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  1. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  2. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block: a useful adjunct in the management of postoperative respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Chin, Ki Jinn; Chan, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    The ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a useful tool in controlling postoperative pain following abdominal surgery. The bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP blocks successfully managed the pain of a patient presenting with hypoxemia and respiratory failure in the Post-anesthesia Care Unit, following a laparotomy for small bowel obstruction during general anesthesia. The TAP block reduced systemic opioid requirements and opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression, improved patient compliance with non-invasive positive pressure ventilation, and prevented the need for intubation and ventilation in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  4. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  5. Reducing resistance and emotional blocks in writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Cencič

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Writing is as much a communicative as it is a cognitive process an active individual is involved in. In this paper some characteristics of writing as a communicative process and some characteristics of writing as a cognitive process are stated. Further a model engaging both communicative and cognitive elements of writing is added, these elements being connected with linguistic resources. The author considers some prejudices, myths or emotional blocks to be destroyed as not to hinder the writer in writing. Besides the confrontation with the blocks, it is also important that the writer have in mind that writing or cul ture of writing can be improved only through the writing itself. Moreover, good writing is not correct but effective writing, pursuing its objective, reaching out to the readers and reflecting the author's thoughts.

  6. Reducing resistance and emotional blocks in writing

    OpenAIRE

    Majda Cencič

    1996-01-01

    Writing is as much a communicative as it is a cognitive process an active individual is involved in. In this paper some characteristics of writing as a communicative process and some characteristics of writing as a cognitive process are stated. Further a model engaging both communicative and cognitive elements of writing is added, these elements being connected with linguistic resources. The author considers some prejudices, myths or emotional blocks to be destroyed as not to hinder the write...

  7. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  8. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even completely prevent the KHFAC onset response without a change in nerve conductivity.

  9. Prevalence of reduced respiratory muscle strength in institutionalized elderly people

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    Rodrigo Polaquini Simões

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Respiratory muscle strength is relevant to the clinical situation of elderly patients, particularly those presenting with respiratory or cardiac diseases. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the respiratory muscle strength of institutionalized elderly women, compare this with predicted values for the Brazilian population and calculate the correlation with age and anthropometric characteristics. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study at the Department of Physiotherapy of Universidade Camilo Castelo Branco. METHODS: The participants were 56 institutionalized elderly women (74.87 ± 10.55 years of age, evaluated in eight institutions in three cities in the central region of the State of São Paulo, between January 2005 and March 2006. They were separated into three subgroups according to age: 60-69 years (n = 20, 70-79 (n = 18 and 80-89 years (n = 18. Maximal respiratory pressures were obtained using a manovacuometer. The values obtained were compared between subgroups and with predicted values. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate age, weight, height and body mass index in relation to maximal respiratory pressures. The significance level was P < 0.05. RESULTS: No significant differences in maximal respiratory pressures were seen between the three subgroups. The maximal respiratory pressures were significantly lower in the three subgroups, compared with predicted values. Negative correlations between maximal respiratory pressures and age and positive correlations in relation to weight, height and body mass index were found. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory muscle strength was markedly reduced in institutionalized 60 to 89-year-old women and the values demonstrated correlations with age and anthropometric characteristics.

  10. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strey, K A; Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-11-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: Protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strey, K.A.; Baertsch, N.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  12. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren-Gash, C; Fragaszy, E; Hayward, AC

    2012-01-01

    : Please cite this paper as: Warren-Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary an...

  13. Residual neuromuscular block as a risk factor for critical respiratory events in the post anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, M; Xará, D; Parente, D; Barbosa, M; Abelha, F J

    2013-04-01

    Residual neuromuscular block is an important postoperative complication associated to the use of neuromuscular blocking drugs. The purpose of this study was to access the incidence of residual neuromuscular block in a post-anesthesia care unit and to evaluate its association with critical respiratory events. Prospective cohort study was conducted in a Post Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU) for a period of 3 weeks. Two hundred two adult patients who submitted to scheduled non-cardiac and non-intracranial surgery were eligible to the study. The primary outcome variable was residual neuromuscular block after arrival to PACU that was defined as train-of-four ratio <0.9 and objectively quantified using acceleromyography. Demographic data, perioperative variables, lengths of hospital and recovery room stay and critical respiratory events were recorded. Inadequate emergence was classified in its different forms according to the Richmond agitation and sedation scale 10 min after admission to the recovery room. Residual neuromuscular block incidence in the post-anesthesia care unit was 29.7% (95% confidence interval: 23.4, 36.1). Patients with residual neuromuscular block had more frequently overall critical respiratory events (51% versus 16%, P<0.001), airway obstruction (10% versus 2%, P=0.029), mild-moderate hypoxemia (23% versus 4%, P<0.001), severe hypoxemia (7% versus 1%, P=0.033), respiratory failure (8% versus 1%, P=0.031), inability to breathe deeply (38% versus 12%, P<0.001) and muscular weakness (16% versus 1%, P<0.001). Residual neuromuscular block was more common after high-risk surgery (53% versus 33%, P=0.011) and was more often associated with post-operative hypoactive emergence as defined by the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (21% versus 6%, P=0.001). This study suggests that residual neuromuscular block is common in the PACU and is associated with more frequent critical respiratory events. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimaci

  14. Utilizing Respiratory Therapists to Reduce Costs of Care.

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    Becker, Ellen A; Hoerr, Cheryl A; Wiles, Kimberly S; Skees, Debra L; Miller, Corinne H; Laher, Douglas S

    2018-01-01

    Changes to the reimbursement of respiratory care services over the past 26 years make it imperative that respiratory therapists (RTs) demonstrate cost savings to establish their value. Therefore, this systematic review evaluated the cost-related impacts from utilizing RTs to deliver care when compared to other care providers. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were used to guide the search process. The study addressed articles across all age groups and care settings that compared the cost of care provided by RTs to a comparison group. Studies were excluded if they were not written in English, described care provided outside of the United States, did not provide quantitative data, or lacked a comparison group. A total of 4,120 articles emerged from the search process, of which 60 qualified for a full text review. Cost savings were evaluated for the 28 articles included in this review, noting the study design, the specific respiratory care practice, use of protocols, clinical setting, and age group. The most frequently studied topic was mechanical ventilation, which along with disease management represented by the most randomized, controlled trials for the study design. The clinical practice area notably absent was home care. Although cost comparisons across studies could not be made due to the inconsistent manner in which data were reported, evidence demonstrated that care provided by RTs yielded both direct and indirect cost reductions, which were achieved through protocol utilization, specialized expertise, and autonomous decision making. The care provided was consistent with care provided by other disciplines. It is critical for the respiratory care profession to highlight key clinical practice areas for future research, to establish uniform reporting measures for outcomes, and to foster the development of future respiratory care researchers to affirm the value that respiratory therapists add to patient care

  15. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  16. Sound stabilizes locomotor-respiratory coupling and reduces energy cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles P Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A natural synchronization between locomotor and respiratory systems is known to exist for various species and various forms of locomotion. This Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling (LRC is fundamental for the energy transfer between the two subsystems during long duration exercise and originates from mechanical and neurological interactions. Different methodologies have been used to compute LRC, giving rise to various and often diverging results in terms of synchronization, (de-stabilization via information, and associated energy cost. In this article, the theory of nonlinear-coupled oscillators was adopted to characterize LRC, through the model of the sine circle map, and tested it in the context of cycling. Our specific focus was the sound-induced stabilization of LRC and its associated change in energy consumption. In our experimental study, participants were instructed during a cycling exercise to synchronize either their respiration or their pedaling rate with an external auditory stimulus whose rhythm corresponded to their individual preferential breathing or cycling frequencies. Results showed a significant reduction in energy expenditure with auditory stimulation, accompanied by a stabilization of LRC. The sound-induced effect was asymmetrical, with a better stabilizing influence of the metronome on the locomotor system than on the respiratory system. A modification of the respiratory frequency was indeed observed when participants cycled in synchrony with the tone, leading to a transition toward more stable frequency ratios as predicted by the sine circle map. In addition to the classical mechanical and neurological origins of LRC, here we demonstrated using the sine circle map model that information plays an important modulatory role of the synchronization, and has global energetic consequences.

  17. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren‐Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Warren‐Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low‐quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower–middle‐income setting. There was high‐quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high‐quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low‐income setting. There was moderate‐ to high‐quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. PMID:23043518

  18. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months-8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  19. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children

  20. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, GmbH, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  1. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse-Sundrup, Martina; Henneman, Justin P; Sandberg, Warren S; Bateman, Brian T; Uribe, Jose Villa; Nguyen, Nicole Thuy; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18 579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18 579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation 3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  2. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. Methods: sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or inter-costal block with %0.25 bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hos-pital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was meas-ured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. Results: We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P < 0.004. Changes in the visual Analogue Scale were associated with marked improvement re-garding pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A com-pared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. Conclusion: tho-racic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib frac-tures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  3. A novel antagonist of CRTH2 blocks eosinophil release from bone marrow, chemotaxis and respiratory burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Royer, J F; Schratl, P; Lorenz, S

    2007-01-01

    developed small molecule antagonist of CRTH2, Cay10471, on eosinophil function with respect to recruitment, respiratory burst and degranulation. METHODS: Chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils were determined using microBoyden chambers. Eosinophil release...... from bone marrow was investigated in the in situ perfused guinea pig hind limb preparation. Respiratory burst and degranulation were measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Cay10471 bound with high affinity to recombinant human and guinea pig CRTH2, but not DP, receptors. The antagonist prevented the PGD......(2)-induced release of eosinophils from guinea pig bone marrow, and inhibited the chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils. Pretreatment with PGD(2) primed eosinophils for chemotaxis towards eotaxin, and this effect was prevented by Cay10471. In contrast...

  4. Mediation pathways and effects of green structures on respiratory mortality via reducing air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Sheng; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown both health and environmental benefits of green spaces, especially in moderating temperature and reducing air pollution. However, the characteristics of green structures have been overlooked in previous investigations. In addition, the mediation effects of green structures on respiratory mortality have not been assessed. This study explores the potential mediation pathways and effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality through temperature, primary and secondary air pollutants separately using partial least squares model with data from Taiwan. The measurable characteristics of green structure include the largest patch percentage, landscape proportion, aggregation, patch distance, and fragmentation. The results showed that mortality of pneumonia and chronic lower respiratory diseases could be reduced by minimizing fragmentation and increasing the largest patch percentage of green structure, and the mediation effects are mostly through reducing air pollutants rather than temperature. Moreover, a high proportion of but fragmented green spaces would increase secondary air pollutants and enhance health risks; demonstrating the deficiency of traditional greening policy with primary focus on coverage ratio. This is the first research focusing on mediation effects of green structure characteristics on respiratory mortality, revealing that appropriate green structure planning can be a useful complementary strategy in environmental health management.

  5. Neuromuscular blocking agents in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: a summary of the current evidence from three randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Pereira, Victor Galvão Moura; Espósito, Daniel Crepaldi; Damasceno, Maria Cecília Toledo; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially fatal disease with high mortality. Our aim was to summarize the current evidence for use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) in the early phase of ARDS. Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of publications between

  6. Postoperative Respiratory Exercises Reduce the Risk of Developing Pulmonary Complications in Patients Undergoing Lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Larrad, Ana; Vellosillo-Ortega, Juan Manuel; Ruiz-Muneta, Carlos; Abecia-Inchaurregui, Luis Carlos; Seco, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of an intensive postoperative physiotherapy program focused on respiratory exercises in patients undergoing lobectomy by open thoracotomy. Quasi-experimental study. Tertiary referral academic hospital. 208 patients undergoing lobectomy by open thoracotomy. Control group patients (n=102) received standard medical/nursing care, and experimental group patients (n=106) added to the standard clinical pathway a daily physiotherapy program focused on respiratory exercises until discharge. Analyzed outcomes were the frequency of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) more amenable to physiotherapy (pneumonia, atelectasis and respiratory insufficiency) and length of hospital stay (LOS). Both groups were comparable regarding preoperative and surgical characteristics. Incidence of PPCs was 20.6% in control and 6.6% in experimental group (P=.003). Median (IQR) LOS in control group was 14 (7) days (Huber M estimator 14.21) and 12 (6) days (Huber M estimator 12.81) in experimental. Logistic regression model identified the evaluated physiotherapy program (P=.017; EXP [B] 95% CI 0.081-0.780) and % FEV1 (P=.042; EXP [B] 95% CI 0.941-0.999) as protective factors for the development of PPCs in patients undergoing lobectomy. Implementing a postoperative intensive physiotherapy program focused on respiratory exercises reduces the risk of PPCs and resultant LOS on patients undergoing lobectomy. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of enhancer-blocking insulators to reduce retroviral vector genotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Groth

    Full Text Available The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity.

  8. Blocks and other techniques pediatric surgeons can employ to reduce postoperative pain in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadman, L M

    1999-02-01

    Painful experiences, such as circumcision without the benefit of anesthesia, during the neonatal period may induce lifelong behavior changes in infants and children. By inference, this is probably true for other painful experiences encountered during childhood. It is much easier to prevent the establishment of pain than it is to eradicate it once it has become firmly established. As "captain of the ship," there are three very basic things a pediatric surgeon can do to reduce postoperative discomfort in your young patients. First, whenever possible, allow caudal blocks or other forms of regional anesthesia, such as penile or ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve blocks, to be performed on your patients. Second, always use timed analgesics and avoid PRN orders. Last, know how to use two analgesics well, one narcotic and one non-narcotic. Be completely familiar with their uptake, distribution, and elimination half-lives. This article presents a review of the efficacy and safety of caudal blocks, and the use of ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric, "splash," and penile blocks as alternative techniques for providing perineal analgesia. In addition, the most current and efficacious dosage regimen for the rectal administration of acetaminophen (40.0 mg/kg after induction of anesthesia, then 20.0 mg/kg every 6 hours for the first 24 postoperative hours) is presented. Additionally, the novel use of intravenous methadone (0.2 to 0.3 mg/kg) to provide intense and protracted narcotic analgesia is discussed.

  9. Using a virtual breakthrough series collaborative to reduce postoperative respiratory failure in 16 Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkoff, Lisa; Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Borzecki, Ann; Shin, Marlena; Lynn, Marilyn M; Gunnar, William; Rosen, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Virtual Breakthrough Series (VBTS) process was used in an eight-month (June 2011-January 2012) quality improvement (QI) project to improve care related to reducing postoperative respiratory failure. The VBTS collaborative drew on Patient Safety Indicator 11: Postoperative Respiratory Failure Rate to guide changes in care at the bedside. Sixteen Veterans Health Administration hospitals, each representing a regional Veterans Integrated Service Network, participated in the QI project. During the prework phase (initial two months), hospitals formed multidisciplinary teams, selected measures related to their goals, and collected baseline data. The six-month action phase included group conference calls in which the faculty presented clinical background on the topic, discussed evidence-based processes of care, and/or presented content regarding reducing postoperative respiratory failure. During a final, six-month continuous improvement and spread phase, teams were to continue implementing changes as part of their usual processes. The six most commonly reported interventions to reduce postoperative respiratory failure focused on improving incentive spirometer use, documenting implementation of targeted interventions, oral care, standardized orders, early ambulation, and provider education. A few teams reported reduced ICU readmissions for respiratory failure. The VBTS collaborative helped teams implement process changes to help reduce postoperative respiratory complications. Teams reported initial success at implementing site-specific improvements using real-time data. The VBTS model shows promise for knowledge sharing and efficient multifacility improvement efforts, although long-term sustainability and testing in these and other settings need to be examined.

  10. Mouse Saliva Inhibits Transit of Influenza Virus to the Lower Respiratory Tract by Efficiently Blocking Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Brad; Ng, Wy Ching; Crawford, Simon; McKimm-Breschkin, Jenny L; Brown, Lorena E

    2017-07-15

    We previously identified a novel inhibitor of influenza virus in mouse saliva that halts the progression of susceptible viruses from the upper to the lower respiratory tract of mice in vivo and neutralizes viral infectivity in MDCK cells. Here, we investigated the viral target of the salivary inhibitor by using reverse genetics to create hybrid viruses with some surface proteins derived from an inhibitor-sensitive strain and others from an inhibitor-resistant strain. These viruses demonstrated that the origin of the viral neuraminidase (NA), but not the hemagglutinin or matrix protein, was the determinant of susceptibility to the inhibitor. Comparison of the NA sequences of a panel of H3N2 viruses with differing sensitivities to the salivary inhibitor revealed that surface residues 368 to 370 (N2 numbering) outside the active site played a key role in resistance. Resistant viruses contained an EDS motif at this location, and mutation to either EES or KDS, found in highly susceptible strains, significantly increased in vitro susceptibility to the inhibitor and reduced the ability of the virus to progress to the lungs when the viral inoculum was initially confined to the upper respiratory tract. In the presence of saliva, viral strains with a susceptible NA could not be efficiently released from the surfaces of infected MDCK cells and had reduced enzymatic activity based on their ability to cleave substrate in vitro This work indicates that the mouse has evolved an innate inhibitor similar in function, though not in mechanism, to what humans have created synthetically as an antiviral drug for influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Despite widespread use of experimental pulmonary infection of the laboratory mouse to study influenza virus infection and pathogenesis, to our knowledge, mice do not naturally succumb to influenza. Here, we show that mice produce their own natural form of neuraminidase inhibitor in saliva that stops the virus from reaching the lungs, providing a

  11. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Sherry L.; Fowler, Cecile; Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally; Martinez, Yolanda; Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice; Jacobs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting

  12. Market Impacts of Reducing the Prevalence of Bovine Respiratory Disease in United States Beef Cattle Feedlots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamina Keiko Johnson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is a common endemic disease among North American feedlot cattle. BRD can lead to significant economic losses for individual beef cattle feedlot producers through mortality and morbidity. With promising new management and technology research that could reduce BRD prevalence, this study evaluates the potential impacts of a reduction of BRD in the US beef cattle feedlot sector. Using a multi-market, multi-commodity partial equilibrium economic model of the US agricultural industry, we evaluate the market impacts of reduced BRD to producers from various livestock, meat, and feedstuffs industries. We find that as morbidity and mortality is reduced, beef cattle producers experience losses due to increased supplies (lower beef cattle prices and increased demand for feedstuff (higher feedstuff prices. Beef cattle processors see gains as the price of beef cattle is lower, whereas feedstuff producers gain from higher feedstuff prices. Producers in the allied industries (pork, lamb, poultry, and eggs see a small reduction in returns as consumers substitute with less expensive beef products. Consumers see gains in welfare as the increase in beef cattle supply results in lower beef prices. These lower beef prices more than offset the small increases in pork, lamb, poultry, and egg prices. Overall, the potential economic welfare change due to management and technologies that reduce BRD is a net gain for the US society as a whole.

  13. Gold drug auranofin could reduce neuroinflammation by inhibiting microglia cytotoxic secretions and primed respiratory burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Jocelyn M; Bajwa, Ekta; Stuart, Maegan J; Hashioka, Sadayuki; Klegeris, Andis

    2014-11-15

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Anti-inflammatory treatments could potentially be used to slow down the progression of these diseases. We studied the anti-neuroinflammatory activity of gold compounds which have been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Non-toxic concentrations of auranofin (0.1-1 μM) significantly reduced the cytotoxic secretions by primary human microglia and microglia-like THP-1 promonocytic cells. Auranofin inhibited primed NADPH-oxidase dependent respiratory burst and secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and nitric oxide by monocytic cells. It had a direct neuroprotective effect on SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. Auranofin could have a novel application in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of a blocking ELISA for screening of antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Bøtner, Anette; Madsen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa was sens......A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa...

  15. Public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing transmission of respiratory infection: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-pharmaceutical public health interventions may provide simple, low-cost, effective ways of minimising the transmission and impact of acute respiratory infections in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts. Understanding what influences the uptake of non-pharmaceutical interventions such as hand and respiratory hygiene, mask wearing and social distancing could help to inform the development of effective public health advice messages. The aim of this synthesis was to explore public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions that aim to reduce the transmission of acute respiratory infections. Methods Five online databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Web of Science) were systematically searched. Reference lists of articles were also examined. We selected papers that used a qualitative research design to explore perceptions and beliefs about non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of acute respiratory infections. We excluded papers that only explored how health professionals or children viewed non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control. Three authors performed data extraction and assessment of study quality. Thematic analysis and components of meta-ethnography were adopted to synthesise findings. Results Seventeen articles from 16 studies in 9 countries were identified and reviewed. Seven key themes were identified: perceived benefits of non-pharmaceutical interventions, perceived disadvantages of non-pharmaceutical interventions, personal and cultural beliefs about infection transmission, diagnostic uncertainty in emerging respiratory infections, perceived vulnerability to infection, anxiety about emerging respiratory infections and communications about emerging respiratory infections. The synthesis showed that some aspects of non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control (particularly hand and respiratory hygiene) were viewed as familiar and socially responsible actions to take. There was ambivalence about adopting

  16. Public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing transmission of respiratory infection: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Emma; Santer, Miriam; Geraghty, Adam W A; Little, Paul; Yardley, Lucy

    2014-06-11

    Non-pharmaceutical public health interventions may provide simple, low-cost, effective ways of minimising the transmission and impact of acute respiratory infections in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts. Understanding what influences the uptake of non-pharmaceutical interventions such as hand and respiratory hygiene, mask wearing and social distancing could help to inform the development of effective public health advice messages. The aim of this synthesis was to explore public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions that aim to reduce the transmission of acute respiratory infections. Five online databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Web of Science) were systematically searched. Reference lists of articles were also examined. We selected papers that used a qualitative research design to explore perceptions and beliefs about non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of acute respiratory infections. We excluded papers that only explored how health professionals or children viewed non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control. Three authors performed data extraction and assessment of study quality. Thematic analysis and components of meta-ethnography were adopted to synthesise findings. Seventeen articles from 16 studies in 9 countries were identified and reviewed. Seven key themes were identified: perceived benefits of non-pharmaceutical interventions, perceived disadvantages of non-pharmaceutical interventions, personal and cultural beliefs about infection transmission, diagnostic uncertainty in emerging respiratory infections, perceived vulnerability to infection, anxiety about emerging respiratory infections and communications about emerging respiratory infections. The synthesis showed that some aspects of non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control (particularly hand and respiratory hygiene) were viewed as familiar and socially responsible actions to take. There was ambivalence about adopting isolation and personal

  17. A Longitudinal Supra-Inguinal Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block Reduces Morphine Consumption After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Matthias; Vermeylen, Kris; Van Herreweghe, Imré; Carlier, Laurence; Soetens, Filiep; Lambrecht, Stijn; Croes, Kathleen; Pottel, Hans; Van de Velde, Marc

    The role of a fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) for postoperative analgesia after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains questionable. High-dose local anesthetics and a proximal injection site may be essential for successful analgesia. High-dose local anesthetics may pose a risk for local anesthetic systemic toxicity. We hypothesized that a high-dose longitudinal supra-inguinal FICB is safe and decreases postoperative morphine consumption after anterior approach THA. We conducted a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled trial. Patients scheduled for THA were randomized to group FICB (longitudinal supra-inguinal FICB with 40-mL ropivacaine 0.5%) or group C (control, no block). Standard hypothesis tests (t test or Mann-Whitney U test, χ test) were performed to analyze baseline characteristics and outcome parameters. The primary end point of the study was total morphine (mg) consumption at 24 hours postoperatively. Serial total and free ropivacaine serum levels were determined in 10 patients. After obtaining ethical committee approval and written informed consent, 88 patients were included. Mean (SD) morphine consumption at 24 hours postoperatively was reduced in group FICB compared to group C: 10.25 (1.64) mg versus 19.0 (2.4) mg (P = 0.004). Using a mean dose of 2.6-mg/kg ropivacaine (range, 2-3.4 mg/kg), none of the patients had total or free ropivacaine levels above the maximum tolerated serum concentration. We conclude that a high-dose longitudinal supra-inguinal FICB reduces postoperative morphine requirements after anterior approach THA.Clinical Trials Registry: EU Clinical Trials Register. www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu #2014-002122-12.

  18. Defining indicators to motorize block valves aiming to reduce potential leakage applied to OSBRA pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F.G. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Sousa, A.G.; Castro, N.C.; Spagnolo, R. [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The discussion about motorizing block valves is a constant point being brought up when it is intended to control or reduce the amount of liquid leaking in the event of a pipe rupture. During the pipeline's project stage the installation of blocking valves along the pipeline must be taken into consideration to meet the operation and maintenance requirements as well as to reduce the potential amounts of volume being leaked. In existing pipelines, the main concern is the definition of which valves are candidates to be motorized. In both situations criteria should be established to define this choice. A math algorithm was developed to define the potential leakage due to gravity along the pipeline profile where the influence of a valve over another is verified, as well as the contribution of the check valves existing in the pipeline. The present work defines a parameter based on the extension protected by the valve and the reduction of the potential leakage. This parameter is then fed to a worksheet where the efficiency indicators are calculated to each valve eligible to be motorized. It also takes into consideration factors relative to the valve location, such as the environmental sensitivity, risk assessment, social diagnosis and device's proximity to contingency resources. Finally, after considering all the above aspects, it's possible to come up with a final classification, recommending specific valves to be prioritized on an eventual process of motorization adequacies. This methodology was applied, experimentally on a pipe segment of TRANSPETRO's Sao Paulo-Brasilia pipeline - OSBRA , where it proved to be an important technological and management tool. (author)

  19. Block-structured adaptive meshes and reduced grids for atmospheric general circulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Christiane; Oehmke, Robert C; Stout, Quentin F

    2009-11-28

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques offer a flexible framework for future variable-resolution climate and weather models since they can focus their computational mesh on certain geographical areas or atmospheric events. Adaptive meshes can also be used to coarsen a latitude-longitude grid in polar regions. This allows for the so-called reduced grid setups. A spherical, block-structured adaptive grid technique is applied to the Lin-Rood finite-volume dynamical core for weather and climate research. This hydrostatic dynamics package is based on a conservative and monotonic finite-volume discretization in flux form with vertically floating Lagrangian layers. The adaptive dynamical core is built upon a flexible latitude-longitude computational grid and tested in two- and three-dimensional model configurations. The discussion is focused on static mesh adaptations and reduced grids. The two-dimensional shallow water setup serves as an ideal testbed and allows the use of shallow water test cases like the advection of a cosine bell, moving vortices, a steady-state flow, the Rossby-Haurwitz wave or cross-polar flows. It is shown that reduced grid configurations are viable candidates for pure advection applications but should be used moderately in nonlinear simulations. In addition, static grid adaptations can be successfully used to resolve three-dimensional baroclinic waves in the storm-track region.

  20. Initiatives to reduce overcrowding and access block in Australian emergency departments: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kimberley; Morphet, Julia; Jones, Tamsin; Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra; Williams, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Australian emergency departments are experiencing an increasing demand for their services. Patient throughput continues to expand resulting in overcrowding and access block where patients cannot gain entry to appropriate hospital beds. This is despite both state and federal governments implementing numerous schemes to address the complex causes of stress on emergency departments. This paper explores the current literature and highlights the key strategies adopted by different emergency departments to reduce delays and streamline patient flow, including: waiting room nurses; streaming; rapid assessment teams; short stay units and care coordination programmes. Many of these initiatives have proven successful at reducing the number of people re-presenting to the emergency department, addressing time delays and improving the management of existing resources and patient flow. More recent changes include increasing the scope of practice and workload for triage nurses. With the recent introduction of the National Emergency Access Target, which requires that most patients presenting to Australian emergency departments are reviewed and transferred or discharged from the department within 4h, traditional roles of nurses in the emergency department are changing and expanding to meet the needs of modern healthcare systems.

  1. The Economics of Strategies to Reduce Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalizations in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Rebekah H; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Bruden, Dana T; Fry, Alicia M; Hennessy, Thomas W; Meltzer, Martin I

    2014-09-01

    Alaska Native infants experience high rates of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalizations. Through 2008, Alaska administered a 7-dose (maximum) palivizumab regime to high-risk infants from October to May. In 2009, the maximum was reduced to 3 doses for 32- to 34-week preterm babies and 6 doses for other groups. We used 11 years of data and regional Medicaid reimbursement rates to model the cost effectiveness of 4 palivizumab intervention strategies to reduce RSV hospitalizations among Alaskan infants including: current strategy, old strategy (1998-2008), and 2 hypothetical strategies using the current strategy plus 1 or 3 doses to all newborn infants during the RSV season. The current strategy represents 5 hospitalizations averted per year for the palivizumab cohort (∼50-56 children) at ∼$52 846 per hospitalization averted, compared with no intervention. Compared with the old strategy, the mean cost per hospitalization prevented for the current strategy was 63% lower, net program costs were 85% lower, and the mean hospitalizations prevented were 27% lower. Compared with current strategy only, the addition of 1 dose to all newborns during the RSV season could decrease the mean cost per hospitalization prevented by 23%, increase the number of hospitalizations prevented by 2.5-fold, and increase the net programmatic costs by 3.3-fold; administering up to 3 doses to infants further reduced hospitalizations and increased costs. The current palivizumab strategy improved the cost-effectiveness ratio compared with the old strategy. Further improvement could be obtained by adding doses for Alaskan Native newborns during the RSV season; however, programmatic costs would increase. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society 2013. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. The role of geochemistry and energetics in the evolution of modern respiratory complexes from a proton-reducing ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg; Wu, Chang-Hao; Peters, John W; Boyd, Eric S; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I or NADH quinone oxidoreductase (NUO) is an integral component of modern day respiratory chains and has a close evolutionary relationship with energy-conserving [NiFe]-hydrogenases of anaerobic microorganisms. Specifically, in all of biology, the quinone-binding subunit of Complex I, NuoD, is most closely related to the proton-reducing, H2-evolving [NiFe]-containing catalytic subunit, MbhL, of membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH), to the methanophenzine-reducing subunit of a methanogenic respiratory complex (FPO) and to the catalytic subunit of an archaeal respiratory complex (MBX) involved in reducing elemental sulfur (S°). These complexes also pump ions and have at least 10 homologous subunits in common. As electron donors, MBH and MBX use ferredoxin (Fd), FPO uses either Fd or cofactor F420, and NUO uses either Fd or NADH. In this review, we examine the evolutionary trajectory of these oxidoreductases from a proton-reducing ancestral respiratory complex (ARC). We hypothesize that the diversification of ARC to MBH, MBX, FPO and eventually NUO was driven by the larger energy yields associated with coupling Fd oxidation to the reduction of oxidants with increasing electrochemical potential, including protons, S° and membrane soluble organic compounds such as phenazines and quinone derivatives. Importantly, throughout Earth's history, the availability of these oxidants increased as the redox state of the atmosphere and oceans became progressively more oxidized as a result of the origin and ecological expansion of oxygenic photosynthesis. ARC-derived complexes are therefore remarkably stable respiratory systems with little diversity in core structure but whose general function appears to have co-evolved with the redox state of the biosphere. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm. Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection. PMID:26953343

  4. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloet, M.; Meulepas, M.A.; Cals, J.W.J.; Eimers, M.; Hoek, L.S. van der; Dijk, L. van

    2016-01-01

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster

  5. Bactericidal peptidoglycan recognition protein induces oxidative stress in Escherichia coli through a block in respiratory chain and increase in central carbon catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Des R; Kuzma, Marcin; Kowalczyk, Dominik A; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2017-09-01

    Mammalian Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs) kill both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria through simultaneous induction of oxidative, thiol and metal stress responses in bacteria. However, metabolic pathways through which PGRPs induce these bactericidal stress responses are unknown. We screened Keio collection of Escherichia coli deletion mutants and revealed that deleting genes for respiratory chain flavoproteins or for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle resulted in increased resistance of E. coli to PGRP killing. PGRP-induced killing depended on the production of hydrogen peroxide, which required increased supply of NADH for respiratory chain oxidoreductases from central carbon catabolism (glycolysis and TCA cycle), and was controlled by cAMP-Crp. Bactericidal PGRP induced a rapid decrease in respiration, which suggested that the main source of increased production of hydrogen peroxide was a block in respiratory chain and diversion of electrons from NADH oxidoreductases to oxygen. CpxRA two-component system was a negative regulator of PGRP-induced oxidative stress. By contrast, PGRP-induced thiol stress (depletion of thiols) and metal stress (increase in intracellular free Zn 2+ through influx of extracellular Zn 2+ ) were mostly independent of oxidative stress. Thus, manipulating pathways that induce oxidative, thiol and metal stress in bacteria could be a useful strategy to design new approaches to antibacterial therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Anaesthetic management of emergency pacemaker implantation in a case of neonatal lupus erythematosus with complete congenital heart block & severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kiran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-week old 3-kilogram male baby was brought to this tertiary care hospital with respiratory distress, marked tracheal tug, poor feeding and a heart rate of 46/minute. The child had been referred from a peripheral hospital as a case of neonatal lupus with complete congenital heart block. The mother was seropositive for systemic lupus erythematosus with a history of two abortions. Evaluation on admission revealed a heart rate between 40-60/ minute, respiratory rate 40-50/ minute, inspiratory stridor, bilateral crepitations, chest retrac-tion and a marked tracheal tug that improved with prone positioning. Electrocardiography and echocardiography confirmed complete congenital heart block with cardiomegaly and mild left ventricular dysfunction. Keeping in view the impending congestive heart failure, possible early cardiomyopathy and the bad obstetric history ur-gent pacemaker implantation was planned to allow early recovery of the child. The anaesthetic risk was high due to the heart block, ventricular dysfunction, laryngomalacia, severe tracheal tug and anticipated difficult weaning from controlled ventilation. General anaesthesia was administered with endotracheal tube and con-trolled ventilation using ketamine, rocuronium and sufentanil. For patient safety invasive monitoring was pro-vided and external pacing was kept standby. Epicardial pacemaker leads were implanted onto the left ventricu-lar wall through a left anterior 6th intercostal space thoracotomy. The child was electively ventilated for two post operative days. The tracheal tug and secretions gradually subsided over 2 weeks with oxygen, antibiotics, steroids, bronchodilators and physiotherapy. At the time of discharge from hospital 2 weeks after the implant the child was feeding well, tracheal tug was minimal and the lungs were clear.

