 were examined. The relationship between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths was calculated by crude and adjusted negative binomial regression analysis. It was adjusted for humidity, rainfall, wind speed and direction, and air pollutants including CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, O3, and THC. Spearman and Pearson correlations were also calculated between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths. The analysis was done using MINITAB16 and STATA 11. During this period, 2598 respiratory-related deaths occurred in Shiraz. The minimum number of respiratory-related deaths among all subjects happened in an average temperature of 25 °C. There was a significant inverse relationship between average temperature- and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects and women. There was also a significant inverse relationship between average temperature and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects, men and women in the next month. The results suggest that cold temperatures can increase the number of respiratory-related deaths and therefore policies to reduce mortality in cold weather, especially in patients with respiratory diseases should be implemented.

  19. Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadbakhsh, Manizhe; Khanjani, Narges; Bahrampour, Abbas; Haghighi, Pegah Shoae

    2017-02-01

    Some studies have suggested that the number of deaths increases as temperatures drops or rises above human thermal comfort zone. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relation between respiratory-related mortality and temperature in Shiraz, Iran. In this ecological study, data about the number of respiratory-related deaths sorted according to age and gender as well as average, minimum, and maximum ambient air temperatures during 2007-2011 were examined. The relationship between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths was calculated by crude and adjusted negative binomial regression analysis. It was adjusted for humidity, rainfall, wind speed and direction, and air pollutants including CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, O3, and THC. Spearman and Pearson correlations were also calculated between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths. The analysis was done using MINITAB16 and STATA 11. During this period, 2598 respiratory-related deaths occurred in Shiraz. The minimum number of respiratory-related deaths among all subjects happened in an average temperature of 25 °C. There was a significant inverse relationship between average temperature- and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects and women. There was also a significant inverse relationship between average temperature and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects, men and women in the next month. The results suggest that cold temperatures can increase the number of respiratory-related deaths and therefore policies to reduce mortality in cold weather, especially in patients with respiratory diseases should be implemented.

  20. Demographic Data - MDC_Block

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade Census 2000 Blocks. Census blocks are areas bounded on all sides by visible and/or invisible features shown on a map prepared...

  1. Habitat Blocks and Wildlife Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Habitat blocks are areas of contiguous forest and other natural habitats that are unfragmented by roads, development, or agriculture. Vermonts habitat blocks are...

  2. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  3. Properties of blocked linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weitian; Anderson, Brian D O; Deistler, Manfred; Filler, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the properties of blocked linear systems that have resulted from blocking discrete-time linear time invariant systems. The main idea is to explore the relationship between the blocked and the unblocked systems. Existing results are reviewed and a number of important new results are derived. Focus is given particularly on the zero properties of the blocked system as no such study has been found in the literature.

  4. Appropriate schemata and building blocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Haijun; Li Minqiang

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate schemata as a novel concept to characterize building blocks are introduced, and then, the traits of appropriate schemata are presented. The effects of building blocks by search operators are analyzed. Hence, the experiments on RR-8X8 are employed to verify that appropriate schemata construct the building blocks. The validity of appropriate schemata and building blocks from the views of theory and practice is presented.

  5. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  6. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel; Hansen, Tobias; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  7. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autzen, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how...... the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star....

  8. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  9. Respiratory symptoms in adults are related to impaired quality of life, regardless of asthma and COPD: results from the European community respiratory health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakke Per S

    2010-09-01

    symptoms in the European Community Respiratory Health Study (ECRHS varied from one percent to 35% 1. In fact, two studies have reported that more than half of the adult population suffers from one or more respiratory symptoms 45. Respiratory symptoms are important markers of the risk of having or developing disease. Respiratory symptoms have been shown to be predictors for lung function decline 678, asthma 910, and even all-cause mortality in a general population study 11. In patients with a known diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, respiratory symptoms are important determinants of reduced health related quality of life (HRQoL 12131415. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms exceeds the combined prevalences of asthma and COPD, and both asthma and COPD are frequently undiagnosed diseases 161718. Thus, the high prevalence of respipratory symptoms may mirror undiagnosed and untreated disease. The common occurrence of respiratory symptoms calls for attention to how these symptoms affect health also in subjects with no diagnosis of obstructive airways disease. Impaired HRQoL in the presence of respiratory symptoms have been found in two population-based studies 619, but no study of respiratory sypmtoms and HRQoL have separate analyses for subjects with and without asthma and COPD, and no study provide information about extensive objective measurements of respiratory health. The ECRHS is a randomly sampled, multi-cultural, population based cohort study. The ECRHS included measurements of atopy, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR, and lung function, and offers a unique opportunity to investigate how respiratory symptoms affect HRQoL among subjects both with and without obstructive lung disease. In the present paper we aimed to: 1 Describe the relationship between respiratory symptoms and HRQoL in an international adult general population and: 2 To assess whether this relationship varied with presence of asthma and/or COPD, or presence of objective

  10. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, G.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Montijn, R.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bogaert, D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease.

  11. Chain exchange in block copolymer micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Block copolymer micelles are aggregates formed by self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers dispersed in a selective solvent, driven by unfavorable interactions between the solvent and the core-forming block. Due to the relatively long chains being subject to additional thermodynamic and dynamic constraints (e.g., entanglements, crystallinity, vitrification), block copolymer micelles exhibit significantly slower equilibration kinetics than small molecule surfactants. As a result, details of the mechanism(s) of equilibration in block copolymer micelles remain unclear. This present works focuses on the chain exchange kinetics of poly(styrene-b-ethylenepropylene) block copolymers in squalane (C30H62) using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). A mixture of h-squalane and d-squalane is chosen so that it contrast matches a mixed 50/50 h/d polystyrene micelle core. When the temperature is appropriate and isotopically labeled chains undergo mixing, the mean core contrast with respect to the solvent decreases, and the scattering intensity is therefore reduced. This strategy allows direct probing of chain exchange rate from the time dependent scattering intensity I(q, t).

  12. Natural convection through enclosed disconnected solid blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Fernando Cesar De; Junqueira, Silvio L.M.; Franco, Admilson T. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: fernandodelai@gmail.com; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; admilson@utfpr.edu.br; Lage, Jose L. [Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX (United States)]. E-mail: JLL@smu.edu

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the natural convection inside a fluid filled, enclosure containing several solid obstructions and being heated from the side is modeled and numerically simulated. The solid obstructions are equally spaced, conducting, and disconnected square blocks. The mathematical model is based on the balance equations of mass, momentum and energy, which are then solved numerically via the finite-volume method with the SIMPLEST algorithm and the HYBRID scheme. The effects of varying the solid-fluid thermal conductivity ratio (K), the fluid volume-fraction or porosity ({phi}), the number of solid blocks (N) and the heating strength (represented by the Rayleigh number, Ra) of the enclosure on the Nusselt number based on the surface-averaged heat transfer coefficient along the heated wall of the enclosure are studied. The results indicate a competing effect caused by the proximity of the solid blocks to the heated and cooled walls, vis-a-vis hindering the boundary layer growth, hence reducing the heat transfer effectiveness, and at the same time enhancing the heat transfer when the blocks' thermal conductivity is larger than that of the fluid. An analytical estimate of the minimum number of blocks beyond which the convection hindrance becomes predominant is presented and validated by the numerical results. (author)

  13. Gene therapy and respiratory neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a life-sustaining behavior that in mammals is accomplished by activation of dedicated muscles responsible for inspiratory and expiratory forces acting on the lung and chest wall. Motor control is exerted by specialized pools of motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord innervated by projections from multiple centers primarily in the brainstem that act in concert to generate both the rhythm and pattern of ventilation. Perturbations that prevent the accomplishment of the full range of motor behaviors by respiratory muscles commonly result in significant morbidity and increased mortality. Recent developments in gene therapy and novel targeting strategies have contributed to deeper understanding of the organization of respiratory motor systems. Gene therapy has received widespread attention and substantial progress has been made in recent years with the advent of improved tools for vector design. Genes can be delivered via a variety of plasmids, synthetic or viral vectors and cell therapies. In recent years, adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have become one of the most commonly used vector systems, primarily because of the extensive characterization conducted to date and the versatility in targeting strategies. Recent studies highlight the power of using AAV to selectively and effectively transduce respiratory motoneurons and muscle fibers with promising therapeutic effects. This brief review summarizes current evidence for the use of gene therapy in respiratory disorders with a primary focus on interventions that address motor control and neuroplasticity, including regeneration, in the respiratory system.

  14. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  15. Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hirofumi; Koike, Minoru; Takeuchi, Seiichi; Douhara, Noriyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK (robot block system) and the rational formula of robots were proposed. ROBO-BLOCK is composed of servo motors, the parts for servomotor rotor, the brackets for servomotor fixation, the board parts and the controllers. A robot can be assembled easily by ROBO-BLOCK. Meanwhile, it is convenient when the structure of the robot can be described easily as a character. The whole structure of the robot is expressed as rational formula of the robot to show molecule structure in chemistry. ROBO-BLOCK can be useful for not only the research but also the education. Creative student experiment was done in the college of industrial technology.

  16. Iron inhibits respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Jurek, Aleksandra; Kubit, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study examines the effects of iron ions Fe(3+) on the respiratory burst of phagocytes isolated from peritoneal effluents of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, as an in vitro model of iron overload in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Material and Methods....... Respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes was measured by chemiluminescence method. Results. At the highest used concentration of iron ions Fe(3+) (100 µM), free radicals production by peritoneal phagocytes was reduced by 90% compared to control. Conclusions. Iron overload may increase the risk of infectious...

  17. Finding maximum JPEG image block code size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Gopal

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of JPEG baseline coding. It aims to determine the minimum storage needed to buffer the JPEG Huffman code bits of 8-bit image blocks. Since DC is coded separately, and the encoder represents each AC coefficient by a pair of run-length/AC coefficient level, the net problem is to perform an efficient search for the optimal run-level pair sequence. We formulate it as a two-dimensional, nonlinear, integer programming problem and solve it using a branch-and-bound based search method. We derive two types of constraints to prune the search space. The first one is given as an upper-bound for the sum of squares of AC coefficients of a block, and it is used to discard sequences that cannot represent valid DCT blocks. The second type constraints are based on some interesting properties of the Huffman code table, and these are used to prune sequences that cannot be part of optimal solutions. Our main result is that if the default JPEG compression setting is used, space of minimum of 346 bits and maximum of 433 bits is sufficient to buffer the AC code bits of 8-bit image blocks. Our implementation also pruned the search space extremely well; the first constraint reduced the initial search space of 4 nodes down to less than 2 nodes, and the second set of constraints reduced it further by 97.8%.

  18. Respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    2001-09-01

    This article was written as an introduction to a special issue of Behavior Modification dedicated to studies in the field of respiratory psychophysiology. Although the invited articles that constitute this special issue cover a fairly broad range of topics, priority was given to articles that focus on the role of respiration in panic disorder. Attention is directed to the fundamental role of breathing in applied psychophysiology and to the encouragement of research in the modification of breathing behavior. The connection between respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification is explained by reference to (a) a recent article on Pavlovian and operant control of breathing behavior and (b) four published volumes of selected articles dedicated exclusively to the field of respiratory psychophysiology. The present special issue of Behavior Modification marks the fifth volume.

  19. Neck pain causes respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapreli, Eleni; Vourazanis, Evangelos; Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a presumptive mechanism for the development of changes in respiratory function due to chronic neck pain. The patient with neck pain presents a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition of leading to a respiratory dysfunction: (a) the decreased strength of deep neck flexors and extensors, (b) the hyperactivity and increased fatigability of superficial neck flexors, (c) the limitation of range of motion, (d) the decrease in proprioception and disturbances in neuromuscular control, (e) the existence of pain and (f) the psychosocial influence of dysfunction. The possible connection of neck pain and respiratory function could have a great impact on various clinical aspects notably patient assessment, rehabilitation and pharmacological prescription.

  20. Reference respiratory waveforms by minimum jerk model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anetai, Yusuke, E-mail: anetai@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 2-2, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Osaka University Hospital, Yamadaoka 2-15, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife{sup ®} robotic surgery system has the ability to deliver radiation to a tumor subject to respiratory movements using Synchrony{sup ®} mode with less than 2 mm tracking accuracy. However, rapid and rough motion tracking causes mechanical tracking errors and puts mechanical stress on the robotic joint, leading to unexpected radiation delivery errors. During clinical treatment, patient respiratory motions are much more complicated, suggesting the need for patient-specific modeling of respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel method that provides a reference respiratory wave to enable smooth tracking for each patient. Methods: The minimum jerk model, which mathematically derives smoothness by means of jerk, or the third derivative of position and the derivative of acceleration with respect to time that is proportional to the time rate of force changed was introduced to model a patient-specific respiratory motion wave to provide smooth motion tracking using CyberKnife{sup ®}. To verify that patient-specific minimum jerk respiratory waves were being tracked smoothly by Synchrony{sup ®} mode, a tracking laser projection from CyberKnife{sup ®} was optically analyzed every 0.1 s using a webcam and a calibrated grid on a motion phantom whose motion was in accordance with three pattern waves (cosine, typical free-breathing, and minimum jerk theoretical wave models) for the clinically relevant superior–inferior directions from six volunteers assessed on the same node of the same isocentric plan. Results: Tracking discrepancy from the center of the grid to the beam projection was evaluated. The minimum jerk theoretical wave reduced the maximum-peak amplitude of radial tracking discrepancy compared with that of the waveforms modeled by cosine and typical free-breathing model by 22% and 35%, respectively, and provided smooth tracking for radial direction. Motion tracking constancy as indicated by radial tracking discrepancy

  1. [Ultrasound for peripheral neural block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefalianakis, F

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound is well established in medicine. Unfortunately, ultrasound is still rarely used in the area of anesthesia. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound in regional anesthesia. The basic principles of ultrasound are the piezoelectric effect and the behaviour of acoustic waveforms in human tissue. Ultrasound imaging in medicine uses high frequency pulses of sound waves (2.5-10 MHz). The following images are built up from the reflected sounds. The ultrasound devices used in regional anesthesia (commonly by 10 MHz) deliver a two-dimensional view. The main step for a successful regional anaesthesia is to identify the exact position of the nerve. In addition, specific surface landmarks and the use of peripheral nerve stimulator help to detect the correct position of the needle. Nerves are demonstrated as an composition of hyperechogenic (white) and hypoechogenic (black) areas. The surrounding hyperechogenic parts are epi- and perineurium, the dark hypoechogenic part is the neural tissue. The composition of peripheral nerves are always similar, but the quantities of each part, of surrounding perineurium and nerval structures, differ. Further the imaging of nerves is significantly influenced by the angle of beam to the nerve and the surrounding anatomic structures. Only experience and correct interpretation make the ultrasound a valid method in clinical practice. Correct interpretation has to be learned by standardized education. Three examples of peripheral nerve blocks are described. The detection of nerves and the visualization of the correct spread of local anesthetics to the nerves are the main principles of effective ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, whereas closest proximity of the needle to the target nerve is not necessary. The described examples of ultrasound guidance for nerval block illustrates the specific procedures with reduced probability of nerval irritation, high success and low rate of

  2. Respiratory distress in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Suzanne; Moser, Chuanpit; Baack, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory distress presents as tachypnea, nasal flaring, retractions, and grunting and may progress to respiratory failure if not readily recognized and managed. Causes of respiratory distress vary and may not lie within the lung. A thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic and laboratory findings will aid in the differential diagnosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, neonatal pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Strong evidence reveals an inverse relationship between gestational age and respiratory morbidity. (1)(2)(9)(25)(26) Expert opinion recommends careful consideration about elective delivery without labor at less than 39 weeks’ gestation. Extensive evidence, including randomized control trials, cohort studies, and expert opinion, supports maternal group B streptococcus screening, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, and appropriate followup of high-risk newborns according to guidelines established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (4)(29)(31)(32)(34) Following these best-practice strategies is effective in preventing neonatal pneumonia and its complications. (31)(32)(34). On the basis of strong evidence, including randomized control trials and Cochrane Reviews, administration of antenatal corticosteroids (5) and postnatal surfactant (6) decrease respiratory morbidity associated with RDS. Trends in perinatal management strategies to prevent MAS have changed. There is strong evidence that amnioinfusion, (49) oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal suctioning at the perineum, (45) or intubation and endotracheal suctioning of vigorous infants (46)(47) do not decrease MAS or its complications. Some research and expert opinion supports endotracheal suctioning of nonvigorous meconium-stained infants (8) and induction of labor at 41 weeks’ gestation (7) to prevent MAS.

  3. Ambient wood smoke exposure and respiratory symptoms in Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C M; Dharmage, S C; Matheson, M; Gras, J L; Markos, J; Mészáros, D; Hopper, J; Walters, E H; Abramson, M J

    2010-12-15

    Wood smoke exposure has been associated with adverse respiratory health outcomes, with much of the current research focused on wood smoke from domestic heating and cooking. This study examined the association between respiratory symptoms and outdoor wood smoke in Launceston, Tasmania, where ~30% of homes use wood burners for domestic heating. This ecological study examined data from participants of the 2004 Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study postal survey and compared the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in Launceston (n=601) with that in Hobart (n=1071), a larger Tasmanian city with much less wood smoke. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations of interest while adjusting for gender, atopy, history of allergic disease and current smoking status. There were no significant differences in symptom prevalence between Launceston and Hobart. Two subgroup analyses, which examined participants with pre-existing chronic respiratory disease, and those who reported actively using a wood burner in their home, also did not find significant differences. Any impact of wood smoke on non-specific respiratory symptoms might have been overshadowed by other important determinants of respiratory health, such as vehicle exhaust and tobacco smoking, or were too small to have been detected. However, the lack of detectable differences in symptom prevalence might also reflect the success of regulatory action by local governments to reduce wood smoke emissions in Launceston. The results of other epidemiological studies support an association between ambient wood smoke exposure and adverse respiratory health. Further investigations of wood smoke exposure in Australian settings are needed to investigate the lack of significant associations found in this study, especially studies of indoor air quality and health impacts in children and elderly populations.