  7. Efficacy of Opioid-free Anesthesia in Reducing Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Anesthesia; General Anesthesia; Analgesics, Opioid; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes; Physiologic Effects of Drugs; Narcotics; Analgesics; Sleep Disordered Breathing; Obstructive Sleep Apnea of Child; Tonsillectomy; Respiratory Depression; Dexmedetomidine; Ketamine; Lidocaine; Gabapentin; Pulse Oximetry

  8. Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccination during pregnancy and reduced risk of infant acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodr, Zeina G; Bukowinski, Anna T; Gumbs, Gia R; Conlin, Ava Marie S

    2017-10-09

    To protect infants from pertussis infection, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends women receive the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine between 27 and 36weeks of pregnancy. Here, we assessed the association between timing of maternal Tdap vaccination during pregnancy and acute respiratory infection (ARI) in infants <2months of age. This retrospective cohort study included 99,434 infants born to active duty military women in the Department of Defense Birth and Infant Health Registry from 2006 through 2013. Multivariable log-binomial regression was used to calculate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between maternal Tdap vaccination during pregnancy and infant ARI at <2months of age. Infants of mothers who received Tdap vaccination during pregnancy vs those who did not were 9% less likely to be diagnosed with an ARI at <2months of age (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.99), and the risk was 17% lower if vaccination was received between 27 and 36weeks of pregnancy (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.74-0.93). Similar results were observed when comparing mothers who received Tdap vaccination prior to pregnancy in addition to Tdap vaccination between 27 and 36weeks of pregnancy versus mothers who only received vaccination prior to pregnancy (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.98). Maternal Tdap vaccination between 27 and 36weeks of pregnancy was consistently protective against infant ARI in the first 2months of life vs no vaccination during pregnancy, regardless of Tdap vaccination prior to pregnancy. Our findings strongly support current ACIP guidelines recommending Tdap vaccination in late pregnancy for every pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces acute respiratory infection and diarrhea deaths among infants in Dhaka slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifeen, S; Black, R E; Antelman, G; Baqui, A; Caulfield, L; Becker, S

    2001-10-01

    To describe breastfeeding practices and investigate the influence of exclusive breastfeeding in early infancy on the risk of infant deaths, especially those attributable to respiratory infections (ARI) and diarrhea. A prospective observational study was conducted on a birth cohort of 1677 infants who were born in slum areas of Dhaka in Bangladesh and followed from birth to 12 months of age. After enrollment at birth, the infants were visited 5 more times by 12 months of age. Verbal autopsy, based on a structured questionnaire, was used to assign a cause to the 180 reported deaths. Proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the effect of breastfeeding practices, introduced as a time-varying variable, after accounting for other variables, including birth weight. Overall neonatal, postneonatal and infant mortality, and mortality attributable to ARI and diarrhea were measured. The proportion of infants who were breastfed exclusively was only 6% at enrollment, increasing to 53% at 1 month and then gradually declining to 5% at 6 months of age. Predominant breastfeeding declined from 66% at enrollment to 4% at 12 months of age. Very few infants were not breastfed, whereas the proportion of partially breastfed infants increased with age. Breastfeeding practices did not differ between low and normal birth weight infants at any age. The overall infant mortality rate was 114 deaths per 1000 live births. Compared with exclusive breastfeeding in the first few months of life, partial or no breastfeeding was associated with a 2.23-fold higher risk of infant deaths resulting from all causes and 2.40- and 3.94-fold higher risk of deaths attributable to ARI and diarrhea, respectively. The important role of appropriate breastfeeding practices in the survival of infants is clear from this analysis. The reduction of ARI deaths underscores the broad-based beneficial effect of exclusive breastfeeding in prevention of infectious diseases beyond its role in reducing

  10. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces leftventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chainactivity and increases oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eKINDO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n=10 for each group. Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilised fibres, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity.Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (-36.7%, P<0.01 and complex IV activity (-57.4%, P<0.05. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production was similar in both LV layers.Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass, associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (-23.6 and -33.3%, increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%, free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3% and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3% in Endo and Epi, respectively.Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (-57.4 vs –12.2%; P=0.02. Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH.

  11. Field validation of a commercial blocking ELISA to differentiate antibody to transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine respiratory coronavirus and to identify TGEV-infected swine herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Susy; Josephson, Gaylan; McEwen, Beverly; Maxie, Grant; Antochi, Mioara; Eernisse, Ken; Nayar, Gopi; Halbur, Pat; Erickson, Gene; Nilsson, Ernst

    2002-03-01

    A commercially available blocking ELISA was analyzed for its ability to identify antibodies to porcine coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus [TGEV] or porcine respiratory coronavirus [PRCV]), to differentiate antibodies to TGEV and PRCV, and to identify TGEV-infected herds. Nine sera from uninfected pigs, 34 sera from 16 pigs experimentally infected with TGEV, and sera from 10 pigs experimentally infected with PRCV were evaluated using both the TGEV/PRCV blocking ELISA and a virus neutralization (VN) assay. The ELISA was not consistently effective in identifying pigs experimentally infected with TGEV until 21 days postinfection. Sera from 100 commercial swine herds (1,783 sera; median 15 per herd) were similarly evaluated using both tests. Thirty of these commercial herds had a clinical history of TGEV infection and a positive TGEV fluorescent antibody test recorded at necropsy within the last 35 months, while 70 herds had no history of clinical TGEV infection. The blocking ELISA and the VN showed good agreement (kappa 0.84) for the detection of porcine coronavirus antibody (TGEV or PRCV). The sensitivity (0.933) of the ELISA to identify TGEV-infected herds was good when considered on a herd basis. The ELISA was also highly specific (0.943) for the detection of TGEV-infected herds when the test results were evaluated on a herd basis. When sera from specific age groups were compared, the ELISA identified a greater proportion (0.83) of pigs in herds with TGEV antibody when suckling piglets were used. In repeatability experiments, the ELISA gave consistent results when the same sera were evaluated on different days (kappa 0.889) and when sera were evaluated before and after heating (kappa 0.888). The blocking ELISA was determined to be useful for herd monitoring programs and could be used alone without parallel use of the VN assay for the assessment of large swine populations for the detection of TGEV-infected herds.

  12. The use of bamboo and autoclaved aerated concrete block to reduce the weight of precast concrete beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Sri Murni; Simatupang, Roland Martin; Waluyohadi, Indra

    2017-09-01

    The lightweight structure is important for precast beam to reduce the dead loads and the handling loads. Steel reinforcement substitution with bamboo can be used to reduce the weight. For reinforced concrete beams, the concrete in tension side does not need a high compressive strength, hence it can be replaced with Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) Block. Purpose of this research is to study the strength and density behavior of the bamboo reinforced concrete beam substitute with the AAC block in tension area. The research variable was the portion of the AAC block height to the total beam height. The beam dimension was 16 cm × 20 cm × 200 cm. The concrete strength varied between 20 MPa and 25 MPa. Two variation of AAC block height were 6.5 cm and 8 cm. The beam tested in simple supported and two point loads. The control beam was made without AAC block, and 20 MPa concrete strength, and was used to compare the strength and the density of the beam. The experiment results show that the density of the beam varied between 1900 kg /m3 and 2000 kg/m3 and no significant decrease of the strength.

  13. Early application of airway pressure release ventilation may reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yongfang; Jin, Xiaodong; Lv, Yinxia; Wang, Peng; Yang, Yunqing; Liang, Guopeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Experimental animal models of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have shown that the updated airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) methodologies may significantly improve oxygenation, maximize lung recruitment, and attenuate lung injury, without circulatory depression. This led us to hypothesize that early application of APRV in patients with ARDS would allow pulmonary function to recover faster and would reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation as compared with low ...

  14. Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Reduces Vitamin D3 in the Blood Stream and Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Published Online: April 2, 2014 Cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke have long been known to exacerbate respiratory diseases ... the inflammatory effects of cigarette smoke. In conclusion, exposure to ... exposed to secondhand smoke, or who have chronic sinusitis with nasal ...

  15. Liposomal Bupivacaine Use in Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks Reduces Pain and Postoperative Intravenous Opioid Requirement After Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Audrey L; Adhikary, Sanjib D; Quintili, Ashley; Puleo, Frances J; Choi, Christine S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Messaris, Evangelos

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery protocols frequently use multimodal postoperative analgesia to improve postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liposomal bupivacaine use in transversus abdominis plane blocks on postoperative pain scores and opioid use after colorectal surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes between patients receiving nonliposomal anesthetic (n = 104) and liposomal bupivacaine (n = 303) blocks. The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. Patients included those identified within an institutional database as inpatients undergoing colorectal procedures between 2013 and 2015 who underwent transversus abdominis plane block for perioperative analgesia. The study measured postoperative pain scores and opioid requirements. Patients receiving liposomal bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores for the first 24 to 36 postoperative hours. Pain scores were similar after 36 hours. The use of intravenous opioids among the liposomal bupivacaine group decreased by more than one third during the hospitalization (99.1 vs 64.5 mg; p = 0.040). The use of ketorolac was also decreased (49.0 vs 18.3 mg; p bupivacaine group but did not achieve statistical significance. The study was limited by its retrospective, single-center design and heterogeneity of block administration. Attenuated pain scores observed with liposomal bupivacaine use were associated with significantly lower intravenous opioid and ketorolac use, suggesting that liposomal bupivacaine-containing transversus abdominis plane blocks are well aligned with the opioid-reducing goals of many enhanced recovery protocols.

  16. Respiratory muscle endurance training reduces chronic neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, B; Ferreira, T Duarte; Mittelholzer, M; Humphreys, B K; Boutellier, U

    2016-11-21

    Patients with chronic neck pain show also respiratory dysfunctions. To investigate the effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) on chronic neck pain. In this pilot study (single-subject design: 3 baseline measurements, 4 measurements during RMET), 15 neck patients (49.3 ± 13.7 years; 13 females) conducted 20 sessions of home-based RMET using a SpiroTiger® (normocapnic hyperpnoea). Maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory (Pemax) pressure were measured before and after RMET. Neck flexor endurance, cervical and thoracic mobility, forward head posture, chest wall expansion and self-assessed neck disability [Neck Disability Index (NDI), Bournemouth questionnaire] were weekly assessed. Repeated measure ANOVA (Bonferroni correction) compared the first and last baseline and the last measurement after RMET. RMET significantly increased MVV (p= 0.025), Pimax (p= 0.001) and Pemax (pneck pain. The underlying mechanisms, including blood gas analyses, need further investigation in a randomized controlled study.

  17. Evaluation of systems for reducing the transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Dee, Scott A.; Batista, Laura; Deen, John; Pijoan, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 methods for the reduction of aerosol transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration, low-cost filtration, and ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The HEPA-filtration system involved a pre-filter screen, a bag filter (EU8 rating), and a HEPA filter (EU13 rating). The low-cost-filtration system contained mosquito netting (pre-filter), a fiberglass furnace filter, and an ele...

  18. Addition of lidocaine to levobupivacaine reduces intrathecal block duration: randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yazicioglu, Dilek; Akkaya, Taylan; Sonmez, Ercan; Gumus, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Background: The duration of the spinal block is a concern for anesthetists. Low dose intrathecal lidocaine has vasodilatory effects and increases the local anesthetic clearance from the intrathecal space. The aim was to investigate whether this effect of lidocaine can be used to increase the resolution of levobupivacaine spinal anesthesia. Method: After obtaining ethical approval and informed patient consent, 40 patients underwent transurethral prostate resection were studied. Patients were r...

  19. Zinc or multiple micronutrient supplementation to reduce diarrhea and respiratory disease in South African children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kany-Kany Angelique Luabeya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain.To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence.Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Rural community in South Africa.THREE COHORTS: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers.Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly.Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker.Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852. Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857. Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts.When compared with vitamin A alone, supplementation with zinc, or with zinc and multiple

  20. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

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    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  1. Hand Hygiene Intervention Strategies to Reduce Diarrhoea and Respiratory Infections among Schoolchildren in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review

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    Balwani Chingatichifwe Mbakaya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective and appropriate hand-washing practice for schoolchildren is important in preventing infectious diseases such as diarrhoea, which is the second most common cause of death among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the review was to identify hand hygiene intervention strategies to reduce infectious diseases such as diarrhoea and respiratory tract infections among schoolchildren aged 6–12 years in developing countries. Published research articles were searched from databases covering a period from as far back as the creation of the databases to November 2015. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCT/CRCT from developing countries met the inclusion criteria. The Jadad Scale for appraising RCT/CRCT studies revealed methodological challenges in most studies, such that 75% (6/8 were rated as low-quality articles. The review found that hand hygiene can reduce the incidence of diarrhoea and respiratory conditions. Three hand hygiene intervention strategies utilized were training, funding and policy, with training and funding implemented more commonly than policy. These strategies were not only used in isolation but also in combination, and they qualified as multi-level interventions. Factors that influenced hand washing were contextual, psychosocial and technological. Findings can inform school health workers in categorizing and prioritizing activities into viable strategies when implementing multi-level hand-washing interventions. This review also adds to the existing evidence that multi-level hand-washing interventions can reduce the incidence of diarrhoea, respiratory infections, and school absenteeism. Further evidence-based studies are needed with improved methodological rigour in developing countries, to inform policy in this area.

  2. Reducing Respiratory Health Risks to Horses and Workers: A Comparison of Two Stall Bedding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Saastamoinen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stable air quality and the choice of bedding material are an important health issue both in horses and people working or visiting horse stables. Risks of impaired respiratory health are those that can especially be avoided by improving air quality in the stable. The choice of bedding material is particularly important in cold climate conditions; where horses are kept most of the day and year indoors throughout their life. This study examined the effect of two bedding materials; wood shavings and peat; on stable air quality and health of horses. Ammonia and dust levels were also measured to assess conditions in the stable. Ammonia was not detected or was at very low levels (<0.25 ppm in the boxes in which peat was used as bedding; but its concentration was clearly higher (1.5–7.0 ppm in stalls with wood shavings as bedding. Personal measurements of workers revealed quite high ammonia exposure (5.9 ppm8h in the boxes in which wood shavings were used; but no exposure was Animals 2015, 5 966 observed in stalls bedded with peat. The respiratory symptoms in horses increased regardless of the bedding material at the beginning of the study. The health status of the horses in the peat bedding group returned to the initial level in the end of the trial but horses bedded with wood shavings continued to be symptomatic. The hooves of the horses with peat bedding had a better moisture content than those of the horses bedded with wood shavings. The results suggest that peat is a better bedding material for horses than wood shavings regarding the health of both horses and stable workers.

  3. Pre-emptive penile ring block with sucrose analgesia reduces pain response to neonatal circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Rodriguez, Christian F; Toussaint, Thomas; Sherlock, Douglas J; Fogel, Joshua; Hsu, Chaur-Dong

    2014-04-01

    To compare retrospective use of oral sucrose (SUC) vs oral sucrose plus lidocaine ring block (SUC + RB) in the management of pain during neonatal circumcision. A retrospective review of medical records of newborns circumcised using the "Neonatal Infant Pain Scale" was done. With regard to pain, the SUC group had a significantly greater percentage of those with pain than the SUC + RB group at 1 minute (77.7% vs 69.4%; P = .01) and 5 minutes (65.7% vs 55.7%; P = .004). There was no significant pain difference at 30 minutes. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, those in the SUC group had significantly greater odds for pain at 1 minute than those in the SUC + RB group (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.02; P = .03). No significant difference was noted at 5 minutes. Each of the SUC and SUC + RB groups had significant decreases in pain percentages at 5 minutes and 30 minutes (P analgesia. In addition, for post-term neonates, we recommend greater focus on pain levels, including considering higher dosages of pain medications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reducing Trap-Assisted Recombination in Small Organic Molecule-Based Photovoltaics by the Addition of a Conjugated Block Copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyuwan; Kim, Jinseck; Yoon, So Yeon; Ryu, Ka Yeon; Jang, Song-Rim; Lim, Bogyu; Kim, Kyungkon

    2018-03-01

    The performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) based on the small-molecule organic semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh 2 ) 2 is greatly improved by the addition of a conjugated block copolymer composed of difluoroquinoxaline and thienopyrrolodione blocks (D130). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the p-DTS(FBTTh 2 ) 2 -based OPV is improved from 5.08% to 6.75% by the addition of 5 wt% D130 to the photoactive layer, which is composed of p-DTS(FBTTh 2 ) 2 and a fullerene derivative. Current-voltage and grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering analyses revealed that the addition of D130 significantly reduces the trap density of the device and changes the packing orientation of p-DTS(FBTTh 2 ) 2 from mostly edge-on to partially face-on. These changes greatly improve the charge carrier mobility of the OPV, indicating that D130 is highly compatible with p-DTS(FBTTh 2 ) 2 . Furthermore, the addition of D130 improve the photostability of the OPV by reducing the burn-in loss under a light soaking intensity of 1 sun. The D130-based OPV maintained 34% of its initial PCE after a light soaking test for 858 h. In contrast, the PCE of the OPV without D130 reduced to 14% of its initial efficiency in the same time period. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Spread of Mutant Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus with Reduced Affinity to Human CD26 during the South Korean Outbreak

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    Yuri Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV causes a severe respiratory infection with a high mortality rate (~35%. MERS-CoV has been a global threat due to continuous outbreaks in the Arabian peninsula and international spread by infected travelers since 2012. From May to July 2015, a large outbreak initiated by an infected traveler from the Arabian peninsula swept South Korea and resulted in 186 confirmed cases with 38 deaths (case fatality rate, 20.4%. Here, we show the rapid emergence and spread of a mutant MERS-CoV with reduced affinity to the human CD26 receptor during the South Korean outbreak. We isolated 13 new viral genomes from 14 infected patients treated at a hospital and found that 12 of these genomes possess a point mutation in the receptor-binding domain (RBD of viral spike (S protein. Specifically, 11 of these genomes have an I529T mutation in RBD, and 1 has a D510G mutation. Strikingly, both mutations result in reduced affinity of RBD to human CD26 compared to wild-type RBD, as measured by surface plasmon resonance analysis and cellular binding assay. Additionally, pseudotyped virus bearing an I529T mutation in S protein showed reduced entry into host cells compared to virus with wild-type S protein. These unexpected findings suggest that MERS-CoV adaptation during human-to-human spread may be driven by host immunological pressure such as neutralizing antibodies, resulting in reduced affinity to host receptor, and thereby impairs viral fitness and virulence, rather than positive selection for a better affinity to CD26.

  6. Smoke-free legislation reduces hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Lun; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Lau, Yu Lung

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies showed reduction of hospital admissions for asthma after implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation. We aimed to evaluate the impact of comprehensive smoke-free legislation implemented in Hong Kong in 2007 on hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We obtained data on 75 870 hospital admissions for LRTI among children ≤18 years of age between January 2004 and December 2012 from all Hospital Authority hospitals. Using a negative binomial regression model, we assessed the impact of smoke-free legislation on admission counts. After legislation implementation, there was an immediate effect with a change in the admission count of -33.5% (95% CI -36.4% to -30.5%), and a change in time trend to -13.9% per year (95% CI -16.0% to -11.7%). Overall, the legislation was associated with a net 47.4% reduction in admission counts in the first year. We estimated that the legislation was associated with a reduction of 13 635 admissions in the first 6 years after implementation. The immediate reduction and change in time trend was more apparent among school-age than preschool children. Implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for childhood LRTI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a condition marked by a low level of carbon dioxide in the blood due to breathing excessively. ... aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing ... dioxide -- sometimes helps reduce symptoms when anxiety is the ...

  8. Renaturation of reduced hen egg white lysozyme containing two blocked sulfhydryl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, A.S.; Taniuchi, H.

    1980-10-01

    Formation of native lysozyme from the reduced form involves many pathways in two processes: incorrect pairing of half-cystine residues by oxidation and rearrangement of disulfide (SS) bonds. The energy barrier against suflhydryl (SH)-disulfide interchange of the native or nativelike species thus formed causes accumulation of these species. For example, the enzymatically active isomers containing three presumably native SS bonds and one open SS bond may be thermodynamically favorable over the nonnative isomers and can be formed from reduced lysozyme or lysozyme containing scrambled SS bonds by nonobligatory and flexible pathways. As an extension of these observations formation of nativelike species from reduced lysozyme containing the average of two carboxymethyl (CM)-cysteine was investigated.

  9. Blocking mineralocorticoid receptors prior to retrieval reduces contextual fear memory in mice.

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    Ming Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corticosteroid hormones regulate appraisal and consolidation of information via mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs respectively. How activation of these receptors modulates retrieval of fearful information and the subsequent expression of fear is largely unknown. We tested here whether blockade of MRs or GRs during retrieval also affects subsequent expression of fear memory. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were trained in contextual or tone cue fear conditioning paradigms, by pairing mild foot shocks with a particular context or tone respectively. Twenty-four hours after training, context-conditioned animals were re-exposed to the context for 3 or 30 minutes (day 2; tone-conditioned animals were placed in a different context and re-exposed to one or six tones. Twenty-four hours (day 3 and one month later, freezing behavior to the aversive context/tone was scored again. MR or GR blockade was achieved by giving spironolactone or RU486 subcutaneously one hour before retrieval on day 2. Spironolactone administered prior to brief context re-exposure reduced freezing behavior during retrieval and 24 hours later, but not one month later. Administration of spironolactone without retrieval of the context or immediately after retrieval on day 2 did not reduce freezing on day 3. Re-exposure to the context for 30 minutes on day 2 significantly reduced freezing on day 3 and one month later, but freezing was not further reduced by spironolactone. Administration of spironolactone prior to tone-cue re-exposure on day 2 did not affect freezing behavior. Treatment with RU486 prior to re-exposure did not affect context or tone-cue fear memories at any time point. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that MR blockade prior to retrieval strongly reduces the expression of contextual fear, implying that MRs, rather than GRs, play an important role in retrieval of emotional information and subsequent fear expression.

  10. Coupled and reduced dimensional modeling of respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M; Comerford, A; Wall, W A

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a total lung model based on a tree of 0D airway and acinar models for studying respiratory mechanics during spontaneous breathing. This model utilizes both computer tomography-based geometries and artificially generated lobe-filling airway trees to model the entire conducting region of the lung. Beyond the conducting airways, we develop an acinar model, which takes into account the alveolar tissue resistance, compliance, and the intrapleural pressure. With this methodology, we compare four different 0D models of airway mechanics and determine the best model based on a comparison with a 3D-0D coupled model of the conducting airways; this methodology is possible because the majority of airway resistance is confined to the lower generations, that is, the trachea and the first few bronchial generations. As an example application of the model, we simulate the flow and pressure dynamics under spontaneous breathing conditions, that is, at flow conditions driven purely by pleural space pressure. The results show good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with reported physiological values. One of the key advantages of this model is the ability to provide insight into lung ventilation in the peripheral regions. This is often crucial because this is where information, specifically for studying diseases and gas exchange, is needed. Thus, the model can be used as a tool for better understanding local peripheral lung mechanics without excluding the upper portions of the lung. This tool will be also useful for in vitro investigations of lung mechanics in both health and disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gabapentin reduces CX3CL1 signaling and blocks spinal microglial activation in monoarthritic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jia-Le

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal glia, particularly microglia and astrocytes, are of the utmost importance in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. A recent study from our laboratory revealed that gabapentin, a recommended first-line treatment for multiple neuropathic conditions, could also efficiently antagonize thermal hyperalgesia evoked by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-induced monoarthritis (MA. In the present study, we investigated whether the spinal glia are involved in the anti-hyperalgesic effect of gabapentin and how this event occurs. Results Unilateral intra-articular injection of CFA produced a robust activation of microglia and astrocytes. These cells exhibited large cell bodies, thick processes and increases in the ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1, a microglial marker or the glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocytic marker. These cells also displayed immunoreactive signals, and an upregulation of the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs α2/δ-1 subunit, CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 expression levels in the spinal cord. These changes were associated with the development of thermal hyperalgesia. Immunofluorescence staining showed that VGCC α2/δ-1 subunit, a proposed gabapentin target of action, was widely distributed in primary afferent fibers terminals and dorsal horn neurons. CX3CL1, a potential trigger to activate microglia, colocalized with VGCC α2/δ-1 subunits in the spinal dorsal horn. However, its receptor CX3CR1 was mainly expressed in the spinal microglia. Multiple intraperitoneal (i.p. gabapentin injections (100 mg/kg, once daily for 4 days with the first injection 60 min before intra-articular CFA suppressed the activation of spinal microglia, downregulated spinal VGCC α2/δ-1 subunits decreased CX3CL1 levels and blocked the development of thermal hyperalgesia in MA rats. Conclusions Here we provide the first evidence that gabapentin diminishes CX3CL1 signaling and spinal microglia

  12. The Susceptibilities of Respiratory Syncytial Virus to Nucleolin Receptor Blocking and Antibody Neutralization are Dependent upon the Method of Virus Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M. Bilawchuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV that is propagated in cell culture is purified from cellular contaminants that can confound experimental results. A number of different purification methods have been described, including methods that utilize fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC and gradient ultracentrifugation. Thus, the constituents and experimental responses of RSV stocks purified by ultracentrifugation in sucrose and by FPLC were analyzed and compared by infectivity assay, Coomassie stain, Western blot, mass spectrometry, immuno-transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and ImageStream flow cytometry. The FPLC-purified RSV had more albumin contamination, but there was less evidence of host-derived exosomes when compared to ultracentrifugation-purified RSV as detected by Western blot and mass spectrometry for the exosome markers superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SOD1 and the tetraspanin CD63. Although the purified virus stocks were equally susceptible to nucleolin-receptor blocking by the DNA aptamer AS1411, the FPLC-purified RSV was significantly less susceptible to anti-RSV polyclonal antibody neutralization; there was 69% inhibition (p = 0.02 of the sucrose ultracentrifugation-purified RSV, 38% inhibition (p = 0.03 of the unpurified RSV, but statistically ineffective neutralization in the FPLC-purified RSV (22% inhibition; p = 0.30. The amount of RSV neutralization of the purified RSV stocks was correlated with anti-RSV antibody occupancy on RSV particles observed by immuno-TEM. RSV purified by different methods alters the stock composition and morphological characteristics of virions that can lead to different experimental responses.

  13. Dapagliflozin-lowered blood glucose reduces respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åstrand, Annika; Wingren, Cecilia; Benjamin, Audra; Tregoning, John S; Garnett, James P; Groves, Helen; Gill, Simren; Orogo-Wenn, Maria; Lundqvist, Anders J; Walters, Dafydd; Smith, David M; Taylor, John D; Baker, Emma H; Baines, Deborah L

    2017-05-01

    Hyperglycaemia increases glucose concentrations in airway surface liquid and increases the risk of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We determined whether reduction of blood and airway glucose concentrations by the anti-diabetic drug dapagliflozin could reduce P. aeruginosa growth/survival in the lungs of diabetic mice. The effect of dapagliflozin on blood and airway glucose concentration, the inflammatory response and infection were investigated in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT) or leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice, treated orally with dapagliflozin prior to intranasal dosing with LPS or inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Pulmonary glucose transport and fluid absorption were investigated in Wistar rats using the perfused fluid-filled lung technique. Fasting blood, airway glucose and lactate concentrations were elevated in the db/db mouse lung. LPS challenge increased inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from WT and db/db mice with and without dapagliflozin treatment. P. aeruginosa colony-forming units (CFU) were increased in db/db lungs. Pretreatment with dapagliflozin reduced blood and bronchoalveolar lavage glucose concentrations and P. aeruginosa CFU in db/db mice towards those seen in WT. Dapagliflozin had no adverse effects on the inflammatory response in the mouse or pulmonary glucose transport or fluid absorption in the rat lung. Pharmacological lowering of blood glucose with dapagliflozin effectively reduced P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of diabetic mice and had no adverse pulmonary effects in the rat. Dapagliflozin has potential to reduce the use, or augment the effect, of antimicrobials in the prevention or treatment of pulmonary infection. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Architecturally sensitive retrofitting of PV to a residential block in Greece to reduce its carbon footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulou, Ismini

    different factors influencing the feasibility of the PV investment was carried out and as it was expected it had significant effect on the initially calculated the payback period value. The expected future increase of fuel prices and the reduction of the investment's initial cost due to government grants, added to the prospect of new future tax incentive and subsidies, have made the prospect of the project more attractive while significantly reducing the payback period.

  15. Hippocampal Cortactin Levels are Reduced Following Spatial Working Memory Formation, an Effect Blocked by Chronic Calpain Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel L. Olson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism by which the hippocampus facilitates declarative memory formation appears to involve, among other things, restructuring of the actin cytoskeleton within neuronal dendrites. One protein involved in this process is cortactin, which is an important link between extracellular signaling and cytoskeletal reorganization. In this paper, we demonstrate that total hippocampal cortactin, as well as Y421-phosphorylated cortactin are transiently reduced following spatial working memory formation in the radial arm maze (RAM. Because cortactin is a substrate of the cysteine protease calpain, we also assessed the effect of chronic calpain inhibition on RAM performance and cortactin expression. Calpain inhibition impaired spatial working memory and blocked the reduction in hippocampal cortactin levels following RAM training. These findings add to a growing body of research implicating cortactin and calpain in hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  16. Hippocampal Cortactin Levels are Reduced Following Spatial Working Memory Formation, an Effect Blocked by Chronic Calpain Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mikel L; Ingebretson, Anna E; Harmelink, Katherine M

    2015-06-19

    The mechanism by which the hippocampus facilitates declarative memory formation appears to involve, among other things, restructuring of the actin cytoskeleton within neuronal dendrites. One protein involved in this process is cortactin, which is an important link between extracellular signaling and cytoskeletal reorganization. In this paper, we demonstrate that total hippocampal cortactin, as well as Y421-phosphorylated cortactin are transiently reduced following spatial working memory formation in the radial arm maze (RAM). Because cortactin is a substrate of the cysteine protease calpain, we also assessed the effect of chronic calpain inhibition on RAM performance and cortactin expression. Calpain inhibition impaired spatial working memory and blocked the reduction in hippocampal cortactin levels following RAM training. These findings add to a growing body of research implicating cortactin and calpain in hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  17. Professional and home-made face masks reduce exposure to respiratory infections among the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne van der Sande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Governments are preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. Therefore they need data to assess the possible impact of interventions. Face-masks worn by the general population could be an accessible and affordable intervention, if effective when worn under routine circumstances. METHODOLOGY: We assessed transmission reduction potential provided by personal respirators, surgical masks and home-made masks when worn during a variety of activities by healthy volunteers and a simulated patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All types of masks reduced aerosol exposure, relatively stable over time, unaffected by duration of wear or type of activity, but with a high degree of individual variation. Personal respirators were more efficient than surgical masks, which were more efficient than home-made masks. Regardless of mask type, children were less well protected. Outward protection (mask wearing by a mechanical head was less effective than inward protection (mask wearing by healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Any type of general mask use is likely to decrease viral exposure and infection risk on a population level, in spite of imperfect fit and imperfect adherence, personal respirators providing most protection. Masks worn by patients may not offer as great a degree of protection against aerosol transmission.

  18. Respiratory and dissimilatory nitrate-reducing communities from an extreme saline alkaline soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of the dissimilatory and respiratory nitrate-reducing communities was studied in two soils of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico). Genes encoding the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (narG) and the periplasmic nitrate reductase (napA) were used as functional markers. To investigate bacterial communities containing napA and narG in saline alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, libraries of the two sites were constructed (soil T3 with pH 11 and electrolytic conductivity in saturated extract (EC(SE)) 160 dS m(-1) and soil T1 with pH 8.5 and EC(SE) 0.8 dS m(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of napA sequences separated the clone families into two main groups: dependent or independent of NapB. Most of napA sequences from site T1 were grouped in the NapB-dependent clade, meanwhile most of the napA sequences from the extreme soil T3 were affiliated to the NapB-independent group. For both sites, partial narG sequences were associated with representatives of the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla, but the proportions of the clones were different. Our results support the concept of a specific and complex nitrate-reducing community for each soil of the former lake Texcoco.

  19. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindh Magnus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit and after 10 days (follow-up visit. Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days. The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202 of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204 (P = 0.005 of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202 in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204 in the delayed result group (P

  20. Remediating buildings damaged by dampness and mould for preventing or reducing respiratory tract symptoms, infections and asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauni, Riitta; Uitti, Jukka; Jauhiainen, Merja; Kreiss, Kathleen; Sigsgaard, Torben; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Dampness and mould in buildings have been associated with adverse respiratory symptoms, asthma and respiratory infections of inhabitants. Moisture damage is a very common problem in private houses, workplaces and public buildings such as schools. To determine the effectiveness of remediating

  1. Reducing early career general practitioners' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: a pragmatic prospective non-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker; Tapley, Amanda; Morgan, Simon; Davis, Joshua S; McElduff, Patrick; Yardley, Lucy; Henderson, Kim; Dallas, Anthea; McArthur, Lawrie; Mulquiney, Katie; Davey, Andrew; Little, Paul; Spike, Neil; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescription and consequent antibacterial resistance is a major threat to healthcare. To evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted intervention in reducing early career general practitioners' (GPs') antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis. A pragmatic non-randomized trial employing a non-equivalent control group design nested within an existing cohort study of GP registrars' (trainees') clinical practice. The intervention included access to online modules (covering the rationale of current clinical guidelines recommending non-prescription of antibiotics for URTI and bronchitis/bronchiolitis, and communication skills in management of acute bronchitis) followed by a face-to-face educational session. The intervention was delivered to registrars (and their supervisors) in two of Australia's seventeen regional GP training providers (RTPs). Three other RTPs were the control group. Outcomes were proportion of registrars' URTI consultations and bronchitis/bronchiolitis consultations prescribed antibiotics. Intention-to-treat analyses employed logistic regression within a Generalised Estimating Equation framework, adjusted for relevant independent variables. The predictors of interest were time; treatment group; and an interaction term for time-by-treatment group. The P value associated with an interaction term determined statistically significant differences in antibiotic prescribing. Analyses include data of 217 intervention RTPs' and 311 control RTPs' registrars. There was no significant reduction in antibiotic prescribing for URTIs. For bronchitis/bronchiolitis, a significant reduction (interaction P value = 0.024) remained true for analysis adjusted for independent variables (P value = 0.040). The adjusted absolute reduction in prescribing was 15.8% (95% CI: 4.2%-27.5%). A multifaceted intervention reduced antibiotic prescribing for bronchitis/bronchiolitis but not URTIs. © The

  2. Blocking ELISA’s for the destinction between antibodies against European and American strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K. J.; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Bøtner, Anette

    1998-01-01

    A double blocking ELISA was developed in order to satisfy the need for large scale serological screening for PRRS and simultaneous distinction between infection with European and American strains of PRRSV in pig herds. The Immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the double blocking ELISA...

  3. Reduced graphene oxide/hydroxylated styrene–butadiene–styrene tri-block copolymer electroconductive nanocomposites: Preparation and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Yuanqin; Xie, Yanyan; Zhang, Fan; Ou, Encai; Jiang, Zhuojuan; Ke, Lili; Hu, Ding; Xu, Weijian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RGO/HO-SBS nanocomposites are prepared successfully. ► The introduction of -OH improves the compatibility between RGO and HO-SBS. ► RGO disperse homogeneously and form a compact continuous network in matrix (HO-SBS). ► The percolation threshold of the nanocomposites is of 0.2–0.5 wt% (0.09–0.23 vol%) and its conductivity is up to 1.3 S/m. - Abstract: Flexible and electroconductive nanocomposites based on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and hydroxylated styrene–butadiene–styrene tri-block copolymer (HO-SBS) were prepared by solution blending method. By the introduction of the groups of -OH and >C=O onto SBS, the compatibility between RGO and SBS was enhanced. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) showed that RGO dispersed homogeneously and formed a compact continuous network in matrix (HO-SBS). The addition of RGO improved the thermal stability of the RGO/HO-SBS nanocomposites while slightly lowered the mechanical property. Moreover, RGO gave the nanocomposites a maximum electrical conductivity up to 1.3 S/m.

  4. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: christoph.binkert@ksw.ch [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hirzel, Florian C. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland); Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hess, Thomas [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  5. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a long-lasting decrease in the CO2 threshold for apnea in anesthetized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, N.A.; Baker, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Two critical parameters that influence breathing stability are the levels of arterial pCO2 at which breathing ceases and subsequently resumes – termed the apneic and recruitment thresholds (AT and RT, respectively). Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a chemoreflex-independent, long-lasting increase in phrenic burst amplitude, a form of plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). The physiological significance of iPMF is unknown. To determine if iPMF and neural apnea have long-lasting physiological effects on breathing, we tested the hypothesis that patterns of neural apnea that induce iPMF also elicit changes in the AT and RT. Phrenic nerve activity and end-tidal CO2 were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, ventilated rats to quantify phrenic nerve burst amplitude and the AT and RT before and after three patterns of neural apnea that differed in their duration and ability to elicit iPMF: brief intermittent neural apneas, a single brief “massed” neural apnea, or a prolonged neural apnea. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that patterns of neural apnea that elicited iPMF also resulted in changes in the AT and RT. Specifically, intermittent neural apneas progressively decreased the AT with each subsequent neural apnea, which persisted for at least 60 min. Similarly, a prolonged neural apnea elicited a long-lasting decrease in the AT. In both cases, the magnitude of the AT decrease was proportional to iPMF. In contrast, the RT was transiently decreased following prolonged neural apnea, and was not proportional to iPMF. No changes in the AT or RT were observed following a single brief neural apnea. Our results indicate that the AT and RT are differentially altered by neural apnea and suggest that specific patterns of neural apnea that elicit plasticity may stabilize breathing via a decrease in the AT. PMID:27474512

  6. Short courses of daily prednisolone during upper respiratory tract infections reduce relapse frequency in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyagunawardena, Asiri S; Thalgahagoda, R S; Dissanayake, Pathum V; Abeyagunawardena, Shamali; Illangasekera, Y A; Karunadasa, Umeshi I; Trompeter, Richard S

    2017-08-01

    Relapses of childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS) are frequently precipitated by viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). A review of the literature reveals that in patients with steroid-dependent NS on alternate day corticosteroids, a short course of daily corticosteroid therapy during the course of an URTI may reduce relapse frequency. To assess the effect of a short course of low-dose corticosteroid therapy during the course of an URTI on relapse frequency in patients with steroid-sensitive NS who have not been taking any treatment for a minimum period of 3 months. A double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial was conducted on 48 patients with idiopathic NS who had not been receiving corticosteroid therapy for a minimum of 3 months. Patients were randomized into two groups. Group A received 5 days of daily prednisolone at 0.5 mg/kg at the onset of an URTI while group B received 5 days of placebo. Both groups were followed up for 1 year and the URTI-induced relapse frequency was noted. A crossover was performed during the next year, with group A receiving placebo and group B receiving prednisolone. Thirty-three patients completed the study. In the treatment group, 115 episodes of URTI led to 11 relapses while in the control group 101 episodes of URTI led to 25 relapses. There was no significant difference between the mean number of URTIs between the treatment and control groups. The treatment group had significantly less relapses compared to the control group (p = 0.014). Within the treatment group, 65.6% did not relapse, while the remainder had a single relapse. In contrast, only 40.6% of the control group remained in remission while 40.6% suffered a single relapse and 18.8% had two or more relapses. Prescribing a short course of daily corticosteroids during an URTI significantly reduces the frequency of URTI-induced relapse in patients with steroid-responsive NS who are off corticosteroid therapy.

  7. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  8. THE DIFFERENCE IN RESPIRATORY AND BLOOD GAS VALUES DURING RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE WITH SPONTANEOUS VERSUS REDUCED BREATHING FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kapus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapolation from post-exercise measurements has been used to estimate respiratory and blood gas parameters during exercise. This may not be accurate in exercise with reduced breathing frequency (RBF, since spontaneous breathing usually follows exercise. This study was performed to ascertain whether measurement of oxygen saturation and blood gases immediately after exercise accurately reflected their values during exercise with RBF. Eight healthy male subjects performed an incremental cycling test with RBF at 10 breaths per minute. A constant load test with RBF (B10 was then performed to exhaustion at the peak power output obtained during the incremental test. Finally, the subjects repeated the constant load test with spontaneous breathing (SB using the same protocol as B10. Pulmonary ventilation (VE, end-tidal oxygen (PETO2, and carbon dioxide pressures (PETCO2 and oxygen saturation (SaO2 were measured during both constant load tests. The partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 in capillary blood were measured during the last minute of exercise, immediately following exercise and during the third minute of recovery. At the end of exercise RBF resulted in lower PETO2, SaO2 and PO2, and higher PETCO2 and PCO2 when compared to spontaneous breathing during exercise. Lower SaO2 and PETO2 were detected only for the first 16s and 20s of recovery after B10 compared to the corresponding period in SB. There were no significant differences in PO2 between SB and B10 measured immediately after the exercise. During recovery from exercise, PETCO2 remained elevated for the first 120s in the B10 trial. There were also significant differences between SB and B10 in PCO2 immediately after exercise. We conclude that RBF during high intensity exercise results in hypoxia; however, due to post-exercise hyperpnoea, measurements of blood gas parameters taken 15s after cessation of exercise did not reflect the changes in PO2 and SaO2 seen during

  9. Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Martin C; Moore, Michael V; Little, Paul; Hay, Alastair D; Fox, Robin; Prevost, A Toby; Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; Ashworth, Mark

    2016-07-04

     To determine whether the incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre's syndrome is higher in general practices that prescribe fewer antibiotics for self limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs).  Cohort study.  610 UK general practices from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink.  Registered patients with 45.5 million person years of follow-up from 2005 to 2014.  Standardised proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed for each general practice, and rate of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 registered patients.  Incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre's syndrome, adjusting for age group, sex, region, deprivation fifth, RTI consultation rate, and general practice.  From 2005 to 2014 the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed decreased from 53.9% to 50.5% in men and from 54.5% to 51.5% in women. From 2005 to 2014, new episodes of meningitis, mastoiditis, and peritonsillar abscess decreased annually by 5.3%, 4.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, whereas new episodes of pneumonia increased by 0.4%. Age and sex standardised incidences for pneumonia and peritonsillar abscess were higher for practices in the lowest fourth of antibiotic prescribing compared with the highest fourth. The adjusted relative risk increases for a 10% reduction in antibiotic prescribing were 12.8% (95% confidence interval 7.8% to 17.5%, P<0.001) for pneumonia and 9.9% (5.6% to 14.0%, P<0.001) for peritonsillar abscess. If a general practice with an average list size of 7000 patients reduces the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed by 10%, then it might observe 1.1 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 1.5) more cases of pneumonia each year and 0.9 (0.5 to 1.3) more cases of peritonsillar abscess each decade. Mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre

  10. Blocking-out auditory distracters while driving : A cognitive strategy to reduce task-demands on the road

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, Ayca Berfu; Platteel, Samantha; Steg, Linda; Epstude, Kai

    The current research examined how drivers handle task-demands induced by listening to the radio while driving. In particular, we explored the traces of a possible cognitive strategy that might be used by drivers to cope with task-demands, namely blocking-out auditory distracters. In Study 1 (N =

  11. Prevention of Pneumococcal Infection in Children with Chronic Diseases of the Nasopharynx Reduces the Incidence of Other Respiratory Tract Infections: Results of a Comparative Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vavilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A promising approach to solving the problem of widespread infections of the respiratory tract in children is the use ofspecific prophylaxis against the pneumococcus.Objective: Our aim was to examine the clinical efficacy of PCV13 of children with chronic foci of infection in the nasopharynx and the changes of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract.Methods: We have evaluated the incidence of respiratory tract and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. Research period: January 2011 — January 2015. Upper airway function examination included cytologic analysis — counting the main cell populations ratio in the common cytoplasm, lysozym activity and secretory immunoglobulin of class A (sIgA in nasal secretions.Results: The study involved 876 children 2–5 years old. Main group (PCV13 amounted to 448 patients, and the control group (unvaccinated 428. Annual dynamic observation showed a significant reduction of acute morbidity by 2 times (p < 0.001, pneumonia by 2.4 times (p = 0.042, acute bronchitis by 2.5 times (p = 0.008, concomitant ENT pathology (acute otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic sinusitis by 2.2 times (p = 0.001 and 2.3 times (p = 0.004, respectively. There was a positive effect of vaccination on the level of local factors of protection of the upper respiratory tract (lysozyme, sIgA, the somatic cell count in nasal secretions.Conclusion: PCV13 vaccination reduces the risk of developing acute respiratory infections and ENT infections in children with chronic diseases of the nasopharynx. This is against the background of recovery in the levels of factors of local immunity.

  12. A short-term supranutritional vitamin E supplementation alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat stressed pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Celi, Pietro; Chauhan, Surinder Singh; Cottrell, Jeremy James; Leury, Brian Joseph; Dunshea, Frank Rowland

    2018-02-01

    Heat stress (HS) triggers oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in pigs. The objective of this experiment was to study whether a short-term supranutritional amount of dietary vitamin E (VE) can mitigate oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in heat-stressed pigs. A total of 24 pigs were given either a control diet (17 IU/kg VE) or a high VE (200 IU/kg VE; HiVE) diet for 14 d, then exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 20°C, 45% humidity) or HS (35°C, 35% to 45% humidity, 8 h daily) conditions for 7 d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature were measured three times daily during the thermal exposure. Blood gas variables and oxidative stress markers were studied in blood samples collected on d 7. Although HiVE diet did not affect the elevated rectal temperature or respiration rate observed during HS, it alleviated (all pproducts (AOPP) in the heat-stressed pigs, suggesting HS triggers oxidative stress. The HiVE diet did not affect plasma BAP or AOPP. Only under TN conditions the HiVE diet reduced the plasma reactive oxygen metabolites (p<0.05 for diet× temperature). A short-term supplementation with 200 IU/kg VE partially alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

  13. The study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a family-centred tobacco control program about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to reduce respiratory illness in Indigenous infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segan Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illness (ARI is the most common cause of acute presentations and hospitalisations of young Indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand (NZ. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS from household smoking is a significant and preventable contributor to childhood ARI. This paper describes the protocol for a study which aims to test the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program about ETS to improve the respiratory health of Indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when referring to Australian Indigenous populations. In New Zealand, the term 'Indigenous' refers to Māori. Methods/Design This study will be a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. Participants will be Indigenous women and their infants, half of whom will be randomly allocated to an 'intervention' group, who will receive the tobacco control program over three home visits in the first three months of the infant's life and half to a control group receiving 'usual care' (i.e. they will not receive the tobacco control program. Indigenous health workers will deliver the intervention, the goal of which is to reduce or eliminate infant exposure to ETS. Data collection will occur at baseline (shortly after birth and when the infant is four months and one year of age. The primary outcome is a doctor-diagnosed, documented case of respiratory illness in participating infants. Discussion Interventions aimed at reducing exposure of Indigenous children to ETS have the potential for significant benefits for Indigenous communities. There is currently a dearth of evidence for the effect of tobacco control interventions to reduce children's exposure to ETS among Indigenous populations. This study will provide high-quality evidence of the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program on ETS to reduce respiratory illness. Outcomes of

  14. Recent advances in neuromuscular block during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Martijn; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Muscle relaxation is a routine part of anesthesia and has important advantages. However, the lingering effects of muscle relaxants in the postoperative period have historically been associated with postoperative adverse events. Neuromuscular reversal, together with neuromuscular monitoring, is a recognized strategy to reduce the rate of postoperative residual relaxation but has only marginally improved outcome in the past few decades. Sugammadex, a novel reversal agent with unique encapsulating properties, has changed the landscape of neuromuscular reversal and opened up new opportunities to improve patient care. By quickly and completely reversing any depth of neuromuscular block, it may reduce the rate of residual relaxation and improve respiratory recovery. In addition, sugammadex has made the use of deep neuromuscular block possible during surgery. Deep neuromuscular block may improve surgical working conditions and allow for a reduction in insufflation pressures during selected laparoscopic procedures. However, whether and how this may impact outcomes is not well established.

  15. Myelodysplastic syndrome patients present more severe respiratory muscle impairment and reduced forced vital capacity: Is disordered inflammatory signaling the culprit?

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    Bruno Memória Okubo

    Full Text Available The ageing process is associated with gradual decline in respiratory system performance. Anemia is highly prevalent among older adults and usually associated with adverse outcomes. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies with increasing incidence with age and characterized by anemia and other cytopenias. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate respiratory muscle strength and lung function in elderly patients with anemia, compare data between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal anemias and evaluate the influence of serum IL-8 level and NF-kB activity on deteriorate pulmonary function in this specific population.Individuals aged 60 and older with anemia secondary to MDS, non-clonal anemia and healthy elderly individuals.Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, and FEV1/ FVC ratio were measured by spirometry. Respiratory muscle strength was evaluated by maximal static respiratory pressures measurement. IL-8 analysis was performed by ELISA and activity of NF-kB by chemiluminescent assay.Mean Hb concentration was comparable between patients with anemia. Significant differences were detected between all patients with anemia and controls for maximum-effort inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax and also for maximum-effort expiratory mouth pressure (PEmax. The MDS group recorded a significantly lower PImax and PEmax percent predicted when compared to non-clonal anemia group. For FVC and FEV1, a significant difference was found in anemic patients, with even significantly lower values for FVC and FEV1 in MDS group. No significant differences were detected for PImax and PEmax and spirometry parameters when anemic patients were stratified according to the degree of anemia. A significant negative impact in FVC (% pred, PImax (% pred and PEmax (% pred was observed in patients with MDS and higher levels of IL-8 or increased activity of NF-kB.A negative impact of anemia

  16. Reducing the length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty: influence of femoral and sciatic nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório de; Temponi, Eduardo Frois; Paganini, Vinícius Oliveira; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques

    2015-01-01

    the aim of this study is to evaluate the change in length of hospital stay postoperatively for Total Knee Arthroplasty after using femoral and sciatic nerve block. the medical records of 287 patients were evaluated, taking into account the number of hours of admission, the percentage and the reason for re-hospitalization within 30 days, as well as associated complications. All patients were divided into two groups according or not to whether they were admitted to ICU or not. During the years 2009 and 2010, isolated spinal anesthesia was the method used in the procedure. From 2011 on, femoral and sciatic nerve blocking was introduced. between the years 2009 and 2012, the average length of stay ranged from 74 hours in 2009 to 75.2 hours in 2010. The average length of stay in 2011 was 56.52 hours and 53.72 hours in 2012, all in the group of patients who did not remain in the ICU postoperatively. In the same period, among those in the group that needed ICU admission, the average length of stay was 138.7 hours in 2009, 90.25 hours in 2010, 79.8 hours in 2011, and 52.91 hours in 2012. During 2009 and 2010, the rate of re-hospitalization was 0%, while in 2011 and 2012, were 3.44% and 1%, respectively. according to this study, the use of femoral and sciatic nerve blocking after total knee arthroplasty allowed significant reduction in hospital stay.

  17. Ankle Nerve Block Adjuvant to General Anesthesia Reduces Post-surgical Pain and Improves Functional Outcomes in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

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    Kir, Mustafa; Kir, Gulay

    2018-03-12

    Postoperative pain is a frequently problem after orthopedic procedures like hallux valgus surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ankle block improves early and mid-term functional outcomes and postoperative pain management after hallux valgus surgery in patients receiving general anesthesia. This randomized controlled trial investigated 60 patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were prospectively randomized into two groups; general anesthesia only (Group A) and ankle block added to general anesthesia (Group B). Age, body-mass index (BMI), tourniquet time (TT), duration of surgery (DOS), first analgesic need time (FANT), perioperative analgesic regimen and visual analog scale (VAS), The Ankle Score American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) and length of hospital stay were recorded. Independent variables were analyzed by t-test. Non-parametric data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney-U test. Patient's age, demographics and body mass indices were similar between the two groups. Average length of hospital stay was significantly longer in Group A (p < 0,01). Group B had longer time to first analgesic need than Group A (p < 0,01) Patients in Group B required less analgesic in postoperative period. Preoperative VAS and AOFAS scores were not statistically different between the two groups. Postoperative day 1 VAS score was significantly lower in Group B than in Group A. Follow-up visits at 3, 6 and 12 months showed significantly lower VAS and higher AOFAS scores in Group B than Group A. Ankle block added to general anaesthesia may improve early and mid-term postoperative functional outcomes and postoperative pain management in patients who undergo hallux valgus surgery. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Reducing the length of hospital stay after total knee arthroplasty: influence of femoral and sciatic nerve block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Honório de Carvalho Júnior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this study is to evaluate the change in length of hospital stay postoperatively for Total Knee Arthroplasty after using femoral and sciatic nerve block. Materials and methods: the medical records of 287 patients were evaluated, taking into account the number of hours of admission, the percentage and the reason for re-hospitalization within 30 days, as well as associated complications. All patients were divided into two groups according or not to whether they were admitted to ICU or not. During the years 2009 and 2010, isolated spinal anesthesia was the method used in the procedure. From 2011 on, femoral and sciatic nerve blocking was introduced. Results: between the years 2009 and 2012, the average length of stay ranged from 74 hours in 2009 to 75.2 hours in 2010. The average length of stay in 2011 was 56.52 hours and 53.72 hours in 2012, all in the group of patients who did not remain in the ICU postoperatively. In the same period, among those in the group that needed ICU admission, the average length of stay was 138.7 hours in 2009, 90.25 hours in 2010, 79.8 hours in 2011, and 52.91 hours in 2012. During 2009 and 2010, the rate of re-hospitalization was 0%, while in 2011 and 2012, were 3.44% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: according to this study, the use of femoral and sciatic nerve blocking after total knee arthroplasty allowed significant reduction in hospital stay.

  19. A short-term supranutritional vitamin E supplementation alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat stressed pigs

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    Fan Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Heat stress (HS triggers oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in pigs. The objective of this experiment was to study whether a short-term supranutritional amount of dietary vitamin E (VE can mitigate oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in heat-stressed pigs. Methods A total of 24 pigs were given either a control diet (17 IU/kg VE or a high VE (200 IU/kg VE; HiVE diet for 14 d, then exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 20°C, 45% humidity or HS (35°C, 35% to 45% humidity, 8 h daily conditions for 7 d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature were measured three times daily during the thermal exposure. Blood gas variables and oxidative stress markers were studied in blood samples collected on d 7. Results Although HiVE diet did not affect the elevated rectal temperature or respiration rate observed during HS, it alleviated (all p<0.05 for diet×temperature the loss of blood CO2 partial pressure and bicarbonate, as well as the increase in blood pH in the heat-stressed pigs. The HS reduced (p = 0.003 plasma biological antioxidant potential (BAP and tended to increase (p = 0.067 advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP in the heat-stressed pigs, suggesting HS triggers oxidative stress. The HiVE diet did not affect plasma BAP or AOPP. Only under TN conditions the HiVE diet reduced the plasma reactive oxygen metabolites (p<0.05 for diet× temperature. Conclusion A short-term supplementation with 200 IU/kg VE partially alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

  20. Reduced Chest and Abdominal Wall Mobility and Their Relationship to Lung Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Exercise Tolerance in Subjects With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Shiranita, Shuichi; Horie, Jun; Hayashi, Shinichiro

    2016-11-01

    Advanced air-flow limitation in patients with COPD leads to a reduction in vital capacity, respiratory muscle strength, and exercise capacity. However, its impact on chest and abdominal wall mobility is unknown. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of patients with COPD with reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility and to investigate the effect of reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and exercise capacity. In 51 elderly male subjects with COPD, chest and abdominal wall mobility, FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC, maximal inspiratory pressure (P Imax ), maximal expiratory pressure (P Emax ), and the 6-min walk distance (6MWD) were assessed. Chest and abdominal wall mobility were measured using the breathing movement scale (0-8) at the 3 regions (upper chest, lower chest, and abdomen). Reduced mobility was defined as a value lower than the lower limit of the normal scale. The unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test, and multiple regression analysis were performed. The percentages of subjects with reduced mobility were 78% for the upper chest, 76% for the lower chest, and 53% for the abdomen. The subjects with reduced mobility had significantly low FVC, FEV 1 , and 6MWD in each region and significantly low FEV 1 /FVC, P Imax , and P Emax in the abdominal region compared with those with nonreduced mobility. FVC and 6MWD were independently associated with the scale values in each region and with the abdominal scale value, respectively. The majority of subjects with COPD had reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility, which was independently associated with FVC. Even though abdominal wall mobility was relatively preserved compared with chest wall mobility, it was also independently associated with 6MWD. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zong-Sian, E-mail: gary810426@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Che Fu, E-mail: s9823002@m98.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fu, Brian, E-mail: brianfu9@gmail.com [Northwood High School, Irvine, CA (United States); Chou, Ruey-Hwang, E-mail: rhchou@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Chin, E-mail: cyu.nthu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-02

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs. - Highlights: • The interfacial residues on hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. • hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex models were generated from NMR restraints by using HADDOCK program. • We analyzed hFGF1-Suramin complex models and found the interaction between hFGF1-Suramin is hydrophobic. • The bioactivity of the hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 and hFGF1-Suramin complex was studied by using WST1 assay.

  2. Simple motion correction strategy reduces respiratory-induced motion artifacts for k-t accelerated and compressed-sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Chen, Xiao; Weller, Daniel S; Kramer, Christopher M; Kozerke, Sebastian; Salerno, Michael

    2018-02-01

    SSIM (p strategy improved k-t PCA and k-t SLR reconstruction image quality (p strategy greatly reduces motion artifacts and improves image quality for standard k-t PCA and k-t SLR techniques in setting of respiratory motion due to imperfect breath-holding.

  3. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  4. [Impact on the gait time cycle of ischemic stroke in the treatment with yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Tian, Fu-Ling; Liu, Guo-Rong; Zheng, De-Song; Chen, Jin-Ming; Ma, Shu-Riang; Cui, Jian-Mei; Wang, Hong-Bin; Li, Xue-Qing

    2014-03-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy on gait time cycle of ischemic stroke between yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique (yin-yang needling) and the conventional acupuncture. Sixty cases of ischemic stroke were randomized into a conventional acupuncture group and a yin-yang needling group, 30 cases in each one. The basic treatment (the control of blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipid, the intravenous drops of ginkgo leaf extract and dipyridamole injection and vinpocetine injection) were applied in the two groups. Additionally, in the conventional acupuncture group, the acupoints of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming [Biguan (ST 31), Liangqiu (ST 34), Zusanli (ST 36), Shangjuxu (ST 37), Xiajuxu (ST 39), etc.] were selected and stimulated with the even needling technique. In the yin-yang needling group, the acupoints of yin meridians such as Zuwuli (LR 10), Xuehai (SP 10), Yinlingquan (SP 9) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), etc. and the acupoints of yang meridians such as Biguan (ST 31), Liangqiu (ST 34) and Yanglingquan (GB 34), etc. were selected. The reducing manipulation of respiratory reinforcing and reducing technique was applied to the acupoints of yin meridians and the reinforcing manipulation was applied to the acupoints of yang meridians. The kinematics time parameters were determined and compared before and 4 weeks after treatment. After treatment, the differences in the gait cycle, the phase time of standing (%), the phase time of single support (%), the phase time of unilateral sway (%) on the affected (healthy) foot and phase time of double support (%) were significant as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P yin-yang needling group were improved much obviously after treatment as compared with those in the conventional acupuncture group. The differences in support phase time (%), single support phase time (%) and sway phase time (%) were significant between the affected limb and

  5. Does Measles Vaccination Reduce the Risk of Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI and Diarrhea in Children: A Multi-Country Study?

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    Rahul Bawankule

    Full Text Available Pneumonia and diarrhea occur either as complications or secondary infections in measles affected children. So, the integrated Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD by WHO and UNICEF includes measles vaccination as preventive measure in children. The objective of the study is to examine the effect of measles vaccination on Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI and diarrhea in children in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan.We analyzed data from the most recent rounds of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS in the selected countries. We included children age 12-59 months in the analysis. We used multivariable binary logistic regression to examine the effect of measles vaccination on ARI and diarrhea in children. We also estimated Vaccination Effectiveness (VE.More than 60 percent of the children age 12-59 months were given measles vaccine before the survey in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine were less likely to suffer from ARI than unvaccinated children in India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine had a lower risk of diarrhea than those who did not receive it in all the selected countries except Ethiopia. Measles vaccination was associated with reduction in ARI cases by 15-30 percent in India and Pakistan, and diarrhea cases by 12-22 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Nigeria and Pakistan.The receipt of the measles vaccine was associated with decrease in ARI and diarrhea in children. The immunization program must ensure that each child gets the recommended doses of measles vaccine at the appropriate age. The measles vaccination should be given more attention as a preventive intervention under the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD in all low and middle-income countries.

  6. Respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea improves ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination, and reduces oxygen desaturation during endurance exercise testing in COPD patients

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    Bernardi E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bernardi,1 Luca Pomidori,1 Faisy Bassal,1 Marco Contoli,2 Annalisa Cogo11Biomedical Sport Studies Center, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 2Respiratory Section, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Cona (FE, ItalyBackground: Few data are available about the effects of respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea (NH in COPD. The aim is to evaluate the effects of 4 weeks of NH (Spirotiger® on ventilatory pattern, exercise capacity, and quality of life (QoL in COPD patients.Methods: Twenty-six COPD patients (three females, ages 49–82 years, were included in this study. Spirometry and maximal inspiratory pressure, St George Respiratory Questionnaire, 6-minute walk test, and symptom-limited endurance exercise test (endurance test to the limit of tolerance [tLim] at 75%–80% of peak work rate up to a Borg Score of 8–9/10 were performed before and after NH. Patients were equipped with ambulatory inductive plethysmography (LifeShirt® to evaluate ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination (phase angle [PhA] during tLim. After four supervised sessions, subjects trained at home for 4 weeks – 10 minutes twice a day at 50% of maximal voluntary ventilation. The workload was adjusted during the training period to maintain a Borg Score of 5–6/10.Results: Twenty subjects completed the study. After NH, maximal inspiratory pressure significantly increased (81.5±31.6 vs 91.8±30.6 cmH2O, P<0.01; exercise endurance time (+150 seconds, P=0.04, 6-minute walk test (+30 meters, P=0.03, and QoL (-8, P<0.01 all increased. During tLim, the ventilatory pattern changed significantly (lower ventilation, lower respiratory rate, higher tidal volume; oxygen desaturation, PhA, and dyspnea Borg Score were lower for the same work intensity (P<0.01, P=0.02, and P<0.01, respectively; one-way ANOVA. The improvement in tidal volume and oxygen saturation after NH were significantly related (R2=0.65, P<0.01.Conclusion: As

  7. Geldanamycin Reduces Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Promotes the Survival of Mice Infected with the Highly Virulent H5N1 Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengmin; Liu, Pengpeng; Luo, Jing; Ding, Hua; Gao, Yan; Sun, Lei; Luo, Fubing; Liu, Xiaodong; He, Hongxuan

    2017-01-01

    Infections with lethal influenza viruses lead to acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may be related to the activation of the host's immune system. Here, in our study, male C57BL/6 mice were infected with 10 LD 50 of the H5N1 influenza virus and treated with geldanamycin or oseltamivir 2 h after infection. Lung injury was assessed by histopathology on days 4 and 7. The viral load was quantified by measuring the NP gene expression level on days 2, 4, and 7. Levels of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and inflammatory cells were analyzed at different time points. Geldanamycin administration prolonged survival in mice and dramatically reduced lung injury and pulmonary inflammatory compared with other mice. Viral loads in geldanamycin-treated mice also significantly reduced compared with non-treated mice, but not to the extent as the oseltamivir-treated mice. Furthermore, the geldanamycin treatment markedly reduced the production of major proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and attenuated the infiltration and activation of immune cells, but it did not alter the generation of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, geldanamycin plays an important role in attenuating virus infection-induced ALI/ARDS by reducing the host's inflammatory responses and may provide an important reference for clinical treatments.

  8. Rectal Delivery of a DNAzyme That Specifically Blocks the Transcription Factor GATA3 and Reduces Colitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Vanessa; Gerlach, Katharina; Mott, Stefanie; Turowska, Agnieszka; Garn, Holger; Atreya, Raja; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Ho, I-Cheng; Renz, Harald; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2017-01-01

    GATA3 is a transcription factor that regulates T-cell production of cytokines. We investigated the role of GATA3 in development of colitis in mice. We performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analyses of colon tissues from patients with Crohn's disease (n = 61) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 74) or from patients without inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 22), to measure levels of GATA3. Colitis was induced by administration of oxazolone or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid to control mice, mice with T-cell-specific deletion of GATA3, and mice with deletion of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 1 and TNFR2 (TNFR double knockouts); some mice were given a GATA3-specific DNAzyme (hgd40) or a control DNAzyme via intrarectal administration, or systemic injections of an antibody to TNF before or during sensitization and challenge phase of colitis induction. Colon tissues were collected and immunofluorescence and histochemical analyses were performed. Lamina propria mononuclear cells and T cells were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry or cytokine assays. Colonic distribution of labeled DNAzyme and inflammation were monitored by in vivo imaging (endoscopy) of mice. Levels of GATA3 messenger RNA were higher in colon tissues from patients with UC, but not ileal Crohn's disease, than control tissues; levels of GATA3 correlated with levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL] 9, IL17A, IL6, IL5, IL4, IL13, and TNF). We observed increased expression of GATA3 by lamina propria T cells from mice with colitis compared with controls. Mice with T-cell-specific deletion of GATA3 did not develop colitis and their colonic tissues did not produce inflammatory cytokines (IL6, IL9, or IL13). The DNAzyme hgd40 inhibited expression of GATA3 messenger RNA by unstimulated and stimulated T cells, and distributed throughout the inflamed colons of mice with colitis. Colon tissues from mice given hgd40 had reduced expression of GATA3 messenger RNA

  9. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as ... need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  10. Respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  11. Suprascapular and Interscalene Nerve Block for Shoulder Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nasir; Goldar, Ghazaleh; Ragina, Neli; Banfield, Laura; Laffey, John G; Abdallah, Faraj W

    2017-12-01

    Interscalene block provides optimal shoulder surgery analgesia, but concerns over its associated risks have prompted the search for alternatives. Suprascapular block was recently proposed as an interscalene block alternative, but evidence of its comparative analgesic effect is conflicting. This meta-analysis compares the analgesic effect and safety of suprascapular block versus interscalene block for shoulder surgery. Databases were searched for randomized trials comparing interscalene block with suprascapular block for shoulder surgery. Postoperative 24-h cumulative oral morphine consumption and the difference in the area under curve for pooled rest pain scores were designated as primary outcomes. Analgesic and safety outcomes, particularly block-related and respiratory complications, were evaluated as secondary outcomes. Results were pooled using random-effects modeling. Data from 16 studies (1,152 patients) were analyzed. Interscalene block and suprascapular block were not different in 24-h morphine consumption. The difference in area under the curve of pain scores for the 24-h interval favored interscalene block by 1.1 cm/h, but this difference was not clinically important. Compared with suprascapular block, interscalene block reduced postoperative pain but not opioid consumption during recovery room stay by a weighted mean difference (95% CI) of 1.5 cm (0.6 to 2.5 cm; P shoulder surgery.