  4. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  5. Spintronics: Conceptual Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    The purpose of this introduction to spintronics is to provide some elementary description of its conceptual building blocks. Thus, it is intended for a newcomer to the field. After recalling rudimentary descriptions of spin precession and spin relaxation, spin-dependent transport is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. This suffices to introduce key notions such as the spin asymmetry of the conductivities in the two-current model, the spin diffusion length, and spin accumulation. Two basic mechanisms of spin relaxation are then presented, one arising from spin-orbit scattering and the other from electron-magnon collisions. Finally, the action of a spin-polarized current on magnetization is presented in a thermodynamics framework. This introduces the notion of spin torque and the characteristic length scale over which the transverse spin polarization of conduction electron decays as it is injected into a magnet.

  6. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...... efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...

  7. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  8. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  9. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul SP

    2014-12-01

    instances, about prevention and avoidance to reduce the risks of any further RTIs must be addressed, including immunization and smoking cessation. Keywords: respiratory tract infections, children, red flags, holistic care, immunization

  11. Perinatal respiratory infections and long term consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Indinnimeo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most important pathogen in the etiology of respiratory infections in early life. 50% of children are affected by RSV within the first year of age, and almost all children become infected within two years. Numerous retrospective and prospective studies linking RSV and chronic respiratory morbidity show that RSV bronchiolitis in infancy is followed by recurrent wheezing after the acute episod. According to some authors a greater risk of wheezing in children with a history of RSV bronchiolitis would be limited to childhood, while according to others this risk would be extended into adolescence and adulthood. To explain the relationship between RSV infection and the development of bronchial asthma or the clinical pathogenetic patterns related to a state of bronchial hyperreactivity, it has been suggested that RSV may cause alterations in the response of the immune system (immunogenic hypothesis, activating directly mast cells and basophils and changing the pattern of differentiation of immune cells present in the bronchial tree as receptors and inflammatory cytokines. It was also suggested that RSV infection can cause bronchial hyperreactivity altering nervous airway modulation, acting on nerve fibers present in the airways (neurogenic hypothesis.The benefits of passive immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, which seems to represent an effective approach in reducing the sequelae of RSV infection in the short- and long-term period, strengthen the implementation of prevention programs with this drug, as recommended by the national guidelines of the Italian Society of Neonatology. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the

  12. Motavizumab for prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus in high-risk children: a noninferiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Simões, Eric A F; Dagan, Ron

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Palivizumab reduces respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization in children at high risk by approximately 50% compared with placebo. We compared the efficacy and safety of motavizumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody with enhanced anti-RSV activity in preclinical studies, ...

  13. Specific Dietary Oligosaccharides Increase Th1 Responses in a Mouse Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, Marcel A.; Kruijsen, Debby; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M.; van't Land, Belinda

    2012-01-01

    Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in infants. In addition to maternal antibodies, other immune-modulating factors in human milk contribute to this protection. Specific dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides, similar to oligosaccharides pres

  14. Respiratory motion correction for PET oncology applications using affine transformation of list mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' information medicale (LaTIM), Universite de Bretagne occidentale, Brest (France); Cresson, T [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' information medicale (LaTIM), Universite de Bretagne occidentale, Brest (France); Savean, J [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' information medicale (LaTIM), Universite de Bretagne occidentale, Brest (France); Rest, C Cheze Le [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' information medicale (LaTIM), Universite de Bretagne occidentale, Brest (France); Reader, A J [Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Science, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom); Visvikis, D [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' information medicale (LaTIM), Universite de Bretagne occidentale, Brest (France)

    2007-01-07

    Respiratory motion is a source of artefacts and reduced image quality in PET. Proposed methodology for correction of respiratory effects involves the use of gated frames, which are however of low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore a method accounting for respiratory motion effects without affecting the statistical quality of the reconstructed images is necessary. We have implemented an affine transformation of list mode data for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax. The study was performed using datasets of the NCAT phantom at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List mode data based PET simulated frames were produced by combining the NCAT datasets with a Monte Carlo simulation. Transformation parameters accounting for respiratory motion were estimated according to an affine registration and were subsequently applied on the original list mode data. The corrected and uncorrected list mode datasets were subsequently reconstructed using the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm. Comparison of corrected and uncorrected respiratory motion average frames suggests that an affine transformation in the list mode data prior to reconstruction can produce significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lungs and heart. However, the application of a common set of transformation parameters across the imaging field of view does not significantly correct the respiratory effects on organs such as the stomach, liver or spleen.

  15. INGUINAL NERVE BLOCK FOR PATIENTS UNDERGOING INGUINAL HERNIOPLASTY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is the most common elective surgical procedure performed under general, regional or local anesthesia. The advantages of day case surgery include greater patient satisfaction and reduced financial costs to the health service. Inguinal nerve b locks may be particularly helpful for patients with cardiovascular or respiratory dis...

  16. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  17. Respiratory muscle training improves hemodynamics, autonomic function, baroreceptor sensitivity, and respiratory mechanics in rats with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Hentschke, Vítor S; Quagliotto, Edson; Cavinato, Paulo R; Schmeing, Letiane A; Xavier, Léder L; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory muscle training (RMT) improves functional capacity in chronic heart-failure (HF) patients, but the basis for this improvement remains unclear. We evaluate the effects of RMT on the hemodynamic and autonomic function, arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and respiratory mechanics in rats with HF. Rats were assigned to one of four groups: sedentary sham (n = 8), trained sham (n = 8), sedentary HF (n = 8), or trained HF (n = 8). Trained animals underwent a RMT protocol (30 min/day, 5 day/wk, 6 wk of breathing through a resistor), whereas sedentary animals did not. In HF rats, RMT had significant effects on several parameters. It reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (P RMT (P RMT (P RMT (P RMT protocol in HF rats promotes an improvement in hemodynamic function, sympathetic and vagal heart modulation, arterial BRS, and respiratory mechanics, all of which are benefits associated with improvements in cardiopulmonary interaction.

  18. Large Block Test Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  19. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a respiratory therapy technology program. The guide contains four sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining the purpose and objectives, a program…

  20. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and…

  1. Respiratory Therapy Assistant. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judy A.

    This manual is one in a new series of self-contained materials for students enrolled in training with the allied health field. It includes competencies that are associated with the performance of skills by students beginning the study of respiratory therapy assistance. Intended to be used for individualized instruction under the supervision of an…

  2. [Respiratory function in glass blowers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, E; Butković, D; Mustajbegović, J

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic and acute respiratory symptoms and diseases and changes in lung function in a group of 80 glass blowers have been investigated. In addition a group of 80 not exposed workers was used as a control group for respiratory symptoms and diseases. In glass blowers, there was significant increase in prevalence of chronic bronchitis, nasal catarrh, and sinusitis than in the controls. Glass blowers exposed for more and less than 10 years had similar prevalences of respiratory symptoms. A large number of glass blowers complained of acute across-shift symptoms. Significant increase in FVC, FEF50 and FEF25 was documented at the end of the work shift. Comparison with predicted normal values showed that glass blowers had FVC and FEF25 significantly lower than predicted. RV and RV/TLC were significantly increased compared with the predicted normal values. DLCO was within the normal values in most glass blowers. It is concluded that work in the glass blower industry is likely to lead the development of chronic respiratory disorders.

  3. Nasopharyngeal colonization with respiratory pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory (otitis media, pneumonia) and invasive (sepsis, meningitis) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that every year one million children under the age of five die of pneumonia, mainly in developing countries. Elderly are ano

  4. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  5. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  6. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased implemen

  7. Neonatal total liquid ventilation: is low-frequency forced oscillation technique suitable for respiratory mechanics assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Dominick; Beaulieu, Alexandre; Avoine, Olivier; Micheau, Philippe; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to implement low-frequency forced oscillation technique (LFFOT) in neonatal total liquid ventilation (TLV) and to provide the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. Thirteen newborn lambs, weighing 2.5 + or - 0.4 kg (mean + or - SD), were premedicated, intubated, anesthetized, and then placed under TLV using a specially design liquid ventilator and a perfluorocarbon. The respiratory mechanics measurements protocol was started immediately after TLV initiation. Three blocks of measurements were first performed: one during initial respiratory system adaptation to TLV, followed by two other series during steady-state conditions. Lambs were then divided into two groups before undergoing another three blocks of measurements: the first group received a 10-min intravenous infusion of salbutamol (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) after continuous infusion of methacholine (9 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), while the second group of lambs was chest strapped. Respiratory impedance was measured using serial single-frequency tests at frequencies ranging between 0.05 and 2 Hz and then fitted with a constant-phase model. Harmonic test signals of 0.2 Hz were also launched every 10 min throughout the measurement protocol. Airway resistance and inertance were starkly increased in TLV compared with gas ventilation, with a resonant frequency ventilation. We show that LFFOT is an effective tool to track respiratory mechanics under TLV.

  8. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ye

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting.

  9. Occupational pesticide exposures and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-11-28

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting.

  10. Respiratory Information Extraction from Electrocardiogram Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Gamal El Din Fathy

    2010-12-01

    The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical activity of the heart, and it is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs. In this thesis, several methods for the extraction of respiratory process information from the ECG signal are presented. These methods allow an estimation of the lung volume and the lung pressure from the ECG signal. The potential benefit of this is to eliminate the corresponding sensors used to measure the respiration activity. A reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients will increase patients’ comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. As a further result, the efficiency of diagnosing respirational disorders will increase since the respiration activity can be monitored with a common, widely available method. The developed methods can also improve the detection of respirational disorders that occur while patients are sleeping. Such disorders are commonly diagnosed in sleeping laboratories where the patients are connected to a number of different sensors. Any reduction of these sensors will result in a more natural sleeping environment for the patients and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis.

  11. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Jignesh Mukeshkumar; Dhareshwar, Shashank; Sharma, Anand; Karanth, Raghuveer; Ramkumar, V. S.; Ramaiah, Indira

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP) of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air. PMID:25006313

  12. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh Mukeshkumar Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air.

  13. Dimensional Reduction for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hogervorst, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    We consider the dimensional reduction of a CFT, breaking multiplets of the d-dimensional conformal group SO(d+1,1) up into multiplets of SO(d,1). This leads to an expansion of d-dimensional conformal blocks in terms of blocks in d-1 dimensions. In particular, we obtain a formula for 3d conformal blocks as an infinite sum over 2F1 hypergeometric functions with closed-form coefficients.

  14. Common blocks for ASQS(12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Milazzo

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available An ASQS(v is a particular Steiner system featuring a set of v vertices and two separate families of blocks, B and G, whose elements have a respective cardinality of 4 and 6. It has the property that any three vertices of X belong either to a B-block or to a G-block. The parameter cb is the number of common blocks in two separate ASQSs, both defined on the same set of vertices X . In this paper it is shown that cb ≤ 29 for any pair of ASQSs(12.

  15. Eikonalization of Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, A Liam; Walters, Matthew T; Wang, Junpu

    2015-01-01

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the $t$-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the `eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator $T$ appears in the OPE $\\mathcal{O}(x) \\mathcal{O}(0)$, then the large spin $\\ell$ Fock space states $[TT \\cdots T]_{\\ell}$ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an $\\langle \\mathcal{O} \\mathcal{O} \\mathcal{O} \\mathcal{O} \\rangle$ correlator build the classical `$T$ field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single $T$ exchange in the 4-pt correlator of $\\mathcal{O}$. Our results should be useful for systematizing $1/\\ell$ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading $\\log \\ell$...

  16. Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveen Kumar; AK Gadpayle; Deepshikha Trisal

    2013-01-01

    In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease.With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure.

  17. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency and the elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarzan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory failure is a complex entity of varied etiology and physio-pathological mechanisms. It is mainly characterised by the respiratory system's difficulty in ensuring correct aeration at rest, resulting initially in insufficient oxygenation of arterial blood. Treatment is adapted to each etiology and aims to compensate for respiratory failure and to ensure the oxygenation of the organism.

  18. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  19. Evaluation of effects of sciatic and femoral nerve blocks in sheep undergoing stifle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ann E; Mama, Khursheed R; Ruehlman, Dana L; Pelkey, Sheila; Turner, A Simon

    2011-04-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of locally anesthetizing the sciatic and femoral nerves in sheep undergoing stifle (femorotibial) surgery (16 sheep received nerve blocks; 16 sheep underwent a nerve localization procedure but received no nerve blocks). Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and end-tidal isoflurane were recorded every 5 min while sheep were anesthetized. At some of the observed time points, the mean heart rate in the sheep that had received no nerve blocks was significantly higher than in the sheep that had received the nerve blocks. Postoperatively, each sheep was assigned scores for comfort and attitude, movement, flock behavior, feeding behavior and appetite and respiratory rate (based on predefined descriptions). Though the authors found no undesirable effects of this local anesthesia, beneficial effects of the nerve blocks were minimal or not readily apparent under the conditions of this study.

  20. Subsea building blocks for slender wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabedotti, Sergio

    2010-07-01

    Reduce the Life Cycle Cost (LCC), IOR and improve HSE are fundamental aspects in future subsea field developments. The SBB (Subsea Building Blocks) is an R D effort from Statoil and Aker Solutions to investigate and develop new technology that can allow the industry to achieve these objectives. One important aspect of this initiative is well construction and reduced rig time for drilling, completion and intervention of subsea wells. To enable a slender system and increase the operational flexibility, well equipment (WH, XMT) has been analyzed and redesigned. (Author)

  1. Seed Conformal Blocks in 4D CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Karateev, Denis; Serone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We compute in closed analytical form the minimal set of "seed" conformal blocks associated to the exchange of generic mixed symmetry spinor/tensor operators in an arbitrary representation (l,\\bar l) of the Lorentz group in four dimensional conformal field theories. These blocks arise from 4-point functions involving two scalars, one (0,|l-\\bar l|) and one (|l-\\bar l|,0) spinors or tensors. We directly solve the set of Casimir equations, that can elegantly be written in a compact form for any (l,\\bar l), by using an educated ansatz and reducing the problem to an algebraic linear system. Various details on the form of the ansatz have been deduced by using the so called shadow formalism. The complexity of the conformal blocks depends on the value of p=|l-\\bar l | and grows with p, in analogy to what happens to scalar conformal blocks in d even space-time dimensions as d increases. These results open the way to bootstrap 4-point functions involving arbitrary spinor/tensor operators in four dimensional conformal f...

  2. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection.

  3. A Comparison of Jump Height, Takeoff Velocities, and Blocking Coverage in the Swing and Traditional Volleyball Blocking Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Ficklin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and swing blocking techniques on center of mass (COM projectile motion and effective blocking area in nine healthy Division I female volleyball players. Two high-definition (1080 p video cameras (60 Hz were used to collect two-dimensional variables from two separate views. One was placed perpendicular to the plane of the net and the other was directed along the top of the net, and were used to estimate COM locations and blocking area in a plane parallel to the net and hand penetration through the plane of the net respectively. Video of both the traditional and swing techniques were digitized and kinematic variables were calculated. Paired samples t-tests indicated that the swing technique resulted in greater (p < 0.05 vertical and horizontal takeoff velocities (vy and vx, jump height (H, duration of the block (tBLOCK, blocking coverage during the block (C as well as hand penetration above and through the net’s plane (YPEN, ZPEN. The traditional technique had significantly greater approach time (tAPP. The results of this study suggest that the swing technique results in both greater jump height and effective blocking area. However, the shorter tAPP that occurs with swing is associated with longer times in the air during the block which may reduce the ability of the athlete to make adjustments to attacks designed to misdirect the defense.

  4. Prone positioning in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kristy; Dufault, Marlene; Bergeron, Kathy

    2015-08-12

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a condition with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and treatment is often long and costly. Prone positioning is a rarely used intervention for patients with this syndrome, although research suggests it may be effective. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effects of prone positioning on oxygenation, morbidity and mortality in patients with ARDS. It revealed that prone positioning, when used with low tidal volume ventilation over an extended period, may reduce mortality rates in selected patients with severe ARDS. The selection of patients with severe ARDS for prone positioning should be done on a case-by-case basis to maximise benefits and minimise complications. Further research is required on the use of prone positioning in patients with severe ARDS to support or disclaim the therapy's use in practice, and to compare confounding variables such as ideal prone duration and mechanical versus manual pronation.

  5. Respiratory effects of air pollution on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldizen, Fiona C; Sly, Peter D; Knibbs, Luke D

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the global burden of disease is directly or indirectly attributable to exposure to air pollution. Exposures occurring during the periods of organogenesis and rapid lung growth during fetal development and early post-natal life are especially damaging. In this State of the Art review, we discuss air toxicants impacting on children's respiratory health, routes of exposure with an emphasis on unique pathways relevant to young children, methods of exposure assessment and their limitations and the adverse health consequences of exposures. Finally, we point out gaps in knowledge and research needs in this area. A greater understanding of the adverse health consequences of exposure to air pollution in early life is required to encourage policy makers to reduce such exposures and improve human health.

  6. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  7. Four-block beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows a four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with the secondary beams, the collimators operated in vacuum conditions. The blocks were made of steel and had a standard length of 1 m. The maximum aperture had a square coss-section of 144 cm2. (See Annual Report 1976.)

  8. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  9. Block storage subsystem performance analysis

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    You feel that your service is slow because of the storage subsystem? But there are too many abstraction layers between your software and the raw block device for you to debug all this pile... Let's dive on the platters and check out how the block storage sees your I/Os! We can even figure out what those patterns are meaning.