  12. Prone positioning reduces mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome in the low tidal volume era: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaefi, Shahzad; Montesi, Sydney B.; Devlin, Amy; Loring, Stephen H.; Talmor, Daniel; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prone positioning for ARDS has been performed for decades without definitive evidence of clinical benefit. A recent multicenter trial demonstrated for the first time significantly reduced mortality with prone positioning. This meta-analysis was performed to integrate these findings with existing literature and test whether differences in tidal volume explain conflicting results among randomized trials. Methods Studies were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, LILACS, and citation review. Included were randomized trials evaluating the effect on mortality of prone versus supine positioning during conventional ventilation for ARDS. The primary outcome was risk ratio of death at 60 days meta-analyzed using random effects models. Analysis stratified by high (>8 ml/kg predicted body weight) or low (≤8 ml/kg PBW) mean baseline tidal volume was planned a priori. Results Seven trials were identified including 2,119 patients, of whom 1,088 received prone positioning. Overall, prone positioning was not significantly associated with the risk ratio of death (RR 0.83; 95 % CI 0.68–1.02; p = 0.073; I2 = 64 %). When stratified by high or low tidal volume, prone positioning was associated with a significant decrease in RR of death only among studies with low baseline tidal volume (RR 0.66; 95 % CI 0.50–0.86; p = 0.002; I2 = 25 %). Stratification by tidal volume explained over half the between-study heterogeneity observed in the unstratified analysis. Conclusions Prone positioning is associated with significantly reduced mortality from ARDS in the low tidal volume era. Substantial heterogeneity across studies can be explained by differences in tidal volume. PMID:24435203

  13. The effect of reduced treatment time and dosage of enrofloxacin on the course of respiratory disease caused by avian metapneumovirus and Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmyn, A; Martel, A; Froyman, R; Ludwig, C; Nauwynck, H; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F

    2009-11-01

    A dose titration and reduced duration medication study were performed to evaluate the current enrofloxacin treatment schedule in growing turkeys experimentally infected with avian metapneumovirus and Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale. Experimental groups of 17 four-week-old turkeys were first infected with avian metapneumovirus and 3 d later with O. rhinotracheale. Enrofloxacin treatment in the drinking water was started 24 h after O. rhinotracheale inoculation. In the dose titration study, enrofloxacin doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of BW were administered for 5 successive days. In the reduced duration medication study, the following enrofloxacin regimens were compared: 25 mg/kg of BW per day on d 0 and 2; 15 mg/kg of BW per day on d 0, 2, and 4; and 10 mg/kg of BW for 5 successive days. In both studies, all enrofloxacin treatments were equally efficacious (i.e., equally capable of shortening the course of clinical disease), eliminating O. rhinotracheale from the respiratory tract and reducing gross lesions. Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale bacteria were not recovered from any of the birds on enrofloxacin-supplemented media, indicating that none of the used treatment regimens promoted the selection of bacterial clones with reduced susceptibility or resistance to this antimicrobial agent. In conclusion, none of the alternative enrofloxacin treatment regimens yielded better results than the current prescribed treatment (i.e., 10 mg/kg of BW for 5 successive days) of O. rhinotracheale infections in turkeys. However, the reduced duration of application would offer a less time-consuming and equally effective alternative.

  14. Respiratory guiding system for respiratory motion management in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory guiding systems have been shown to improve the respiratory regularity. This, in turn, improves the efficiency of synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy, and it reduces the artifacts caused by irregular breathing in imaging techniques such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), which is used for treatment planning in RGRT. We have previously developed a respiratory guiding system that incorporates an individual-specific guiding waveform, which is easy to follow for each volunteer, to improve the respiratory regularity. The present study evaluates the application of this system to improve the respiratory regularity for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an in-house-developed respiratory guiding system incorporating an individual specific guiding waveform to improve the respiratory regularity for RGRT. Most volunteers showed significantly less residual motion at each phase during guided breathing owing to the improvement in respiratory regularity. Therefore, the respiratory guiding system can clearly reduce the residual, or respiratory, motion in each phase. From the result, the CTV and the PTV margins during RGRT can be reduced by using the respiratory guiding system, which reduces the residual motions, thus improving the accuracy of RGRT

  15. Effectiveness of a Respiratory Day Hospital Program to Reduce Admissions for Exacerbation in Patients with Severe COPD: A Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Daniel; Montón, Concepción; Marín, Alicia; Solanes, Ingrid; López-Sánchez, Marta; Pomares, Xavier; Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2017-06-01

    The respiratory Day Hospital (DH) is a care facility currently operating at various healthcare institutions. It monitors patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presenting repeated exacerbations with at least two hospital admissions per year. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the DH program for controlling admissions for COPD exacerbations in this cohort of patients, and to identify clinical factors associated with hospitalizations and mortality. An observational prospective multicenter study was carried out at three hospitals. The sample comprised 150 consecutive patients (median age 70 [65-76] years, FEV 1 33 [26-43]%, 97% males), included at the DH program. Over a one-year period, variables assessing effectiveness and use of healthcare resources were recorded. Factors associated with hospitalizations and mortality were identified. Patients made a median of 4[2-5] emergency visits due to COPD exacerbations with a median of 1[0-2] hospitalization(s)/year. Most of exacerbations (77%) were evaluated at the DH, but there were fewer hospitalizations from the DH than from the emergency department (21% vs. 81%, p < 0.001). In all, 29% of the patients had at least two admissions; these were the patients with the most severe disease. Age, readmission at 30-days and the presence of respiratory failure were the predictors of mortality. In conclusion, the DH program is an effective model for reducing hospitalizations in this cohort of patients. In all, 29% of the patients required two hospital admissions or more; these patients had more advanced disease and poorer prognosis, and would be most likely to benefit from additional care support.

  16. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  17. Consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 reduces the duration of respiratory infections in the elderly in a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemard, E; Tondu, F; Lacoin, F; Schrezenmeir, J

    2010-01-01

    Common infectious diseases (CID) of the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are still a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. The present study examined the beneficial effect of a dairy product containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 (fermented product) on the resistance of free-living elderly to CID. The study was multicentric, double blind and controlled, involving 1072 volunteers (median age = 76.0 years) randomised for consumption of either 200 g/d of fermented (n 537) or control (non-fermented) dairy product (n 535) for 3 months, followed by an additional 1 month's follow-up. The results showed that, when considering all CID, the fermented product significantly reduced the average duration per episode of CID (6.5 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.008) and the cumulative duration of CID (7 v. 8 d in control group; P = 0.009). Reduction in both episode and cumulative durations was also significant for all upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; P fermented product consumption (2-3.8 x 107 equivalents of colony-forming unit/g of stools, P fermented product was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, consumption of a fermented dairy product containing the probiotic strain L. casei DN-114 001 in elderly was associated with a decreased duration of CID in comparison with the control group, especially for URTI such as rhinopharyngitis.

  18. Infection control and prevention practices implemented to reduce transmission risk of Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus in a tertiary care institution in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Taimur S; Koutlakis-Barron, Irene; AlJumaah, Suliman; AlThawadi, Sahar; AlMofada, Saleh

    2016-05-01

    Transmission of Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) among health care workers (HCWs) and patients has been documented with mortality rate approximating 36%. We propose advanced infection control measures (A-IC) used in conjunction with basic infection control measures (B-IC) help reduce pathogen transmission. B-IC include standard and transmission-based precautions. A-IC are initiatives implemented within our center to enhance effectiveness of B-IC. Study effectiveness of combining B-IC and A-IC to prevent transmission of MERS-CoV to HCWs. A retrospective observational study was undertaken. A-IC measures include administrative support with daily rounds; infection control risk assessment; timely screening, isolation, and specimen analysis; collaboration; epidemic planning; stockpiling; implementation of contingency plans; full personal protective equipment use for advanced airway management; use of a real-time electronic isolation flagging system; infection prevention and control team on-call protocols; pretransfer MERS-CoV testing; and education. A total of 874 real-time polymerase chain reaction MERS-CoV tests were performed during the period beginning July 1, 2013, and ending January 31, 2015. Six hundred ninety-four non-HCWs were tested, of these 16 tested positive for MERS-CoV and their infection was community acquired. Sixty-nine percent of the confirmed MERS-CoV-positive cases were men, with an average age of 56 years (range, 19-84 years). Of the total tested for MERS-CoV, 180 individuals were HCWs with zero positivity. Adhering to a combination of B-IC and A-IC reduces the risk of MERS-CoV transmission to HCWs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Results from a Patient-Based Health Education Intervention in Reducing Antibiotic Use for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in the Private Sector Primary Care Setting in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Magdalene Hui Min; Pan, Darius Shaw Teng; Huang, Joyce Huixin; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Chong, Joash Wen Chen; Goh, Ee Hui; Jiang, Lili; Leo, Yee Sin; Lee, Tau Hong; Wong, Chia Siong; Loh, Victor Weng Keong; Lim, Fong Seng; Poh, Adrian Zhongxian; Tham, Tat Yean; Wong, Wei Mon; Yu, Yue

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the efficacy of patient-targeted education in reducing antibiotic prescriptions for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) among adults in the private primary care setting in Singapore. Our randomized controlled trial enrolled patients aged 21 years and above presenting at general practitioner (GP) clinics with URTI symptoms for 7 days or less. Intervention arm patients were verbally educated via pamphlets about the etiology of URTIs, the role of antibiotics in treating URTIs, and the consequences of inappropriate antibiotic use. Control arm patients were educated on influenza vaccinations. Both arms were compared regarding the proportions prescribed antibiotics and the patients' postconsultation views. A total of 914 patients consulting 35 doctors from 24 clinics completed the study (457 in each arm). The demographics of patients in both arms were similar, and 19.1% were prescribed an antibiotic, but this varied from 0% to 70% for individual GPs. The intervention did not significantly reduce antibiotic prescriptions (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.73) except in patients of Indian ethnicity (OR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.93). Positive associations between the intervention and the view that antibiotics were not needed most of the time for URTIs ( P = 0.047) and on being worried about the side effects of antibiotics ( P = 0.018) were restricted to the Indian subgroup. GPs in limited liability partnerships or clinic chains prescribed less (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.92), while certain inappropriate patient responses were associated with the receipt of antibiotics. Follow-up studies to investigate differences in responses to educational programs between ethnicities and to explore GP-targeted interventions are recommended. Copyright © 2017 Lee et al.

  20. Prazosin reduces alcohol drinking throughout prolonged treatment and blocks the initiation of drinking in rats selectively bred for high alcohol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Janice C; Hausauer, Brett J; Federoff, David L; Fischer, Stephen M; Rasmussen, Dennis D

    2013-09-01

    This study examined whether prazosin reduces alcohol drinking over the course of prolonged treatment and whether it blocks the initiation of alcohol drinking in rats with a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking, that is alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In study one, alcohol-experienced P rats that had been drinking alcohol for 2 h/d for several months were treated daily with prazosin (0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg body weight [BW]) for 7 weeks. In study two, alcohol-naïve P rats were treated daily with prazosin (0, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg BW) for 2 weeks prior to, or concomitantly with, the initiation of alcohol access and throughout 3 weeks of alcohol availability. Prazosin treatment and alcohol access were then discontinued for 2 weeks followed by reinstatement of alcohol access without prazosin treatment for 4 weeks, followed by resumption of daily prazosin treatment (2.0 mg/kg BW) for 3 weeks. Prazosin reduced alcohol drinking throughout 7 weeks of treatment in P rats accustomed to drinking alcohol. Following termination of prazosin treatment, alcohol drinking slowly returned to pretreatment baseline. Reduced alcohol intake was accompanied by increased water intake. In alcohol-naïve P rats, prazosin administration prior to the first opportunity to drink alcohol and throughout 3 weeks of alcohol access retarded acquisition of alcohol drinking and reduced the amount of alcohol consumed. When prazosin was administered concomitantly with the first opportunity to drink alcohol, it abolished acquisition of alcohol drinking. Discontinuation of prazosin treatment allowed expression of a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking to gradually emerge. Prazosin retained the ability to reduce alcohol intake with repeated treatments. Prazosin decreased alcohol drinking during prolonged treatment and may be useful for treating alcoholism and alcohol-use disorders. Prazosin may also be useful for deterring the initiation of drinking in individuals with a family

  1. Reducing persistent postoperative pain and disability 1 year after breast cancer surgery: a randomized, controlled trial comparing thoracic paravertebral block to local anesthetic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Bryson, Gregory L; Lui, Anne; Watters, James M; Taljaard, Monica; Nathan, Howard J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) and local anesthetic (LA) on persistent postoperative pain (PPP) 1 year following breast cancer surgery. Secondary objectives were to compare the effect on arm morbidity and quality of life. Women scheduled for elective breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to either TPVB or LA followed by general anesthesia. An NRS value of >3 at rest or with movement 1 year following surgery defined PPP. Blinded interim analysis suggested rates of PPP much lower than anticipated, making detection of the specified 20 % absolute reduction in the primary outcome impossible. Recruitment was stopped, and all enrolled patients were followed to 1 year. A total of 145 participants were recruited; 65 were randomized to TPVB and 64 to LA. Groups were similar with respect to demographic and treatment characteristics. Only 9 patients (8 %; 95 % CI 4-14 %) met criteria for PPP 1 year following surgery; 5 were in the TPVB and 4 in the LA group. Brief Pain Inventory severity and interference scores were low in both groups. Arm morbidity and quality of life were similar in both groups. The 9 patients with PPP reported shoulder-arm morbidity and reduced quality of life. This study reports a low incidence of chronic pain 1 year following major breast cancer surgery. Although PPP was uncommon at 1 year, it had a large impact on the affected patients' arm morbidity and quality of life.

  2. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  3. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervloet, Marcia; Meulepas, Marianne A; Cals, Jochen W L; Eimers, Mariëtta; van der Hoek, Lucas S; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-02-04

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial with pre- and follow-up measurement. The intervention was implemented through PharmacoTherapy Audit Meetings (PTAM) in which family physicians (FPs) and pharmacists collaborate. Four PTAM groups received the intervention consisting of: (1) FP communication skills training, including communication about delayed prescribing; (2) implementation of antibiotic prescribing agreements in FPs' Electronic Prescribing Systems; (3) quarterly feedback figures for FPs. Four other PTAM groups were matched controls. Primary outcome measure was the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions after the intervention, assessed with multilevel linear regression analyses. Total number and number of prescriptions stratified by age (under/over 12 years) were analysed. At baseline, the average total number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions per 1,000 patients was 207.9 and 176.7 in the intervention and control PTAM groups, respectively. At follow-up, FPs in both the intervention and control groups prescribed significantly less antibiotics. For adolescents and adults, the drop in number of antibiotic prescription was significantly larger in the intervention groups (-27.8 per 1,000 patients) than the control groups (-7.2 per 1,000 patients; Pantibiotic prescriptions for adolescents and adults. To affect antibiotic prescribing in children other methods are needed.

  4. Effect of a family-centered, secondhand smoke intervention to reduce respiratory illness in indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Natalie; Johnston, Vanessa; Glover, Marewa; Bullen, Christopher; Trenholme, Adrian; Chang, Anne; Morris, Peter; Segan, Catherine; Brown, Ngiare; Fenton, Debra; Hawthorne, Eyvette; Borland, Ron; Parag, Varsha; Von Blaramberg, Taina; Westphal, Darren; Thomas, David

    2015-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a significant cause of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and 5 times more common in indigenous children. A single-blind randomized trial was undertaken to determine the efficacy of a family centered SHS intervention to reduce ARI in indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. Indigenous mothers/infants from homes with ≥ 1 smoker were randomized to a SHS intervention involving 3 home visits in the first 3 months of the infants' lives (plus usual care) or usual care. The primary outcome was number of ARI-related visits to a health provider in the first year of life. Secondary outcomes, assessed at 4 and 12 months of age, included ARI hospitalization rates and mothers' report of infants' SHS exposure (validated by urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios [CCRs]), smoking restrictions, and smoking cessation. Two hundred and ninety-three mother/infant dyads were randomized and followed up. Three quarters of mothers smoked during pregnancy and two thirds were smoking at baseline (as were their partners), with no change for more than 12 months. Reported infant exposure to SHS was low (≥ 95% had smoke-free homes/cars). Infant CCRs were higher if one or both parents were smokers and if mothers breast fed their infants. There was no effect of the intervention on ARI events [471 intervention vs. 438 usual care (reference); incidence rate ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.88-1.37, p = .40]. Despite reporting smoke-free homes/cars, mothers and their partners continue to smoke in the first year of infants' lives, exposing them to SHS. Emphasis needs to be placed on supporting parents to stop smoking preconception, during pregnancy, and postnatal. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

  5. Paravertebral Block Does Not Reduce Cancer Recurrence, but Is Related to Higher Overall Survival in Lung Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Hyun Joo; Zo, Jae Ill; Kim, Kyunga; Jung, Dae Myung; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative analgesic methods are suggested to have an impact on long-term prognosis after cancer surgery through opioid-induced immune suppression. We hypothesized that regional analgesia that reduces the systemic opioid requirement would be related to lower cancer recurrence and higher overall survival compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for lung cancer surgery. Records for all patients who underwent open thoracotomy for curative resection of primary lung cancer between 2009 and 2013 in a tertiary care hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided by postoperative analgesic methods: PCA (n = 574), thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA, n = 619), or paravertebral block (PVB, n = 536). Overall and recurrence-free survivals were compared among 3 analgesic methods via a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model and a log-rank test after adjusting confounding factors using propensity score matching (PSM). Analgesic method was associated with overall survival (P= .0015; hazard ratio against TEA [95% confidence intervals]: 0.58 [0.39-0.87] for PCA, 0.60 [0.45-0.79] for PVB). After confounder adjustment using PSM, PVB showed higher overall survival than PCA (log-rank P= .0229) and TEA (log-rank P= .0063) while PCA and TEA showed no difference (log-rank P= .6). Hazard ratio for PVB was 0.66 [0.46-0.94] against PCA and 0.65 [0.48-0.89] against TEA after PSM. However, there was no significant association between the analgesic methods and recurrence-free survival (P= .5; log-rank P with PSM = .5 between PCA and TEA, .5 between PCA and PVB, .1 between TEA and PVB). Pain-control methods are not related to cancer recurrence. However, PVB may have a beneficial effect on overall survival of patients with lung cancer.

  6. Control rod blocking monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru.

    1993-01-01

    The number of times for setting up a control rod blocking monitor of a BWR type power plant is remarkably reduced to mitigate operator's burden. In the control rod blocking monitor, trip levels, as a judging standard upon outputting control rod blocking inhibition signals, are set up stepwise depending on the power level around control rods put to blocking control. The present invention comprises an allowance judging means capable of setting up trip levels for each of power levels corresponding to a plurality of control rods at once if the power levels are within the set up allowable range. With such a constitution, the set up allowable range is determined previously in the allowance judging means. Accordingly, when a gang blocking is conducted to control rods, if power levels around the control rods are increased at once into the set up allowable range, the trip levels for each of the control rods are set up at once. (I.S.)

  7. A short-term supranutritional vitamin E supplementation alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat stressed pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fan; Celi, Pietro; Chauhan, Surinder Singh; Cottrell, Jeremy James; Leury, Brian Joseph; Dunshea, Frank Rowland

    2017-01-01

    Objective Heat stress (HS) triggers oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in pigs. The objective of this experiment was to study whether a short-term supranutritional amount of dietary vitamin E (VE) can mitigate oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in heat-stressed pigs. Methods A total of 24 pigs were given either a control diet (17 IU/kg VE) or a high VE (200 IU/kg VE; HiVE) diet for 14 d, then exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 20°C, 45% humidity) or HS (35°C, 35% to 45% humidity, 8...

  8. Immunoglobulin M-enriched intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulins reduce bacteremia following Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in an acute respiratory distress syndrome rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmann, R. A.; van Kaam, A. H. L. C.; Haitsma, J. J.; Verbrugge, S. J. C.; Delreu, F.; Lachmann, B.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is known to induce bacterial translocation from the lung into the systemic circulation. This study determined the effect of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins on bacteremia due to ventilation-induced translocation in an acute respiratory distress

  9. Electronically delivered, multicomponent intervention to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections in primary care: a cluster randomised trial using electronic health records-REDUCE Trial study original protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; McDermott, Lisa; Soames, Jamie; Sultana, Kirin; Ashworth, Mark; Fox, Robin; Hay, Alastair D; Little, Paul; Moore, Michael V; Yardley, Lucy; Prevost, A Toby; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-08-04

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) account for about 60% of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. This study aims to test the effectiveness, in a cluster randomised controlled trial, of electronically delivered, multicomponent interventions to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing when patients consult for RTIs in primary care. The research will specifically evaluate the effectiveness of feeding back electronic health records (EHRs) data to general practices. 2-arm cluster randomised trial using the EHRs of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). General practices in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are being recruited and the general population of all ages represents the target population. Control trial arm practices will continue with usual care. Practices in the intervention arm will receive complex multicomponent interventions, delivered remotely to information systems, including (1) feedback of each practice's antibiotic prescribing through monthly antibiotic prescribing reports estimated from CPRD data; (2) delivery of educational and decision support tools; (3) a webinar to explain and promote effective usage of the intervention. The intervention will continue for 12 months. Outcomes will be evaluated from CPRD EHRs. The primary outcome will be the number of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 patient years. Secondary outcomes will be: the RTI consultation rate; the proportion of consultations for RTI with an antibiotic prescribed; subgroups of age; different categories of RTI and quartiles of intervention usage. There will be more than 80% power to detect an absolute reduction in antibiotic prescription for RTI of 12 per 1000 registered patient years. Total healthcare usage will be estimated from CPRD data and compared between trial arms. Trial protocol was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee (14/LO/1730). The pragmatic design of the trial will enable subsequent translation of effective

  10. Electronically delivered, multicomponent intervention to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections in primary care: a cluster randomised trial using electronic health records—REDUCE Trial study original protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; McDermott, Lisa; Soames, Jamie; Sultana, Kirin; Ashworth, Mark; Fox, Robin; Hay, Alastair D; Little, Paul; Moore, Michael V; Yardley, Lucy; Prevost, A Toby; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) account for about 60% of antibiotics prescribed in primary care. This study aims to test the effectiveness, in a cluster randomised controlled trial, of electronically delivered, multicomponent interventions to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing when patients consult for RTIs in primary care. The research will specifically evaluate the effectiveness of feeding back electronic health records (EHRs) data to general practices. Methods and analysis 2-arm cluster randomised trial using the EHRs of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). General practices in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are being recruited and the general population of all ages represents the target population. Control trial arm practices will continue with usual care. Practices in the intervention arm will receive complex multicomponent interventions, delivered remotely to information systems, including (1) feedback of each practice's antibiotic prescribing through monthly antibiotic prescribing reports estimated from CPRD data; (2) delivery of educational and decision support tools; (3) a webinar to explain and promote effective usage of the intervention. The intervention will continue for 12 months. Outcomes will be evaluated from CPRD EHRs. The primary outcome will be the number of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 patient years. Secondary outcomes will be: the RTI consultation rate; the proportion of consultations for RTI with an antibiotic prescribed; subgroups of age; different categories of RTI and quartiles of intervention usage. There will be more than 80% power to detect an absolute reduction in antibiotic prescription for RTI of 12 per 1000 registered patient years. Total healthcare usage will be estimated from CPRD data and compared between trial arms. Ethics and dissemination Trial protocol was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee (14/LO/1730). The pragmatic design of the trial

  11. Practical Application of the Concept of Separating the Zone of Overheating and Reducing the Stress Level in Cathode Block of an Aluminium Electrolytic Cell During Formation of Connection with the Steel Pin by Cast Iron Pouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piekło J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the concept of division of a carbon block into single cathode sections to reduce stresses that occur during thermal shock accompanying the operation of pouring cast iron into a shaped groove in which the current-carrying steel pin is mounted. The temperature field and the state of stress were determined by FEM. Experimental measurements were used to determine the core displacement during pouring operation. The calculations were verified by thermovision and photoelastic method. Based on the temperature field and stress field analysis, a method for the block division into sections has been proposed, resulting in a significant reduction of the stress level.

  12. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  13. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  14. Intramuscular adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in neonates delivered by elective caesarean section at term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Avlund, O L; Pedersen, B L

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test whether intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline decreased the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in term infants delivered by elective caesarean section before active labour. METHOD: The study was randomised and double-blinded. A total of 270 neonates were...... assigned to intramuscular treatment with saline (0.30 ml) or 30 microg adrenaline (0.30 ml) immediately after birth. The primary endpoint was referral to the neonatal ward because of respiratory distress or a blood glucose level ... with pulse oximetry to disclose potential side effects. RESULTS: Pulse-oximetry recordings revealed a modest systemic effect by intramuscular adrenaline as the heart rate and the haemoglobin oxygen saturation were significantly higher in infants who received adrenaline. In contrast, the incidence...

  15. Access to Point-of-Care Tests Reduces the Prescription of Antibiotics Among Antibiotic-Requesting Subjects With Respiratory Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, C.; Bjerrum, Lars; Munck, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) often feel uncomfortable when patients request an antibiotic when there is likely little benefit. This study evaluates the effect of access to point-of-care tests on decreasing the prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in subjects who...... explicitly requested an antibiotic prescription. METHODS: Spanish GPs registered all cases of respiratory tract infections over a 3-week period before and after an intervention undertaken in 2008 and 2009. Patients with acute sinusitis, pneumonia, and exacerbations of COPD were excluded. Two types...... tract infections were included, of whom 344 (1.4%) requested antibiotic prescribing. Antibiotics were more frequently prescribed to subjects requesting them compared with those who did not (49.1% vs 18.5%, P

  16. Long-term non-invasive ventilation reduces readmissions in COPD patients with two or more episodes of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Kasper Linde; Maibom, Sophia Liff; Wilcke, Jon Torgny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who have had an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) have a large 1-year risk of death or readmission. Acute non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to be an effective treatment of AHRF; and long-term NIV...... (LTNIV) has been shown to be an effective treatment of chronic respiratory failure in stable hypercapnic COPD. We investigated the effects of LTNIV in a group of patients with severe, unstable COPD: frequent admissions and multiple previous episodes of AHRF treated with NIV. METHODS: We conducted...... a retrospective analysis of 20 COPD patients treated with LTNIV after two or more episodes of AHRF during 1 year. RESULTS: The mean number of AHRF episodes decreased from 2.44 in the year prior to LTNIV initiation to 0.44 in the year following (p

  17. Further evaluation of alternative air-filtration systems for reducing the transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Dee, Scott A.; Deen, John; Cano, Jean Paul; Batista, Laura; Pijoan, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 4 methods for the reduction of aerosol transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration, 2×-low-cost filtration, bag filtration, and use of a filter tested against particles derived from dioctylphthalate (DOP). The HEPA-filtration system used a prefilter screen, a bag filter (Eurovent [EU] 8 rating), and a HEPA filter (EU13 rating). The low-cost-filtration system contained mo...

  18. High fatty acid oxidation capacity and phosphorylation control despite elevated leak and reduced respiratory capacity in northern elephant seal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicco, Adam J; Le, Catherine H; Schlater, Amber; Nguyen, Alex; Kaye, Spencer; Beals, Joseph W; Scalzo, Rebecca L; Bell, Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Costa, Daniel P; Crocker, Daniel E; Kanatous, Shane B

    2014-08-15

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) are extreme, hypoxia-adapted endotherms that rely largely on aerobic metabolism during extended breath-hold dives in near-freezing water temperatures. While many aspects of their physiology have been characterized to account for these remarkable feats, the contribution of adaptations in the aerobic powerhouses of muscle cells, the mitochondria, are unknown. In the present study, the ontogeny and comparative physiology of elephant seal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function was investigated under a variety of substrate conditions and respiratory states. Intact mitochondrial networks were studied by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fiber bundles obtained from primary swimming muscles of pup, juvenile and adult seals, and compared with fibers from adult human vastus lateralis. Results indicate that seal muscle maintains a high capacity for fatty acid oxidation despite a progressive decrease in total respiratory capacity as animals mature from pups to adults. This is explained by a progressive increase in phosphorylation control and fatty acid utilization over pyruvate in adult seals compared with humans and seal pups. Interestingly, despite higher indices of oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, juvenile and adult seals also exhibit a ~50% greater capacity for respiratory 'leak' compared with humans and seal pups. The ontogeny of this phenotype suggests it is an adaptation of muscle to the prolonged breath-hold exercise and highly variable ambient temperatures experienced by mature elephant seals. These studies highlight the remarkable plasticity of mammalian mitochondria to meet the demands for both efficient ATP production and endothermy in a cold, oxygen-limited environment. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. [Investigations into the use of respiratory masks for reducing the MRSA-exposure of veterinarians visiting regularly pig herds--first experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaus, Rolf; Schulz, Jochen; Hartung, Jörg; Cuny, Christiane; Fetsch, Alexandra; Blaha, Thomas; Meemken, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The study presents first experiences on the controlled use of respiratory masks against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a multi-person veterinary pig practice. Seven veterinarians entered the trial (five wearing masks, two wearing no masks) after the veterinarians had performed a decolonisation protocol. The pig herds were visited regularly by the veterinarians during the study period. The five "trial" veterinarians wore gloves and respiratory masks for at least 30 days and 30 farm visits. The two "control" veterinarians wore gloves only. Nasal swabs were collected at a seven day interval. Swabs and ten masks per "trial" veterinarian were bacteriologically tested for MRSA including MLST- and spa-typing. The study showed a high MRSA-exposure for the veterinarians, since 68% of the masks were tested positive for MRSA. However, four vets stayed MRSA-negative while using the masks. Only one of the"trial" veterinarians became positive after two weeks. After the masks were not worn any more, two veterinarians returned to colonisation soon again. The two "control" veterinarians turned positive after 26 and 54 days, respectively. The high finding-rates of MRSA in the masks proof an enormous risk of nasal colonisation during routine work.The results of our study do not proof the potential of respiratory masks to prevent nasal colonisation of veterinarians with MRSA. However, there are no hints, that the proper use of masks could be a risk factor for becoming colonised. Further details of the proper use of masks and the quantification of their protective potential need further studies on a larger scale.

  20. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  1. Intravenous administration of high-dose Paclitaxel reduces gut-associated lymphoid tissue cell number and respiratory immunoglobulin A concentrations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Tomoyuki; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Midori; Okamoto, Koichi; Murakoshi, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Miyazaki, Masaru; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2014-02-01

    Chemotherapy remains a mainstay of treatment for cancer patients. However, anti-cancer drugs frequently cause a wide range of side effects, including leukopenia and gastrointestinal toxicity. These adverse effects can lead to treatment delays or necessitate temporary dose reductions. Although chemotherapy-related changes in gut morphology have been demonstrated, the influences of chemotherapeutic regimens on gut immunity are understood poorly. This study aimed to examine whether the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) impairs gut immunity in mice. Male ICR mice were randomized into three groups: Control, low-dose PTX (low PTX; 2 mg/kg), or high-dose PTX (high PTX; 4 mg/kg). A single intravenous dose was given. On day seven after the injection, lymphocytes from Peyer patches (PP), intraepithelial (IE) spaces, and the lamina propria (LP) were counted and analyzed by flow cytometry (CD4(+), CD8(+), αβTCR(+), γδTCR(+), B220(+)). Immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations were measured in small intestinal and respiratory tract washings. Total, CD4(+) and γδTCR(+) lymphocyte numbers in PPs were significantly lower in the high PTX than in the control group. The CD4(+) lymphocyte numbers in the IE spaces were significantly lower in both PTX groups than in the control group. Respiratory tract IgA concentrations were lower in the high PTX than in the control group. The present data suggest high-dose PTX impairs mucosal immunity, possibly rendering patients more vulnerable to infection. Careful dose selection and new therapies may be important for maintaining mucosal immunity during PTX chemotherapy.