  10. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (pdefect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (pdefect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and

  11. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and

  12. Respiratory dysfunction and proinflammatory chemokines in the pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) model of viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonville, Cynthia A; Bennett, Nicholas J; Koehnlein, Melissa; Haines, Deborah M; Ellis, John A; DelVecchio, Alfred M; Rosenberg, Helene F; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2006-05-25

    We explore relationships linking clinical symptoms, respiratory dysfunction, and local production of proinflammatory chemokines in the pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) model of viral bronchiolitis. With a reduced inoculum of this natural rodent pathogen, we observe virus clearance by day 9, while clinical symptoms and respiratory dysfunction persist through days 14 and 17 postinoculation, respectively. Via microarray and ELISA, we identify expression profiles of proinflammatory mediators MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and MIP-2 that correlate with persistent respiratory dysfunction. MIP-1alpha is localized in bronchial epithelium, which is also the major site of PVM replication. Interferon-gamma was detected in lung tissue, but at levels that do not correlate with respiratory dysfunction. Taken together, we present a modification of our pneumovirus infection model that results in improved survival and data that stand in support of a connection between local production of specific mediators and persistent respiratory dysfunction in the setting of acute viral bronchiolitis.

  13. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  14. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  15. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks: what are the benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Zbigniew Jerzy Koscielniak

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of ultrasound by anaesthesiologists performing regional blocks is rapidly gaining popularity. The aims of this review were to summarize and update accumulating evidence on ultrasound-guided nerve blocks, with an emphasis on the clinical relevance of the results and to critically...... appraise changing standards in regional anaesthesia. METHODS: A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966 to 31 December 2007) was conducted using the following free terms: 'ultrasound and regional anesthesia', 'ultrasound and peripheral block' and 'ultrasound and nerve and block'. These were combined......, the concomitant use of nerve stimulation offers no further advantage. However, several studies reported problems with obtaining satisfactory images in some patients. Ultrasound guidance significantly shortened the block performance time and/or reduced the number of needle passes to reach the target in all...

  16. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirala, Waltteri; Korpela, Jaana; Vuori, Arno; Saaresranta, Tarja; Olkkola, Klaus T; Aantaa, Riku

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease causing degeneration of motor neurons, without any curative treatment. The most common cause of death is respiratory arrest due to atrophy of the respiratory musculature. ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency differs in mechanism from the more common causes of dyspnea, such as diseases of pulmonary or cardiac origin. Recognizing the respiratory insufficiency can be challenging for a clinician. It should be possible to predict the development of respiratory insufficiency in order to avoid leaving the treatment decisions concerning respiratory insufficiency to emergency services. Noninvasive ventilatory support can be used to alleviate the patient's dyspnea. It is actually recommended as the first-line treatment of ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency.

  17. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  18. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...

  19. Deployment-related Respiratory Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael J; Rawlins, Frederic A; Forbes, Damon A; Skabelund, Andrew J; Lucero, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Military deployment to Southwest Asia since 2003 in support of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn has presented unique challenges from a pulmonary perspective. Various airborne hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents. These exposures may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and in some instances development of chronic lung disease. While increased respiratory symptoms during deployment are well documented, there is limited data on whether inhalation of airborne particulate matter is causally related to an increase in either common or unique pulmonary diseases. While disease processes such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia and exacerbation of preexisting asthma have been adequately documented, there is significant controversy surrounding the potential effects of deployment exposures and development of rare pulmonary disorders such as constrictive bronchiolitis. The role of smoking and related disorders has yet to be defined. This article presents the current evidence for deployment-related respiratory symptoms and ongoing Department of Defense studies. Further, it also provides general recommendations for evaluating pulmonary health in the deployed military population.

  20. Adenosine improves cardiomyocyte respiratory efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babsky, A M; Doliba, M M; Doliba, N M; Osbakken, M D

    1998-01-01

    The role of adenosine on the regulation of mitochondrial function has been studied. In order to evaluate this the following experiments were done in isolated rat cardiomyocites and mitochondria using polarographic techniques. Cardiomyocyte oxygen consumption (MVO2) and mitochondrial respiratory function (State 3 and State 4, respiratory control index, and ADP/O ratio) were evaluated after exposure to adenosine. Cardiomyocyte MVO2 was significantly lower in cells previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) than in cells not exposed to adenosine (control). Addition of dipyridamole (10 microM) or 8-(p-Sulfophenyl) theophylline (50 microM) to cardiomyocytes before adenosine incubation prevented the adenosine-induced changes in MVO2. Mitochondria obtained from isolated perfused beating heart previously perfused with adenosine (10 microM, 30 min heart perfusion) also resulted in significant increases in ADP/O and respiratory control index compared to matching control. Mitochondria isolated from cardiomyocytes previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) resulted in a significant increase in mitochondrial ADP/O ratio compared to control. Adenosine-induced decrease in cardiomyocyte MVO2 may be related to an increase in efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and more economical use of oxygen, which is necessary for survival under ischemic stress.

  1. Laparoscopic surgery and muscle relaxants: is deep block helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, Aaron F; Naguib, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that providing deep neuromuscular block (a posttetanic count of 1 or more, but a train-of-four [TOF] count of zero) when compared with moderate block (TOF counts of 1-3) for laparoscopic surgery would allow for the use of lower inflation pressures while optimizing surgical space and enhancing patient safety. We conducted a literature search on 6 different medical databases using 3 search strategies in each database in an attempt to find data substantiating this proposition. In addition, we studied the reference lists of the articles retrieved in the search and of other relevant articles known to the authors. There is some evidence that maintaining low inflation pressures during intra-abdominal laparoscopic surgery may reduce postoperative pain. Unfortunately most of the studies that come to these conclusions give few if any details as to the anesthetic protocol or the management of neuromuscular block. Performing laparoscopic surgery under low versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum is associated with no difference in outcome with respect to surgical morbidity, conversion to open cholecystectomy, hemodynamic effects, length of hospital stay, or patient satisfaction. There is a limit to what deep neuromuscular block can achieve. Attempts to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an inflation pressure of 8 mm Hg are associated with a 40% failure rate even at posttetanic counts of 1 or less. Well-designed studies that ask the question "is deep block superior to moderate block vis-à-vis surgical operating conditions" are essentially nonexistent. Without exception, all the peer-reviewed studies we uncovered which state that they investigated this issue have such serious flaws in their protocols that the authors' conclusions are suspect. However, there is evidence that abdominal compliance was not increased by a significant amount when deep block was established when compared with moderate neuromuscular block. Maintenance of deep block for

  2. IL-15 participates in the respiratory innate immune response to influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C Verbist

    Full Text Available Following influenza infection, natural killer (NK cells function as interim effectors by suppressing viral replication until CD8 T cells are activated, proliferate, and are mobilized within the respiratory tract. Thus, NK cells are an important first line of defense against influenza virus. Here, in a murine model of influenza, we show that virally-induced IL-15 facilitates the trafficking of NK cells into the lung airways. Blocking IL-15 delays NK cell entry to the site of infection and results in a disregulated control of early viral replication. By the same principle, viral control by NK cells can be therapeutically enhanced via intranasal administration of exogenous IL-15 in the early days post influenza infection. In addition to controlling early viral replication, this IL-15-induced mobilization of NK cells to the lung airways has important downstream consequences on adaptive responses. Primarily, depletion of responding NK1.1+ NK cells is associated with reduced immigration of influenza-specific CD8 T cells to the site of infection. Together this work suggests that local deposits of IL-15 in the lung airways regulate the coordinated innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza infection and may represent an important point of immune intervention.

  3. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because

  4. Ship Block Transportation Scheduling Problem Based on Greedy Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ship block transportation problems are crucial issues to address in reducing the construction cost and improving the productivity of shipyards. Shipyards aim to maximize the workload balance of transporters with time constraint such that all blocks should be transported during the planning horizon. This process leads to three types of penalty time: empty transporter travel time, delay time, and tardy time. This study aims to minimize the sum of the penalty time. First, this study presents the problem of ship block transportation with the generalization of the block transportation restriction on the multi-type transporter. Second, the problem is transformed into the classical traveling salesman problem and assignment problem through a reasonable model simplification and by adding a virtual node to the proposed directed graph. Then, a heuristic algorithm based on greedy algorithm is proposed to assign blocks to available transporters and sequencing blocks for each transporter simultaneously. Finally, the numerical experiment method is used to validate the model, and its result shows that the proposed algorithm is effective in realizing the efficient use of the transporters in shipyards. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the promising application of the proposed method to efficiently improve the utilization of transporters and to reduce the cost of ship block logistics for shipyards.

  5. The influence of the Gulf Stream on wintertime European blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Christopher H.; Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Wintertime blocking is responsible for extended periods of anomalously cold and dry weather over Europe. In this study, the influence of the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature (SST) front on wintertime European blocking is investigated using a reanalysis dataset and a pair of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations. The AGCM is forced with realistic and smoothed Gulf Stream SST, and blocking frequency over Europe is found to depend crucially on the Gulf Stream SST front. In the absence of the sharp SST gradient European blocking is significantly reduced and occurs further downstream. The Gulf Stream is found to significantly influence the surface temperature anomalies during blocking periods and the occurrence of associated cold spells. In particular the cold spell peak, located in central Europe, disappears in the absence of the Gulf Stream SST front. The nature of the Gulf Stream influence on European blocking development is then investigated using composite analysis. The presence of the Gulf Stream SST front is important in capturing the observed quasi-stationary development of European blocking. The development is characterised by increased lower-tropospheric meridional eddy heat transport in the Gulf Stream region and increased eddy kinetic energy at upper-levels, which acts to reinforce the quasi-stationary jet. When the Gulf Stream SST is smoothed the storm track activity is weaker, the development is less consistent and European blocking occurs less frequently.

  6. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  7. Performance of Saw-Dust in Low Cost Sandcrete Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the salient features of an experimental study on sandcrete blocks prepared by partially replacing sand with saw dust. Influence on compressive strength, water absorption capacity and density characteristics are studied by varying replacement percentage of sand with sawdust. Saw dust, the Industrial waste obtained from sawdust refuse dump form Timber shade & saw-mills, if used for partially replacing sand can reduce the density of block to a considerable extent....

  8. TCM Therapeutic Strategy on Acute Lung Injury Caused by Infectious Atypical Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (IAP) is also called severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by WHO. In its development, around 20% of SARS can develop into the stage of acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), active and effective treatment of it constitutes the important basis for lowering mortality and reducing secondary pulmonary function impairment and pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  10. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory diseases in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    The year 2009 led to a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational allergic diseases. The role of exposure to environmental pollutants, respiratory viruses, and allergen exposure showed significant advances. New allergens were identified. Occupational asthma and the relationship of complementary and alternative medicine to allergic diseases were extensively reviewed. New approaches to immunotherapy, novel vaccine techniques, and methods to reduce risks for severe allergic disease were addressed.

  11. Coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malig, Brian J; Green, Shelley; Basu, Rupa; Broadwin, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Although respiratory disease has been strongly connected to fine particulate air pollution (particulate matter effects of coarse particles (particulate matter from 2.5 to 10 μm in diameter), possibly because of the greater spatial heterogeneity of coarse particles. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits, including common subdiagnoses, from 2005 to 2008 in 35 California counties. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to help control for time-invariant confounders and seasonal influences, and the study population was limited to those residing within 20 km of pollution monitors to mitigate the influence of spatial heterogeneity. Significant associations between respiratory emergency department visits and coarse particle levels were observed. Asthma visits showed associations (for 2-day lag, excess risk per 10 μg/m³ = 3.3%, 95% confidence interval: 2.0, 4.6) that were robust to adjustment by other common air pollutants (particles acute respiratory infection visits were not associated, although some suggestion of a relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visits was present. Our results indicate that coarse particle exposure may trigger asthma exacerbations requiring emergency care, and reducing exposures among asthmatic persons may provide benefits.

  12. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to respiratory infections.

  13. Surfactant replacement therapy for preterm and term neonates with respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Richard A; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory failure secondary to surfactant deficiency is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Surfactant therapy substantially reduces mortality and respiratory morbidity for this population. Secondary surfactant deficiency also contributes to acute respiratory morbidity in late-preterm and term neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, and perhaps pulmonary hemorrhage; surfactant replacement may be beneficial for these infants. This statement summarizes the evidence regarding indications, administration, formulations, and outcomes for surfactant-replacement therapy. The clinical strategy of intubation, surfactant administration, and extubation to continuous positive airway pressure and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure on outcomes and surfactant use in preterm infants are also reviewed.

  14. Non rigid respiratory motion correction in whole body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Schmidt, Holger [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Wuerslin, Christian [University Hospital of Tübingen (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2014-07-29

    Respiratory motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies include the use of respiratory synchronized gated frames which lead to low signal to noise ratio (SNR) given that each frame contains only part of the count available throughout an average PET acquisition. In this work, 4D MRI extracted elastic transformations were applied to list-mode data either inside the image reconstruction or to the reconstructed respiratory synchronized images to obtain respiration corrected PET images.

  15. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  16. MarineMineralsProgramBlocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains OCS block outlines and delineated polygons in ESRI ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Region that contain sediment resources...

  17. Hawaii Census 2000 Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups...

  18. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  19. Multi-block and path modelling procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2008-01-01

    The author has developed a unified theory of path and multi-block modelling of data. The data blocks are arranged in a directional path. Each data block can lead to one or more data blocks. It is assumed that there is given a collection of input data blocks. Each of them is supposed to describe one...

  20. Cardio-respiratory function during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, G

    1991-01-01

    Respiratory function undergoes sleep-associated changes which in normal subjects leave it unaffected. However in some cases they may be more marked than usual or may be superimposed on a pre-existing disease, thus giving rise to sleep-related ventilation disorders. These include obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), nocturnal desaturation events of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and restrictive syndromes, as well as nocturnal asthmatic attacks. OSAS is a condition characterized by the frequent recurrence of interruptions of oronasal flow (greater than 10 s.) due to upper airway occlusion induced by a reduction in pharyngeal muscle tone. This phenomenon, particularly prominent in REM sleep, results in oxyhemoglobin desaturation and marked cardiovascular consequences (arrhythmias, increases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure), as well as symptoms (loud intermittent snoring, daytime sleepiness, intellectual deterioration etc.). Obesity is often associated with OSAS or may lead to a sleep-related hypoventilation syndrome. Treatment is based on weight loss, surgery of upper airway abnormalities, if present, and on splinting of the upper airway by the application of nasal continuous positive airway pressure. In COPD and restrictive disorders, nocturnal hypoxemia is mainly due to REM-associated loss of respiratory muscle tone, as well as in the sleep-related exaggeration of functional defects due to COPD (low chemoreceptor sensitivity, high closing volume etc.). Treatment is based on oxygen administration, provided that possible side-effects are carefully monitored. Nocturnal asthma is due to circadian changes in hormonal secretion (catecholamines, cortisol), as well as supine posture, reduced muco-ciliary clearance, gastro-esophageal reflux etc. Sleep itself plays some role through a depressed arousal reaction in slow wave sleep, resulting in more marked and prolonged attacks in this stage. Slow-release theophylline or beta-mimetic medications

  1. NANOSTRUCTURES OF FUNCTIONAL BLOCK COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojun Liu

    2000-01-01

    Nanostructure fabrication from block copolymers in my group normally involves polymer design, synthesis, selfassembly, selective domain crosslinking, and sometimes selective domain removal. Preparation of thin films with nanochannels was used to illustrate the strategy we took. In this particular case, a linear triblock copolymer polyisopreneblock-poly(2-cinnamoylethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(t-butyl acrylate), PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA, was used. Films, 25 to50μm thick, were prepared from casting on glass slides a toluene solution of PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA and PtBA homopolymer,hPtBA, where hPtBA is shorter than the PtBA block. At the hPtBA mass fraction of 20% relative to the triblock or the total PtBA (hPtBA and PtBA block) volume fraction of 0.44, hPtBA and PtBA formed a seemingly continuous phase in the matrix of PCEMA and PI. Such a block segregation pattern was locked in by photocrosslinking the PCEMA domain. Nanochannels were formed by extracting out hPtBA with solvent. Alternatively, larger channels were obtained from extracting out hPtBA and hydrolyzing the t-butyl groups of the PtBA block. Such membranes were not liquid permeable but had gas permeability constants ~6 orders of magnitude higher than that of low-density polyethylene films.

  2. Respiratory muscle weakness in peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; Höke, Ahmet

    2010-12-01

    Common peripheral neuropathies do not usually cause diaphragmatic weakness and subsequent respiratory compromise. However, respiratory involvement is relatively common in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Experience in GBS has led to a standardized approach to manage respiratory problems in peripheral neuropathies. Diaphragmatic weakness is not common in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and extremely rare in multifocal motor neuropathy. The linkage has been described between certain subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease such as CMT2C and CMT4B1 and diaphragmatic weakness. A correlation usually has not been found between electrophysiologic findings and clinical respiratory signs or spirometric abnormalities in peripheral neuropathies except in amplitudes of evoked phrenic nerve responses. Careful and frequent assessment of respiratory function by a qualified team of healthcare professionals and physicians is essential. Criteria established for mechanical ventilation in GBS cases may be applied to other peripheral neuropathies with respiratory compromise as necessary.

  3. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Kale Cekinmez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing efforts. Respiratory distress syndrome or complications caused by respiratory distress syndrome are the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in premature infants. This article briefly reviews respiratory distress syndrome and its complications. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 615-630

  4. Respiratory distress of the term newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Martin O; Kotecha, Sarah J; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory distress is recognised as any signs of breathing difficulties in neonates. In the early neonatal period respiratory distress is common, occurring in up to 7% of newborn infants, resulting in significant numbers of term-born infants being admitted to neonatal units. Many risk factors are involved; the increasing number of term infants delivered by elective caesarean section has also increased the incidence. Additionally the risk decreases with each advancing week of gestation. At 37 weeks, the chances are three times greater than at 39-40 weeks gestation. Multiple conditions can present with features of respiratory distress. Common causes in term newborn infants include transient tachypnoea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate and pneumothorax. Early recognition of respiratory distress and initiation of appropriate treatment is important to ensure optimal outcomes. This review will discuss these common causes of respiratory distress in term-born infants.

  5. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaudi, L R [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Rossi, E [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Mantaras, M C [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Perrone, M S [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Siri, L Nicola [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  6. Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections among infants in the Canadian Arctic: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Young, Michael; Robinson, Joan; Lee, Bonita; Moraes, Theo; Mamdani, Muhammad; Giles, B. Louise; Jiang, Depeng; Bisson, Danny; Dennis, Marguerite; Morel, Johanne; Hall, Judith; Hui, Charles; Paes, Bosco; Mahony, James B.

    2016-01-01

    4.39). Length of stay decreased by 32.2% for every 30-day increase in age (OR 0.68). Interpretation: Nunavut and Nunavik have very elevated rates of lower respiratory tract infection, with severe outcomes. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified, and coinfection was associated with longer length of stay. Targeted public health interventions are required to reduce the burden of disease for infants residing in these Arctic regions. PMID:28018874

  7. Dental considerations in patients with respiratory problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Lozano, Ariadna; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Many respiratory disorders can compromise routine dental care and require special treatment for the affected patients. Patients often visit the dental clinic with respiratory problems already diagnosed by other specialists. The dental professional therefore must provide correct dental care in the context of such a diagnosis. The present study offers a literature review of those respiratory disorders which can have implications for dental care. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CO...

  8. Respiratory Disease: Diagnostic Approaches in the Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Joanne; Arroyo, Luis G

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the upper and lower respiratory tract of horses requires strategic selection of possible diagnostic tests based on location of suspected pathologic lesions and purpose of testing and must also include consideration of patient status. This article discusses the various diagnostic modalities that may be applied to the respiratory system of horses under field conditions, indications for use, and aspects of sample collection, handling, and laboratory processing that can impact test results and ultimately a successful diagnosis in cases of respiratory disease.

  9. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing effor...

  10. Skin delivery by block copolymer nanoparticles (block copolymer micelles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Rovère, Marie-Rose; Smatti, Batoule; Chevalier, Yves

    2015-12-30

    Block copolymer nanoparticles often referred to as "block copolymer micelles" have been assessed as carriers for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Such carriers are based on organic biocompatible and biodegradable materials loaded with hydrophobic drugs: poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PLA-b-PEG) nanoparticles that have a solid hydrophobic core made of glassy poly(d,l-lactide), and poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PCL-b-PEG) nanoparticles having a liquid core of polycaprolactone. In vitro skin absorption of all-trans retinol showed a large accumulation of retinol in stratum corneum from both block copolymer nanoparticles, higher by a factor 20 than Polysorbate 80 surfactant micelles and by a factor 80 than oil solution. Additionally, skin absorption from PLA-b-PEG nanoparticles was higher by one order of magnitude than PCL-b-PEG, although their sizes (65nm) and external surface (water-swollen PEG layer) were identical as revealed by detailed structural characterizations. Fluorescence microscopy of histological skin sections provided a non-destructive picture of the storage of Nile Red inside stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis. Though particle cores had a different physical states (solid or liquid as measured by (1)H NMR), the ability of nanoparticles for solubilization of the drug assessed from their Hildebrand solubility parameters appeared the parameter of best relevance regarding skin absorption.

  11. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy for a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction and annuloaortic ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Masakazu; Ohzeki, Hajime; Namura, Osamu; Hayashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-08-01

    A 23-year-old man with Marfan syndrome, who had undergone surgery for pectus excavatum and scoliosis and who had severe respiratory dysfunction, was referred for surgical repair of annuloaortic ectasia. The preoperative pulmonary function test revealed severe obstructive and restrictive respiratory dysfunction, with forced expiratory volume in one second of 650 ml and vital capacity of 1,220 ml. These parameters improved after 4 months respiratory physiotherapy. A modified Bentall's procedure was performed after respiratory physiotherapy. A tracheostomy made on the 7th postoperative day (POD) appeared to improve respiratory condition and he was weaned off mechanical ventilation on the 14th POD. The lower limits of pulmonary function for open heart surgery have not been established clearly; however, our case will help elucidate these limits of respiratory function for open heart surgery. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy improved parameters of pulmonary function test and may decrease the morbidity of postoperative pulmonary complications in a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction.

  12. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  13. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Bayhan

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory failure due to giant nodular goiter is a life-threatening situation and should be treated immediately by performing awake endotracheal intubation following emergency total thyroidectomy.

  14. Shrinking the room for invasive ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarpazza P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Scarpazza,1 Cristoforo Incorvaia,2 Chiara Melacini,1 Roberta Cattaneo,1 Cristiano Bonacina,1 Gian Galeazzo Riario-Sforza,2 Walter Casali1 1Pneumology Unit, Ospedale Civile, Vimercate, 2Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan, Italy Abstract: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV was introduced as an alternative to invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure caused from exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the 1980s, and its use gradually rose worldwide. Seventy-eight patients (57 males, mean age 78.3 ± 9.2 years undergoing NIV were evaluated. Of them, 48 (62.3% had acute hypercapnic respiratory failure because of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, and the remaining 30 had acute hypercapnic respiratory failure from other causes, mainly cardiac failure. All patients were treated by NIV using the bi-level positive airway pressure set up at high pressure/high backup rate. NIV was successful in 67 subjects (85.9% and the patients were discharged, 57 of whom continued NIV at home and ten had spontaneous breathing. NIV was unsuccessful in eleven patients, ten of whom died and one was successfully treated by invasive mechanical ventilation. Significant differences were detected for a higher basal Glasgow Coma Scale score in successfully treated patients (P = 0.007, a higher basal Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score in unsuccessfully treated patients (P = 0.004, and a lower pH after 1 hour in unsuccessfully treated patients (P = 0.015. These findings show a very high rate of success of NIV in patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure not only from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but also from cardiac failure. This suggests that the use of invasive mechanical ventilation may be further reduced, with a decrease in its known complications as well. Keywords: invasive ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, acute respiratory failure

  15. Mechanisms of respiratory insufficiency induced by methadone overdose in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillard, Lucie; Mégarbane, Bruno; Baud, Frédéric J; Risède, Patricia; Declèves, Xavier; Mager, Donald; Milan, Nathalie; Ricordel, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Methadone may cause respiratory depression. We aimed to understand methadone-related effects on ventilation as well as each opioid-receptor (OR) role. We studied the respiratory effects of intraperitoneal methadone at 1.5, 5, and 15 mg/kg (corresponding to 80% of the lethal dose-50%) in rats using arterial blood gases and plethysmography. OR antagonists, including intravenous 10 mg/kg-naloxonazine at 5 minutes (mu-OR antagonist), subcutaneous 30 mg/kg-naloxonazine at 24 hours (micro1-OR antagonist), 3 mg/kg-naltrindole at 45 minutes (delta-OR antagonist) and 5 mg/kg-Nor-binaltorphimine at 6 hours (kappa-OR antagonist) were pre-administered. Plasma concentrations of methadone enantiomers were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry. Methadone dose-dependent inspiratory time (T(I)) increase tended to be linear. Respiratory depression was observed only at 15 mg/kg and characterized by an increase in expiratory time (T(E)) resulting in hypoxemia and respiratory acidosis. Intravenous naloxonazine completely reversed all methadone-related effects on ventilation, while subcutaneous naloxonazine reduced its effects on pH (P Respiratory effects as a function of plasma R-methadone concentrations showed a decrease in PaO(2) (EC(50): 1.14 microg/ml) at lower concentrations than those necessary for PaCO(2) increase (EC(50): 3.35 microg/ml). Similarly, increased T(I) (EC(50): 0.501 microg/ml) was obtained at lower concentrations than those for T(E) (EC(50): 4.83 microg/ml). Methadone-induced hypoxemia is caused by mu-ORs and modulated by kappa-ORs. Additionally, methadone-induced increase in T(E) is caused by mu1- and delta-opioid receptors while increase in T(I) is caused by mu-ORs.

  16. Dermoid cyst with respiratory manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle-Cabanillas MI, Ibañez-Muñoz C, Pérez-Sáez J, Navazo-Eguía AI, Clemente-García A, Sánchez-Hernández JM.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid cysts are congenital tumors caused by entrapment of ectoderm during embryogenesis. The most common localization are the gonads and less than 10% are in the head and neck. They are slow growing and generally observed between the second and third decades of life, being unusual in chilhood. Description: We report a case of a 5 year old male with recurrent respiratory infections, mouth breathing and snoring with apneas and daytime sleepiness. On physical examination tonsillar hypertrophy and a 4 cm sublingual tumor are detected. As complementary tests are performed overnight polysomnography with AHI of 18.3 / h and ultrasonography, reported as cystic mass with multiple rounded echogenic structures inside. Results: The patient was diagnosed with severe OSA and tonsillectomy and intraorally enucleation of tumor (as diagnosis and treatment were performed; with histopathological diagnosis of dermoid cyst. In the postoperative control we check the resolution of respiratory events and snoring. Discussion: Dermoid cysts of the oral cavity (where sublingual localization is the most common represent only 0,01% of all cysts and 1,6% of all dermoid cysts. Usually present as slow-growing asymptomatic mass, even if they reach large size can compromise swallowing, speech or breathing and eventually cause, as in our case, a severe OSA. The surgical treatment allows to confirm the diagnosis an avoid the risk of infectious complications and eventual malignant transformation.

  17. The respiratory proteins of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    For a long time, respiratory proteins have been considered unnecessary in most insects because the tracheal system was thought to be sufficient for oxygen supply. Only a few species that survive under hypoxic conditions were known exceptions. However, recently it has become evident that (1) intracellular hemoglobins belong to the standard repertoire of insects and (2) that hemocyanin is present in many "lower" insects. Intracellular hemoglobins have been identified in Drosophila, Anopheles, Apis and many other insects. In all investigated species, hemoglobin is mainly expressed in the fat body and the tracheal system. The major Drosophila hemoglobin binds oxygen with high affinity. This hemoglobin type possibly functions as a buffer system for oxygen supply at low partial pressures and/or for the protection from an excess of oxygen. Similar hemoglobins, present in much higher concentrations, store oxygen in specialized tracheal organs of the botfly and some backswimmers. The extracellular hemoglobins in the hemolymph of chironomid midges are evolutionary derivatives of the intracellular insect hemoglobins, which emerged in response to the hypoxic environment of the larvae. In addition, several hemoglobin variants of unknown functions have been discovered in insect genomes. Hemocyanins transport oxygen in the hemolymph of stoneflies, but also in the Entognatha and most hemimetabolan taxa. Apparently, hemocyanin has been lost in Holometabola. At present, no physiological or morphological character is known that could explain the presence or loss of hemocyanins in distinct taxa. Nevertheless, the occurrence of respiratory proteins in insects adds further complexity to our view on insect respiration.

  18. Reducible chiral metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Rizza, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of 3D reducible metamaterials whose constituent permittivity can be modelled by a factorized profile. The separated cartesian coordinates dependence, easily achieved in all-optical reconfigurable materials, allows to physically regard a reducible metamaterial as a superposition of three fictitious 1D generating media. We prove that, in the long-wavelength limit, the electromagnetic response of reducible metamaterials can be reconstructed from the properties of the 1D generating media whose interplay provides large freedom to control the electromagnetic chirality. Our approach introduces an unprecedented decomposition strategy in metamaterial science which allows the full ab-initio and flexible design of a complex 3D bianisotropic response by using 1D metamaterials as basic building blocks.

  19. Optimal Backward Perturbation Analysis for the Block Skew Circulant Linear Systems with Skew Circulant Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We first give the block style spectral decomposition of arbitrary block skew circulant matrix with skew circulant blocks. Secondly, we obtain the singular value of block skew circulant matrix with skew circulant blocks as well. Finally, based on the block style spectral decomposition, we deal with the optimal backward perturbation analysis for the block skew circulant linear system with skew circulant blocks.

  20. Equal virulence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.C.; Goossens, L.K.; Hendrix, R.; Palen, van der J.A.M.; Lusthusz, A.; Thio, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV) are predominant viruses associated with lower respiratory tract infection in infants. We compared the symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV and RV in hospitalized infants. RV showed the same symptoms as RSV, so on clinical g

  1. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  2. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity o...

  3. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers.

  4. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and triple acid-base disturbances that might develop secondary to postperfusion lung syndrome are responsible for the poor prognosis and increased mortality rather than postperfusion lung syndrome itself. Mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (TV and proper positive end-expiratory pressure can be an effective treatment strategy. Use of ulinastatin and propofol may benefit the patients through different mechanisms.

  5. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  6. Respiratory complications after diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Miloš; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Quante, Mirja; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Schnoor, Jörg; Kaisers, Udo X; Dietz, Andreas; Kluba, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Children with certain risk factors, such as comorbidities or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are known to require extended postoperative monitoring after adenotonsillectomy. However, there are no recommendations available for diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. A retrospective chart review of 96 children who underwent diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy (07/2011-06/2013) was performed. Data for general and sleep apnea history, power of the applied diode-laser (λ = 940 nm), anesthesia parameters, the presence of postoperative respiratory complications and postoperative healing were evaluated. After initially uncomplicated diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy, an adjustment of post-anesthesia care was necessary in 16 of 96 patients due to respiratory failure. Respiratory complications were more frequent in younger children (3.1 vs. 4.0 years, p = 0.049, 95 % CI -1.7952 to -0.0048) and in children who suffered from nocturnal apneas (OR = 5.00, p diode-laser power higher than 13 W could be identified as a risk factor for the occurrence of a postoperative oropharyngeal edema (OR = 3.45, p diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. We recommend a reduced diode-laser power (<13 W) to reduce oropharyngeal edema.

  7. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension.

  8. Sleep respiratory disturbances and arousals at moderate altitude have overlapping electroencephalogram spectral signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Tarokh, Leila; Lo Cascio, Christian M; Tesler, Noemi; Stoewhas, Anne-Christin; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter

    2014-08-01

    An ascent to altitude has been shown to result in more central apneas and a shift towards lighter sleep in healthy individuals. This study employs spectral analysis to investigate the impact of respiratory disturbances (central/obstructive apnea and hypopnea or periodic breathing) at moderate altitude on the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and to compare EEG changes resulting from respiratory disturbances and arousals. Data were collected from 51 healthy male subjects who spent 1 night at moderate altitude (2590 m). Power density spectra of Stage 2 sleep were calculated in a subset (20) of these participants with sufficient artefact-free data for (a) epochs with respiratory events without an accompanying arousal, (b) epochs containing an arousal and (c) epochs of undisturbed Stage 2 sleep containing neither arousal nor respiratory events. Both arousals and respiratory disturbances resulted in reduced power in the delta, theta and spindle frequency range and increased beta power compared to undisturbed sleep. The similarity of the EEG changes resulting from altitude-induced respiratory disturbances and arousals indicates that central apneas are associated with micro-arousals, not apparent by visual inspection of the EEG. Our findings may have implications for sleep in patients and mountain tourists with central apneas and suggest that respiratory disturbances not accompanied by an arousal may, none the less, impact sleep quality and impair recuperative processes associated with sleep more than previously believed.

  9. Content-dependent block noise reduction for mobile displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Gyoo; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Number of pixels on mobile displays is rapidly increasing. Recently, mobile displays with more than one million pixels have been introduced into markets. However, most of multimedia contents to be displayed on mobile displays have much smaller pixel counts. For example, number of pixels for a T-DMB(terrestrial digital multimedia broadcasting) sequence is 320x240. When enlargement is applied to input sequence, perceived image quality would be degraded. Increase in visibility of block noise is one of the major reasons for image quality degradation on mobile displays. This paper presents a simple and computationally efficient method to reduce visibility of block noise on enlarged multimedia sequences. In proposed method, a simple low pass filtering is selectively applied to the pixels of block noises for reduction of block noise visibility as well as faithful reproduction of image details.

  10. Multicompartment Micelles From π-Shaped ABC Block Copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jun; ZHONG Chong-Li

    2007-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations were performed on the morphology and structure of multicompartment micelles formed from n-shaped ABC block copolymers in water. The influences of chain architectures were studied in a systematic way, and a rich variety of morphologies were observed, such as spherical, wormlike,X-shaped, Y-shaped, ribbon-like, layered rod-like, layered disk-like, as well as network morphologies. The simulations show that the distance between the two grafts plays an important role in control of the morphology. Since π-shaped ABC block copolymers can be reduced to linear ABC and star ABC block copolymers, they are good model copolymers for studying the self-assembly of complex block copolymers into micelles. The knowledge obtained in this work as well as the new morphologies identified provide useful information for future rational design and synthesis of novel multicompartment micelles.

  11. A new paradigm in respiratory hygiene: modulating respiratory secretions to contain cough bioaerosol without affecting mucus clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilla Gloria

    2007-08-01

    criteria established in the initial phase of developing the concept of mucomodulation: Can we modulate the physical characteristics of the respiratory secretions to reduce aerosolization without affecting normal mucociliary clearance function, or even better improving it?

  12. Diversity Gain through Antenna Blocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dehghanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the typical usage mode, interaction between a handheld receiver antenna and the operator's RF absorbing body and nearby objects is known to generate variability in antenna radiation characteristics through blocking and pattern changes. It is counterintuitive that random variations in blocking can result in diversity gain of practical applicability. This diversity gain is quantified from a theoretical and experimental perspective. Measurements carried out at 1947.5 MHz verify the theoretical predictions, and a diversity gain of 3.1 dB was measured through antenna blocking and based on the utilized measurement setup. The diversity gain can be exploited to enhance signal detectability of handheld receivers based on a single antenna in indoor multipath environments.

  13. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...