  2. Delta inulin-derived adjuvants that elicit Th1 phenotype following vaccination reduces respiratory syncytial virus lung titers without a reduction in lung immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terianne M; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Bissel, Stephanie J; Wiley, Clayton A; Ross, Ted M

    2016-08-02

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of lower respiratory tract infections resulting in bronchiolitis and even mortality in the elderly and young children/infants. Despite the impact of this virus on human health, no licensed vaccine exists. Unlike many other viral infections, RSV infection or vaccination does not induce durable protective antibodies in humans. In order to elicit high titer, neutralizing antibodies against RSV, we investigated the use of the adjuvant Advax™, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin microparticles, to enhance antibody titers following vaccination. BALB/c mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with live RSV as a vaccine antigen in combination with one of two formulations of Advax™. Advax-1 was comprised of the standard delta inulin adjuvant and Advax-2 was formulated delta inulin plus CpG oligodendronucleotides (ODNs). An additional group of mice were either mock vaccinated, immunized with vaccine only, or administered vaccine plus Imject Alum. Following 3 vaccinations, mice had neutralizing antibody titers that correlated with reduction in viral titers in the lungs. Advax-1 significantly enhanced serum RSV-specific IgG1 levels at week 6 indicative of a Th2 response, similar to titers in mice administered vaccine plus Imject Alum. In contrast, mice vaccinated with vaccine plus Advax-2 had predominately IgG2a titers indicative of a Th1 response that was maintained during the entire study. Interestingly, regardless of which Advax TM adjuvant was used, the neutralizing titers were similar between groups, but the viral lung titers were significantly lower (∼10E+3pfu/g) in mice administered vaccine with either Advax TM adjuvant compared to mice administered adjuvants only. The lung pathology in vaccinated mice with Advax TM was similar to Imject Alum. Overall, RSV vaccine formulated with Advax TM had high neutralizing antibody titers with low lung viral titers, but exacerbated lung pathology compared

  3. Design and methods of a social network isolation study for reducing respiratory infection transmission: The eX-FLU cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Allison E; Simanek, Amanda M; Eisenberg, Marisa C; Walsh, Alison R; Davis, Brian; Volz, Erik; Cheng, Caroline; Rainey, Jeanette J; Uzicanin, Amra; Gao, Hongjiang; Osgood, Nathaniel; Knowles, Dylan; Stanley, Kevin; Tarter, Kara; Monto, Arnold S

    2016-06-01

    Social networks are increasingly recognized as important points of intervention, yet relatively few intervention studies of respiratory infection transmission have utilized a network design. Here we describe the design, methods, and social network structure of a randomized intervention for isolating respiratory infection cases in a university setting over a 10-week period. 590 students in six residence halls enrolled in the eX-FLU study during a chain-referral recruitment process from September 2012-January 2013. Of these, 262 joined as "seed" participants, who nominated their social contacts to join the study, of which 328 "nominees" enrolled. Participants were cluster-randomized by 117 residence halls. Participants were asked to respond to weekly surveys on health behaviors, social interactions, and influenza-like illness (ILI) symptoms. Participants were randomized to either a 3-Day dorm room isolation intervention or a control group (no isolation) upon illness onset. ILI cases reported on their isolation behavior during illness and provided throat and nasal swab specimens at onset, day-three, and day-six of illness. A subsample of individuals (N=103) participated in a sub-study using a novel smartphone application, iEpi, which collected sensor and contextually-dependent survey data on social interactions. Within the social network, participants were significantly positively assortative by intervention group, enrollment type, residence hall, iEpi participation, age, gender, race, and alcohol use (all Pdesign for testing the impact of isolation from social networks in a university setting. These data provide an unparalleled opportunity to address questions about isolation and infection transmission, as well as insights into social networks and behaviors among college-aged students. Several important lessons were learned over the course of this project, including feasible isolation durations, the need for extensive organizational efforts, as well as the need for

  4. Blocking heme oxygenase-1 by zinc protoporphyrin reduces tumor hypoxia-mediated VEGF release and inhibits tumor angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Yang, Hao-Jhih; Chang, Chun-Chao; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Jungshan; Ho, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-28

    Hypoxia in tumor niche is one of important factors to start regeneration of blood vessels, leading to increase survival, proliferation, and invasion in cancer cells. Under hypoxia microenvironment, furthermore, steadily increased hypoxia-inducible factor -1α (HIF-1α) is observed, and can increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promote angiogenesis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, is potential to inhibit tumor proliferation and progression. However, the mechanism of ZnPP in inhibition of tumor is not completely clear. We hypothesize that ZnPP may modulate HIF-1α through inhibiting HO-1, and then inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. This study aimed to dissect the mechanism of ZnPP in tumor suppression. We observed the amount of VEGF was increased in the sera of the colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (n = 34, p ZnPP inhibited the expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF coupled with cell proliferations of HCT-15 cells, suggesting that ZnPP blocked HIF-1α expression, and then inhibited the consequent VEGF production. In the xenograft model, we also observed that the animals exposed to ZnPP displayed much smaller tumor nodules and less degree of angiogenesis with decreased expression of the angiogenesis marker, αvβ3 integrin, compared to that in normal control. This study demonstrated that VEGF level in serum was elevated in the patients with CRC. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, possessed the properties of anti-tumor agent by decreasing HIF-1α levels, blocking VEGF production, impairing tumor angiogenesis, and inhibiting tumor growth.

  5. Is pulmonary function affected by bilateral dual transversus abdominis plane block? A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover pilot study in healthy male volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Maria; Elers, Jimmi; Børglum, Jens

    2011-01-01

    : Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been shown to reduce postoperative pain after various abdominal surgical procedures in several studies. The motor nerves of the abdominal wall are located in the same plane as the sensory nerves affected by the TAP block. The aim of this study was t...... was to examine whether the application of an ultrasound-guided TAP block would affect the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall with respect to their function as accessory respiratory muscles and hence pulmonary function....

  6. Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks with Single-Dose Liposomal Bupivacaine in Conjunction with a Nonnarcotic Pain Regimen Help Reduce Length of Stay following Abdominally Based Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Eric M; Lamelas, Andreas M; Kim, Julie N; Molina, Bianca; Molina, Nathan; Okwali, Michelle; Samson, William; Sultan, Mark R; Dayan, Joseph H; Smith, Mark L

    2017-08-01

    Side effects associated with use of postoperative narcotics for pain control can delay recovery after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. The authors evaluated a nonnarcotic pain control regimen in conjunction with bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks on facilitating early hospital discharge. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction using abdominally based free flaps, with or without being included in a nonnarcotic protocol using intraoperative transversus abdominis plane blockade. During this period, the use of locoregional analgesia evolved from none (control), to continuous bupivacaine infusion transversus abdominis plane and catheters, to single-dose transversus abdominis plane blockade with liposomal bupivacaine solution. Demographic factors, length of stay, inpatient opioid consumption, and complications were reported for all three groups. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients (182 flaps) were identified. Forty patients (62 flaps) were in the infusion-liposomal bupivacaine group, 48 (66 flaps) were in the single-dose blockade-catheter group, and 40 (54 flaps) were in the control group. The infusion-liposomal bupivacaine patients had a significantly shorter hospital stay compared with the single-dose blockade-catheter group (2.65 ± 0.66 versus 3.52 ± 0.92 days; p bupivacaine help facilitate early hospital discharge after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. A trend toward consistent discharge by postoperative day 2 was seen. This could result in significant cost savings for health care systems. Therapeutic, III.

  7. Point-of-care C-reactive protein testing to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics for non-severe acute respiratory infections in Vietnamese primary health care: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nga T T; Ta, Ngan T D; Tran, Ninh T H; Than, Hung M; Vu, Bich T N; Hoang, Long B; van Doorn, H Rogier; Vu, Dung T V; Cals, Jochen W L; Chandna, Arjun; Lubell, Yoel; Nadjm, Behzad; Thwaites, Guy; Wolbers, Marcel; Nguyen, Kinh V; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2016-09-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections is common in primary health care, but distinguishing serious from self-limiting infections is difficult, particularly in low-resource settings. We assessed whether C-reactive protein point-of-care testing can safely reduce antibiotic use in patients with non-severe acute respiratory tract infections in Vietnam. We did a multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial in ten primary health-care centres in northern Vietnam. Patients aged 1-65 years with at least one focal and one systemic symptom of acute respiratory tract infection were assigned 1:1 to receive either C-reactive protein point-of-care testing or routine care, following which antibiotic prescribing decisions were made. Patients with severe acute respiratory tract infection were excluded. Enrolled patients were reassessed on day 3, 4, or 5, and on day 14 a structured telephone interview was done blind to the intervention. Randomised assignments were concealed from prescribers and patients but not masked as the test result was used to assist treatment decisions. The primary outcome was antibiotic use within 14 days of follow-up. All analyses were prespecified in the protocol and the statistical analysis plan. All analyses were done on the intention-to-treat population and the analysis of the primary endpoint was repeated in the per-protocol population. This trial is registered under number NCT01918579. Between March 17, 2014, and July 3, 2015, 2037 patients (1028 children and 1009 adults) were enrolled and randomised. One adult patient withdrew immediately after randomisation. 1017 patients were assigned to receive C-reactive protein point-of-care testing, and 1019 patients were assigned to receive routine care. 115 patients in the C-reactive protein point-of-care group and 72 patients in the routine care group were excluded in the intention-to-treat analysis due to missing primary endpoint. The number of patients who used antibiotics

  8. Partnering for optimal respiratory home care: physicians working with respiratory therapists to optimally meet respiratory home care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, G; Petty, T L

    2001-05-01

    The need for respiratory care services continues to increase, reimbursement for those services has decreased, and cost-containment measures have increased the frequency of home health care. Respiratory therapists are well qualified to provide home respiratory care, reduce misallocation of respiratory services, assess patient respiratory status, identify problems and needs, evaluate the effect of the home setting, educate the patient on proper equipment use, monitor patient response to and complications of therapy, monitor equipment functioning, monitor for appropriate infection control procedures, make recommendations for changes to therapy regimen, and adjust therapy under the direction of the physician. Teamwork benefits all parties and offers cost and time savings, improved data collection and communication, higher job satisfaction, and better patient monitoring, education, and quality of life. Respiratory therapists are positioned to optimize treatment efficacy, maximize patient compliance, and minimize hospitalizations among patients receiving respiratory home care.

  9. Protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial for reducing irrational antibiotic prescribing among children with upper respiratory infections in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guanyang; Wei, Xiaolin; Hicks, Joseph P; Hu, Yanhong; Walley, John; Zeng, Jun; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Zhang, Zhitong; Deng, Simin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Blacklock, Claire; Yin, Jia; Sun, Qiang; Lin, Mei

    2016-05-27

    Irrational use of antibiotics is a serious issue within China and internationally. In 2012, the Chinese Ministry of Health issued a regulation for antibiotic prescriptions limiting them to China, through changing doctors' prescribing behaviours and educating parents/caregivers. This is a pragmatic, parallel-group, controlled, cluster-randomised superiority trial, with blinded evaluation of outcomes and data analysis, and un-blinded treatment. From two counties in Guangxi Province, 12 township hospitals will be randomised to the intervention arm and 13 to the control arm. In the control arm, the management of antibiotics prescriptions will continue through usual care via clinical consultations. In the intervention arm, a provider and patient/caregiver focused intervention will be embedded within routine primary care practice. The provider intervention includes operational guidelines, systematic training, peer review of antibiotic prescribing and provision of health education to patient caregivers. We will also provide printed educational materials and educational videos to patients' caregivers. The primary outcome is the proportion of all prescriptions issued by providers for upper respiratory infections in children aged 2-14 years old, which include at least one antibiotic. The trial has received ethical approval from the Ethics Committee of Guangxi Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The results will be disseminated through workshops, policy briefs, peer-reviewed publications, local and international conferences. ISRCTN14340536; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Body Frame in Reducing Respiratory Intrafractional Organ Motion Using the Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Sutherland, Kenneth; Horita, Kenji; Yamazaki, Rie; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Onimaru, Rikiya; Katoh, Noriwo; Inoue, Tetsuya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the stereotactic body frame (SBF), with or without a diaphragm press or a breathing cycle monitoring device (Abches), in controlling the range of lung tumor motion, by tracking the real-time position of fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: The trajectories of gold markers in the lung were tracked with the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. The SBF was used for patient immobilization and the diaphragm press and Abches were used to actively control breathing and for self-controlled respiration, respectively. Tracking was performed in five setups, with and without immobilization and respiration control. The results were evaluated using the effective range, which was defined as the range that includes 95% of all the recorded marker positions in each setup. Results: The SBF, with or without a diaphragm press or Abches, did not yield effective ranges of marker motion which were significantly different from setups that did not use these materials. The differences in the effective marker ranges in the upper lobes for all the patient setups were less than 1mm. Larger effective ranges were obtained for the markers in the middle or lower lobes. Conclusion: The effectiveness of controlling respiratory-induced organ motion by using the SBF+diaphragm press or SBF + Abches patient setups were highly dependent on the individual patient reaction to the use of these materials and the location of the markers. They may be considered for lung tumors in the lower lobes, but are not necessary for tumors in the upper lobes.

  11. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  12. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) in Young Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixhoorn, van I.D.E.; Reimert, I.; Middelkoop, J.A.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Wisselink, H.J.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Kemp, B.; Stockhofe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome

  13. Blocking TGF-β Signaling Pathway Preserves Mitochondrial Proteostasis and Reduces Early Activation of PDGFRβ+ Pericytes in Aristolochic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Wistar Male Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Pozdzik

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ+ perivascular cell activation becomes increasingly recognized as a main source of scar-associated kidney myofibroblasts and recently emerged as a new cellular therapeutic target.In this regard, we first confirmed the presence of PDGFRβ+ perivascular cells in a human case of end-stage aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN and thereafter we focused on the early fibrosis events of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ inhibition in a rat model of AAN.Neutralizing anti-TGFβ antibody (1D11 and its control isotype (13C4 were administered (5 mg/kg, i.p. at Days -1, 0, 2 and 4; AA (15 mg/kg, sc was injected daily.At Day 5, 1D11 significantly suppressed p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improving renal function impairment, reduced the score of acute tubular necrosis, peritubular capillaritis, interstitial inflammation and neoangiogenesis. 1D11 markedly decreased interstitial edema, disruption of tubular basement membrane loss of brush border, cytoplasmic edema and organelle ultrastructure alterations (mitochondrial disruption and endoplasmic reticulum edema in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Moreover, 1D11 significantly inhibited p-PERK activation and attenuated dysregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR pathways, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial proteostasis in vivo and in vitro.The early inhibition of p-Smad2/3 signaling pathway improved acute renal function impairment, partially prevented epithelial-endothelial axis activation by maintaining PTEC proteostasis and reduced early PDGFRβ+ pericytes-derived myofibroblasts accumulation.

  14. Respiratory Viruses in Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Respiratory Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidani, Mohsen; Mirmohammad Sadeghi, Seyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory infections are a frequent cause of fever in neutropenic patients, whereas respiratory viral infections are not frequently considered as a diagnosis, which causes high morbidity and mortality in these patients. This prospective study was performed on 36 patients with neutropenia who admitted to hospital were eligible for inclusion with fever (single temperature of >38.3°C or a sustained temperature of >38°C for more than 1 h), upper and lower respiratory symptoms. Sampling was performed from the throat of the patient by the sterile swab. All materials were analyzed by quantitative real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction covering the following viruses; influenza, parainfluenza virus (PIV), rhinovirus (RV), human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). RV was the most frequently detected virus and then RSV was the most. PIV was not present in any of the tested samples. Furthermore, no substantial differences in the distribution of specific viral species were observed based on age, sex, neutropenia duration, hematological disorder, and respiratory tract symptoms and signs ( P > 0.05). Our prospective study supports the hypothesis that respiratory viruses play an important role in the development of neutropenic fever, and thus has the potential to individualize infection treatment and to reduce the extensive use of antibiotics in immunocompromised patients with neutropenia.

  15. Respiratory Viruses in Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Meidani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory infections are a frequent cause of fever in neutropenic patients, whereas respiratory viral infections are not frequently considered as a diagnosis, which causes high morbidity and mortality in these patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 36 patients with neutropenia who admitted to hospital were eligible for inclusion with fever (single temperature of >38.3°C or a sustained temperature of >38°C for more than 1 h, upper and lower respiratory symptoms. Sampling was performed from the throat of the patient by the sterile swab. All materials were analyzed by quantitative real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction covering the following viruses; influenza, parainfluenza virus (PIV, rhinovirus (RV, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. Results: RV was the most frequently detected virus and then RSV was the most. PIV was not present in any of the tested samples. Furthermore, no substantial differences in the distribution of specific viral species were observed based on age, sex, neutropenia duration, hematological disorder, and respiratory tract symptoms and signs (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Our prospective study supports the hypothesis that respiratory viruses play an important role in the development of neutropenic fever, and thus has the potential to individualize infection treatment and to reduce the extensive use of antibiotics in immunocompromised patients with neutropenia.

  16. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  17. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  18. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) in Young Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dixhoorn, Ingrid D E; Reimert, Inonge; Middelkoop, Jenny; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Wisselink, Henk J; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G; Kemp, Bas; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome of infectious diseases. Therefore psychoneuro-immunological intervention may prove to be a successful approach to diminish the impact of diseases and antibiotics use. This study was designed to investigate the effect of social and environmental enrichment on the impact of disease, referred to as "disease susceptibility", in pigs using a co-infection model of PRRSV and A. pleuropneumoniae. Twenty-eight pigs were raised in four pens under barren conditions and twenty-eight other pigs were raised in four pens under enriched conditions. In the enriched pens a combination of established social and environmental enrichment factors were introduced. Two pens of the barren (BH) and two pens of the enriched housed (EH) pigs were infected with PRRSV followed by A. pleuropneumoniae, the other two pens in each housing treatment served as control groups. We tested if differences in disease susceptibility in terms of pathological and clinical outcome were related to the different housing regimes and if this was reflected in differences in behavioural and immunological states of the animals. Enriched housed pigs showed a faster clearance of viral PRRSV RNA in blood serum (p = 0.014) and histologically 2.8 fold less interstitial pneumonia signs in the lungs (p = 0.014). More barren housed than enriched housed pigs developed lesions in the lungs (OR = 19.2, p = 0.048) and the lesions in the barren housed pigs showed a higher total pathologic tissue damage score (ppigs. EH pigs showed less stress-related behaviour and differed immunologically and clinically from BH pigs. We conclude that enriched housing management reduces disease susceptibility to co-infection of PRRSV and A

  19. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae in Young Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid D E van Dixhoorn

    Full Text Available Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome of infectious diseases. Therefore psychoneuro-immunological intervention may prove to be a successful approach to diminish the impact of diseases and antibiotics use. This study was designed to investigate the effect of social and environmental enrichment on the impact of disease, referred to as "disease susceptibility", in pigs using a co-infection model of PRRSV and A. pleuropneumoniae. Twenty-eight pigs were raised in four pens under barren conditions and twenty-eight other pigs were raised in four pens under enriched conditions. In the enriched pens a combination of established social and environmental enrichment factors were introduced. Two pens of the barren (BH and two pens of the enriched housed (EH pigs were infected with PRRSV followed by A. pleuropneumoniae, the other two pens in each housing treatment served as control groups. We tested if differences in disease susceptibility in terms of pathological and clinical outcome were related to the different housing regimes and if this was reflected in differences in behavioural and immunological states of the animals. Enriched housed pigs showed a faster clearance of viral PRRSV RNA in blood serum (p = 0.014 and histologically 2.8 fold less interstitial pneumonia signs in the lungs (p = 0.014. More barren housed than enriched housed pigs developed lesions in the lungs (OR = 19.2, p = 0.048 and the lesions in the barren housed pigs showed a higher total pathologic tissue damage score (p<0.001 than those in enriched housed pigs. EH pigs showed less stress-related behaviour and differed immunologically and clinically from BH pigs. We conclude that enriched housing management reduces disease

  20. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  1. Managing access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  2. The respiratory microbiome and respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, Stefan A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances over the past ten years lower respiratory tract infections still comprise around a fifth of all deaths worldwide in children under five years of age with the majority in low- and middle-income countries. Known risk factors for severe respiratory infections and poor chronic

  3. Respiratory Development and Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Quinn, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory development is crucial for all newborn infants. Premature infants may be born at an early stage of development and lack sufficient surfactant production. This results in respiratory distress syndrome. This article reviews the normal fetal development of the lung as well as the disorder that develops because of an early birth.

  4. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  5. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory Issues in Osteogenesis Imperfecta \\ Introduction The respiratory system’s job is to bring oxygen into the body and remove carbon dioxide, the waste product of breathing. Because oxygen is the fuel ...

  6. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  8. The bacterial lysate Lantigen B reduces the number of acute episodes in patients with recurrent infections of the respiratory tract: the results of a double blind, placebo controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braido, Fulvio; Melioli, Giovanni; Candoli, Piero; Cavalot, Andrea; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Ferrero, Vittorio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mereu, Carlo; Ridolo, Erminia; Rolla, Giovanni; Rossi, Oliviero; Savi, Eleonora; Tubino, Libero; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Baiardini, Ilaria; di Marco, Eddi; Rinaldi, Gilberto; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Accorsi, Carlo; Bossilino, Claudia; Bonzano, Laura; DiLizia, Michela; Fedrighini, Barbara; Garelli, Valentina; Gerace, Vincenzo; Maniscalco, Sara; Massaro, Ilaria; Messi, Alessandro; Milanese, Manlio; Peveri, Silvia; Penno, Arminio; Pizzimenti, Stefano; Pozzo, Tiziana; Raie, Alberto; Regina, Sergio; Sclifò, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    Studies in the 1970s and 1980s reported that bacterial lysates (BL) had a prophylactic effect on recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTI). However, controlled clinical study procedures have evolved substantially since then. We performed a trial using updated methods to evaluate the efficacy of Lantigen B®, a chemical BL. This double blind, placebo controlled, multi-center clinical trial had the primary objective of assessing the capacity of Lantigen B to significantly reduce the total number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. Secondary aims were the RRTI duration, the frequency and the severity of the acute episodes, the use of drugs and the number of missed workdays. In the subgroup of allergic patients with RRTI, the number of allergic episodes (AE) and the use of anti-allergic drugs were also evaluated. One hundred and sixty patients, 79 allocated to the treated group (TG) and 81 to the placebo group (PG), were enrolled; 30 were lost during the study and 120 (79 females and 38 males) were evaluated. The PG had 1.43 episodes in the 8-months of follow-up while the TG had 0.86 episodes (p=0.036). A similar result was observed in the allergic patients (1.80 and 0.86 episodes for the PG and the TG, respectively, p=0.047). The use of antibiotics was reduced (mean 1.24 and 2.83 days of treatment for the TG and the PG). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the estimated risk of needing antibiotics and NSAIDs was reduced by 52.1 and 30.6%, respectively. With regard to the number of AE, no significant difference was observed between the two groups, but bronchodilators, antihistamines and local corticosteroids were reduced by 25.7%, 56.2% and 41.6%, respectively, in the TG. Lantigen B significantly reduced the number of infectious episodes in patients with RRTI. This finding suggests a first line use of this drug for the prophylaxis of infectious episodes in these patients. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  9. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  10. Deficiency of GABAergic synaptic inhibition in the Kölliker-Fuse area underlies respiratory dysrhythmia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana Paula; Toward, Marie A; Dutschmann, Mathias; Bissonnette, John M; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-01-01

    Life threatening breathing irregularity and central apnoeas are highly prevalent in children suffering from Rett syndrome. Abnormalities in inhibitory synaptic transmission have been associated with the physiopathology of this syndrome, and may underlie the respiratory disorder. In a mouse model of Rett syndrome, GABAergic terminal projections are markedly reduced in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) in the dorsolateral pons, an important centre for control of respiratory rhythm regularity. Administration of a drug that augments endogenous GABA localized to this region of the pons reduced the incidence of apnoea and the respiratory irregularity of Rett female mice. Conversely, the respiratory disorder was recapitulated by blocking GABAergic transmission in the KF area of healthy rats. This study helps us understand the mechanism for generation of respiratory abnormality in Rett syndrome, pinpoints a brain site responsible and provides a clear anatomical target for the development of a translatable drug treatment. Central apnoeas and respiratory irregularity are a common feature in Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder most often caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We used a MECP2 deficient mouse model of RTT as a strategy to obtain insights into the neurobiology of the disease and into mechanisms essential for respiratory rhythmicity during normal breathing. Previously, we showed that, systemic administration of a GABA reuptake blocker in MECP2 deficient mice markedly reduced the occurrence of central apnoeas. Further, we found that, during central apnoeas, post-inspiratory drive (adductor motor) to the upper airways was enhanced in amplitude and duration in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice. Since the pontine Kölliker-Fuse area (KF) drives post-inspiration, suppresses inspiration, and can reset the respiratory oscillator phase, we hypothesized that synaptic inhibition in this area is essential for respiratory rhythm

  11. Probiotic Supplements Beneficially Affect Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism and Reduce the Incidence of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Trained Athletes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gostner, Johanna M; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-11-23

    Prolonged intense exercise has been associated with transient suppression of immune function and an increased risk of infections. In this context, the catabolism of amino acid tryptophan via kynurenine may play an important role. The present study examined the effect of a probiotic supplement on the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and the metabolism of aromatic amino acids after exhaustive aerobic exercise in trained athletes during three months of winter training. Thirty-three highly trained individuals were randomly assigned to probiotic (PRO, n = 17) or placebo (PLA, n = 16) groups using double blind procedures, receiving either 1 × 10 10 colony forming units (CFU) of a multi-species probiotic ( Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, Bifidobacterium lactis W51, Enterococcus faecium W54, Lactobacillus acidophilus W22, Lactobacillus brevis W63, and Lactococcus lactis W58) or placebo once per day for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of tryptophan, phenylalanine and their primary catabolites kynurenine and tyrosine, as well as the concentration of the immune activation marker neopterin were determined at baseline and after 12 weeks, both at rest and immediately after exercise. Participants completed a daily diary to identify any infectious symptoms. After 12 weeks of treatment, post-exercise tryptophan levels were lowered by 11% (a significant change) in the PLA group compared to the concentrations measured before the intervention ( p = 0.02), but remained unchanged in the PRO group. The ratio of subjects taking the placebo who experienced one or more URTI symptoms was increased 2.2-fold compared to those on probiotics (PLA 0.79, PRO 0.35; p = 0.02). Data indicate reduced exercise-induced tryptophan degradation rates in the PRO group. Daily supplementation with probiotics limited exercise-induced drops in tryptophan levels and reduced the incidence of URTI, however, did not benefit athletic performance.

  12. Probiotic Supplements Beneficially Affect Tryptophan–Kynurenine Metabolism and Reduce the Incidence of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Trained Athletes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged intense exercise has been associated with transient suppression of immune function and an increased risk of infections. In this context, the catabolism of amino acid tryptophan via kynurenine may play an important role. The present study examined the effect of a probiotic supplement on the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI and the metabolism of aromatic amino acids after exhaustive aerobic exercise in trained athletes during three months of winter training. Methods: Thirty-three highly trained individuals were randomly assigned to probiotic (PRO, n = 17 or placebo (PLA, n = 16 groups using double blind procedures, receiving either 1 × 1010 colony forming units (CFU of a multi-species probiotic (Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, Bifidobacterium lactis W51, Enterococcus faecium W54, Lactobacillus acidophilus W22, Lactobacillus brevis W63, and Lactococcus lactis W58 or placebo once per day for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of tryptophan, phenylalanine and their primary catabolites kynurenine and tyrosine, as well as the concentration of the immune activation marker neopterin were determined at baseline and after 12 weeks, both at rest and immediately after exercise. Participants completed a daily diary to identify any infectious symptoms. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, post-exercise tryptophan levels were lowered by 11% (a significant change in the PLA group compared to the concentrations measured before the intervention (p = 0.02, but remained unchanged in the PRO group. The ratio of subjects taking the placebo who experienced one or more URTI symptoms was increased 2.2-fold compared to those on probiotics (PLA 0.79, PRO 0.35; p = 0.02. Conclusion: Data indicate reduced exercise-induced tryptophan degradation rates in the PRO group. Daily supplementation with probiotics limited exercise-induced drops in tryptophan levels and reduced the incidence of URTI, however, did not benefit athletic

  13. Mutante espontâneo de Bacillus licheniformis bloqueado no estágio I da esporogênese, possuidor de metabolismo respiratório aumentado A spontaneous mutant of Bacillus licheniformis with increased respiratory metabolism, blocked in stage I of sporogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Rabinovitch

    1976-01-01

    strain. However, it showed a sporulation frequency under 10*-7 when cultivated in media favorable to sporogenesis. This strain shows a restricted initial vegetative growth when compared withstrain 2390, whereas, inversely, its respiratory metabolism (oxigen consumption is signicantly higher. The last-mentioned behavior was confirmed in the present study, contrasting with other described types of sporulation mutants which are blocked at early stages of the sporogenetic path.

  14. Effects of reduced rebreathing time, in spontaneously breathing patients, on respiratory effort and accuracy in cardiac output measurement when using a partial carbon dioxide rebreathing technique: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Tachibana, Kazuya; Imanaka, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Muneyuki; Nishida, Tomoyo; Takauchi, Yuji; Nishimura, Masaji

    2005-01-01

    Introduction New technology using partial carbon dioxide rebreathing has been developed to measure cardiac output. Because rebreathing increases respiratory effort, we investigated whether a newly developed system with 35 s rebreathing causes a lesser increase in respiratory effort under partial ventilatory support than does the conventional system with 50 s rebreathing. We also investigated whether the shorter rebreathing period affects the accuracy of cardiac output measurement. Method Once...

  15. Orexin, cardio-respiratory function, and hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aihua; Nattie, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    In this review we focus on the role of orexin in cardio-respiratory functions and its potential link to hypertension. (1) Orexin, cardiovascular function, and hypertension. In normal rats, central administration of orexin can induce significant increases in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which can be blocked by orexin receptor antagonists. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), antagonizing orexin receptors can significantly lower blood pressure under ...

  16. Non-inferiority of nitric oxide releasing intranasal spray compared to sub-therapeutic antibiotics to reduce incidence of undifferentiated fever and bovine respiratory disease complex in low to moderate risk beef cattle arriving at a commercial feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; McMullin, B; Nation, N; Church, J S; Dorin, C; Miller, C

    2017-03-01

    Undifferentiated fever, or bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked to the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Common practice during processing at feedlots is administration of antibiotic metaphylaxis to reduce the incidence of BRDc. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring nano-molecule with a wide range of physiological attributes. This study evaluated the metaphylactic use of intranasal NO releasing spray (NORS) to control BRDc incidence in calves at low-moderate risk of developing BRDc, arriving at a commercial feedlot as compared to conventional antibiotic metaphylaxis. One thousand and eighty crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled, commercial, weaned beef calves were screened, enrolled, randomized and treated upon arrival. Animals appearing sick were pulled (from their pen) by blinded pen keepers then assessed for BRDc symptoms; blood samples were taken for haptoglobin quantification and the animals were rescued with an antibiotic. After 35 days both groups showed no significant difference in BRDc incidence (5.2% of animals from NORS group and 3.2% from antibiotic group). Average daily weight gain of animals at day 150 for the NORS cohort was 1.17kg compared to 1.18kg for the antibiotic group (p>0.05). There was no significant difference in mortality in the first 35 days (p=0.7552), however, general mortality over 150 days trended higher in the antibiotic cohort. NORS treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. This large randomized controlled study in low-moderate BRDc incidence risk calves demonstrates that NORS treatment, as compared to conventional metaphylactic antibiotics, is non-inferior based on BRDc incidence and other metrics like weight and mortality. These data justify further studies in higher BRDc incidence risk populations to evaluate NORS as

  17. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described. These are the first examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1. Author Affiliations. Adam Korányi1. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA ...

  18. Pixel Decimation in Block Matching Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Levicky

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Block motion estimation using full search algorithm is computationallyextensive. Previously proposed fast algorithms reduce the computationcost by limiting the number of locations searched. In this paper wepresent algorithms for block motion estimation that produce similarperformance to that full search algorithm. The algorithms are based onthe pixel decimation.

  19. Projectors, shadows, and conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons-Duffin, David [Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-04-24

    We introduce a method for computing conformal blocks of operators in arbitrary Lorentz representations in any spacetime dimension, making it possible to apply bootstrap techniques to operators with spin. The key idea is to implement the “shadow formalism' of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi in a setting where conformal invariance is manifest. Conformal blocks in d-dimensions can be expressed as integrals over the projective null-cone in the “embedding space' ℝ{sup d+1,1}. Taking care with their analytic structure, these integrals can be evaluated in great generality, reducing the computation of conformal blocks to a bookkeeping exercise. To facilitate calculations in four-dimensional CFTs, we introduce techniques for writing down conformally-invariant correlators using auxiliary twistor variables, and demonstrate their use in some simple examples.

  20. The human respiratory gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  1. AETIOLOGY OF RESPIRATORY DISTRESS AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH DEVELOPMENT OF RESPIRATORY DISTRESS IN TERM NEWBORNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amarendra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Respiratory distress is a common problem encountered within the first 48-72 hours of life. It is one of the commonest cause of admission to NICU. So, it is very important to know the aetiology and risk factors associated with development of respiratory distress to provide better management. The aim of the study is to study the aetiology of respiratory distress and the risk factors associated with development of respiratory distress in term newborns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective study of 100 term newborns admitted in our NICU with respiratory distress. General information, history and clinical examination findings of mother and newborn were documented. Time of onset of respiratory distress and the severity of the distress were documented. Severity was assessed using Downe’s clinical scoring. X-ray was done at 6 hours in all newborns. Various aetiologies and risk factors associated with respiratory distress were assessed. RESULTS In our study, the most common cause of respiratory distress was transient tachypnoea of newborn seen in 59% cases followed by early onset sepsis 20% cases and meconium aspiration syndrome 17% cases. Majority of newborn had severe distress (42% followed by moderate distress (35% and mild distress (23%. The risk factors associated with development of respiratory distress were low socioeconomic status, more than four per vaginal examinations, meconium-stained liquor, caesarean section, low birth weight and male sex of the baby. CONCLUSION Transient tachypnoea of newborn is the most common cause of respiratory distress in term newborns and the risk factors for development of respiratory distress are low socioeconomic status, more than four per vaginal examinations, meconiumstained liquor, caesarean section, low birth weight and male sex of the baby. Early diagnosis and management of respiratory distress in newborn is needed to decrease the severity of the disease and to reduce the mortality.

  2. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which requires the most regu- lar and precise evaluation of physiological function for complete assessment of the patient. The very nature of respiratory physiology requires the availability of a range of technological devices. Physiological measurements that may be.

  3. 31 CFR 595.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 595.301 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked...

  4. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  5. Management of respiratory symptoms in ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hardiman, Orla

    2012-02-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a frequent feature of ALS and is present in almost all cases at some stage of the illness. It is the commonest cause of death in ALS. FVC is used as important endpoint in many clinical trials, and in decision-making events for patients with ALS, although there are limitations to its predictive utility. There are multiple causes of respiratory muscle failure, all of which act to produce a progressive decline in pulmonary function. Diaphragmatic fatigue and weakness, coupled with respiratory muscle weakness, lead to reduced lung compliance and atelectasis. Increased secretions increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, which further compromises respiratory function. Bulbar dysfunction can lead to nutritional deficiency, which in turn increases the fatigue of respiratory muscles. Early recognition of respiratory decline and symptomatic intervention, including non-invasive ventilation can significantly enhance both quality of life and life expectancy in ALS. Patients with respiratory failure should be advised to consider an advance directive to avoid emergency mechanical ventilation.