  14. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  15. Initial respiratory management in preterm infants and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Sanz López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilator injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Avoiding invasive ventilation could reduce lung injury, and early respiratory management may affect pulmonary outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of initial respiratory support on survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a gestational age of 36 weeks. DESIGN/METHODS: A prospective 3-year observational study. Preterm infants of 26 weeks (sensitivity =89.5% and specificity = 67%. The need for prolonged mechanical ventilation could be an early marker for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This finding could help identify a target population with a high risk of chronic lung disease. Future research is needed to determine other strategies to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in this high-risk group of patients.

  16. Block ground interaction of rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner; Kummer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During a rockfall the interaction of the falling block with the ground is one of the most important factors that define the evolution of a rockfall trajectory. It steers the rebound, the rotational movement, possibly brake effects, friction losses and damping effects. Therefore, if most reliable rockfall /trajectory simulation software is sought a good understanding of the block ground interaction is necessary. Today's rockfall codes enable the simulation of a fully 3D modelled block within a full 3D surface . However, the details during the contact, i.e. the contact duration, the penetration depth or the dimension of the marks in the ground are usually not part of the simulation. Recent field tests with rocks between 20 and 80 kg have been conducted on a grassy slope in 2014 [1]. A special rockfall sensor [2] within the blocks measured the rotational velocity and the acting accelerations during the tests. External video records and a so-called LocalPositioningSystem deliver information on the travel velocity. With these data not only the flight phases of the trajectories but also the contacts with the ground can be analysed. During the single jumps of a block the flight time, jump length, the velocity, and the rotation are known. During the single impacts their duration and the acting accelerations are visible. Further, the changes of rotational and translational velocity influence the next jump of the block. The change of the rotational velocity over the whole trajectory nicely visualizes the different phases of a rockfall regarding general acceleration and deceleration in respect to the inclination and the topography of the field. References: [1] Volkwein A, Krummenacher B, Gerber W, Lardon J, Gees F, Brügger L, Ott T (2015) Repeated controlled rockfall trajectory testing. [Abstract] Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17: EGU2015-9779. [2] Volkwein A, Klette J (2014) Semi-Automatic Determination of Rockfall Trajectories. Sensors 14: 18187-18210.

  17. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  18. A Guide for Respiratory Therapy Curriculum Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Respiratory Therapy, Dallas, TX.

    The document presents educational criterion upon which curriculum builders can create a competency-based program of respiratory therapy education. The 11 modules presented supplement and compliment the document Delineation of Roles and Functions of Respiratory Therapy Personnel (CE 005 945) which is listed as appendix D but not included as such.…

  19. Expanding the Respiratory Therapy Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mary; Allenbaugh, Patricia

    This project was conducted to upgrade Seattle Central Community College's four-quarter respiratory care program to a two-year associate degree program in respiratory therapy. The program needed to include a developmental pathway for entry of nontraditional students and also a college-level prerequisite entry pathway for traditional students. In…

  20. Respiratory health effects in pig farmers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a cross-sectional study of risk factors of chronic respiratory health effects in pig farmers working in the South of the Netherlands. The study population comprised 100 pig farmers with and 100 pig farmers without chronic respiratory symptoms. Base-line lung function, non-speci

  1. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3–12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3–6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7–9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10–12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity. PMID:28356644

  2. OPAL 96 Blocks Lead Glass

    CERN Multimedia

    This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. One half of the complete calorimeter is shown in the picture above. There were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. These are made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP interactions.

  3. [Hot topics in respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza-Galvao, M Luiza; García-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Sanz, Francisco; Blanquer, José

    2011-01-01

    We review the most interesting articles on respiratory infections published in the last trimester of 2009 and in 2010. Notable publications in bronchiectasis were the Guidelines of the British Thoracic Society, as well as several articles on the natural course of the process, the impact of exacerbations on the course of the disease, and treatment with inhaled antibiotics. Other notable publications were the SEPAR-SEIMC consensus document for the management of tuberculosis and articles on the use of interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection. The new recommendations of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery on community-acquired pneumonia have recently been published. Equally important are studies on the viral etiology of community-acquired pneumonia, the impact of corticosteroid treatment in pneumonia, the duration of antibiotic therapy and preventive measures in both community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia.

  4. The respiratory system in equations

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    The book proposes an introduction to the mathematical modeling of the respiratory system. A detailed introduction on the physiological aspects makes it accessible to a large audience without any prior knowledge on the lung. Different levels of description are proposed, from the lumped models with a small number of parameters (Ordinary Differential Equations), up to infinite dimensional models based on Partial Differential Equations. Besides these two types of differential equations, two chapters are dedicated to resistive networks, and to the way they can be used to investigate the dependence of the resistance of the lung upon geometrical characteristics. The theoretical analysis of the various models is provided, together with state-of-the-art techniques to compute approximate solutions, allowing comparisons with experimental measurements. The book contains several exercises, most of which are accessible to advanced undergraduate students.

  5. Pulmonary agenesis and respiratory failure in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarco, Paula Vanessa Valverde; Ponce, Cesar Cilento

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis (PA) is a rare congenital anomaly, which may be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral PA may be associated with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. We report the case of 5-month-old infant who presented a normal development until the age of 4 months when a respiratory infection caused an acute respiratory distress syndrome with a fatal outcome. The autopsy findings depicted the right lung agenesis without any other concomitant malformation. Although respiratory symptoms represent frequent complaints in pediatrics, the aim of this study is not only to draw attention to the unilateral pulmonary agenesis as a possible underlying malformation in children who present recurrent and severe respiratory symptoms, but also to report a case diagnosed at autopsy.

  6. Pulmonary agenesis and respiratory failure in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Vanessa Valverde Dinamarco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary agenesis (PA is a rare congenital anomaly, which may be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral PA may be associated with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. We report the case of 5-month-old infant who presented a normal development until the age of 4 months when a respiratory infection caused an acute respiratory distress syndrome with a fatal outcome. The autopsy findings depicted the right lung agenesis without any other concomitant malformation. Although respiratory symptoms represent frequent complaints in pediatrics, the aim of this study is not only to draw attention to the unilateral pulmonary agenesis as a possible underlying malformation in children who present recurrent and severe respiratory symptoms, but also to report a case diagnosed at autopsy.

  7. Respiratory neuroplasticity - Overview, significance and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, David D; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2017-01-01

    Neuroplasticity is an important property of the neural system controlling breathing. However, our appreciation for its importance is still relatively new, and we have much to learn concerning different forms of plasticity, their underlying mechanisms, and their biological and clinical significance. In this brief review, we discuss several well-studied models of respiratory plasticity, including plasticity initiated by inactivity in the respiratory system, intermittent and sustained hypoxia, and traumatic injury to the spinal cord. Other aspects of respiratory plasticity are considered in other contributions to this special edition of Experimental Neurology on respiratory plasticity. Finally, we conclude with discussions concerning the biological and clinical significance of respiratory motor plasticity, and areas in need of future research effort.

  8. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  9. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins William G; Cripps Allan W; Pyne David B; West Nicholas P; Eskesen Dorte C; Jairath Ashok; Christophersen Claus T; Conlon Michael A; Fricker Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effecti...

  10. The rhythmic, transverse medullary slice preparation in respiratory neurobiology: contributions and caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Gregory D; Greer, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our understanding of the sites and mechanisms underlying rhythmic breathing as well as the neuromodulatory control of respiratory rhythm, pattern, and respiratory motoneuron excitability during perinatal development has advanced significantly over the last 20 years. A major catalyst was the development in 1991 of the rhythmically-active medullary slice preparation, which provided precise mechanical and chemical control over the network as well as enhanced physical and optical access to key brainstem regions. Insights obtained in vitro have informed multiple mechanistic hypotheses. In vivo tests of these hypotheses, performed under conditions of reduced control and precision but more obvious physiological relevance, have clearly established the significance for respiratory neurobiology of the rhythmic slice preparation. We review the contributions of this preparation to current understanding/concepts in respiratory control, and outline the limitations of this approach in the context of studying rhythm and pattern generation, homeostatic control mechanisms and murine models of human genetic disorders that feature prominent breathing disturbances.

  11. Control of respiratory motion by hypnosis intervention during radiotherapy of lung cancer I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongmao; Deng, Jie; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy.

  12. Intrathecal opioid versus ultrasound guided fascia iliaca plane block for analgesia after primary hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, blinded, noninferiority controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinsella John

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip replacement surgery is increasingly common due to an ageing population, and rising levels of obesity. The provision of excellent pain relief with minimal side effects is important in order to facilitate patient mobilisation and rehabilitation. Spinal opioids provide excellent analgesia but are associated with adverse effects. The fascia-iliaca block is an alternative technique which provides analgesia to the nerves innervating the hip. The success of fascia iliaca blocks has been demonstrated to be superior when using ultrasound compared to landmark techniques. However, the clinical benefit of this improvement has yet to be investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for hip replacement surgery. Methods/Design This study is a randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, noninferiority trial. Patients scheduled to undergo unilateral primary hip arthroplasty will receive a study information sheet and consent will be obtained in keeping with the Declaration of Helsinki. Patients will be randomised to receive either; (i Ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block using levobupivacaine, plus spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine containing no morphine, or (ii sham ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block performed with sterile saline, and spinal anaesthesia containing hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.1 mg of spinal morphine. A total of 108 patients will be recruited. Primary outcome is post-operative morphine consumption in a 24 hour period. Secondary outcomes include; pain scores at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, episodes of respiratory depression, hypotension, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, sedation, time to first mobilisation and patient satisfaction. Conclusions There are no studies to date comparing ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for pain control after hip arthroplasty. If the ultrasound guided fascia iliaca

  13. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pal; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The neurolytic blocks of sympathetic pathways, including celiac plexus block (CPB) and superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) , have been used for years. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence to support the performance of sympathetic blocks in cancer patients with abdominal visceral...

  14. Detection of respiratory viruses and the associated chemokine responses in serious acute respiratory illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumino, Kaharu C.; Walter, Michael J.; Mikols, Cassandra L.; Thompson, Samantha A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Arens, Max. Q.; Agapov, Eugene; Hormozdi, David; Gaynor, Anne M.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Background A specific diagnosis of a lower respiratory viral infection is often difficult despite frequent clinical suspicion. This low diagnostic yield may be improved by use of sensitive detection methods and biomarkers. Methods We investigated the prevalence, clinical predictors and inflammatory mediator profile of respiratory viral infection in serious acute respiratory illness. Sequential bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from all patients hospitalized with acute respiratory illness over 12 months (n=283) were tested for the presence of 17 respiratory viruses by multiplex PCR assay and for newly-discovered respiratory viruses (bocavirus, WU and KI polyomaviruses) by single-target PCR. BAL samples also underwent conventional testing (direct immunoflorescence and viral culture) for respiratory virus at the clinician’s discretion. 27 inflammatory mediators were measured in subset of the patients (n=64) using a multiplex immunoassay. Results We detected 39 respiratory viruses in 37 (13.1% of total) patients by molecular testing, including rhinovirus (n=13), influenza virus (n=8), respiratory syncytial virus (n=6), human metapneumovirus (n=3), coronavirus NL63 (n=2), parainfluenza virus (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and newly-discovered viruses (n=4). Molecular methods were 3.8-fold more sensitive than conventional methods. Clinical characteristics alone were insufficient to separate patients with and without respiratory virus. The presence of respiratory virus was associated with increased levels of interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP -10)(p<0.001) and eotaxin-1 (p=0.017) in BAL. Conclusions Respiratory viruses can be found in patients with serious acute respiratory illness by use of PCR assays more frequently than previously appreciated. IP-10 may be a useful biomarker for respiratory viral infection. PMID:20627924

  15. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons.

  16. Medical countermeasure against respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Gordon, Richard K; Rezk, Peter E; Katos, Alexander M; Wajda, Nikolai A; Moran, Theodore S; Steele, Keith E; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2007-03-01

    To develop therapeutics against lung injury and respiratory toxicity following nerve agent VX exposure, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a number of potential pulmonary therapeutics. Guinea pigs were exposed to 27.03 mg/m(3) of VX or saline using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min and then the toxicity was assessed. Exposure to this dose of VX resulted in a 24-h survival rate of 52%. There was a significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, total cell number, and cell death. Surprisingly, direct pulmonary treatment with surfactant, liquivent, N-acetylcysteine, dexamethasone, or anti-sense syk oligonucleotides 2 min post-exposure did not significantly increase the survival rate of VX-exposed guinea pigs. Further blocking the nostrils, airway, and bronchioles, VX-induced viscous mucous secretions were exacerbated by these aerosolized treatments. To overcome these events, we developed a strategy to protect the animals by treatment with atropine. Atropine inhibits muscarinic stimulation and markedly reduces the copious airway secretion following nerve agent exposure. Indeed, post-exposure treatment with atropine methyl bromide, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, resulted in 100% survival of VX-exposed animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage from VX-exposed and atropine-treated animals exhibited lower protein levels, cell number, and cell death compared to VX-exposed controls, indicating less lung injury. When pulmonary therapeutics were combined with atropine, significant protection to VX-exposure was observed. These results indicate that combinations of pulmonary therapeutics with atropine or drugs that inhibit mucous secretion are important for the treatment of respiratory toxicity and lung injury following VX exposure.

  17. Scattering matrices with block symmetries

    OpenAIRE

    Życzkowski, Karol

    1997-01-01

    Scattering matrices with block symmetry, which corresponds to scattering process on cavities with geometrical symmetry, are analyzed. The distribution of transmission coefficient is computed for different number of channels in the case of a system with or without the time reversal invariance. An interpolating formula for the case of gradual time reversal symmetry breaking is proposed.

  18. Architectures for block Toeplitz systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouras, Ilias; Glentis, George-Othon; Kalouptsidis, Nicholas

    1996-01-01

    In this paper efficient VLSI architectures of highly concurrent algorithms for the solution of block linear systems with Toeplitz or near-to-Toeplitz entries are presented. The main features of the proposed scheme are the use of scalar only operations, multiplications/divisions and additions, and th

  19. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  20. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  1. Modern features of infants’ feeding and its impact on respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka K.D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of infants’ feeding connected with the incidence of respiratory diseases. Rationality and duration of breast feeding does not cause doubts. But unfortunately today, only 60-80% of children under the age of 6 months are exclusively breastfed. Naturally, this causes impact on disease incidence of such children. Formation of bronchopulmonary pathology is of particular interest. The basis of modern research is the concept of programmed impact of nutrition in early childhood on health in lateryears. We have determined the dependence of respiratory diseases incidence in children of early age on duration of exclusively breast feeding. Not only frequent respiratory diseases, but formation of bronchitis, pneumonia or other complications of their course is of importance. The study included questioning of mothers and children under 7 years of age, clinical, radiological and laboratory investigations in the hospital in case of respiratory disease. All studies were conducted in accordance with the characteristics of diet quality of the child in the first year of life with the following biostatistical processing. 601 children aged from 3 months to 7 years were examined. It was found that the duration of breast feeding in the region is 89% only to the age of 6-months, and up to 1 year the percentage of breastfed children reduces to 38%. This affected the resistance of children to respiratory infections, especially in the first year of life. Children exclusively breastfed up to 1 year suffer from respiratory diseases 1-2 times per year. In children over one year of age breast feeding does not affect the frequency of respiratory pathology. Increase of respiratory diseases frequency in children aged 3-5 years is due to attending preschool institutions and increasing contacts between children, which significantly reduces their resistance.

  2. [Kinetic therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechenin, M G; Voevodin, S V; Pronichev, E Iu; Shuliveĭstrov, Iu V

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated the clinical and physiological effects of kinetic therapy (KT) in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Forty-six patients with ARDS underwent successive postural positioning in accordance with two regimens: 1) lateral, prone, contralateral, supine positions; 2) prone, lateral, contralateral, supine positions. The criterion for changing each position was the change in monitoring indices: SpO2, PaO2, and thoracopulmonary compliance (C). KT was performed until a respirator was withdrawn from the patient. In 25 patients, each maneuver of positioning was made during 30-minute propofol sedation. The control group included 24 patients with ARDS who received neither KT nor propofol sedation. KT caused a decrease in Vd/Vt, Qs/Qt and an increase in PaO2/FiO2 and C was more intensive, as compared with the control group. The duration of the patient's prone position was 3.2-0.7 hours and that of the supine position was 3.4-0.8 hours. The right and left lateral positions lasted 1.1-0.2 and 1.3-0.2 hours, respectively. KT regimen 1 was found to be more effective than KT regimen 2. Propofol sedation enhanced the efficiency of KT. The latter reduced death rates in patients with ARDS.

  3. Susceptibility of asthmatic children to respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Júlio C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A case-control study of patients with pneumonia was conducted to investigate whether wheezing diseases could be a risk factor. METHODS: A random sample was taken from a general university hospital in S. Paulo City between March and August 1994 comprising 51 cases of pneumonia paired by age and sex to 51 non-respiratory controls and 51 healthy controls. Data collection was carried out by two senior paediatricians. Diagnoses of pneumonia and presence of wheezing disease were independently established by each paediatrician for both cases and controls. Pneumonia was radiologically confirmed and repeatability of information on wheezing diseases was measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. RESULTS: Wheezing diseases, interpreted as proxies of asthma, were found to be an important risk factor for pneumonia with an odds ratio of 7.07 (95%CI= 2.34-21.36, when the effects of bedroom crowding (odds ratio = 1.49 per person, 95%CI= 0.95-2.32 and of low family income (odds ratio = 5.59 against high family income, 95%CI= 1.38-22.63 were controlled. The risk of pneumonia attributable to wheezing diseases is tentatively calculated at 51.42%. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that at practice level asthmatics should deserve proper surveillance for infection and that at public health level pneumonia incidence could be reduced if current World Health Organisation's guidelines were reviewed as to include comprehensive care for this illness.