  6. Immigrant Respiratory Health: a Diverse Perspective in Environmental Influences on Respiratory Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Andrea A; Mosnaim, Giselle

    2018-03-24

    The aim of this review is to examine the prevalence of and impact of environmental exposures in the workplace and home on immigrant respiratory health in the USA. Few studies report levels of workplace and home environmental exposures for immigrant children and adults, and documenting these findings is an important first step to addressing their respiratory health concerns. Rates of respiratory disease are lowest upon first arrival and increase with duration of residency in the USA. Community Health Workers may be an efficacious intervention to reducing exposures and improving lung health among immigrant populations. Immigrant children and adults have a high risk of occupational and home environmental exposures that can negatively affect their respiratory health. While limited studies exist, more documentation of these exposures and their impact on immigrant person's respiratory health are needed to begin to tackle these disparities.

  7. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Assessing the impact of a respiratory diagnosis on smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexandra

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of respiratory diagnoses on smoking cessation. A total of 229 current and former smokers, with and without respiratory diagnoses completed an anonymous online questionnaire assessing how their smoking habit changed when diagnosed with various respiratory conditions. Among all participants the most common reason for quitting smoking was to reduce the risk of health problems in general. In those with a chronic respiratory diagnosis, this was their most common reason for quitting. Motivation to quit smoking, scored by participants on a scale of 0-10, increased at the time of diagnosis then further increased after diagnosis of a chronic respiratory condition but declined after diagnosis of an acute respiratory condition. The research had a small sample size so further research is required. However, important themes are highlighted with the potential to influence clinical practice. All clinicians should receive training to promote cessation at the time of diagnosing respiratory conditions.

  9. Automated respiratory support in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claure, Nelson; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    A considerable proportion of premature infants requires mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen. Due to their immaturity, exposure to these forms of respiratory support contributes to the development of lung injury, oxidative stress and abnormal retinal development. These conditions are associated with poor long-term respiratory and neurological outcome. Mechanically ventilated preterm infants present with frequent fluctuations in ventilation and gas exchange. Currently available ventilatory modes and manual adjustment to the ventilator or supplemental oxygen cannot effectively adapt to these recurrent fluctuations. Moreover, the respiratory support often exceeds the infant's real needs. Techniques that adapt the mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen to the changing needs of preterm infants are being developed in order to improve stability of gas exchange, to minimise respiratory support and to reduce personnel workload. This article describes the preliminary evidence on the application of these new techniques in preterm infants and animal models.

  10. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... shows that no readily available tests with a well-defined substantial eccentricity have been performed. This paper presents theoretical and experimental work leading towards generalized block failure capacity methods. Simple combination of normal force, shear force and moment stress distributions along...

  11. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Pia; Zaric, Dusanka; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm

    2013-01-01

    Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps...... muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability....

  12. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn.

  13. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Guro Hospital, Korea Univeristy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    guidance system than free breathing or breathing with auditory guidance alone. In particular, the above system was excellent at the reproduction of respiratory cycles in care units. Such a system enables to reduce time due to unstable breathing and to perform more precise and detailed treatment.

  14. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. LUNG FUNCTION AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN OBESE IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Furman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is known that obesity may influence the state of respiratory function and it is associated with a number of diseases of the respiratory system. Obesity in itself, even in the absence of other known causes, can cause a feeling of shortness of breath at rest. At the same time, the cardinal symptom of respiratory muscle weakness is shortness of breath, which promotes the reduction of exercise tolerance. At the moment the problem state of respiratory function and respiratory muscles in children with different degrees of obesity is relevant and understudied. Aim. Investigation of lung function and respiratory muscle strength in obese in children. Methods. 46 children with obesity were examined, with a prevalence of obesity of mixed origin with progressive, aged 7 to 16 years. We evaluated the lung function and strength of respiratory muscles in the form of maximum inspiratory pressure at the mouth (MIP, maximal expiratory pressure at the mouth (MEP and nasal inspiratory pressure in the sniff-test (SNIP. Results. The children with obesity complained of dyspnea. The respiratory muscle dysfunction observed in the form of reduction of its forces. Reduced respiratory muscle strength ( 80% of the norm was in 44% of patients on the MIP and 38% on the MEP and was increased with increasing body mass index. Conclusion. Children with obesity need to monitor the lung function and evaluate the strength of the respiratory muscles for early detection of functional disorders of the respiratory system. 

  16. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Homogeneous bilateral block shifts. ADAM KORÁNYI. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York,. New York, NY 10016, USA. E-mail: Adam.Koranyi@lehman.cuny.edu. MS received 18 January 2013. Abstract. A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described.

  17. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix.

  18. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  19. Respiratory disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth; Hardy, Erica; Powrie, Raumond

    2015-07-01

    Many physiological and anatomical changes of pregnancy affect the respiratory system. These changes often affect the presentation and management of the various respiratory illnesses in pregnancy. This article focuses on several important respiratory issues in pregnancy. The management of asthma, one of the most common chronic illnesses in pregnancy, remains largely unchanged compared to the nonpregnant state. Infectious respiratory illness, including pneumonia and tuberculosis, are similarly managed in pregnancy with antibiotics, although special attention may be needed for antibiotic choices with more pregnancy safety data. When mechanical ventilation is necessary, consideration should be given to the maternal hemodynamics of pregnancy and fetal oxygenation. Maintaining maternal oxygen saturation above 95% is recommended to sustain optimal fetal oxygenation. Cigarette smoking has known risks in pregnancy, and current practice guidelines recommend offering cognitive and pharmacologic interventions to pregnant women to assist in smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Confalonieri, Marco; Salton, Francesco; Fabiano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foste...

  2. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks: what are the benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Zbigniew Jerzy Koscielniak

    2008-01-01

    comparative studies. The occurrence of paraesthesia during block performance was also reduced, but not the incidence of short-lasting post-operative neuropraxia. The frequency of accidental vascular punctures may be lower, but the data are contradictory. Block onset time was significantly shortened. Block...

  3. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    described. It was found that the currently used respiratory margin of 5 mm in partial breast irradiation may be overly conservative for many 3DCRT PBI patients. Amplitude alone was found to be insufficient to determine patient-specific margins: individual respiratory trace shape and baseline drift both contributed to the dosimetric target coverage. With respiratory coaching, individualized respiratory margins smaller than the full extent of motion could reduce planning target volumes while ensuring adequate coverage under respiratory motion.

  4. Mechanism and Clinical Importance of Respiratory Failure Induced by Anticholinesterases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivosevic Anita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure is the predominant cause of death in humans and animals poisoned with anticholinesterases. Organophosphorus and carbamate anticholinesterases inhibit acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and reversibly, respectively. Some of them contain a quaternary atom that makes them lipophobic, limiting their action at the periphery, i.e. outside the central nervous system. They impair respiratory function primarily by inducing a desensitization block of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular synapse. Lipophilic anticholinesterases inhibit the acetylcholinesterase both in the brain and in other tissues, including respiratory muscles. Their doses needed for cessation of central respiratory drive are significantly less than doses needed for paralysis of the neuromuscular transmission. Antagonist of muscarinic receptors atropine blocks both the central and peripheral muscarinic receptors and effectively antagonizes the central respiratory depression produced by anticholinesterases. To manage the peripheral nicotinic receptor hyperstimulation phenomena, oximes as acetylcholinesterase reactivators are used. Addition of diazepam is useful for treatment of seizures, since they are cholinergic only in their initial phase and can contribute to the occurrence of central respiratory depression. Possible involvement of central nicotinic receptors as well as the other neurotransmitter systems – glutamatergic, opioidergic – necessitates further research of additional antidotes.

  5. The New Kid on the Block--Incorporating Buprenorphine into a Medical Toxicology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Buprenorphine represents a safe and effective therapy for treating opioid dependence, alleviating craving and withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent patients. Buprenorphine has a "blocking" effect against the action of other opioids at the mu-receptor, preventing not only opioid-induced euphoria, but CNS and respiratory depressant effects as well. Buprenorphine was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002 after the passage of Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA 2000) which allowed clinicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with specifically named opioid agonist therapies in an office setting. Buprenorphine programs reduce the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C and reduce criminal behaviors associated with illicit drug use. Patients stabilized on buprenorphine have increased employment, enhanced engagement with social services, and better overall health and well-being.

  6. A revisit of transthecal digital block and traditional digital block for anesthesia of the finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Finger injuries are very common and the majority can be treated under digital block anesthesia. Traditional digital block is one of the most commonly performed blocks by care providers in several medical fields. There is another less known method, transthecal (Pulley block, in which local anesthesia is injected into the flexor tendon sheath.
    METHODS: A randomized clinical trial was performed to compare the transthecal (Pulley and traditional digital block with regard to the length of anesthesia and the need for another anesthetic method (due to insufficient anesthesia as a supplement. We divided 100 patients who needed digital block due to finger injury, into two groups randomly. In each group the patients were anesthetized either by traditional or transthecal digital block. All blocks were performed by the same investigator.
    RESULTS: Mean length of anesthesia was 34.2 minutes in the transthecal digital block method versus 33.8 minutes in the traditional digital block method (P>0.05. A repeated injection or local infiltration as a supplement was necessary only in 5 instances in the traditional digital block method (P<0.05.
    CONCLUSIONS: Regarding fewer injections and reduced amounts of lidocaine, absence of neurovascular bundles damage and comparable length of anesthesia and no need to supplemental anesthesia, transthecal digital block is an appropriate alternative to traditional digital block.
    KEY WORDS: Digital block, transthecal, pulley, finger, flexor tendon sheath.

  7. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budweiser, Stephan; Jörres, Rudolf A; Pfeifer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients withchronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positivepressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failurebecame a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients' adherence to therapy.

  8. Predictability of blocking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, E.; Ruti, P.; Tibaldi, S.; D'Andrea, F.

    1994-01-01

    Tibaldi and Molteni (1990, hereafter referred to as TM) had previously investigated operational blocking predictability by the ECMWF model and the possible relationships between model systematic error and blocking in the winter season of the Northern Hemisphere, using seven years of ECMWF operational archives of analyses and day 1 to 10 forecasts. They showed that fewer blocking episodes than in the real atmosphere were generally simulated by the model, and that this deficiency increased with increasing forecast time. As a consequence of this, a major contribution to the systematic error in the winter season was shown to derive from the inability of the model to properly forecast blocking. In this study, the analysis performed in TM for the first seven winter seasons of the ECMWF operational model is extended to the subsequent five winters, during which model development, reflecting both resolution increases and parametrisation modifications, continued unabated. In addition the objective blocking index developed by TM has been applied to the observed data to study the natural low frequency variability of blocking. The ability to simulate blocking of some climate models has also been tested

  9. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Budweiser

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy.Keywords: respiratory failure, COPD, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation long-term oxygen therapy, chronic

  10. Pneumococcal vaccination and chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froes F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Froes,1 Nicolas Roche,2 Francesco Blasi3,4 1Chest Department, Hospital Pulido Valente, North Lisbon Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 4Internal Medicine Department, Respiratory Unit and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Patients with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable to viral and bacterial pulmonary infections, which are major causes of exacerbations, hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality in COPD patients. Effective vaccines could reduce the burden of respiratory infections and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, but what is the evidence for this? This article reviews and discusses the existing evidence for pneumococcal vaccination efficacy and its changing role in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, especially COPD. Specifically, the recent Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA showed the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults, many of whom had additional risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including chronic lung diseases. Taken together, the evidence suggests that pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations can prevent community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, while pneumococcal vaccination early in the course of COPD could help maintain stable health status. Despite the need to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and evidence for the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine coverage and awareness are low and need to be improved. Respiratory physicians need to communicate the benefits of vaccination more effectively to their patients who suffer from chronic respiratory diseases

  11. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  12. A respiratory compensating system: design and performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Huang, Ding-Yang; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2014-05-08

    This study proposes a respiratory compensating system which is mounted on the top of the treatment couch for reverse motion, opposite from the direction of the targets (diaphragm and hemostatic clip), in order to offset organ displacement generated by respiratory motion. Traditionally, in the treatment of cancer patients, doctors must increase the field size for radiation therapy of tumors because organs move with respiratory motion, which causes radiation-induced inflammation on the normal tissues (organ at risk (OAR)) while killing cancer cells, and thereby reducing the patient's quality of life. This study uses a strain gauge as a respiratory signal capture device to obtain abdomen respiratory signals, a proposed respiratory simulation system (RSS) and respiratory compensating system to experiment how to offset the organ displacement caused by respiratory movement and compensation effect. This study verifies the effect of the respiratory compensating system in offsetting the target displacement using two methods. The first method uses linac (medical linear accelerator) to irradiate a 300 cGy dose on the EBT film (GAFCHROMIC EBT film). The second method uses a strain gauge to capture the patients' respiratory signals, while using fluoroscopy to observe in vivo targets, such as a diaphragm, to enable the respiratory compensating system to offset the displacements of targets in superior-inferior (SI) direction. Testing results show that the RSS position error is approximately 0.45 ~ 1.42 mm, while the respiratory compensating system position error is approximately 0.48 ~ 1.42 mm. From the EBT film profiles based on different input to the RSS, the results suggest that when the input respiratory signals of RSS are sine wave signals, the average dose (%) in the target area is improved by 1.4% ~ 24.4%, and improved in the 95% isodose area by 15.3% ~ 76.9% after compensation. If the respiratory signals input into the RSS respiratory signals are actual human respiratory

  13. Respiratory variability preceding and following sighs: a resetter hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlemincx, Elke; Van Diest, Ilse; Lehrer, Paul M; Aubert, André E; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2010-04-01

    Respiratory behavior is characterized by complex variability with structured and random components. Assuming that both a lack of variability and too much randomness represent suboptimal breathing regulation, we hypothesized that sighing acts as a resetter inducing structured variability. Spontaneous breathing was measured in healthy persons (N=42) during a 20min period of quiet sitting using the LifeShirt(®) System. Four blocks of 10 breaths with a 50% window overlap were determined before and after spontaneous sighs. Total respiratory variability of minute ventilation was measured using the coefficient of variation and structured (correlated) variability was quantified using autocorrelation. Towards a sigh, total variability gradually increased without concomittant changes in correlated variability, suggesting that randomness increased. After a sigh, correlated variability increased. No changes in variability were found in comparable epochs without intermediate sighs. We conclude that a sigh resets structured respiratory variability, enhancing information processing in the respiratory system. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 594.301 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and...

  15. Bundle Branch Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015. Bundle branch block Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the penis. Rarely, small membranes form across the urethra in boys early in pregnancy, and they can block the flow of urine out of the bladder. These membranes are called posterior urethral valves and can have life-threatening consequences ...

  17. Optoelectronics using block copolymers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botiz, I.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2010-05-01

    Block copolymers, either as semiconductors themselves or as structure directors, are emerging as a promising class of materials for understanding and controlling processes associated with both photovoltaic energy conversion and light emitting devices.

  18. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnell H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helen Parnell,1 Ginny Quirke,1 Sally Farmer,1 Sumbo Adeyemo,2 Veronica Varney11Respiratory Department, 2Pharmacy Department, St Helier Hospital, Carshalton, Surrey, UKAbstract: Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions.Keywords: COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nasal ventilation, acidosis, modafinil, hypercapnic respiratory failure

  19. Effects of reduced rebreathing time, in spontaneously breathing patients, on respiratory effort and accuracy in cardiac output measurement when using a partial carbon dioxide rebreathing technique: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kazuya; Imanaka, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Muneyuki; Nishida, Tomoyo; Takauchi, Yuji; Nishimura, Masaji

    2005-10-05

    New technology using partial carbon dioxide rebreathing has been developed to measure cardiac output. Because rebreathing increases respiratory effort, we investigated whether a newly developed system with 35 s rebreathing causes a lesser increase in respiratory effort under partial ventilatory support than does the conventional system with 50 s rebreathing. We also investigated whether the shorter rebreathing period affects the accuracy of cardiac output measurement. Once a total of 13 consecutive post-cardiac-surgery patients had recovered spontaneous breathing under pressure support ventilation, we applied a partial carbon dioxide rebreathing technique with rebreathing of 35 s and 50 s in a random order. We measured minute ventilation, and arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension at the end of the normal breathing period and at the end of the rebreathing periods. We then measured cardiac output using the partial carbon dioxide rebreathing technique with the two rebreathing periods and using thermodilution. With both rebreathing systems, minute ventilation increased during rebreathing, as did arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tensions. The increases in minute ventilation and arterial carbon dioxide tension were less with 35 s rebreathing than with 50 s rebreathing. The cardiac output measures with both systems correlated acceptably with values obtained with thermodilution. When patients breathe spontaneously the partial carbon dioxide rebreathing technique increases minute ventilation and arterial carbon dioxide tension, but the effect is less with a shorter rebreathing period. The 35 s rebreathing period yielded cardiac output measurements similar in accuracy to those with 50 s rebreathing.

  20. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  1. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. MATERIALS/METHODS: The study is based on data...... for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external...... measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations...

  2. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    was not accounted for. CONCLUSIONS: Margins can only be reduced for respiratory gated radiotherapy, if respiratory baseline shifts and variations in external/internal motion correlation are accounted for. Gated beam delivery alone cannot facilitate margin reduction. In the worst case, margins must be increased...... measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations...... compared to those of ungated data, to assess potential margin reductions. RESULTS: External respiratory data collected over entire treatment courses showed SDs from 1.6 to 8.1mm, the major part arising from baseline variations. The gated data had SDs from 1.5 to 7.7mm, with a mean reduction of 0.3mm (6...

  3. Anesthesia management with ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block for donor nephrectomy: A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenidünya, Ozlem; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Altun, Dilek; Caymaz, Ismail; Demirag, Alp; Turkoz, Ayda

    2017-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block intraoperatively and 24 hours postoperatively in patients undergoing donor nephrectomy. Prospective randomized controlled study. Private foundation university hospital; November 2014 to June 2015. Thirty-two patients undergoing donor nephrectomy (exclusion criteria: coagulation disorders, allergy to local anesthetics, and unwillingness to participate). The final study population comprised 30 patients (15 male, 15 female) randomly assigned to either Group P (paravertebral block, n=14) or Group M (morphine, n=16). In Group P, a unilateral paravertebral catheter was inserted 1 day preoperatively; on the day of surgery, a single-level unilateral paravertebral block was administered through the catheter before general anesthesia. Infusion of bupivacaine continued intraoperatively and postoperatively. Patients in Group M received only general anesthesia, and morphine patient-controlled analgesia was begun postoperatively. Intraoperative analgesic and anesthetic requirement, postoperative numerical rating scale pain scores, additional analgesic consumption during the postoperative period, and incidence of complications related to thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) like pleural puncture, pneumothorax, epidural spread, injection into the subarachnoid space, intravascular injection, and Horner's syndrome and rate of opioid related adverse reactions like nausea and vomiting, itching, constipation, and respiratory depression. Intraoperative remifentanil consumption was significantly higher in Group M, and postoperative morphine consumption was significantly lower in Group P (P<.001). During the first 24 hours postoperatively, the mean numerical rating scale pain scores were similar and there were no significant differences between the 2 groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the additional analgesic consumption and rate of adverse reactions between the 2 groups. We didn

  4. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fernandes-Matano

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections.This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR.The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%. The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8% and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%. A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9% caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age.In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  5. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  6. The Role of Caffeine in Non-Invasive Respiratory Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Nicole R.; Patel, Ravi Mangal

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly prescribed medications in preterm neonates and is widely used to treat or prevent apnea of prematurity. Caffeine therapy is safe, effectively decreases apnea and improves short- and long-term outcomes in preterm infants. In this review, we summarize the role of caffeine therapy for preterm infants receiving non-invasive respiratory support. We highlight caffeine’s beneficial effects on reducing bronchopulmonary dysplasia and focus on the role of caffeine in facilitating the transition from invasive to non-invasive respiratory support, reducing the duration of respiratory support and the potential for decreasing failure of non-invasive respiratory support. We review the multiple mechanisms of action of caffeine, including its effect on apnea, respiratory mechanics and lung inflammation. As caffeine is already widely used, we summarize recent data that may guide clinicians in optimizing the use of caffeine therapy, with a review of the timing of initiation, dose and duration of therapy. PMID:27837758

  7. Current issues in the respiratory care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orsini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neuromuscular disease, resulting in respiratory muscle weakness, reduced pulmonary volumes, ineffective cough, secretion retention, and respiratory failure. Measures as vital capacity, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, cough peak flow and pulse oximetry are recommended to monitor the respiratory function. The patients should be followed up by a multidisciplinary team, focused in improving the quality of life and deal with the respiratory symptoms. The respiratory care approach includes airway clearance techniques, mechanically assisted cough and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Vaccination and respiratory pharmacological support are also recommended. To date, there is no enough evidence supporting the inspiratory muscle training and diaphragmatic pacing.

  8. Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Despreaux, Thomas; Perros, Frédéric; Lau, Edmund; Andujar, Pascal; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Descatha, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  10. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  11. The respiratory neuromuscular system in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, David D; ElMallah, Mai K; Smith, Barbara K; Corti, Manuela; Lawson, Lee Ann; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    Pompe disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Absence of functional GAA typically results in cardiorespiratory failure in the first year; reduced GAA activity is associated with progressive respiratory failure later in life. While skeletal muscle pathology contributes to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease, emerging evidence indicates that respiratory neuron dysfunction is also a significant part of dysfunction in motor units. Animal models show profound glycogen accumulation in spinal and medullary respiratory neurons and altered neural activity. Tissues from Pompe patients show central nervous system glycogen accumulation and motoneuron pathology. A neural mechanism raises considerations about the current clinical approach of enzyme replacement since the recombinant protein does not cross the blood-brain-barrier. Indeed, clinical data suggest that enzyme replacement therapy delays symptom progression, but many patients eventually require ventilatory assistance, especially during sleep. We propose that treatments which restore GAA activity to respiratory muscles, neurons and networks will be required to fully correct ventilatory insufficiency in Pompe disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  13. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  14. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  15. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Updated ...

  16. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their fever and other symptoms are gone. Hand hygiene is the most important part of SARS prevention. ... Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: Bennett JE, Dolin ...

  18. Future considerations for pharmacologic adjuvants in single-injection peripheral nerve blocks for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian A; Murinson, Beth B; Grable, Benjamin R; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As the epidemics of obesity and diabetes expand, there are more patients with these disorders requiring elective surgery. For surgery on the extremities, peripheral nerve blocks have become a highly favorable anesthetic option when compared with general anesthesia. Peripheral blocks reduce respiratory and cardiac stresses, while potentially mitigating untreated peripheral pain that can foster physiologic conditions that increase risks for general health complications. However, local anesthetics are generally accepted to be a rare but possible cause of nerve damage, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for dosing local anesthetic nerve blocks in patients with diabetes. This is important because anesthesiologists do not want to potentially accelerate peripheral nerve dysfunction in diabetic patients at risk. This translational vignette (i) examines laboratory models of diabetes, (ii) summarizes the pharmacology of perineural adjuvants (epinephrine, clonidine, buprenorphine, midazolam, tramadol, and dexamethasone), and (iii) identifies areas that warrant further research to determine viability of monotherapy or combination therapy for peripheral nerve analgesia in diabetic patients. Conceivably, future translational research regarding peripheral nerve blocks in diabetic patients may logically include study of nontoxic injectable analgesic adjuvants, in combination, to provide desired analgesia, while possibly avoiding peripheral nerve toxicity that diabetic animal models have exhibited when exposed to traditional local anesthetics.

  19. E-Block: A Tangible Programming Tool with Graphical Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Danli Wang; Yang Zhang; Shengyong Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper designs a tangible programming tool, E-Block, for children aged 5 to 9 to experience the preliminary understanding of programming by building blocks. With embedded artificial intelligence, the tool defines the programming blocks with the sensors as the input and enables children to write programs to complete the tasks in the computer. The symbol on the programming block's surface is used to help children understanding the function of each block. The sequence information is transfer...

  20. Allergic Respiratory Inflammation and Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Kawa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract. Respiratory inflammation of the adaptive and innate immune system is the focus of this review, and chronic inflammation is not limited to the respiratory tissue. The inflammatory response, which consists of phagocytes, eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes, spreads along the respiratory tract, leading to tissue damage. Mast cells and eosinophils are commonly recognized for their detrimental role in allergic reactions o...

  1. Supplemental single shot femoral nerve block for total hip arthroplasty: impact on early postoperative care, pain management and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, T; Steinfeldt, T; Wagner, G; Wulf, H; Schmitt, J; Zoremba, M

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral regional anesthesia is beneficial in the management of postoperative pain in hip surgery, and can also reduce post-operative care unit (PACU) stay. Its opioid-sparing actions may also be beneficial for respiratory mechanics and pulmonary function. The aim of our pilot study was to evaluate the effect of a supplemental single shot femoral block for elective total hip arthroplasty on early respiratory function and postoperative management within the first 24 postoperative hours. We prospectively studied 80 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Written informed consent was obtained after ethics committee approval. Forty patients were randomLy assigned to receive single shot femoral nerve block (FNB) using 15mL bupivacaine 0.25% and 20 mg clonidine while the remainder received standard treatment without nerve block (STN). Premedication and general anesthesia were standardized. Pulse oximetry saturation and spirometric lung function were measured preoperatively (baseline) and at 0.5 h, 2 h, 6 h and 24 h, after extubation breathing room air. PACU surveillance and postoperative pain therapy was standardized. Oxygen saturation and spirometry results were significantly better within the FNB group during the first six postoperative hours. Although VAS scores during the PACU stay did not significantly differ between the study groups, PACU discharge criteria were met earlier in the FNB group (116±40 min [mean±SD] vs. 152±47 min in the STN group). The FNB group exhibited significantly lower VAS scores at 6 and 24 hours. Supplemental single shot femoral nerve block for total hip arthroplasty resulted in earlier PACU discharge capability, improved lung function during the first six hours and better pain control within the first 24 postoperative hours.

  2. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In

  3. Making Block Grants Accountable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelimsky, Eleanor

    Methods of accountability are presented in considering the Reagan administration plan to consolidate 84 federal health, education and social service grants into six block grant areas and to cut overall funding. After matching aspects of public criticism with proposal objectives, a rationale is developed for building elements of accountability into…

  4. Linoleum Block Printing Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetelat, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses practical considerations of teaching linoleum block printing in the elementary grades (tool use, materials, motivation) and outlines a sequence of design concepts in this area for the primary, intermediate and junior high grades. A short list of books and audiovisual aids is appended. (SJL)

  5. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  6. Coding with Blockly

    CERN Document Server

    Lovett, Amber

    2017-01-01

    "Blockly is a fun, graphical programming language designed to get kids interested in creating their own computer programs. Through simple text written to foster creativity and problem solving, students will the art of innovation. Large, colorful images show students how to complete activities. Additional tools, including a glossary and an index, help students learn new vocabulary and locate information."-- Provided by publisher.

  7. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆.

  8. Comparative Study on Different Slot Forms of Prestressed Anchor Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Si, Jianhui; Jian, Zheng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, two models of prestressed pier, rectangular cavity anchor block and arch hollow anchor block are established. The ABAQUS software was used to calculate the stress of the surface of the neck of the pier and the cavity of the anchor block, through comparative analysis. The results show that compared with the rectangular cavity anchor block, the stress of the pier and the cavity can be effectively reduced when the arch hole is used, and the amount of prestressed anchor can be reduced, so as to obtain obvious economic benefits.

  9. Perioperative modifications of respiratory function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, Michelle

    2012-01-31

    Postoperative pulmonary complications contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality, especially after major thoracic or abdominal surgery. Clinically relevant pulmonary complications include the exacerbation of underlying chronic lung disease, bronchospasm, atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation. Risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications include patient-related risk factors (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tobacco smoking and increasing age) as well as procedure-related risk factors (e.g., site of surgery, duration of surgery and general vs. regional anaesthesia). Careful history taking and a thorough physical examination may be the most sensitive ways to identify at-risk patients. Pulmonary function tests are not suitable as a general screen to assess risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Strategies to reduce the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications include smoking cessation, inspiratory muscle training, optimising nutritional status and intra-operative strategies. Postoperative care should include lung expansion manoeuvres and adequate pain control.

  10. Variable-block-size double predictor DPCM image coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Chyi; Chen, Hong-Bing; Liu, Ren-Jean

    2000-05-01

    This study is to improve double predictor differential pulse code modulation (DP-DPCM) algorithm for image data compression. A variable block-size double predictor DPCM (VBDP-DPCM) image coding system operates on an image that has been preprocessed into segments of variable size, square blocks, and each block is separately encoded by a DP-DPCM system. Quadtree segmentation algorithm is utilized to divide a given real-world image into variable size image blocks. The detail regions of a given image is segmented into blocks with smaller block size, and the background regions of the image will be assigned larger block size to the image blocks. After quadtree segmentation procedure, the differential values between the nearby pixels within an image block are reduced. Therefore, we can decrease the distribution range of the prediction error as well as reduce the quantization levels and the bit rate. We then adopt the double predictor DPCM image coding system to reduce the effect from the fed-back quantization error and not to increase the system complexity. The source coding performance of this proposed variable block-size DP-DPCM image encoder/decoder system is about 5 dB (or greater) coding gain in Signal-to-Noise Ratio than that of a conventional DPCM system.

  11. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  12. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2010-11-21

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a promising

  13. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a promising

  14. Canine respiratory viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Buonavoglia , Canio; Martella , Vito

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Acute contagious respiratory disease (kennel cough) is commonly described in dogs worldwide. The disease appears to be multifactorial and a number of viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported as potential aetiological agents, including canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus and Bordetella bronchiseptica, as well as mycoplasmas, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, canine herpesvirus and reovirus-1,-2 and -3. Enhancement of pathogenicity by multiple in...

  15. Adult respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.H.; Colvin, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Due to improved emergency resuscitation procedures, and with advancing medical technology in the field of critical care, an increasing number of patients survive the acute phase of shock and catastrophic trauma. Patients who previously died of massive sepsis, hypovolemic or hypotensive shock, multiple fractures, aspiration, toxic inhalation, and massive embolism are now surviving long enough to develop previously unsuspected and unrecognized secondary effects. With increasing frequency, clinicians are recognizing the clinical and radiographic manifestations of pathologic changes in the lungs occurring secondary to various types of massive insult. This paper gives a list of diseases that have been shown to precipitate or predispose to diffuse lung damage. Various terms have been used to describe the lung damage and respiratory failure secondary to these conditions. The term adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is applied to several cases of sudden respiratory failure in patients with previously healthy lungs following various types of trauma or shock. Numerous investigations and experiments have studied the pathologic changes in ARDS, and, while there is still no clear indication of why it develops, there is now some correlation of the sequential pathologic developments with the clinical and radiographic changes

  16. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  17. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  18. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  19. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  20. Change Around the Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Joey

    2017-04-01

    Proponents of a block grant or per-capita cap trumpet them as vehicles for the federal government to give the states a capped amount of funding for Medicaid that legislatures would effectively distribute how they see fit. Questions abound as to what capped Medicaid funding would look like, and what effect it would have on the current Medicaid-eligible population, covered services, and physician payments.

  1. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Nikola N; Pavlović, Siniša U; Milašinović, Goran; Kirćanski, Bratislav; Platiša, Mirjana M

    2018-01-01

    We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals) and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin), with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES), and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF). We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF) there is no coherence between signals ( p failure groups causality between signals is diminished, but with significantly stronger causality of RR signal in respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the presence of atrial/ventricular arrhythmias and it could be revealed by complementary methods of time series

  2. Strength of masonry blocks made with recycled concrete aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Pierre; Dalati, Rouba El

    The idea of recycling concrete of demolished buildings aims at preserving the environment. Indeed, the reuse of concrete as aggregate in new concrete mixes helped to reduce the expenses related to construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and, especially, to protect the environment by reducing the development rate of new quarries. This paper presents the results of an experimental study conducted on masonry blocks containing aggregates resulting from concrete recycling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of recycled aggregates on compressive strength of concrete blocks. Tests were performed on series of concrete blocks: five series each made of different proportions of recycled aggregates, and one series of reference blocks exclusively composed of natural aggregates. Tests showed that using recycled aggregates with addition of cement allows the production of concrete blocks with compressive strengths comparable to those obtained on concrete blocks made exclusively of natural aggregates.

  3. Potential impact of fireworks on respiratory health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gouder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The world-wide use of fireworks with their consequent detrimental effect on the air quality is widely recognized with elevated ambient air levels of particulate matter and its several metallic components and gases identified in several studies carried out during such events. Exposed individuals may be at risk following inhalation of such produced pollutants. This review focuses on the impact of fireworks on air quality and the potential effect of fireworks on the respiratory system of healthy individuals as well as those suffering from underlying respiratory diseases, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This applies not only to spectators including children but also to pyrotechnicians themselves. An extensive Medline search revealed that a strong evidence of the impact of fireworks on respiratory health is lacking in susceptible as well as healthy individuals with no formal studies on COPD or asthma, other than a few case reports in the latter. The implementation of global strategies to control the use of fireworks and hence improve air quality could possibly reduce their likely detrimental effect on human respiratory health in exposed individuals, but clearly a more targeted research is needed.

  4. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korreman, Stine S.; Juhler-Nottrup, Trine; Boyer, Arthur L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/objective: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. Materials/methods: The study is based on data for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations were described by medians and standard deviations (SDs) of position distributions of the markers. Gating windows (35% duty cycle) were retrospectively applied to the respiratory data for each session, mimicking the use of commercially available gating systems. Medians and SDs of gated data were compared to those of ungated data, to assess potential margin reductions. Results: External respiratory data collected over entire treatment courses showed SDs from 1.6 to 8.1 mm, the major part arising from baseline variations. The gated data had SDs from 1.5 to 7.7 mm, with a mean reduction of 0.3 mm (6%). Gated distributions were more skewed than ungated, and in a few cases a marginal miss of gated respiration would be found even if no margin reduction was applied. Regularization of breathing amplitude to simulate coaching did not alter these results significantly. Simulation of varying phase shifts between internal and external respiratory signals showed that the SDs of gated distributions were the same as for the ungated or smaller, but the median values were markedly shifted

  5. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.N.; Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 μg fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 μg fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients

  6. Paving block study : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-10-01

    The Louisiana Department of Highways has conducted field tests with an experimental revetment consisting of cellular concrete revetment blocks used in conjunction with plastic filter cloth and/or vegetation such as grass or vines. The precast blocks ...