  4. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  5. Boussignac CPAP in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is one of the most important therapeutic interventions used in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF secondary to acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE. Thanks to its positive effects on both hemodynamics and ventilation, CPAP improves clinical and blood-gas parameters. Compared with standard oxygen therapy, use of CPAP is associated with decreased mortality and reduced need for intubation in these patients. Aim of the study: This review examines the principles of CPAP, techniques and equipment used to deliver it, and clinical applications. Special emphasis is placed on CPAP delivered with the Boussignac device. Discussion and conclusions: In emergency departments, this simple, lightweight, disposable device has proved to be well tolerated and similar to Venturi-like flow generators in terms of effectiveness. These findings suggest that Boussignac CPAP might be useful for managing ARF in non-critical care areas where other more complicated CPAP equipment (Venturi-like flow generators and ventilators are not available (for example, in general medical wards.

  6. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2013-04-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  7. Endoscopic sphenopalatine ganglion block for pain relief

    OpenAIRE

    Murty, P. S. N.; Prasanna, Atma

    1998-01-01

    The anaesthetic effect of the sphenopalatine (SPG) block has been well utilized for intranasal topical anaesthesia but the analgesic efficacy of (SPG) block, though well documented in literature, has not been put into practice. The methods available for SPG block till date were blind as they do not visualize the foramen. Nasal endoscopies have been used to visualize the foramen for an effective block. The authors present their experience with the endoscopic sphenopalatine ganglion block for p...

  8. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Chandramouli Basappji Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner′s syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner′s syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  9. SU-E-J-192: Comparative Effect of Different Respiratory Motion Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Kanai, T; Jingu, K [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kida, S [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai City, Miyagi (Japan); Kishi, K; Sato, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of four-dimensional computed tomography imaging for causing artifacts. Audio-visual biofeedback systems associated with patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches), representing simpler visual coaching techniques without guiding waveform are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching to reduce respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. Methods: We collected data from eleven healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as audio-visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. Results: All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared to free breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86, and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free breathing, Abches, bar model, and wave model, respectively. Free breathing and wave model differed significantly (p < 0.05). Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18, and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free breathing, Abches, bar model, and wave model, respectively. Free breathing and all coaching techniques differed significantly (p < 0.05). For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to free breathing, bar model, and Abches. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. Conclusion: The efficacy of audio-visual biofeedback to reduce respiratory irregularity compared with Abches. Our results showed that audio-visual biofeedback combined with a wave model can potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management

  10. Effect Observation and Immunology Test of Vitamin D Supplements on Reducing the Number of Swimmers Upper Respiratory Tract Infection%补充维生素D对减少游泳运动员上呼吸道感染发病次数的效果观察及免疫学检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万月红; 郭建军

    2015-01-01

    Objective :To study the effect of Vtiamin D supplements on number of swimmers up‐per respiratory tract infection and discuss its immunological mechanism .Methods :16 profes‐sional swimmers were randomly divided into two groups :Vitamin D capsules supplement group and control group ,each group of 8 people .In the case of diet and daily routine are basically the same ,supplement group took Vitamin D capsules ,control groups did’ t add ,observing two groups of athletes’ physiological function change .Results :1) the 25‐(OH) D3 content in ser‐um of two groups is below health standard before experiment ,the 25‐(OH ) D3 in serum for supplement Vitamin D capsule group increases to normal level after three months ,while the the 25‐(OH ) D3 in serum of control group is still lower .2) The ratio of Th/Ts and NK lympho‐cytes in peripheral blood cell number for supplement group is higher than control group ,there is significant difference ( P<0 .05 ) .3 ) The level of IgA in peripheral blood cell for supple‐ment group is higher than that of control group ,there was significant difference (P<0 .05);4) The frequency of catching cold for supplement group during the winter training is signifi‐cantly less than that in the control group .There is a significant difference (P<0 .05) .Conclu‐sion :There is good effect to supple Vitamin D for reducing the number of swimmers upper re‐spiratory tract infection during winter training .The mechanism is to increase the ratio of Th/Ts ,NK cell and IgA level in the normal range ,but needs further tested .%目的:研究补充维生素D对于游泳运动员上呼吸道感染发病次数的影响并探讨其免疫学机制。方法:研究对象:16名专业游泳运动员,随机分为两组:维生素D胶囊补充组和空白对照组,每组8人。在饮食和作息时间基本一致的情况下,补充组口服维生素 D胶囊,对照组不补充,观察两组运动员生理机

  11. Limiting Spectral Distribution of Block Matrices with Toeplitz Block Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Riddhipratim; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Hazra, Rajat Subhra

    2011-01-01

    We study two specific symmetric random block Toeplitz (of dimension $k \\times k$) matrices: where the blocks (of size $n \\times n$) are (i) matrices with i.i.d. entries, and (ii) asymmetric Toeplitz matrices. Under suitable assumptions on the entries, their limiting spectral distributions (LSDs) exist (after scaling by $\\sqrt{nk}$) when (a) $k$ is fixed and $n \\to\\infty$ (b) $n$ is fixed and $k\\rightarrow \\infty$ (c) $n$ and $k$ go to $\\infty$ simultaneously. Further the LSD's obtained in (a) and (b) coincide with those in (c) when $n$ or respectively $k$ tends to infinity. This limit in (c) is the semicircle law in case (i). In Case (ii) the limit is related to the limit of the random symmetric Toepiltz matrix as obtained by Bryc et al.(2006) and Hammond and Miller(2005).

  12. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  13. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, L; Alam, J; Lane, S

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  14. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  15. Pesticides and respiratory symptoms among farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Neice Müller Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite the intensive use of pesticides in agriculture there are few studies assessing the risk of respiratory conditions from this exposure. The study aimed at quantifying the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among farmers and evaluating its relationship with occupational use of pesticides and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,379 farmers from two municipalities of Southern Brazil in 1996. Frequency and type of chemical exposure and pesticide poisoning were recorded for both sexes. All subjects aged 15 years or older with at least 15 weekly hours of agricultural activity were interviewed. An adapted questionnaire developed by the American Thoracic Society was used for the assessment of respiratory symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out. RESULTS: More than half (55% of interviewees were male. The prevalence of asthma symptoms was 12% and chronic respiratory disease symptoms was 22%. Higher odds ratios for both asthma (OR=1.51; 95% CI: 1.07-2.14 and chronic respiratory disease (OR=1.34; 95% CI 1.00-1.81 symptoms were found in women. Logistic regression analysis identified associations between many forms of exposure to pesticides and increased respiratory symptoms. Occurrence of pesticide poisoning was associated with higher prevalence of asthma symptoms (OR=1.54; 95% CI: 1.04-2.58 and chronic respiratory disease symptoms (OR=1.57; 95% CI: 1.08-2.28. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of causality limitations, the study results provide evidence that farming exposure to pesticides is associated with higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, especially when the exposure is above two days per month.

  16. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, pcycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  17. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Lung Injury in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, defined as acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, are critical conditions associated with frequent mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains...... be recommended for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. iNO results in a transient improvement in oxygenation but does not reduce mortality and may be harmful....

  18. Effect of Streptococcus pneumoniae on human respiratory epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfort, C; Wilson, R; Mitchell, T; Feldman, C; Rutman, A; Todd, H; Sykes, D; Walker, J; Saunders, K; Andrew, P W

    1989-07-01

    A total of 11 of 15 Streptococcus pneumoniae culture filtrates and all five bacterial autolysates produced by cell death in the stationary phase caused slowed ciliary beating and disruption of the surface integrity of human respiratory epithelium in organ culture. This effect was inhibited by cholesterol and was heat labile and reduced by standing at room temperature but was stable at -40 degrees C. The activity was detected at the late stationary phase of culture and was associated with the presence of hemolytic activity. Gel filtration of a concentrated culture filtrate and autolysate both yielded a single fraction of approximately 50 kilodaltons which slowed ciliary beating and were the only fractions with hemolytic activity. Rabbit antiserum to pneumolysin, a sulfhydryl-activated hemolytic cytotoxin released by S. pneumoniae during autolysis, neutralized the effect of the culture filtrate on respiratory epithelium. Both native and recombinant pneumolysin caused ciliary slowing and epithelial disruption. Electron microscopy showed a toxic effect of pneumolysin on epithelial cells: cytoplasmic blebs, mitochondrial swelling, cellular extrusion, and cell death, but no change in ciliary ultrastructure. Recombinant pneumolysin (10 micrograms/ml) caused ciliary slowing in the absence of changes in cell ultrastructure. Release of pneumolysin in the respiratory tract during infection may perturb host defenses, allowing bacterial proliferation and spread.

  19. Importance of respiratory exposure to pesticides among agricultural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Kathryn C; Seiber, James N

    2002-01-01

    In the majority of cases, respiratory exposure accounts for a small fraction of total body exposure to pesticides; however, higher volatility pesticides pose a greater risk for exposure, particularly in enclosed spaces and near application sites. In 2000, nearly 22 million pounds of active ingredients designated as toxic air contaminants (TACs) were applied as pesticides in California (combined agricultural and reportable non-agricultural uses; California Department of Pesticide Regulation, 2001a, Summary of Pesticide Use Report Data, 2000, Sacramento, CA: author). Agricultural workers and agricultural community residents are at particular risk for exposure to these compounds. The TAC program in California, and more recently the federal Clean Air Act amendments, have begun to address the exposures of these groups and have promulgated exposure guidelines that are, in general, much more stringent than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) worker exposure guidelines. Choosing lower volatility pesticides, lower concentrations of active ingredients, and handling equipment designed to minimize exposure can often reduce worker respiratory exposures significantly. The use of personal protective equipment, which would be facilitated by the development of more ergonomic alternatives, is important in these higher respiratory exposure situations. Finally, in the case of community residents, measures taken to protect workers often translate to lower ambient air concentrations, but further study and development of buffer zones and application controls in a given area are necessary to assure community protection.

  20. Respiratory Depression Caused by Heroin Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Hakan Cansiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Heroin is a semisynthetic narcotic analgesic and heroin abuse is common due to its pleasure-inducing effect. For the last 30 years heroin abuse has become an important worldwide public health problem. Heroin can be administered in many different ways as preferred. Heroin affects many systems including respiratory system, cardiovascular system and particulary the central nervous system. Overdose use of heroin intravenously can be fatal due to respiratory depression. In this letter, we wanted to engage attention to respiratory depression caused by heroin abuse and potential benefits of using naloxone. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 248-250

  1. Cardiac and Respiratory Disease in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Celia M

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac diseases are common in older horses. Advancing age is a specific risk factor for cardiac murmurs and these are more likely in males and small horses. Airway inflammation is the most common respiratory diagnosis. Recurrent airway obstruction can lead to irreversible structural change and bronchiectasis; with chronic hypoxia, right heart dysfunction and failure can develop. Valvular heart disease most often affects the aortic and/or the mitral valve. Management of comorbidity is an essential element of the therapeutic approach to cardiac and respiratory disease in older equids.

  2. Cardio-respiratory capacity as an important biomarker of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Novák

    2016-12-01

    could be calculated according to the maximal performance (Wmax and Wmax/kg attained on bicycle ergometer. Regular aerobic endurance exercise could reduce biological age of active individuals by 10 to 20 years with a correspondingly decreased likelihood of becoming dependent when a senior and an expressive improvement in the quality of the final years of life (Shephard, 1994. VO2max and VO2max/kg values represent important health quality biomarkers. They also offer feedback information, positive and/or negative, about the effectiveness of physical activity influencing its development. Thus, aerobic fitness level has been strongly and positively associated with reduced morbidity, prevalence and mortality rates of so called civilization diseases, good quality of life, performance level, and functional ability. Thus, if no O2-CO2 analyzer during ergometry examination is available, calculated VO2max and VO2max/kg values can be used for evaluation of cardio-respiratory capacity.

  3. On the Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of Block Triangular Preconditioned Block Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Block lower triangular matrices and block upper triangular matrices are popular preconditioners for 2×2 block matrices. In this note we show that a block lower triangular preconditioner gives the same spectrum as a block upper triangular preconditioner and that the eigenvectors of the two preconditioned matrices are related. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Performance of block lining in the zone of slanted ducts of a coke dry quenching unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolova, L.S.; Drozd, V.I.; Zadorozhnaya, T.A.; Minasov, A.N.; Surenskii, O.N.; Ershov, N.A.; Ignashin, G.I.; Mishin, E.N. (UkrNIIO (USSR))

    1991-01-01

    Discusses service life and wear of concrete blocks used for construction of dry coke quenching chambers. Concrete blocks replaced conventional refractory bricks. A filler from calcinated bauxites and a high-alumina cement were used for concrete block production. The blocks were used for construction of the zones of slanted ducts. Concrete block properties are analyzed: dimensions, weight, ultimate compression strength, open porosity, apparent density, linear shrinkage at 1,400 C and holding for 5 hours, content of calcium, aluminium and iron oxides. Abrasive wear and spalling of the working surface of the slanted duct zone made of the concrete blocks was 1.5-2.0 lower than that of conventional refractory bricks in chambers with the same service life. Tests carried out 8 years long showed that the slanted duct zones made of concrete blocks were characterized by higher abrasion resistance and heat resistance, reduced number of joints and increased rigidity of the slanted duct structure. 4 refs.

  5. Block-Krylov component synthesis method for structural model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Hale, Arthur L.

    1988-01-01

    A new analytical method is presented for generating component shape vectors, or Ritz vectors, for use in component synthesis. Based on the concept of a block-Krylov subspace, easily derived recurrence relations generate blocks of Ritz vectors for each component. The subspace spanned by the Ritz vectors is called a block-Krylov subspace. The synthesis uses the new Ritz vectors rather than component normal modes to reduce the order of large, finite-element component models. An advantage of the Ritz vectors is that they involve significantly less computation than component normal modes. Both 'free-interface' and 'fixed-interface' component models are derived. They yield block-Krylov formulations paralleling the concepts of free-interface and fixed-interface component modal synthesis. Additionally, block-Krylov reduced-order component models are shown to have special disturbability/observability properties. Consequently, the method is attractive in active structural control applications, such as large space structures. The new fixed-interface methodology is demonstrated by a numerical example. The accuracy is found to be comparable to that of fixed-interface component modal synthesis.

  6. An Efficient Block Matching Algorithm Using Logical Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Pal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Motion estimation, which has been widely used in various image sequence coding schemes, plays a key role in the transmission and storage of video signals at reduced bit rates. There are two classes of motion estimation methods, Block matching algorithms (BMA and Pel-recursive algorithms (PRA. Due to its implementation simplicity, block matching algorithms have been widely adopted by various video coding standards such as CCITT H.261, ITU-T H.263, and MPEG. In BMA, the current image frame is partitioned into fixed-size rectangular blocks. The motion vector for each block is estimated by finding the best matching block of pixels within the search window in the previous frame according to matching criteria. The goal of this work is to find a fast method for motion estimation and motion segmentation using proposed model. Recent day Communication between ends is facilitated by the development in the area of wired and wireless networks. And it is a challenge to transmit large data file over limited bandwidth channel. Block matching algorithms are very useful in achieving the efficient and acceptable compression. Block matching algorithm defines the total computation cost and effective bit budget. To efficiently obtain motion estimation different approaches can be followed but above constraints should be kept in mind. This paper presents a novel method using three step and diamond algorithms with modified search pattern based on logical image for the block based motion estimation. It has been found that, the improved PSNR value obtained from proposed algorithm shows a better computation time (faster as compared to original Three step Search (3SS/TSS method .The experimental results based on the number of video sequences were presented to demonstrate the advantages of proposed motion estimation technique.

  7. Respiratory signal analysis of liver cancer patients with respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Im; Jung, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chul Jong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Byung Ki [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    External markers respiratory movement measuring device (RPM; Real-time Position Management, Varian Medical System, USA) Liver Cancer Radiation Therapy Respiratory gated with respiratory signal with irradiation time and the actual research by analyzing the respiratory phase with the breathing motion measurement device respiratory tuning evaluate the accuracy of radiation therapy May-September 2014 Novalis Tx. (Varian Medical System, USA) and liver cancer radiotherapy using respiratory gated RPM (Duty Cycle 20%, Gating window 40%-60%) of 16 patients who underwent total when recording the analyzed respiratory movement. After the breathing motion of the external markers recorded on the RPM was reconstructed by breathing through the acts phase analysis, for Beam-on Time and Duty Cycle recorded by using the reconstructed phase breathing breathing with RPM gated the prediction accuracy of the radiation treatment analysis and analyzed the correlation between prediction accuracy and Duty Cycle in accordance with the reproducibility of the respiratory movement. Treatment of 16 patients with respiratory cycle during the actual treatment plan was analyzed with an average difference -0.03 seconds (range -0.50 seconds to 0.09 seconds) could not be confirmed statistically significant difference between the two breathing (p = 0.472). The average respiratory period when treatment is 4.02 sec (0.71 sec), the average value of the respiratory cycle of the treatment was characterized by a standard deviation 7.43% (range 2.57 to 19.20%). Duty Cycle is that the actual average 16.05% (range 13.78 to 17.41%), average 56.05 got through the acts of the show and then analyzed% (range 39.23 to 75.10%) is planned in respiratory research phase (40% to 60%) in was confirmed. The investigation on the correlation between the ratio Duty Cycle and planned respiratory phase and the standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was analyzed in each -0.156 (p = 0.282) and -0.385 (p = 0.070). This study is

  8. Graphs obtained from collections of blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton Magnant

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Given a collection of $d$-dimensional rectangular solids called blocks, no two of which sharing interior points, construct a block graph by adding a vertex for each block and an edge if the faces of the two corresponding blocks intersect nontrivially.  It is known that if $d \\geq 3$, such block graphs can have arbitrarily large chromatic number.  We prove that the chromatic number can be bounded with only a mild restriction on the sizes of the blocks.  We also show that block graphs of block configurations arising from partitions of $d$-dimensional hypercubes into sub-hypercubes are at least $d$-connected.  Bounds on the diameter and the hamiltonicity of such block graphs are also discussed.

  9. Running training and adaptive strategies of locomotor-respiratory coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, William J; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2003-06-01

    It has been suggested that stronger coupling between locomotory and breathing rhythms may occur as a result of training in the particular movement pattern and also may reduce the perceived workload or metabolic cost of the movement. Research findings on human locomotor-respiratory coordination are equivocal, due in part to the fact that assessment techniques range in sensitivity to important aspects of coordination (e.g. temporal ordering of patterns, half-integer couplings and changes in frequency and phase coupling). An additional aspect that has not received much attention is the adaptability of this coordination to changes in task constraints. The current study investigated the effect of running training on the locomotor-respiratory coordination and the adaptive strategies observed across a wide range of walking and running speeds. Locomotor-respiratory coordination was evaluated by the strength and variability of both frequency and phase coupling patterns that subjects displayed within and across the speed conditions. Male subjects (five runners, five non-runners) locomoted at seven different treadmill speeds. Group results indicated no differences between runners and non-runners with respect to breathing parameters, stride parameters, as well as the strength and variability of the coupling at each speed. Individual results, however, showed that grouping subjects masks large individual differences and strategies across speeds. Coupling strategies indicated that runners show more stable dominant couplings across locomotory speeds than non-runners do. These findings suggest that running training does not change the strength of locomotor-respiratory coupling but rather how these systems adapt to changing speeds.

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  11. A conformal block Farey tail

    CERN Document Server

    Maloney, Alexander; Ng, Gim Seng

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the constraints of crossing symmetry on CFT correlation functions. Four point conformal blocks are naturally viewed as functions on the upper-half plane, on which crossing symmetry acts by PSL(2,Z) modular transformations. This allows us to construct a unique, crossing symmetric function out of a given conformal block by averaging over PSL(2,Z). In some two dimensional CFTs the correlation functions are precisely equal to the modular average of the contributions of a finite number of light states. For example, in the two dimensional Ising and tri-critical Ising model CFTs, the correlation functions of identical operators are equal to the PSL(2,Z) average of the Virasoro vacuum block; this determines the 3 point function coefficients uniquely in terms of the central charge. The sum over PSL(2,Z) in CFT2 has a natural AdS3 interpretation as a sum over semi-classical saddle points, which describe particles propagating along rational tangles in the bulk. We demonstrate this explicitly for the corre...

  12. Altered cardiac rhythm in infants with bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galeone Carlotta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the most frequent extra-pulmonary manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection involve the cardiovascular system, no data regarding heart function in infants with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection have yet been systematically collected. The aim of this study was to verify the real frequency of heart involvement in patients with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection, and whether infants with mild or moderate disease also risk heart malfunction. Methods A total of 69 otherwise healthy infants aged 1-12 months with bronchiolitis hospitalised in standard wards were enrolled. Pernasal flocked swabs were performed to collect specimens for the detection of RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and a blood sample was drawn to assess troponin I concentrations. On the day of admission, all of the infants underwent 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring and a complete heart evaluation with echocardiography. Patients were re-evaluated by investigators blinded to the etiological and cardiac findings four weeks after enrolment. Results Regardless of their clinical presentation, sinoatrial blocks were identified in 26/34 RSV-positive patients (76.5% and 1/35 RSV-negative patients (2.9% (p Conclusions RSV seems associated with sinoatrial blocks and transient rhythm alterations even when the related respiratory problems are mild or moderate. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of these rhythm problems and whether they remain asymptomatic and transient even in presence of severe respiratory involvement or chronic underlying disease.

  13. Non lineal respiratory systems mechanics simulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorno, Matias; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2010-01-01

    Model and simulation of biological systems help to better understand these systems. In ICUs patients often reach a complex situation where supportive maneuvers require special expertise. Among them, mechanical ventilation in patients suffering from acuter respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is specially challenging. This work presents a model which can be simulated and use to help in training of physicians and respiratory therapists to analyze the respiratory mechanics in this kind of patients. We validated the model in 2 ARDS patients.

  14. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia as well...

  15. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Rachel L Z; Hardy, Thomas G; Williams, Richard A; McNab, Alan A

    2016-10-01

    To describe post-traumatic and congenital respiratory epithelial cysts in the orbit, which are rare lesions with only 5 and 13 published cases, respectively. We reviewed all cases of respiratory epithelial cysts diagnosed at three institutions (two tertiary referral hospitals, one private clinic) between 1995 and 2015. We describe 10 cases of post-traumatic respiratory epithelial cyst (age range 23 - 82), presenting a mean of 17.4 years after their original trauma; and 3 congenital cases (age range 17-34). All but one case underwent surgical excision of the cyst and its lining, along with any surgical implant within the cyst. Two were recurrent after incomplete excision. Three presented with acute infection within the cyst. Respiratory epithelial orbital cysts are probably commoner than the paucity of published reports would suggest. Post-traumatic cysts often present many years after trauma, and may become secondarily infected. Complete surgical removal is recommended to prevent future recurrence.

  16. National prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahl, R; Andersen, PS; Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; De Monchy, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Many epidemiological studies have assessed the prevalence of respiratory allergic disorders in confined geographical locations. However, no study has yet established nationally prevalence data in a uniform manner representing whole countries and, thus, enabling cross-national comparisons

  17. Complete heart block in a neutropenic patient with aspergillosis: An unusual adverse effect of caspofungins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Biswal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of complete heart block (CHB in a 58-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with no past history of cardiac disease, who received caspofungin in the treatment of disseminated fungal infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CHB associated with caspofungins. Subsequent to induction chemotherapy the patient developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with sudden tachypnea, dyspnoea, fever, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and acute respiratory insufficiency consequent to neutropenia with ANC<500. During the first dose of antifungal therapy with caspofungins, she developed complete atrioventricular block and cardiac arrest. Complete heart block is an unusual adverse effect of caspofungins which has not been reported previously. Caspofungins release histamine in peripheral blood cells, so possible histamine-mediated symptoms ranging from severe fatal anaphylaxis can occur. These data suggest that infusion-related reactions associated with caspofungin may be mediated by histamine release secondary to caspofungin therapy.

  18. Occupational exposure to poultry dust and effects on the respiratory system in workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, S; Faísca, V M; Dias, H; Clérigo, A; Carolino, E; Viegas, C

    2013-01-01

    Farmers are occupationally exposed to many respiratory hazards at work and display higher rates of asthma and respiratory symptoms than other workers. Dust is one of the components present in poultry production that increases risk of adverse respiratory disease occurrence. Dust originates from poultry residues, molds, and feathers and is biologically active as it contains microorganisms. Exposure to dust is known to produce a variety of clinical responses, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic airways obstructive disease (COPD), allergic alveolitis, and organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS). A study was developed to determine particle contamination in seven poultry farms and correlate this with prevalence rate of respiratory defects and record by means of a questionnaire the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases by European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Poultry farm dust contamination was found to contain higher concentrations of particulate matter (PM) PM5 and PM10. Prevalence rate of obstructive pulmonary disorders was higher in individuals with longer exposure regardless of smoking status. In addition, a high prevalence for asthmatic (42.5%) and nasal (51.1%) symptoms was noted in poultry workers. Data thus show that poultry farm workers are more prone to suffer from respiratory ailments and this may be attributed to higher concentrations of PM found in the dust. Intervention programs aimed at reducing exposure to dust will ameliorate occupational working conditions and enhance the health of workers.

  19. Effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民辉; 代文光; 邓洵鼎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury and the possible mechanism.Methods: The middle degree brain injury in rats was made by BIM-III multi-function impacting machine. The brain mitochondrial respiratory function was measured with oxygen electrode and the ultra-structural changes were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: 1. The brain mitochondrial respiratory stage III and respiration control rate reduced significantly in the untreated groups within 24 and 72 hours. But treated Group A showed certain degree of recovery of respiratory function; treated Group B showed further improvement. 2. Untreated Group, treated Groups A and B had different degrees of mitochondrial ultra-structural damage respectively, which could be attenuated after the treatment with magnesium sulfate.Conclusions: The mitochondrial respiratory function decreases significantly after traumatic brain injury. But it can be apparently improved after magnesium sulfate management along with the attenuated damage of mitochondria discovered by TEM. The longer course of treatment can obtain a better improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function.

  20. Control methods for bovine respiratory disease for feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T A

    2010-07-01

    Vaccines and antibiotics are still relied upon as the standard methods of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) prevention, control, and therapy. Success in building disease resistance begins with genetic selection and continues with colostrum management and reducing pathogen exposure. Purchasing single-source cattle with a history of pre- and post-weaning procedures will minimize pathogen exposure and enhance immunity. Using cattle-handling techniques and facilities that promote low stress will allow host immune defenses to remain effective against bacterial and viral colonization. Lastly, controlling BRD must be managed through a comprehensive herd health immunization and management program that effectively addresses disease challenges common to the operation.

  1. REPEATED ABDOMINAL EXERCISE INDUCES RESPIRATORY MUSCLE FATIGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Richard Coast

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged bouts of hyperpnea or resisted breathing are known to result in respiratory muscle fatigue, as are primarily non respiratory exercises such as maximal running and cycling. These exercises have a large ventilatory component, though, and can still be argued to be respiratory activities. Sit-up training has been used to increase respiratory muscle strength, but no studies have been done to determine whether this type of non-respiratory activity can lead to respiratory fatigue. The purpose of the study was to test the effect of sit-ups on various respiratory muscle strength and endurance parameters. Eight subjects performed pulmonary function, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP measurements, and an incremental breathing test before and after completing a one-time fatiguing exercise bout of sit-ups. Each subject acted as their own control performing the same measurements 3-5 days following the exercise bout, substituting rest for exercise. Following sit-up induced fatigue, significant decreases were measured in MIP [121.6 ± 26 to 113.8 ± 23 cmH2O (P <0.025], and incremental breathing test duration [9.6 ± 1.5 to 8.5 ± 0.7 minutes (P <0.05]. No significant decreases were observed from control pre-test to control post-test measurements. We conclude that after a one-time fatiguing sit-up exercise bout there is a reduction in respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP and endurance (incremental breathing test duration but not spirometric pulmonary function

  2. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  3. Total-Count Calibration Blocks for use in uranium Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif

    Transportable calibration blocks for field scintillometers and borehole probes were manufactured from concrete and installed at calibration sites in Denmark and Greece. The concrete mixes were prepared from aggregates of quartz sand and crushed uranium-thorium ore. Hater-reducing agents and silica...... dust added to the cement paste produced concretes of acceptable porosity and pore structure. The content of ore was adjusted to provide block grades of approximately 2, 140, and 540 units of radioelement concentration (Ur). Thorium was estimated to contribute 0.39 ± 0.02 Ur per ppm Th. The adopted...

  4. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, K H; Mathiesen, O; Dahl, J B;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral regional nerve blocks are commonly used for pain management after lower extremity surgery, but motor blockade can be a significant concern. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) is a purely sensory nerve from the lumbar plexus. We hypothesised that an LFCN block would...... reduce movement-related pain after total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with moderate-to-severe pain. METHODS: Sixty patients with visual analogue scale (VAS) score > 40 mm during 30-degree active flexion of the hip on either the first or second postoperative day after THA were included...

  5. Managing the Morbidity Associated with Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Geskey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with congenital heart disease (CHD are at risk for increased morbidity from viral lower respiratory tract infections because of anatomical cardiac lesions than can worsen an already compromised respiratory status. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV remains an important pathogen in contributing toward the morbidity in this population. Although the acute treatment of RSV largely remains supportive, the development of monoclonal antibodies, such as palivuzumab, has reduced the RSV-related hospitalization rate in children with CHD. This review highlights the specific cardiac complications of RSV infection, the acute treatment of bronchiolitis in patients with CHD, and the search for new therapies against RSV, including an effective vaccine, because of the high cost associated with immunoprophylaxis and its lack of reducing RSV-related mortality.

  6. Environmental exposure to pesticides and respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mamane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory effects of environmental exposure to pesticides are debated. Here we aimed to review epidemiological studies published up until 2013, using the PubMed database. 20 studies dealing with respiratory health and non-occupational pesticide exposure were identified, 14 carried out on children and six on adults. In four out of nine studies in children with biological measurements, mothers' dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE blood levels during pregnancy were associated with asthma and wheezing in young children. An association was also found between permethrin in indoor air during pregnancy and wheezing in children. A significant association between asthma and DDE measured in children's blood (aged 7–10 years was observed in one study. However, in three studies, no association was found between asthma or respiratory infections in children and pesticide levels in breast milk and/or infant blood. Lastly, in three out of four studies where post-natal pesticide exposure of children was assessed by parental questionnaire an association with respiratory symptoms was found. Results of the fewer studies on pesticide environmental exposure and respiratory health of adults were much less conclusive: indeed, the associations observed were weak and often not significant. In conclusion, further studies are needed to confirm whether there is a respiratory risk associated with environmental exposure to pesticides.

  7. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Narayan Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49% had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  8. Direct Inhibition of Cellular Fatty Acid Synthase Impairs Replication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamini M Ohol

    Full Text Available Fatty acid synthase (FASN catalyzes the de novo synthesis of palmitate, a fatty acid utilized for synthesis of more complex fatty acids, plasma membrane structure, and post-translational palmitoylation of host and viral proteins. We have developed a potent inhibitor of FASN (TVB-3166 that reduces the production of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV progeny in vitro from infected human lung epithelial cells (A549 and in vivo from mice challenged intranasally with RSV. Addition of TVB-3166 to the culture medium of RSV-infected A549 cells reduces viral spread without inducing cytopathic effects. The antiviral effect of the FASN inhibitor is a direct consequence of reducing de novo palmitate synthesis; similar doses are required for both antiviral activity and inhibition of palmitate production, and the addition of exogenous palmitate to TVB-3166-treated cells restores RSV production. TVB-3166 has minimal effect on RSV entry but significantly reduces viral RNA replication, protein levels, viral particle formation and infectivity of released viral particles. TVB-3166 substantially impacts viral replication, reducing production of infectious progeny 250-fold. In vivo, oral administration of TVB-3166 to RSV-A (Long-infected BALB/c mice on normal chow, starting either on the day of infection or one day post-infection, reduces RSV lung titers 21-fold and 9-fold respectively. Further, TVB-3166 also inhibits the production of RSV B, human parainfluenza 3 (PIV3, and human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16 progeny from A549, HEp2 and HeLa cells respectively. Thus, inhibition of FASN and palmitate synthesis by TVB-3166 significantly reduces RSV progeny both in vitro and in vivo and has broad-spectrum activity against other respiratory viruses. FASN inhibition may alter the composition of regions of the host cell membrane where RSV assembly or replication occurs, or change the membrane composition of RSV progeny particles, decreasing their infectivity.

  9. Bit Serial Architecture for Variable Block Size Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kaveri Devarinti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available H.264/AVC is the latest video coding standard adopting variable block size, quarter-pixel accuracy and motion vector prediction and multi-reference frames for motion estimations. These new features result in higher computation requirements than that for previous coding standards.The computational complexity of motion estimation is about 60% in the H.264/AVC encoder. In this paper most significant bit (MSB first arithmetic based bit serial Variable Block Size Motion Estimation (VBSME hardware architecture is proposed. MSB first bit serial architecture main feature is, its early termination SAD computation compared to normal bit serial architectures. With this early termination technique, number computations are reduced drastically. Hence power consumption is also less compared to parallel architectures. An efficient bit serial processing element is proposed and developed 2D architecture for processing of 4x4 block in parallel .Inter connect structure is developed in such way that data reusability is achieved between PEs. Two types of adder trees are employed for variable block size SAD calculation with less number of adders. The proposed architecture can generate up to 41 motion vectors (MVs for each macroblock. The inter connection complexity between PEs reduced drastically compared to parallel architectures. The architecture supports processing of SDTV (640x480 with 30fps at 172.8 MHz for search range [+8, -7]. We could reduce 14% of computations by using early termination technique.

  10. Effects of bite blocks and hearing status on vowel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Harlan; Denny, Margaret; Guenther, Frank H.; Matthies, Melanie L.; Menard, Lucie; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Tiede, Mark; Vick, Jennell; Zandipour, Majid

    2005-09-01

    This study explores the effects of hearing status and bite blocks on vowel production. Normal-hearing controls and postlingually deaf adults read elicitation lists of /hVd/ syllables with and without bite blocks and auditory feedback. Deaf participants' auditory feedback was provided by a cochlear prosthesis and interrupted by switching off their implant microphones. Recording sessions were held before prosthesis was provided and one month and one year after. Long-term absence of auditory feedback was associated with heightened dispersion of vowel tokens, which was inflated further by inserting bite blocks. The restoration of some hearing with prosthesis reduced dispersion. Deaf speakers' vowel spaces were reduced in size compared to controls. Insertion of bite blocks reduced them further because of the speakers' incomplete compensation. A year of prosthesis use increased vowel contrast with feedback during elicitation. These findings support the inference that models of speech production must assign a role to auditory feedback in error-based correction of feedforward commands for subsequent articulatory gestures.