  7. Habitat Blocks and Wildlife Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Habitat blocks are areas of contiguous forest and other natural habitats that are unfragmented by roads, development, or agriculture. Vermonts habitat blocks are...

  8. Demographic Data - MDC_Block

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade Census 2000 Blocks. Census blocks are areas bounded on all sides by visible and/or invisible features shown on a map prepared...

  9. European Respiratory Society statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Dirksen, Asger; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    lung disease. A large proportion of individuals affected remain undiagnosed and therefore without access to appropriate care and treatment.The most recent international statement on AATD was published by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society in 2003. Since then there has...... the efficacy and safety of augmentation therapy, the only specific treatment available for the pulmonary disease associated with AATD.As AATD is a rare disease, it is crucial to organise national and international registries and collect information prospectively about the natural history of the disease...

  10. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    (Betula verrucosa) (Bet v 1), the major allergen in birch pollen, to serum IgG and IgE, separately and in competition. Sera from six birch pollen-allergic patients were obtained before and after 5 years of SAV, and binding was assessed with 125I-Bet v 1. Before SAV, IgG bound more than eight times...... the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post......-SAV IgG provided similar inhibition of Bet v 1 binding to IgE at equimolar levels, and cross inhibition studies between IgG and IgE showed low inter-individual differences. Following SAV, all sera reduced Bet v 1 binding to CD23(+) cells, correlating with reduced binding of Bet v 1 to IgE (P...

  11. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    (Betula verrucosa) (Bet v 1), the major allergen in birch pollen, to serum IgG and IgE, separately and in competition. Sera from six birch pollen-allergic patients were obtained before and after 5 years of SAV, and binding was assessed with 125I-Bet v 1. Before SAV, IgG bound more than eight times...... the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post......-SAV IgG provided similar inhibition of Bet v 1 binding to IgE at equimolar levels, and cross inhibition studies between IgG and IgE showed low inter-individual differences. Following SAV, all sera reduced Bet v 1 binding to CD23(+) cells, correlating with reduced binding of Bet v 1 to IgE (P

  12. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autzen, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how...... the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star....

  13. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  14. Block Scheduling in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmsher, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Block Scheduling has been considered a cure for a lengthy list of educational problems. This report reviews the literature on block schedules and describes some Oregon high schools that have integrated block scheduling. Major disadvantages included resistance to change and requirements that teachers change their teaching strategies. There is…

  15. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.  Rec...

  16. Split tensile strength of soilcrete blocks | Okere | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the ever increasing problems associated with dredging of rivers to obtain river sand, reduced dependence on river sand should be encouraged by using alternative materials in block production. This work deals with the production of soilcrete blocks using readily available and affordable laterite. Split tensile strength of ...

  17. The contribution of periapical nerve block in transrectal ultrasound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Periprostatic nerve block has been shown to be the most effective method to reduce pain during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, but the ideal technique remains controversial. The aim of this studywas to compare pain control between bilateral basal block (BBB) alone and BBB combined ...

  18. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  19. Respiratory symptoms of megaesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Megaesophagus as the end result of achalasia is the consequence of disordered peristalsis and the slow decompensation of the esophageal muscular layer. The main symptoms of achalasia are dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss, but respiratory symptoms, such as coughing, particularly when patients lie in a horizontal position, may also be common due to microaspiration. A 70-year old woman suffered from a nocturnal cough and shortness of breath with stridor. She reported difficulty in swallowing food over the past ten years, but had adapted by eating a semi-liquid diet. Chest X-ray showed right hemithorax patchy opacities projecting from the posterior mediastinum. Chest computed tomography scan showed a marked dilatation of the esophagus with abundant food residues. Endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of megaesophagus due to esophageal achalasia, excluding other causes of obstruction, such as secondary esophagitis, polyps, leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. In the elderly population, swallowing difficulties due to esophageal achalasia are often underestimated and less troublesome than the respiratory symptoms that are caused by microaspiration. The diagnosis of esophageal achalasia, although uncommon, should be considered in patients with nocturnal chronic coughs and shortness of breath with stridor when concomitant swallowing difficulties are present.

  20. Respiratory sounds compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2008-04-01

    Recently, with the advances in digital signal processing, compression of biomedical signals has received great attention for telemedicine applications. In this paper, an adaptive transform coding-based method for compression of respiratory and swallowing sounds is proposed. Using special characteristics of respiratory sounds, the recorded signals are divided into stationary and nonstationary portions, and two different bit allocation methods (BAMs) are designed for each portion. The method was applied to the data of 12 subjects and its performance in terms of overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values was calculated at different bit rates. The performance of different quantizers was also considered and the sensitivity of the quantizers to initial conditions has been alleviated. In addition, the fuzzy clustering method was examined for classifying the signal into different numbers of clusters and investigating the performance of the adaptive BAM with increasing the number of classes. Furthermore, the effects of assigning different numbers of bits for encoding stationary and nonstationary portions of the signal were studied. The adaptive BAM with variable number of bits was found to improve the SNR values of the fixed BAM by 5 dB. Last, the possibility of removing the training part for finding the parameters of adaptive BAMs for each individual was investigated. The results indicate that it is possible to use a predefined set of BAMs for all subjects and remove the training part completely. Moreover, the method is fast enough to be implemented for real-time application.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  2. Respiratory mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostert, J.W. (Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Anesthesiology)

    1983-06-01

    The high degree of technical perfection of the respiratory mass spectrometer has rendered the instrument feasible for routine monitoring of anesthetized patients. It is proposed that the difference between inspired and expired oxygen tension in mm Hg be equated with whole body oxygen consumption in ml/min/M/sup 2/ body-surface area at STPD, by the expedient of multiplying tension-differences by a factor of 2. Years of experience have confirmed the value of promptly recognizing sudden drops in this l/E tension difference below 50 mm Hg indicative of metabolic injury from hypovolemia or respiratory depression. Rises in l/E tension-differences were associated with shivering as well as voluntary muscle activity. Tension differences of less than 25 mm Hg (equated with a whole-body O/sub 2/ consumption of less than 50 ml O/sub 2//min/M/sup 2/) occurred in a patient in the sitting position for posterior fossa exploration without acidosis, hypoxia or hypotension for several hours prior to irreversible cardiac arrest. The value of clinical monitoring by mass spectrometry is especially impressive in open-heart surgery.

  3. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  5. Respiratory Motion Correction for Compressively Sampled Free Breathing Cardiac MRI Using Smooth l1-Norm Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Bilal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transformed domain sparsity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has recently been used to reduce the acquisition time in conjunction with compressed sensing (CS theory. Respiratory motion during MR scan results in strong blurring and ghosting artifacts in recovered MR images. To improve the quality of the recovered images, motion needs to be estimated and corrected. In this article, a two-step approach is proposed for the recovery of cardiac MR images in the presence of free breathing motion. In the first step, compressively sampled MR images are recovered by solving an optimization problem using gradient descent algorithm. The L1-norm based regularizer, used in optimization problem, is approximated by a hyperbolic tangent function. In the second step, a block matching algorithm, known as Adaptive Rood Pattern Search (ARPS, is exploited to estimate and correct respiratory motion among the recovered images. The framework is tested for free breathing simulated and in vivo 2D cardiac cine MRI data. Simulation results show improved structural similarity index (SSIM, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR, and mean square error (MSE with different acceleration factors for the proposed method. Experimental results also provide a comparison between k-t FOCUSS with MEMC and the proposed method.

  6. High-Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Singh, Jayesh; Khant, Chiragkumar; Kumar Dash, Swarup; Oleti, Tejo Pratap; Joy, Percy; Kabra, Nandkishor S

    2018-01-23

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress. Preterm infants (gestation ≥28 weeks and birth weight ≥1,000 g) with respiratory distress were randomized to either HFNC or nCPAP in a non-inferiority trial. Failure of the support mode in the first 72 h after birth was the primary outcome. Infants failing HFNC were rescued either with nCPAP or mechanical ventilation, and those failing nCPAP received mechanical ventilation. During the study period, 139 and 133 infants were randomized to the nCPAP and HFNC groups, respectively. The study was stopped after an interim analysis showed a significant difference (p respiratory distress (SAS score >5). When comparing HFNC to nCPAP as a primary noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress, HFNC is inferior to nCPAP in avoiding the need for a higher mode of respiratory support in the first 72 h of life. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Program structure-based blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolli, Carlo; Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; O'Brien, John K.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2017-09-26

    Embodiments relate to program structure-based blocking. An aspect includes receiving source code corresponding to a computer program by a compiler of a computer system. Another aspect includes determining a prefetching section in the source code by a marking module of the compiler. Yet another aspect includes performing, by a blocking module of the compiler, blocking of instructions located in the prefetching section into instruction blocks, such that the instruction blocks of the prefetching section only contain instructions that are located in the prefetching section.

  8. Addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir

    2017-06-26

    Research is ongoing to determine the lowest dose of local anesthetics in brachial plexus block that provides adequate anesthesia and postoperative analgesia and reduces complications related to local anesthetics. Patients 18-65 years of age who underwent upper limb surgery and who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block at the Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between February 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study (n=50). Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks were performed on Group B cases by adding 30 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and on Group BD cases by adding 15 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and 1 µg / kg dexmedetomidine. Block success was evaluated by the onset and block duration of motor and sensory block and the duration of analgesia. The block success of Group B and Group BD was 92.6% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 1.000). Onset time of sensory block, degree of sensory block, duration of sensory block, onset time of motor block, degree of motor block and duration of motor block were similar in both groups in the intergroup comparison (P > 0.05). Duration of analgesia and the operative conditions of groups were similar (P > 0.05). In the implementation of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block, block success, sensory and motor block and analgesia duration were similar for patients anaesthetized with 30 ml of bupivacaine in comparison with dexmedetomidine+bupivacaine (when the bupivacaine dose was reduced by 50% by the addition of the adjuvant).

  9. Single injection thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB for breast surgery in morbidly obese patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese (MO patients with associated restrictive airway disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and coronary artery disease pose challenge to an anesthesiologist. Regional block combined with general anesthesia (GA is the anesthetic technique of choice as it will decrease the requirement of opioids, anesthetics, and postoperative respiratory depression. A MO patient for modified radical mastectomy was successfully managed with single-injection thoracic paravertebral block and conventional GA.

  10. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  11. Block copolymer investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  12. SU-E-J-211: Development of Respiratory Training System Using Individual Characteristic Guiding Waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S; Yoon, J; Kim, T; Suh, T

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the respiratory training system using individual characteristic guiding waveform to reduce the impact of respiratory motion that causes artifact in radiation therapy. Respiratory training system was developed by LabView (National Instruments, version 8.6). The real-time respiratory signals were acquired using in-house developed belt type sensor and more user-comfortable HMD was used for visual guiding (Vuzix, Wrap 920). The respiratory training program consists of three main components. It is (1) respiratory signal reading and peak detection program (2) individual characteristic guiding waveform generation program (3) respiratory signals acquisition and visual guiding program. In order to evaluate the feasibility of in-house developed respiratory training system, 5 volunteers were included and their respiratory signals were acquired using the in-house developed belt-type sensor. Respiratory training system needs 10 free breathing cycles of each volunteer to make individual characteristic guiding waveform based on Fourier series and it guides patient's next breathing. For each volunteer, free breathing and guided breathing which uses individual characteristic guiding waveform were performed to acquire the respiratory cycles for 3 min. The root mean square error (RMSE) was computed to analyze improvement of respiratory regularity in period and displacement. It was found that respiratory regularity was improved by using respiratory training system. RMSE of guided breathing decreased up to 40% in displacement and 76% in period compared with free breathing. The average of RMSE was decreases from 0.012V to 0.008V in displacement and from 0.432 sec to 0.192 sec in period. In conclusion, since the guiding waveform was easy to follow for the volunteers, The respiratory regularity was significantly improved by using in-house developed respiratory training system. So it would be helpful to improve accuracy and efficiency during 4D-RT, 4

  13. Aquaporins in Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanlin; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Jian; Bai, Chunxue

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs ) are water channel proteins supposed to facilitating fluid transport in alveolar space, airway humidification, pleural fluid absorption, and submucosal gland secretion . In this chapter, we mainly focus on the expression of 4 AQPs in the lungs which include AQP1, AQP2 , AQP4 and AQP5 in normal and disease status, and the experience of AQPs function from various model and transgenic mice were summarized in detail to improve our understanding of the role of AQPs in fluid balance of respiratory system. It has been suggested that AQPs play important roles in various physiology and pathophysiology conditions of different lung diseases. There still remains unclear the exact role of AQPs in lung diseases, and thus continuous efforts on elucidating the roles of AQPs in lung physiological and pathophysilogical processes are warranted.

  14. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  15. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...... it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...

  16. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  17. Celiac ganglia block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Akhan, Okan

    2005-01-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation

  18. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids in multiple organs, primarily heart, kidneys, skin, CNS, and lungs. MATERIALS AND METHOD: A systematic literature search was performed...... using the PubMed database, leading to a total number of 154 hits. Due to language restriction, this number was reduced to 135; 53 papers did not concern Fabry disease, 19 were either animal studies or gene therapy studies, and 36 papers did not have lung involvement in Fabry disease as a topic....... The remaining 27 articles were relevant for this review. RESULTS: The current literature concerning lung manifestations describes various respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea or shortness of breath, wheezing, and dry cough. These symptoms are often related to cardiac involvement in Fabry disease as respiratory...

  19. Respiratory synchronization for lung tumors exploration by positon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotus, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that requires several minutes of acquisition to get an image. PET images are thus severely affected by the respiratory motion of the patient, which introduces a blur in the images. Techniques consisting in gating the PET acquisition as a function of the patient respiration exist and reduce the respiratory blur in the PET images. However, these techniques increase the noise in the reconstructed images. The aim of this work was to propose a method for respiratory motion compensation that would not enhance the noise in the PET images, without increasing the acquisition duration nor estimating the deformation field associated with the respiratory motion. We proposed 2 original spatio-temporal (4D) reconstruction algorithms of gated PET images. These 2 methods take advantage of the temporal correlation between the images corresponding to the different breathing phases. The performances of these techniques were evaluated and compared to classic approaches using phantom data and simulated data. The results showed that the 4D reconstructions increase the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the classic reconstructions while maintaining the reduction of the respiratory blur. For a fixed acquisition duration, the 4D reconstructions can thus yield gated images that are almost free of respiratory blur and of the same quality in terms of noise level as the ones obtained without respiratory gating. The clinical feasibility of the proposed techniques was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  20. Gender differences in respiratory symptoms-Does occupation matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimich-Ward, Helen; Camp, Patricia G.; Kennedy, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Little attention has been given to gender differences in respiratory health, particularly in occupational settings. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate gender differences in respiratory morbidity based on surveys of hospitality workers, radiographers, and respiratory therapists. Data were available from mail surveys of 850 hospitality industry workers (participation rate 73.9%; 52.6% female), 586 radiographers (participation rate 63.6%; 85% female), and 275 respiratory therapists (participation rate 64.1%; 58.6% female). Cross-tabulations by gender were evaluated by χ 2 analysis and logistic regression with adjustment for personal and work characteristics. Women consistently had greater respiratory morbidity for symptoms associated with shortness of breath, whereas men usually had a higher prevalence of phlegm. There were few differences in work exposures apart from perception of exposure to ETS among hospitality workers. Gender differences in symptoms were often reduced after adjustment for personal and work characteristics but for respiratory therapists there were even greater gender disparities for asthma attack and breathing trouble. Population health findings of elevated symptoms among women were only partially supported by these occupational respiratory health surveys. The influence of differential exposures and personal factors should be considered when interpreting gender differences in health outcomes

  1. Epidural Anaesthesia Reduces Peri-Operative Morbidity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural Anaesthesia Reduces Peri-Operative Morbidity and Mortality in Patients With Significant Cardio-Respiratory Diseases: Report of Five Cases. ... of five patients with multiple co-morbid cardio-respiratory diseases who had surgeries in the presence of severe respiratory and cardiovascular systems compromise.

  2. Management of respiratory motion in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedam, Subrahmanya Sastry

    2003-01-01

    images obtained during simulation by reducing the motion artifacts typically seen during CT imaging. An analysis of several patient breathing patterns with (audio instructions and visual feedback) and without training, indicated that breathing training improved the reproducibility of amplitude and/or frequency of patient breathing cycles. A phantom based study by superposition of sinusoidal motion of a 'simulated' tumor onto the initial beam aperture as formed by the multileaf collimator revealed that target dose measurements obtained with such a motion synchronized setup were equivalent to those delivered to a static target by a static beam. An attempt to acquire respiration synchronized (4D) CT images of a motion phantom and a patient also yielded a 4D CT data set with reduced motion artifacts. Respiratory gated and respiration synchronized radiotherapy are both viable approaches to account for respiratory motion during radiotherapy. While respiratory gated radiotherapy has been successfully implemented in some centers, several technical advances are required for clinical implementation of respiration synchronized radiotherapy. Future applicability of either of the above approaches as routine treatment procedures will be determined by their potential clinical gains over currently available methods

  3. Cytokine responses to two common respiratory pathogens in children are dependent on interleukin-1β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice C-H. Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB in young children is a common cause of prolonged wet cough and may be a precursor to bronchiectasis in some children. Although PBB and bronchiectasis are both characterised by neutrophilic airway inflammation and a prominent interleukin (IL-1β signature, the contribution of the IL-1β pathway to host defence is not clear. This study aimed to compare systemic immune responses against common pathogens in children with PBB, bronchiectasis and control children and to determine the importance of the IL-1β pathway. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from control subjects (n=20, those with recurrent PBB (n=20 and bronchiectasis (n=20 induced high concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN-γ and IL-10. Blocking with an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra modified the cellular response to pathogens, inhibiting cytokine synthesis by NTHi-stimulated PBMCs and rhinovirus-stimulated PBMCs (in a separate PBB cohort. Inhibition of IFN-γ production by IL-1Ra was observed across multiple cell types, including CD3+ T cells and CD56+ NK cells. Our findings highlight the extent to which IL-1β regulates the cellular immune response against two common respiratory pathogens. While blocking the IL-1β pathway has the potential to reduce inflammation, this may come at the cost of protective immunity against NTHi and rhinovirus.

  4. Stable respiratory activity requires both P/Q-type and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Henner; Zanella, Sebastien; Elsen, Gina E; Smith, Lincoln; Doi, Atsushi; Garcia, Alfredo J; Wei, Aguan D; Xun, Randy; Kirsch, Sarah; Gomez, Christopher M; Hevner, Robert F; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2013-02-20

    P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)2.1) play critical presynaptic and postsynaptic roles throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders. Here we report that mice with a genetic ablation of the Ca(v)2.1 pore-forming α(1A) subunit (α(1A)⁻/⁻) encoded by CACNA1a (Jun et al., 1999) suffer during postnatal development from increasing breathing disturbances that lead ultimately to death. Breathing abnormalities include decreased minute ventilation and a specific loss of sighs, which was associated with lung atelectasis. Similar respiratory alterations were preserved in the isolated in vitro brainstem slice preparation containing the pre-Bötzinger complex. The loss of Ca(v)2.1 was associated with an alteration in the functional dependency on N-type calcium channels (Ca(v)2.2). Blocking N-type calcium channels with conotoxin GVIA had only minor effects on respiratory activity in slices from control (CT) littermates, but abolished respiratory activity in all slices from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice. The amplitude of evoked EPSPs was smaller in inspiratory neurons from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice compared with CTs. Conotoxin GVIA abolished all EPSPs in inspiratory neurons from α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice, while the EPSP amplitude was reduced by only 30% in CT mice. Moreover, neuromodulation was significantly altered as muscarine abolished respiratory network activity in α(1A)⁻/⁻ mice but not in CT mice. We conclude that excitatory synaptic transmission dependent on N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels is required for stable breathing and sighing. In the absence of P/Q-type calcium channels, breathing, sighing, and neuromodulation are severely compromised, leading to early mortality.

  5. Implementing a bedside assessment of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Shore, Kevin; Shklar, Orest; Martins, Concetta; Devenyi, Brian; Lindsay, Paul; McPhail, Heather; Lanys, Ashley; Soliman, Ibrahim; Tuma, Mazin; Kim, Michael; Porretta, Kerri; Greco, Pamela; Every, Hilary; Hayes, Chris; Baker, Andrew; Friedrich, Jan O; Brochard, Laurent

    2017-04-04

    Despite their potential interest for clinical management, measurements of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are seldom performed in routine practice. We introduced a systematic assessment of respiratory mechanics in our clinical practice. After the first year of clinical use, we retrospectively assessed whether these measurements had any influence on clinical management and physiological parameters associated with clinical outcomes by comparing their value before and after performing the test. The respiratory mechanics assessment constituted a set of bedside measurements to determine passive lung and chest wall mechanics, response to positive end-expiratory pressure, and alveolar derecruitment. It was obtained early after ARDS diagnosis. The results were provided to the clinical team to be used at their own discretion. We compared ventilator settings and physiological variables before and after the test. The physiological endpoints were oxygenation index, dead space, and plateau and driving pressures. Sixty-one consecutive patients with ARDS were enrolled. Esophageal pressure was measured in 53 patients (86.9%). In 41 patients (67.2%), ventilator settings were changed after the measurements, often by reducing positive end-expiratory pressure or by switching pressure-targeted mode to volume-targeted mode. Following changes, the oxygenation index, airway plateau, and driving pressures were significantly improved, whereas the dead-space fraction remained unchanged. The oxygenation index continued to improve in the next 48 h. Implementing a systematic respiratory mechanics test leads to frequent individual adaptations of ventilator settings and allows improvement in oxygenation indexes and reduction of the risk of overdistention at the same time. The present study involves data from our ongoing registry for respiratory mechanics (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02623192 . Registered 30 July 2015).

  6. Learn about Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus ( ... file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RSV Symptoms, Causes & ...

  7. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (Pmuscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; Pfatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  8. Prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and postbronchiolitic wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimpen Jan LL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the primary cause of hospitalization for acute respiratory tract illness in general and specifically for bronchiolitis in young children. The link between RSV bronchiolitis and reactive airway disease is not completely understood, even though RSV bronchiolitis is frequently followed by recurrent episodes of wheezing. Therapy with ribavirin does not appear to significantly reduce long-term respiratory outcome of RSV lower respiratory tract infection, and corticosteroid or bronchodilator therapy may possibly improve outcomes only on a short-term basis. No vaccine against RSV is yet available. It is not known whether prophylaxis with RSV intravenous immune globulin or palivizumab can reduce postbronchiolitic wheezing.

  9. Respiratory management of inhalation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2007-02-01

    Advances in the care of patients with major burns have led to a reduction in mortality and a change in the cause of their death. Burn shock, which accounted for almost 20 percent of burn deaths in the 1930s and 1940s, is now treated with early, vigorous fluid resuscitation and is only rarely a cause of death. Burn wound sepsis, which emerged as the primary cause of mortality once burn shock decreased in importance, has been brought under control with the use of topical antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement. Inhalation injury has now become the most frequent cause of death in burn patients. Although mortality from smoke inhalation alone is low (0-11 percent), smoke inhalation in combination with cutaneous burns is fatal in 30 to 90 percent of patients. It has been recently reported that the presence of inhalation injury increases burn mortality by 20 percent and that inhalation injury predisposes to pneumonia. Pneumonia has been shown to independently increase burn mortality by 40 percent, and the combination of inhalation injury and pneumonia leads to a 60 percent increase in deaths. Children and the elderly are especially prone to pneumonia due to a limited physiologic reserve. It is imperative that a well organized, protocol driven approach to respiratory care of inhalation injury be utilized so that improvements can be made and the morbidity and mortality associated with inhalation injury be reduced.

  10. Anatomy and physiology of respiratory system relevant to anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwa, Apeksh; Shah, Amit

    2015-09-01

    Clinical application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of respiratory system improves patient's safety during anaesthesia. It also optimises patient's ventilatory condition and airway patency. Such knowledge has influence on airway management, lung isolation during anaesthesia, management of cases with respiratory disorders, respiratory endoluminal procedures and optimising ventilator strategies in the perioperative period. Understanding of ventilation, perfusion and their relation with each other is important for understanding respiratory physiology. Ventilation to perfusion ratio alters with anaesthesia, body position and with one-lung anaesthesia. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an important safety mechanism, is inhibited by majority of the anaesthetic drugs. Ventilation perfusion mismatch leads to reduced arterial oxygen concentration mainly because of early closure of airway, thus leading to decreased ventilation and atelectasis during anaesthesia. Various anaesthetic drugs alter neuronal control of the breathing and bronchomotor tone.

  11. Anatomy and physiology of respiratory system relevant to anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apeksh Patwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of respiratory system improves patient's safety during anaesthesia. It also optimises patient's ventilatory condition and airway patency. Such knowledge has influence on airway management, lung isolation during anaesthesia, management of cases with respiratory disorders, respiratory endoluminal procedures and optimising ventilator strategies in the perioperative period. Understanding of ventilation, perfusion and their relation with each other is important for understanding respiratory physiology. Ventilation to perfusion ratio alters with anaesthesia, body position and with one-lung anaesthesia. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an important safety mechanism, is inhibited by majority of the anaesthetic drugs. Ventilation perfusion mismatch leads to reduced arterial oxygen concentration mainly because of early closure of airway, thus leading to decreased ventilation and atelectasis during anaesthesia. Various anaesthetic drugs alter neuronal control of the breathing and bronchomotor tone.

  12. The Role of Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    José Aguirre; Alicia Del Moral; Irina Cobo; Alain Borgeat; Stephan Blumenthal

    2012-01-01

    A continuous peripheral nerve block (cPNB) is provided in the hospital and ambulatory setting. The most common use of CPNBs is in the peri- and postoperative period but different indications have been described like the treatment of chronic pain such as cancer-induced pain, complex regional pain syndrome or phantom limb pain. The documented benefits strongly depend on the analgesia quality and include decreasing baseline/dynamic pain, reducing additional analgesic requirements, decrease of po...

  13. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of

  14. Dimensional reduction for conformal blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs

    2016-09-01

    We consider the dimensional reduction of a CFT, breaking multiplets of the d-dimensional conformal group SO( d + 1 , 1) up into multiplets of SO( d, 1). This leads to an expansion of d-dimensional conformal blocks in terms of blocks in d - 1 dimensions. In particular, we obtain a formula for 3 d conformal blocks as an infinite sum over 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions with closed-form coefficients.

  15. Learning Potentials in Number Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Misfeldt, Morten; Nielsen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    . The tool is called Number Blocks and it combines physical interaction, learning, and immediate feedback. Number Blocks supports the children's understanding of place value in the sense that it allows them to experiment with creating large numbers. We found the blocks contributed to the learning process...... in several ways. The blocks combined mathematics and play, and they included and supported children at different academic levels. The auditory representation, especially the enhanced rhythmic effects due to using speech synthesis, and the rhythm helped the children to pronounce large numbers. This creates...

  16. Common blocks for ASQS(12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Milazzo

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available An ASQS(v is a particular Steiner system featuring a set of v vertices and two separate families of blocks, B and G, whose elements have a respective cardinality of 4 and 6. It has the property that any three vertices of X belong either to a B-block or to a G-block. The parameter cb is the number of common blocks in two separate ASQSs, both defined on the same set of vertices X . In this paper it is shown that cb ≤ 29 for any pair of ASQSs(12.

  17. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN) SANCTIONS... name of the Taliban or persons whose property or interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 545.201, or in which the Taliban or persons whose property or interests in property are blocked pursuant...

  18. A case of advanced second-degree atrioventricular block in a ferret ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of advanced second-degree atrioventricular block in a ferret secondary to lymphoma. ... A female ferret was referred as an emergency for severe respiratory distress symptoms. ... Moreover, a pericardial lymphocytic infiltration and a widespread myocardial nodular localization of lymphoma were evidenced as well.

  19. Respiratory effort from the photoplethysmogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    The potential for a simple, non-invasive measure of respiratory effort based on the pulse oximeter signal - the photoplethysmogram or 'pleth' - was investigated in a pilot study. Several parameters were developed based on a variety of manifestations of respiratory effort in the signal, including modulation changes in amplitude, baseline, frequency and pulse transit times, as well as distinct baseline signal shifts. Thirteen candidate parameters were investigated using data from healthy volunteers. Each volunteer underwent a series of controlled respiratory effort maneuvers at various set flow resistances and respiratory rates. Six oximeter probes were tested at various body sites. In all, over three thousand pleth-based effort-airway pressure (EP) curves were generated across the various airway constrictions, respiratory efforts, respiratory rates, subjects, probe sites, and the candidate parameters considered. Regression analysis was performed to determine the existence of positive monotonic relationships between the respiratory effort parameters and resulting airway pressures. Six of the candidate parameters investigated exhibited a distinct positive relationship (poximeter probe and an ECG (P2E-Effort) and the other using two pulse oximeter probes placed at different peripheral body sites (P2-Effort); and baseline shifts in heart rate, (BL-HR-Effort). In conclusion, a clear monotonic relationship was found between several pleth-based parameters and imposed respiratory loadings at the mouth across a range of respiratory rates and flow constrictions. The results suggest that the pleth may provide a measure of changing upper airway dynamics indicative of the effort to breathe. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of respiratory muscles during respiratory muscle training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Pietsch, Fabian; Walker, David Johannes; Röcker, Kai; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    It is unknown which respiratory muscles are mainly activated by respiratory muscle training. This study evaluated Inspiratory Pressure Threshold Loading (IPTL), Inspiratory Flow Resistive Loading (IFRL) and Voluntary Isocapnic Hyperpnea (VIH) with regard to electromyographic (EMG) activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM), parasternal muscles (PARA) and the diaphragm (DIA) in randomized order. Surface EMG were analyzed at the end of each training session and normalized using the peak EMG recorded during maximum inspiratory maneuvers (Sniff nasal pressure: SnPna, maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure: PImax). 41 healthy participants were included. Maximal activation was achieved for SCM by SnPna; the PImax activated predominantly PARA and DIA. Activations of SCM and PARA were higher in IPTL and VIH than for IFRL (pVIH (pVIH differ in activation of inspiratory respiratory muscles. Whereas all methods mainly stimulate accessory respiratory muscles, diaphragm activation was predominant in IPTL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Acute respiratory dyspnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, G; Hanssens, L; Mulier, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute respiratory dyspnea is very frequent in children and must be quickly treated to obtain the best prognosis. The diagnosis depends from the natural history of the disease and from the quality of clinical assessment. The use of an algorithm according to the presence of stridor or bronchospasm is very contributive to the diagnosis. The paper reviews the pathophysiology of dyspnea in children and the more common diseases that are causing respiratory distress. Finally, treatment of respiratory failure and management of specific diseases are defined.

  2. Assessing Respiratory System Mechanical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ruben D; Serrato, Diana M; Adasme, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    The main goals of assessing respiratory system mechanical function are to evaluate the lung function through a variety of methods and to detect early signs of abnormalities that could affect the patient's outcomes. In ventilated patients, it has become increasingly important to recognize whether respiratory function has improved or deteriorated, whether the ventilator settings match the patient's demand, and whether the selection of ventilator parameters follows a lung-protective strategy. Ventilator graphics, esophageal pressure, intra-abdominal pressure, and electric impedance tomography are some of the best-known monitoring tools to obtain measurements and adequately evaluate the respiratory system mechanical function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Mary [Brentwood, CA; Slezak, Thomas [Livermore, CA; Birch, James M [Albany, CA

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  4. Implicit Block ACK Scheme for IEEE 802.11 WLANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sthapit, Pranesh; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    The throughput of IEEE 802.11 standard is significantly bounded by the associated Medium Access Control (MAC) overhead. Because of the overhead, an upper limit exists for throughput, which is bounded, including situations where data rates are extremely high. Therefore, an overhead reduction is necessary to achieve higher throughput. The IEEE 802.11e amendment introduced the block ACK mechanism, to reduce the number of control messages in MAC. Although the block ACK scheme greatly reduces overhead, further improvements are possible. In this letter, we propose an implicit block ACK method that further reduces the overhead associated with IEEE 802.11e’s block ACK scheme. The mathematical analysis results are presented for both the original protocol and the proposed scheme. A performance improvement of greater than 10% was achieved with the proposed implementation.

  5. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, B G; Whisnant, J; Kashima, H; Levy, H; Biggers, W P

    1985-10-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a disease caused by a virus in the Papovaviridae family. It tends to recur in the laryngotracheal tree, and treatment is surgical removal with a CO2 laser and suspension microlaryngoscopy. Some patients may require these procedures every few weeks, and a systemic agent to control disease would be ideal for them. Care must be taken in the selection of an agent, as these lesions, similar to other papova virus-induced lesions, are most susceptible to malignant degeneration in the presence of a carcinogen. Eight patients were given 10 courses of polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I,C)-LC] in an attempt to control their disease. The three who were tested were able to produce good titers of interferon. The rate of disease progression was probably slowed in four patients, as reflected by a decrease in the requirement for surgery; however, the medication appeared to be relatively toxic in effective doses. Four of 10 courses were held for hepatotoxicity, and mild hepatotoxicity occurred in four more. One course was held for thrombocytopenia associated with bleeding at the tracheostomy site. We conclude that in its presently available form, poly(I,C)-LC is too toxic to be administered long term for control of this disease.