  11. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH)

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  12. Increased Life Span due to Calorie Restriction in Respiratory-Deficient Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A model for replicative life span extension by calorie restriction (CR in yeast has been proposed whereby reduced glucose in the growth medium leads to activation of the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2. One mechanism proposed for this putative activation of Sir2 is that CR enhances the rate of respiration, in turn leading to altered levels of NAD or NADH, and ultimately resulting in enhanced Sir2 activity. An alternative mechanism has been proposed in which CR decreases levels of the Sir2 inhibitor nicotinamide through increased expression of the gene coding for nicotinamidase, PNC1. We have previously reported that life span extension by CR is not dependent on Sir2 in the long-lived BY4742 strain background. Here we have determined the requirement for respiration and the effect of nicotinamide levels on life span extension by CR. We find that CR confers robust life span extension in respiratory-deficient cells independent of strain background, and moreover, suppresses the premature mortality associated with loss of mitochondrial DNA in the short-lived PSY316 strain. Addition of nicotinamide to the medium dramatically shortens the life span of wild type cells, due to inhibition of Sir2. However, even in cells lacking both Sir2 and the replication fork block protein Fob1, nicotinamide partially prevents life span extension by CR. These findings (1 demonstrate that respiration is not required for the longevity benefits of CR in yeast, (2 show that nicotinamide inhibits life span extension by CR through a Sir2-independent mechanism, and (3 suggest that CR acts through a conserved, Sir2-independent mechanism in both PSY316 and BY4742.

  13. Subtropical grass pollen allergens are important for allergic respiratory diseases in subtropical regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Janet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grass pollen allergens are a major cause of allergic respiratory disease but traditionally prescribing practice for grass pollen allergen-specific immunotherapy has favoured pollen extracts of temperate grasses. Here we aim to compare allergy to subtropical and temperate grass pollens in patients with allergic rhinitis from a subtropical region of Australia. Methods Sensitization to pollen extracts of the subtropical Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum, Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense and Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon as well as the temperate Ryegrass (Lolium perenne were measured by skin prick in 233 subjects from Brisbane. Grass pollen-specific IgE reactivity was tested by ELISA and cross-inhibition ELISA. Results Patients with grass pollen allergy from a subtropical region showed higher skin prick diameters with subtropical Bahia grass and Bermuda grass pollens than with Johnson grass and Ryegrass pollens. IgE reactivity was higher with pollen of Bahia grass than Bermuda grass, Johnson grass and Ryegrass. Patients showed asymmetric cross-inhibition of IgE reactivity with subtropical grass pollens that was not blocked by temperate grass pollen allergens indicating the presence of species-specific IgE binding sites of subtropical grass pollen allergens that are not represented in temperate grass pollens. Conclusions Subtropical grass pollens are more important allergen sources than temperate grass pollens for patients from a subtropical region. Targeting allergen-specific immunotherapy to subtropical grass pollen allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis in subtropical regions could improve treatment efficacy thereby reducing the burden of allergic rhinitis and asthma.

  14. Megacomplex organization of the oxidative phosphorylation system by structural analysis of respiratory supercomplexes from potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultema, Jelle B; Braun, Hans-Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Kouril, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The individual protein complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS complexes I to V) specifically interact and form defined supramolecular structures, the so-called "respiratory supercomplexes". Some supercomplexes appear to associate into larger structures, or megacomplexes, such as a string of dimeric ATP synthase (complex V(2)). A row-like organization of OXPHOS complexes I, III and IV into respiratory strings has also been proposed. These transient strings cannot be purified after detergent solubilization. Hence the shape and composition of the respiratory string was approached by an extensive structural characterization of all its possible building blocks, which are the supercomplexes. About 400,000 molecular projections of supercomplexes from potato mitochondria were processed by single particle electron microscopy. We obtained two-dimensional projection maps of at least five different supercomplexes, including the supercomplex I+III(2), III(2)+IV(1), V(2), I+III(2)+IV(1) and I(2)+III(2) in different types of position. From these maps the relative position of the individual complexes in the largest unit, the I(2)+III(2)+IV(2) supercomplex, could be determined in a coherent way. The maps also show that the I+III(2)+IV(1) supercomplex, or respirasome, differs from its counterpart in bovine mitochondria. The new structural features allow us to propose a consistent model of the respiratory string, composed of repeating I(2)+III(2)+IV(2) units, which is in agreement with dimensions observed in former freeze-fracture electron microscopy data.

  15. Hillslope-derived blocks retard river incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Charles M.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    The most common detachment-limited river incision models ignore the effects of sediment on fluvial erosion, yet steep reaches of mountain rivers often host clusters of large (>1 m) blocks. We argue that this distribution of blocks is a manifestation of an autogenic negative feedback in which fast vertical river incision steepens adjacent hillslopes, which deliver blocks to the channel. Blocks inhibit incision by shielding the bed and enhancing form drag. We explore this feedback with a 1-D channel-reach model in which block delivery by hillslopes depends on the river incision rate. Results indicate that incision-dependent block delivery can explain the block distribution in Boulder Creek, Colorado. The proposed negative feedback may significantly slow knickpoint retreat, channel adjustment, and landscape response compared to rates predicted by current theory. The influence of hillslope-derived blocks may complicate efforts to extract base level histories from river profiles.

  16. Demographic Data - MDC_BlockGroup

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade County Census 2000 Block Groups. A census Block Group is a statistical subdivision of a census Tract consisting of a cluster...

  17. Effect of sympathetic nerve block on acute inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Rung, G W; Kehlet, H

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sympathetic nerve blocks relieve pain in certain chronic pain states, but the role of the sympathetic pathways in acute pain is unclear. Thus the authors wanted to determine whether a sympathetic block could reduce acute pain and hyperalgesia after a heat injury in healthy volunteers....

  18. An Analysis of Response-Blocking Parameters in the Prevention of Pica

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Brandon E.; Grosser, Jason W.; Iwata, Brian A.; Powers, Lauren A.

    2005-01-01

    We manipulated two parameters of response blocking to reduce pica: (a) the criteria for initiating the procedure (either earlier or later in the response chain) and (b) the distance from which the procedure was initiated. Results suggested that response blocking may be effective only when implemented early in the chain and with near-perfect…

  19. The role of image guidance in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Fredberg Persson, Gitte

    2008-01-01

    cycle, and thereby enable dose escalation and/or reduction of dose to organs at risk. Without adequate use of respiratory correlated image guidance on a regular basis, respiratory beam gating may however have a detrimental effect on target coverage. Image guidance of tumour respiratory motion...... is therefore of utmost importance for the safe introduction of respiratory gating. In this short overview, suitable image guidance strategies for respiratory gated radiotherapy are reviewed for two cancer sites; breast cancer and lung tumours....

  20. [Research progress of adventitious respiratory sound signal processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaoming

    2013-10-01

    Adventitious respiratory sound signal processing has been an important researching topic in the field of computerized respiratory sound analysis system. In recent years, new progress has been achieved in adventitious respiratory sound signal analysis due to the applications of techniques of non-stationary random signal processing. Algorithm progress of adventitious respiratory sound detections is discussed in detail in this paper. Then the state of art of adventitious respiratory sound analysis is reviewed, and development directions of next phase are pointed out.

  1. Slickenside developed in chert block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, J.; Hayasaka, Y.; Nishiwaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    We observe the microstructures of slickenside developed in chert block mainly with a TEM, in order to clarify generation mechanism of the slickenside. This chert block occurs in the Jurassic accretionary complex in eastern Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The complex, chaotic sediment, is composed of allochthonous blocks, mainly of chert, limestone, sandstone and mudstone in the argillaceous matrix. The color of the undeformed chert is pale blue to white, while the surface of slickenside is black. The stereo microscopy indicates the top surface of slickenside is covered with a transparent material, whose composition is mainly Si, measured by EPMA. The striation is well developed on the transparent-Si-material. We made thin sections, parallel and perpendicular to striation and slickenside, respectively. On the thin sections, the elongated quartz grains are oriented obliquely to the slickenside with 20-30 degree. Many fluid inclusions, which represent healed microcracks, are observed within the quartz grains. These quartz grains show strong undulose extinction and bulging-recrystallization. Apatite grains are also observed as a main constituent mineral. We made TEM foils from the above thin section by FIB. TEM observation indicates the amorphous layer with several ten nanometers in width distributes along the slickenside. (We speculate the most part of the amorphous layer are taken away during polishing of the thin section, because the strength of the amorphous layer is weak. Therefore we now make thin section again with care.) The tangled dislocations are developed within the quartz grains. They make subgrains with ca. 1 micrometer in size. These results suggest the slickenside was generated by the frictional melting of quartz grains on slip plane under very high stress condition, same as pseudotachylyte.

  2. QUASI-SYSTEMATIC BLOCK-CIRCULANT LDPC CODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ying; Wei Guo

    2008-01-01

    A class of Quasi-Systematic Block-Circulant Low-Density Parity-Check (QSBC-LDPC) codes is proposed. Block-circulant LDPC codes have been studied a lot recently,because the simple structures of their parity-check matrices are very helpful to reduce the implementation complexities.QSBC-LDPC codes are special block-circulant LDPC codes with quasi-systematic parity-check ma-trices. The memories for encoders of QSBC-LDPC codes are limited,and the encoding process can be carried out in a simple recursive way with low complexities. Researches show that the QSBC-LDPC codes can provide remarkable performances with low encoding complexities.

  3. Practical Binary Adaptive Block Coder

    CERN Document Server

    Reznik, Yuriy A

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes design of a low-complexity algorithm for adaptive encoding/ decoding of binary sequences produced by memoryless sources. The algorithm implements universal block codes constructed for a set of contexts identified by the numbers of non-zero bits in previous bits in a sequence. We derive a precise formula for asymptotic redundancy of such codes, which refines previous well-known estimate by Krichevsky and Trofimov, and provide experimental verification of this result. In our experimental study we also compare our implementation with existing binary adaptive encoders, such as JBIG's Q-coder, and MPEG AVC (ITU-T H.264)'s CABAC algorithms.

  4. Treatment of congestion in upper respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli O Meltzer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eli O Meltzer1, Fernan Caballero2, Leonard M Fromer3, John H Krouse4, Glenis Scadding51Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San Diego, CA and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, USA; 2Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Centro Medico-Docente La Trinidad, Caracas, Venezuela; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 4Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA; 5Department of Allergy and Rhinology, Royal National TNE Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Congestion, as a symptom of upper respiratory tract diseases including seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis, is principally caused by mucosal inflammation. Though effective pharmacotherapy options exist, no agent is universally efficacious; therapeutic decisions must account for individual patient preferences. Oral H1-antihistamines, though effective for the common symptoms of allergic rhinitis, have modest decongestant action, as do leukotriene receptor antagonists. Intranasal antihistamines appear to improve congestion better than oral forms. Topical decongestants reduce congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, but local adverse effects make them unsuitable for long-term use. Oral decongestants show some efficacy against congestion in allergic rhinitis and the common cold, and can be combined with oral antihistamines. Intranasal corticosteroids have broad anti-inflammatory activities, are the most potent long-term pharmacologic treatment of congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, and show some congestion relief in rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Immunotherapy and surgery may be used in some cases refractory to pharmacotherapy. Steps in congestion management include (1 diagnosis of the cause(s, (2 patient education and monitoring, (3 avoidance of environmental triggers where possible, (4 pharmacotherapy, and (5 immunotherapy

  5. New Considerations of Turbo Block Codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUEDianwu; EdSHWEDYK

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that (1) a general linear systematic block code can be expressed as a turbo block code and therefore can be decoded using any turbo decoding algorithm; (2) a turbo block code can be also encoded and decoded without any interleaver with the same performance as when an interleaver is present.

  6. Writer's block in a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sy-Ying; Krashen, Stephen

    2003-10-01

    To assess whether writer's block occurs in languages other than English, a Chinese language translation of Rose's Writer's Block questionnaire was administered to 98 university students in Taiwan. Analysis suggests that writer's block occurs for Chinese students, and, as in English, it is related to premature editing and to a lack of strategies for dealing with complex writing tasks.

  7. Micellization and Dynamics of a Block Copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Triblock copolymers of the type EPE, where E and P denote ethylene oxide and propylene oxide blocks, respectively, are industrially important copolymers often called Pluronics or Poloxamers. EPE copolymers form micelles with a core of P blocks and different micellar shapes depending on block leng...

  8. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4% cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7% among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6% of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0% had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9% case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000, followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000. These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and

  9. Improvement of cylinder block line for high productivity. Koseisansei cylinder block seizo line no kakuritsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, M. (Aisin Takaoka Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Ito, M. (Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan))

    1991-05-25

    This paper is a technical report of improvig manufacturing line in an automotive cylinder block casting factory, and enhancing the productivity. Gists of the improvement can be summarized in the following three items: Standardization of the production corresponding to product acceptance condition by the subsequent process; elimination of waste in time by means of establishing production framework, including material handling; and accumulation of small scale automations. The result was the productivity in 1989 increased by 1.2 times that in around 1975 as a result of improved rate of operation, and number of workers reduced to half, supported particularly by manpower saving in core making and finishing processes. For instance, core making machines were given size reduction in the facility and die, and multiple core making function, in which one die makes different cores for the same part. The multiple core making function, which can reduce number of machines necessary to make one cylinder block, has a large advantage not only facilitating arrangemets for small quantity production parts, but also dealing with stepwise capacity increase and eliminating the necessity of keeping spare dies. 16 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  11. Cutaneous Sensory Block Area, Muscle-Relaxing Effect, and Block Duration of the Transversus Abdominis Plane Block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, Kion; Rothe, Christian; Rosenstock, Charlotte V

    2015-01-01

    into a medial and lateral part by a vertical line through the anterior superior iliac spine. We measured muscle thickness of the 3 lateral abdominal muscle layers with ultrasound in the relaxed state and during maximal voluntary muscle contraction. The volunteers reported the duration of the sensory block...... and the abdominal muscle-relaxing effect. RESULTS: The lateral part of the cutaneous sensory block area was a median of 266 cm2 (interquartile range, 191-310 cm2) and the medial part 76 cm 2(interquartile range, 54-127 cm2). In all the volunteers, lateral wall muscle thickness decreased significantly by 9.2 mm (6......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a widely used nerve block. However, basic block characteristics are poorly described. The purpose of this study was to assess the cutaneous sensory block area, muscle-relaxing effect, and block duration. METHODS: Sixteen...

  12. Reducing sedentarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Wendy; Andersen, Lars Bo; Sigmund, Anderssen

    Reducing Sedentarism Brown, WJ*1; Brown, WJ*1; Andersen, LB*2; Anderssen, SA*3 1The University of Queensland, Australia; 2University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; 3Norwegian School of Sports Medicine, Norway Western lifestyles have changed remarkably over the last century, with decreasing levels...... between 7 and 10 hours each day sitting, with about half this time spent sitting at work. This paper will examine the hypothesis that too much sitting is a risk factor for poor health, even in those who meet the current physical activity guidelines. First, the biological plausibility of too much sitting...

  13. Respiratory sensitization : Advances in assessing the risk of respiratory inflammation and irritation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandebriel, R.; Callant Cransveld, C.; Crommelin, D.; Diamant, Z.; Glazenburg, B.; Joos, G.; Kuper, F.; Natsch, A.; Nijkamp, F.; Noteborn, H.; Pieters, R.; Roberts, D.; Roggen, E.; Rorije, E.; Seed, M.; Sewald, K.; Heuvel, R. van den; Engelen, J. van; Verstraelen, S.; Loveren, H. van

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory sensitization provides a case study for a new approach to chemical safety evaluation, as the prevalence of respiratory sensitization has increased considerably over the last decades, but animal and/or human experimental/predictive models are not currently available. Therefore, the goal o

  14. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  15. Seasonality of long term wheezing following respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Steijn, M; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; Kimpen, JLL

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well known that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is associated with subsequent wheezing episodes, but the precise natural course of wheezing following RSV LRTI is not known. This study aimed to determine the continuous development of wheezi

  16. Research on overall assembling and welding process of steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shiguang; Li Hongtao; Wang Chao

    2012-01-01

    This article presents in detail the assembling and welding process technique of the steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge. The application of this process technique effectively solves the problem of welding stress release in tuyere block assembling and welding without increasing the number of turns of the blocks and overhead welding, thus avoiding possible structural deformation due to excessive accumulation of internal welding stress, greatly reducing the repeated deformation and correction work during assembling and welding, and ensuring the weld seam quality and overall dimensions of tuvere blocks of Taizhou Bridze.

  17. Seismicity of the Jalisco Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Rutz, M.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Trejo-Gomez, E.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    In April 2002 began to transmit the stations of the first phase of Jalisco Telemetric Network located at the northwest of Jalisco Block and at the area of Volcan de Fuego (Colima Volcano), in June were deployed four additional MarsLite portable stations in the Bahia de Banderas area, and by the end of August one more portable station at Ceboruco Volcano. The data of these stations jointly with the data from RESCO (Colima Telemetric Network) give us the minimum seismic stations coverage to initiate in a systematic and permanent way the study of the seismicity in this very complex tectonic region. A preliminary analysis of seismicity based on the events registered by the networks using a shutter algorithm, confirms several important features proposed by microseismicity studies carried out between 1996 and 1998. A high level of seismicity inside and below of Rivera plate is observed, this fact suggest a very complex stress pattern acting on this plate. Shallow seismicity at south and east of Bahia de Banderas also suggest a complex stress pattern in this region of the Jalisco Block, events at more than 30 km depth are located under the mouth of the bay and in face of it, a feature denominated Banderas Boundary mark the change of the seismic regime at north of this latitude (20.75°N), however some shallow events were located at the region of Nayarit.

  18. Apneic oxygenation for elimination of respiratory motion artefact in an intubated patient undergoing helical chest computed tomography angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Pneumatikos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion artifact in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients often reduces the quality of helical computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Apneic oxygenation is a well established intra-operative technique that allows adequate oxygenation for short periods (up to 10 min in sedated and paralyzed patients. We describe the use of the apneic oxygenation for elimination of respiratory motion artefact in an intubated patient undergoing helical chest computed tomography angiography.

  19. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  20. Functional and genetic predisposition to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract infections in prematurely born infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drysdale, Simon B.; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Greenough, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Term born infants are predisposed to human rhinovirus (HRV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) by reduced neonatal lung function and genetic susceptibility. Our aim was to investigate whether prematurely born infants were similarly predisposed to HRV LRTIs or any other viral LRTIs. Infants bo