  6. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutlić, Z; Rudez, I; Biocina, B; Husedzinović, I

    1997-01-01

    In this article the authors present a case of successful treatment of a 54-year old male patient with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and triple-vessel coronary artery disease who underwent surgical myocardial revascularization and was reoperated on the same day because of excessive bleeding. The patient was given cca 5000 mL of whole blood and cca 3000 mL of blood derivatives. The first postoperative chest X-ray showed radiological signs of ARDS. The therapy was based upon authors' experience and was consisted of controlled mechanical ventilation (respiratory volume 12-15 mL/kg, 10-14 cycles/min, I/E ratio 1:2, FIO2 0.6, PEEP 2-5 cm H2O), daily bronchoscopies with bronchoaspiration, aggressive diuresis, negative fluid balance, specific antibiotic therapy, and last but not least, of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) 0.5-20 micrograms/kg/min combined with dopamine inotropic support (2-5 micrograms/kg/h). Simple but careful clinical observation still remains a milestone for all therapeutic measures taken in ARDS patients.

  7. Respiratory Patients Breathing Life into the Canterbury Integrated Respiratory Service

    OpenAIRE

    Weatherall, Louise

    2017-01-01

    A group of past pulmonary rehabilitation participants have joined together to form the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Consumer Group. They have been actively engaged in Canterbury’s respiratory service design and innovation since 2013.Telling their Story: Members of the Consumer Group meet monthly to give their opinion on how pulmonary rehabilitation and the wider respiratory service support patients to look after their own health.They discuss their own positive and negative experiences to a wide r...

  8. Photocatalytic pavement blocks. Air purification by pavement blocks. Final results of the research at BRRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The use of materials can influence to a large extent the environmental impact of traffic and of road infrastructure. Especially in urban areas, where the risk on smog formation during hot summer days is high, the use of photocatalytic pavement blocks can reduce the air pollution significantly. A project on environmental friendly concrete pavement blocks is conducted at the Belgian Road Research Centre. The use of photocatalytic material in the surface of pavement blocks to obtain air purifying materials is investigated. In contact with light, TiO2 as photocatalyst, is able to reduce the NO and NO2 content in the air, caused by the exhaust of traffic. The efficiency is tested on pavement blocks, but the technique can as well be applied on other road elements (e.g. noise reducing walls, linear elements) or as a coating on new materials or existing structures. At the previous TRA conference in Gotenborgh, Sweden, the principle of photocatalysis was presented. In this paper, emphasis will be put on the final results of the 4-year project obtained in laboratory as well as on site at the Leien of Antwerp (10,000 m{sup 2}). The results indicate a durable efficiency towards NOx reduction, which is in favour for the diminishing of the risk on ozone formation. However, the precise translation from the laboratory towards the site is still in question. The results obtained during the project are discussed in this paper.

  9. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  10. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong [Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University,Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-30

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  11. Four-block beam collimator

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows a four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with the secondary beams, the collimators operated in vacuum conditions. The blocks were made of steel and had a standard length of 1 m. The maximum aperture had a square coss-section of 144 cm2. (See Annual Report 1976.)

  12. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  13. Writing Blocks and Tacit Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A review of the literature on writing block looks at two kinds: inability to write in a timely, fluent fashion, and reluctance by academicians to assist others in writing. Obstacles to fluent writing are outlined, four historical trends in treating blocks are discussed, and implications are examined. (MSE)

  14. Block storage subsystem performance analysis

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    You feel that your service is slow because of the storage subsystem? But there are too many abstraction layers between your software and the raw block device for you to debug all this pile... Let's dive on the platters and check out how the block storage sees your I/Os! We can even figure out what those patterns are meaning.

  15. A Comparison of Jump Height, Takeoff Velocities, and Blocking Coverage in the Swing and Traditional Volleyball Blocking Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Ficklin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and swing blocking techniques on center of mass (COM projectile motion and effective blocking area in nine healthy Division I female volleyball players. Two high-definition (1080 p video cameras (60 Hz were used to collect two-dimensional variables from two separate views. One was placed perpendicular to the plane of the net and the other was directed along the top of the net, and were used to estimate COM locations and blocking area in a plane parallel to the net and hand penetration through the plane of the net respectively. Video of both the traditional and swing techniques were digitized and kinematic variables were calculated. Paired samples t-tests indicated that the swing technique resulted in greater (p < 0.05 vertical and horizontal takeoff velocities (vy and vx, jump height (H, duration of the block (tBLOCK, blocking coverage during the block (C as well as hand penetration above and through the net’s plane (YPEN, ZPEN. The traditional technique had significantly greater approach time (tAPP. The results of this study suggest that the swing technique results in both greater jump height and effective blocking area. However, the shorter tAPP that occurs with swing is associated with longer times in the air during the block which may reduce the ability of the athlete to make adjustments to attacks designed to misdirect the defense.

  16. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81-2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm displacement resulted in

  17. Employee guide to respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This employee guide discusses use of respiratory protective equipment for particulates, gases, vapors, supplied air, and self-contained breathing apparatus. It also covers equipment selection medical factors, fitting criteria; care; and employee responsibilities

  18. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future.

  19. Evaluation of effects of sciatic and femoral nerve blocks in sheep undergoing stifle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ann E; Mama, Khursheed R; Ruehlman, Dana L; Pelkey, Sheila; Turner, A Simon

    2011-04-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of locally anesthetizing the sciatic and femoral nerves in sheep undergoing stifle (femorotibial) surgery (16 sheep received nerve blocks; 16 sheep underwent a nerve localization procedure but received no nerve blocks). Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure and end-tidal isoflurane were recorded every 5 min while sheep were anesthetized. At some of the observed time points, the mean heart rate in the sheep that had received no nerve blocks was significantly higher than in the sheep that had received the nerve blocks. Postoperatively, each sheep was assigned scores for comfort and attitude, movement, flock behavior, feeding behavior and appetite and respiratory rate (based on predefined descriptions). Though the authors found no undesirable effects of this local anesthesia, beneficial effects of the nerve blocks were minimal or not readily apparent under the conditions of this study.

  20. Nonoverlapping Blocks Based Copy-Move Forgery Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of high computational complexity in block-based methods for copy-move forgery detection, we divide image into texture part and smooth part to deal with them separately. Keypoints are extracted and matched in texture regions. Instead of using all the overlapping blocks, we use nonoverlapping blocks as candidates in smooth regions. Clustering blocks with similar color into a group can be regarded as a preprocessing operation. To avoid mismatching due to misalignment, we update candidate blocks by registration before projecting them into hash space. In this way, we can reduce computational complexity and improve the accuracy of matching at the same time. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves better performance via comparing with the state-of-the-art copy-move forgery detection algorithms and exhibits robustness against JPEG compression, rotation, and scaling.

  1. Activation of respiratory muscles during weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Gückler, Julia; Pietsch, Fabian; Walker, David Johannes; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim; Dreher, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is a key component of weaning failure. Balancing respiratory muscle loading and unloading by applying different ventilation modes along with spontaneous breathing episodes are established weaning strategies. However, the effects of body positioning on the respiratory muscles during weaning remains unclear. This study aimed at assessing respiratory drive by surface electromyography (EMG) of the diaphragm (EMG dia ) and parasternal muscles (EMG para ) in tracheotomized patients during prolonged weaning in 3 randomized body positions-supine, 30° semirecumbent, and 80° sitting-during mechanical ventilation and spontaneous breathing. Nine patients were included for analysis. Cardiorespiratory parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, dyspnea) did not change under each condition (all P>.05). EMG para and EMG dia did not change under mechanical ventilation (both P>.05). EMG dia changed under spontaneous breathing from supine to sitting (0.45±0.26 vs 0.32±0.19; P=.012) and between semirecumbent to sitting (0.41±0.23 vs 0.32±0.19; P=.039), whereas EMG para did not change. This is the first study to show that body positioning influences respiratory drive to the diaphragm in tracheotomized patients with prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation during unassisted breathing. Sitting position reduces respiratory drive compared with semirecumbent and supine positioning and might therefore be favored during spontaneous breathing trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR, parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses.

  3. Can antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections be reduced?

    OpenAIRE

    Gulliford, Martin; Ashworth, Mark

    2017-01-01

    It must be — as an essential component of the response to the antimicrobial drug resistance problemThe growing threat of antimicrobial drug resistance (AMR) is attracting the attention of national governments and international organisations. In the words of Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization, “We are hearing one alarm bell after another.”1 This is apparent in primary care, where the frequency of antibiotic-resistant infections is increasing. The emergence of AMR ...

  4. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  5. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  6. The combination of exercise and respiratory training improves respiratory muscle function in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabitz, Hans-Joachim; Bremer, Hinrich-Cordt; Schwoerer, Anja; Sonntag, Florian; Walterspacher, Stephan; Walker, David Johannes; Ehlken, Nicola; Staehler, Gerd; Windisch, Wolfram; Grünig, Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Increased dyspnea and reduced exercise capacity in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) can be partly attributed to impaired respiratory muscle function. This prospective study was designed to assess the impact of exercise and respiratory training on respiratory muscle strength and 6-min walking distance (6MWD) in PAH patients. Patients with invasively confirmed PAH underwent 3 weeks of in-hospital exercise and respiratory training, which was continued at home for another 12 weeks. Medication remained constant during the study period. Blinded observers assessed efficacy parameters at baseline (I) and after 3 (II) and 15 weeks (III). Respiratory muscle function was assessed by twitch mouth pressure (TwPmo) during nonvolitional supramaximal magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation. Seven PAH patients (4 women; mean pulmonary artery pressure 45 ± 11 mmHg, median WHO functional class 3.1 ± 0.4, idiopathic/associated PAH n = 5/2) were included. The training program was feasible and well tolerated by all patients with excellent compliance. TwPmo was I: 0.86 ± 0.37 kPa, II: 1.04 ± 0.29 kPa, and III: 1.27 ± 0.44 kPa, respectively. 6MWD was I: 417 ± 51 m, II: 509 ± 39 m, and III: 498 ± 39 m, respectively. Both TwPmo (+0.41 ± 0.34 kPa, +56 ± 39 %) and 6MWD (+81 ± 30 m, +20 ± 9 %) increased significantly in the period between baseline and the final assessment (pairwise comparison: p = 0.012/respiratory training as an adjunct to medical therapy may be effective in patients with PAH to improve respiratory muscle strength and exercise capacity. Future, randomized, controlled trials should be carried out to further investigate these findings.

  7. Block by Block: Civic Action in the Battle of Baghdad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    bedding, and latrine facilities. Additionally, provide milk , baby formula, diapers, 7 Bogart: Block by Block and infant/family care items such as...viable agricultural businesses. The cattle are a cross breed of a “regular” Iraqi cow and a water buffalo. Chicken farms are mostly egg farms, and...a problem. Contractors did not want to work for fear of being shot or kid - napped. For example, four contractors were shot over the duration of

  8. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [DESY Hamburg, Theory Group,Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sobko, Evgeny [Nordita and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-03-15

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  9. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Sobko, Evgeny [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    2016-12-07

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  10. Ship Block Transportation Scheduling Problem Based on Greedy Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ship block transportation problems are crucial issues to address in reducing the construction cost and improving the productivity of shipyards. Shipyards aim to maximize the workload balance of transporters with time constraint such that all blocks should be transported during the planning horizon. This process leads to three types of penalty time: empty transporter travel time, delay time, and tardy time. This study aims to minimize the sum of the penalty time. First, this study presents the problem of ship block transportation with the generalization of the block transportation restriction on the multi-type transporter. Second, the problem is transformed into the classical traveling salesman problem and assignment problem through a reasonable model simplification and by adding a virtual node to the proposed directed graph. Then, a heuristic algorithm based on greedy algorithm is proposed to assign blocks to available transporters and sequencing blocks for each transporter simultaneously. Finally, the numerical experiment method is used to validate the model, and its result shows that the proposed algorithm is effective in realizing the efficient use of the transporters in shipyards. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the promising application of the proposed method to efficiently improve the utilization of transporters and to reduce the cost of ship block logistics for shipyards.

  11. Parametric Optimization Design of Brake Block Based on Reverse Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hua-wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the key part of automotive brake,the performance of brake block has a direct impact on the safety and comfort of cars. Modeling the brake block of disc brake in reverse parameterization by reverse engineering software, analyzing and optimizing the reconstructed model by CAE software. Processing the scanned point cloud by Geomagic Studio and reconstructing the CAD model of the brake block with the parametric surface function of the software, then analyzing and optimizing it by Wrokbench. The example shows that it is quick to reconstruct the CAD model of parts by using reverse parameterization method and reduce part re-design development cycle significantly.

  12. Respiratory innate immune proteins differentially modulate the neutrophil respiratory burst response to influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Mitchell R; Crouch, Erika; Vesona, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants and neutrophils contribute to lung injury during influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Surfactant protein (SP)-D plays a pivotal role in restricting IAV replication and inflammation in the first several days after infection. Despite its potent anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, preincubation...... of IAV with SP-D in vitro strongly increases neutrophil respiratory burst responses to the virus. Several factors are shown to modify this apparent proinflammatory effect of SP-D. Although multimeric forms of SP-D show dose-dependent augmentation of respiratory burst responses, trimeric, single-arm forms...... either show no effect or inhibit these responses. Furthermore, if neutrophils are preincubated with multimeric SP-D before IAV is added, oxidant responses to the virus are significantly reduced. The ability of SP-D to increase neutrophil uptake of IAV can be dissociated from enhancement of oxidant...

  13. Impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection on Respiratory Muscle Function in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Friederike Sophie; Callegari, Jens; Dieninghoff, Doris; Spielmanns, Marc; Storre, Jan Hendrik; Schmoor, Claudia; Windisch, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection impairs respiratory muscle function in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, but its impact on adult patients has not been characterised. To investigate respiratory muscle function in adult cystic fibrosis patients according to P. aeruginosa status (repetitive samples over 12 months). The pressure-time index of the respiratory muscles (PTImus), a measure of their efficiency, served as the primary outcome. In addition, respiratory load and maximal respiratory muscle strength were assessed. In 51 patients examined (65% female; median age 32 years, IQR 24-40), a median of 3.0 (IQR 2-4) different pathogens was found in each patient. The PTImus was 0.113 and 0.126 in Pseudomonas-positive (n = 33) and -negative (n = 18) patients, respectively (p = 0.53). Univariate analysis showed a lower PTImus in male than in female patients (p = 0.006). Respiratory muscle load and strength were otherwise comparable, with the exception of higher nasal sniff pressures in Pseudomonas-positive patients who were chronically infected (>50% of positive samples). Quality of Life (according to the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised) was higher if both respiratory load and the PTImus were low (high respiratory muscle efficiency). Chronic P. aeruginosa infection does not influence respiratory muscle efficiency in adult cystic fibrosis patients with otherwise multiple co-infections. In addition, patients with reduced respiratory muscle efficiency had worse Quality of Life. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  15. The wild tapered block bootstrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounyo, Ulrich

    -based method in terms of asymptotic accuracy of variance estimation and distribution approximation. For stationary time series, the asymptotic validity, and the favorable bias properties of the new bootstrap method are shown in two important cases: smooth functions of means, and M-estimators. The first......-order asymptotic validity of the tapered block bootstrap as well as the wild tapered block bootstrap approximation to the actual distribution of the sample mean is also established when data are assumed to satisfy a near epoch dependent condition. The consistency of the bootstrap variance estimator for the sample......In this paper, a new resampling procedure, called the wild tapered block bootstrap, is introduced as a means of calculating standard errors of estimators and constructing confidence regions for parameters based on dependent heterogeneous data. The method consists in tapering each overlapping block...

  16. Recursion Relations for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Penedones, João; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-12

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension $\\Delta$ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in 1307.6856 for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  17. Defying gravity using Jenga™ blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yin-Soo; Yap, Kueh-Chin

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes how Jenga™ blocks can be used to demonstrate the physics of an overhanging tower that appears to defy gravity. We also propose ideas for how this demonstration can be adapted for the A-level physics curriculum.

  18. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  19. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight...

  20. Climate Change Effects on Respiratory Health: Implications for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Maureen; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Matura, Lea Ann

    2017-11-01

    Greenhouse gases are driving climate change. This article explores the adverse health effects of climate change on a particularly vulnerable population: children and adults with respiratory conditions. This review provides a general overview of the effects of increasing temperatures, extreme weather, desertification, and flooding on asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and respiratory infections. We offer suggestions for future research to better understand climate change hazards, policies to support prevention and mitigation efforts targeting climate change, and clinical actions to reduce individual risk. Climate change produces a number of changes to the natural and built environments that may potentially increase respiratory disease prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Nurses might consider focusing their research efforts on reducing the effects of greenhouse gases and in directing policy to mitigate the harmful effects of climate change. Nurses can also continue to direct educational and clinical actions to reduce risks for all populations, but most importantly, for our most vulnerable groups. While advancements have been made in understanding the impact of climate change on respiratory health, nurses can play an important role in reducing the deleterious effects of climate change. This will require a multipronged approach of research, policy, and clinical action. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Respiratory symptoms in adults are related to impaired quality of life, regardless of asthma and COPD: results from the European community respiratory health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakke Per S

    2010-09-01

    symptoms in the European Community Respiratory Health Study (ECRHS varied from one percent to 35% 1. In fact, two studies have reported that more than half of the adult population suffers from one or more respiratory symptoms 45. Respiratory symptoms are important markers of the risk of having or developing disease. Respiratory symptoms have been shown to be predictors for lung function decline 678, asthma 910, and even all-cause mortality in a general population study 11. In patients with a known diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, respiratory symptoms are important determinants of reduced health related quality of life (HRQoL 12131415. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms exceeds the combined prevalences of asthma and COPD, and both asthma and COPD are frequently undiagnosed diseases 161718. Thus, the high prevalence of respipratory symptoms may mirror undiagnosed and untreated disease. The common occurrence of respiratory symptoms calls for attention to how these symptoms affect health also in subjects with no diagnosis of obstructive airways disease. Impaired HRQoL in the presence of respiratory symptoms have been found in two population-based studies 619, but no study of respiratory sypmtoms and HRQoL have separate analyses for subjects with and without asthma and COPD, and no study provide information about extensive objective measurements of respiratory health. The ECRHS is a randomly sampled, multi-cultural, population based cohort study. The ECRHS included measurements of atopy, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR, and lung function, and offers a unique opportunity to investigate how respiratory symptoms affect HRQoL among subjects both with and without obstructive lung disease. In the present paper we aimed to: 1 Describe the relationship between respiratory symptoms and HRQoL in an international adult general population and: 2 To assess whether this relationship varied with presence of asthma and/or COPD, or presence of objective

  2. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  4. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  5. Respiratory distress in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Suzanne; Moser, Chuanpit; Baack, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory distress presents as tachypnea, nasal flaring, retractions, and grunting and may progress to respiratory failure if not readily recognized and managed. Causes of respiratory distress vary and may not lie within the lung. A thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic and laboratory findings will aid in the differential diagnosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, neonatal pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Strong evidence reveals an inverse relationship between gestational age and respiratory morbidity. (1)(2)(9)(25)(26) Expert opinion recommends careful consideration about elective delivery without labor at less than 39 weeks’ gestation. Extensive evidence, including randomized control trials, cohort studies, and expert opinion, supports maternal group B streptococcus screening, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, and appropriate followup of high-risk newborns according to guidelines established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (4)(29)(31)(32)(34) Following these best-practice strategies is effective in preventing neonatal pneumonia and its complications. (31)(32)(34). On the basis of strong evidence, including randomized control trials and Cochrane Reviews, administration of antenatal corticosteroids (5) and postnatal surfactant (6) decrease respiratory morbidity associated with RDS. Trends in perinatal management strategies to prevent MAS have changed. There is strong evidence that amnioinfusion, (49) oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal suctioning at the perineum, (45) or intubation and endotracheal suctioning of vigorous infants (46)(47) do not decrease MAS or its complications. Some research and expert opinion supports endotracheal suctioning of nonvigorous meconium-stained infants (8) and induction of labor at 41 weeks’ gestation (7) to prevent MAS.

  6. Iron inhibits respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfryd, Kamil; Jurek, Aleksandra; Kubit, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study examines the effects of iron ions Fe(3+) on the respiratory burst of phagocytes isolated from peritoneal effluents of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, as an in vitro model of iron overload in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Material and Methods....... Respiratory burst of peritoneal phagocytes was measured by chemiluminescence method. Results. At the highest used concentration of iron ions Fe(3+) (100 µM), free radicals production by peritoneal phagocytes was reduced by 90% compared to control. Conclusions. Iron overload may increase the risk of infectious...

  7. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  8. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  9. Synthetic cannabis and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinwala, Felecia N; Gupta, Mayank

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabis use has been increasing in appeal among adolescents, and its use is now at a 30 year peak among high school seniors. The constituents of synthetic cannabis are difficult to monitor, given the drug's easy accessibility. Currently, 40 U.S. states have banned the distribution and use of some known synthetic cannabinoids, and have included these drugs in the Schedule I category. The depressive respiratory effect in humans caused by synthetic cannabis inhalation has not been thoroughly investigated in the medical literature. We are the first to report, to our knowledge, two cases of self-reported synthetic cannabis use leading to respiratory depression and necessary intubation.

  10. Analysis of Separated Flow over Blocked Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the separated flow over flat and blocked surfaces was investigated experimentally. Velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were carried out by a constanttemperature hot wire anemometer and static pressure measurements by a micro-manometer. The flow separations and reattachments were occurred before the first block, on the first block, between blocks and after the last block, and the presence of the blocks significantly increased the turbulent intensity

  11. Reference respiratory waveforms by minimum jerk model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anetai, Yusuke, E-mail: anetai@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 2-2, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Osaka University Hospital, Yamadaoka 2-15, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife{sup ®} robotic surgery system has the ability to deliver radiation to a tumor subject to respiratory movements using Synchrony{sup ®} mode with less than 2 mm tracking accuracy. However, rapid and rough motion tracking causes mechanical tracking errors and puts mechanical stress on the robotic joint, leading to unexpected radiation delivery errors. During clinical treatment, patient respiratory motions are much more complicated, suggesting the need for patient-specific modeling of respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel method that provides a reference respiratory wave to enable smooth tracking for each patient. Methods: The minimum jerk model, which mathematically derives smoothness by means of jerk, or the third derivative of position and the derivative of acceleration with respect to time that is proportional to the time rate of force changed was introduced to model a patient-specific respiratory motion wave to provide smooth motion tracking using CyberKnife{sup ®}. To verify that patient-specific minimum jerk respiratory waves were being tracked smoothly by Synchrony{sup ®} mode, a tracking laser projection from CyberKnife{sup ®} was optically analyzed every 0.1 s using a webcam and a calibrated grid on a motion phantom whose motion was in accordance with three pattern waves (cosine, typical free-breathing, and minimum jerk theoretical wave models) for the clinically relevant superior–inferior directions from six volunteers assessed on the same node of the same isocentric plan. Results: Tracking discrepancy from the center of the grid to the beam projection was evaluated. The minimum jerk theoretical wave reduced the maximum-peak amplitude of radial tracking discrepancy compared with that of the waveforms modeled by cosine and typical free-breathing model by 22% and 35%, respectively, and provided smooth tracking for radial direction. Motion tracking constancy as indicated by radial tracking discrepancy

  12. Various semiclassical limits of torus conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of General and Applied Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Institutskiy per. 7, Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Geiko, Roman [Mathematics Department, National Research University Higher School of Economics,Usacheva str. 6, Moscow, 119048 (Russian Federation); Rappoport, Vladimir [I.E. Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky ave. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Quantum Physics, Institute for Information Transmission Problems,Bolshoy Karetny per. 19, Moscow, 127994 (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-12

    We study four types of one-point torus blocks arising in the large central charge regime. There are the global block, the light block, the heavy-light block, and the linearized classical block, according to different regimes of conformal dimensions. It is shown that the blocks are not independent being connected to each other by various links. We find that the global, light, and heavy-light blocks correspond to three different contractions of the Virasoro algebra. Also, we formulate the c-recursive representation of the one-point torus blocks which is relevant in the semiclassical approximation.

  13. Perinatal respiratory infections and long term consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Indinnimeo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most important pathogen in the etiology of respiratory infections in early life. 50% of children are affected by RSV within the first year of age, and almost all children become infected within two years. Numerous retrospective and prospective studies linking RSV and chronic respiratory morbidity show that RSV bronchiolitis in infancy is followed by recurrent wheezing after the acute episod. According to some authors a greater risk of wheezing in children with a history of RSV bronchiolitis would be limited to childhood, while according to others this risk would be extended into adolescence and adulthood. To explain the relationship between RSV infection and the development of bronchial asthma or the clinical pathogenetic patterns related to a state of bronchial hyperreactivity, it has been suggested that RSV may cause alterations in the response of the immune system (immunogenic hypothesis, activating directly mast cells and basophils and changing the pattern of differentiation of immune cells present in the bronchial tree as receptors and inflammatory cytokines. It was also suggested that RSV infection can cause bronchial hyperreactivity altering nervous airway modulation, acting on nerve fibers present in the airways (neurogenic hypothesis.The benefits of passive immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, which seems to represent an effective approach in reducing the sequelae of RSV infection in the short- and long-term period, strengthen the implementation of prevention programs with this drug, as recommended by the national guidelines of the Italian Society of Neonatology. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the

  14. Management of hypoxaemic respiratory failure in a Respiratory High-dependency Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukins, Craig; Wong, Mimi; Murphy, Michelle; Upham, John

    2017-07-01

    There are limited data on outcomes of hypoxaemic respiratory failure (HRF), especially in non-intensive care unit (ICU) settings. To assess outcomes in HRF (without multi-system disease and not requiring early intubation) of patients directly admitted to a Respiratory High-dependency Unit (R-HDU). This is a retrospective cohort study of HRF compared to hypercapnic respiratory failure (HCRF) in a R-HDU (2007-2011). Patient characteristics (age, gender, pre-morbid status, diagnoses) and outcomes (non-invasive ventilation (NIV) use, survival, ICU admission) were assessed. There were 1207 R-HDU admissions in 2007-2011, 205 (17%) with HRF and 495 (41%) with HCRF. The proportion with HRF increased from 12.2% in 2007 to 20.1% in 2011 (P patients were younger, more often male and had better pre-morbid performance. Compared to HCRF, HRF was more frequently associated with lung consolidation (61% vs 15%, P patients with HRF were treated with NIV (28% vs 87%, P patients with HRF died (19.5% vs 12.3%, P = 0.02). Interstitial lung disease, consolidation, shock, malignancy and poorer pre-morbid function were associated with increased mortality. Initial R-HDU management is an effective option in selected HRF to reduce ICU demand, although mortality and clinical deterioration despite NIV are more common than in HCRF. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. [Aging of the respiratory system: anatomical changes and physiological consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2012-10-01

    The respiratory system undergoes progressive involution with age, resulting in anatomical and functional changes that are exerted on all levels. The rib cage stiffens and respiratory muscles weaken. Distal bronchioles have reduced diameter and tend to be collapsed. Mobilized lung volumes decrease with age while residual volume increases. Gas exchanges are modified with a linear decrease of PaO(2) up to the age of 70 years and a decreased diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. Ventilatory responses to hypercapnia, hypoxia and exercise decrease in the elderly. Knowledge of changes in the respiratory system related to advancing age is a medical issue of great importance in order to distinguish the effects of aging from those of diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Manipulation of immunity to and pathology of respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Robert; Williams, Andrew; Thorpe, Callum; Hussell, Tracy

    2004-06-01

    Respiratory infections are the third leading cause of death worldwide and are a priority for vaccine development. Immune defence mechanisms are critical in recovery from most respiratory infections but the role of the immune system in causing bystander lung injury is not as well understood, and will be the focus of this review. Immune-mediated injury results from physical occlusion of the airways or the ensuing 'cytokine storm', which may spill over into the systemic circulation and cause devastating consequences. Respiratory pathogens employ numerous strategies to avoid detection by the immune system. One of these, the alteration of key surface determinants, makes the design of rational vaccines problematic. In the following review the immune compartments responsible for clinical lung disease are discussed, and current and novel strategies to reduce their potency are overviewed.

  17. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Idiopathic Paroxysmal Atrio-Ventricular Block. What is The Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Márquez, Francisco J; Arana-Rueda, Eduardo; Pedrote, Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic paroxysmal atrioventricular (AV) block poses a true diagnostic challenge. What is clear about this entity is the confusion about its definition and consequently about its etiology. According to certain sources, the diagnosis of this block requires the lack of a structural cardiac pathology that justifies the observed manifestations and an absence of electrocardiographic disorders prior to an episode. The clinical presentation of idiopathic paroxysmal AV block does not differ from that of another cardiogenic syncope or of a vasovagal syncope with a significant cardioinhibitory component. With respect to the mechanism that explains this block, it has been postulated that patients with low basal adenosine levels exhibit hyperaffinity of the A2 receptors of the AV node. Variations in plasma adenosine levels may favor episodes of paroxysmal AV block. The diagnosis of this block is complex and can require years to determine. Routine electrophysiological examination of these patients is not cost effective due to the low sensitivity and specificity of this approach. Numerous groups have supported the use of an implantable loop recorder to substantiate AV block paroxysms and assess their clinical correlations. Permanent stimulation devices are utilized to reduce syncopal recurrence.

  19. Concrete blocks' adverse effects on indoor air and recommended solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppersberger, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    Air infiltration through highly permeable concrete blocks can allow entry of various serious indoor air pollutants including radon. An easy approach to avoiding these pollutants is to select a less-air-permeable concrete block. Tests show that air permeability of concrete blocks can vary by a factor greater than 50 (0.63--35 standard L/min/m 2 at 3 Pa). The surface texture of the blocks correlates well with air permeability; test results of smoother, closed-surface-texture blocks were usually less air-permeable. During construction, air infiltration can be minimized by capping walls and carefully sealing around openings for utilities or other penetrations. Structures with indoor air-quality problems due to soil-gas entry can be mitigated more effectively with less coating material if the blocks have a closed surface texture. All coatings evaluated--cementaceous block filler (which has the lowest applied cost and is more than 99.5% effective), surface bonding cement, water-based epoxy, polysulfide vinyl acrylic, and latex (three coats)--were highly effective (more than 98%) in reducing air permeability when adequately applied. Coating selection should be influenced by expected service life, considering surface condition and cost

  20. Climate change and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Daniel A; Kellerman, Roy A

    2014-10-01

    To discuss the nature of climate change and both its immediate and long-term effects on human respiratory health. This review is based on information from a presentation of the American College of Chest Physicians course on Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease held in Toronto, Canada, June 2013. It is supplemented by a PubMed search for climate change, global warming, respiratory tract diseases, and respiratory health. It is also supplemented by a search of Web sites including the Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, World Meteorological Association, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change, and the World Health Organization. Health effects of climate change include an increase in the prevalence of certain respiratory diseases, exacerbations of chronic lung disease, premature mortality, allergic responses, and declines in lung function. Climate change, mediated by greenhouse gases, causes adverse health effects to the most vulnerable patient populations-the elderly, children, and those in distressed socioeconomic strata.

  1. Guide to industrial respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, J.A.

    1977-03-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 has increased the emphasis on proper selection and use of respirators in situations where engineering controls are not feasible or are being implemented. Although a great deal of information on respiratory protection has been published, most of it is more technical than necessary for the average user faced with day-to-day problems of respiratory protection in industrial environments. This Guide is to provide the industrial user a single reference source containing enough information for establishing and maintaining a respirator program that meets the OSHA requirements outlined in 29 CFR Part 1910.134. It includes chapters on respirator selection, use, maintenance, and inspection, a complete description of all types of respirators and their advantages and limitations, and chapters on respirator fitting and wearer training, respiratory physiology, respiratory hazards, and physiological and psychological limitations. Also included are samples of the decision logic used in respirator selection, guidance on setting up an adequate respirator program through formulation of written standard operating procedures, and discussion of the meaning of the approved respirator

  2. Respiratory arrest in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Sudden loss of consciousness and cardiorespiratory disorders occurred in 43 of 254 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients had ventricular fibrillation, 37 had one or more episodes with a disturbance of respiratory rhythm that required assisted ventilation, and 4 died suddenly without

  3. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features · Radiological features of lungs-showing progression of disease · cT Scan of SARS lungs · Imaging type,cost,therapy · SARS – Lung Pathology.

  4. Respiratory effects of borax dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabrant, D H; Bernstein, L; Peters, J M; Smith, T J; Wright, W E

    1985-12-01

    The relation of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, and abnormalities of chest radiographs to estimated exposures of borax dust has been investigated in a cross sectional study of 629 actively employed borax workers. Ninety three per cent of the eligible workers participated in the study and exposures ranged from 1.1 mg/m3 to 14.6 mg/m3. Symptoms of acute respiratory irritation such as dryness of the mouth, nose, or throat, dry cough, nose bleeds, sore throat, productive cough, shortness of breath, and chest tightness were related to exposures of 4.0 mg/m3 or more, and were infrequent at exposures of 1.1 mg/m3. Symptoms of persistent respiratory irritation meeting the definition of chronic simple bronchitis were related to exposure among non-smokers. Decrements in the FEV1 as a percentage of predicted were seen among smokers who had heavy cumulative borax exposures (greater than or equal to 80 mg/m3 years) but were not seen among less exposed smokers or among non-smokers. Radiographic abnormalities were uncommon and were not related to dust exposure. Borax dust appears to act as a simple respiratory irritant and perhaps causes small changes in the FEV1 among smokers who are heavily exposed.

  5. Motavizumab for prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus in high-risk children: a noninferiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Simões, Eric A F; Dagan, Ron

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Palivizumab reduces respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization in children at high risk by approximately 50% compared with placebo. We compared the efficacy and safety of motavizumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody with enhanced anti-RSV activity in preclinical studies, ...

  6. Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a PDF version of the Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking report and also a pdf version of an overview of progress made in reducing exposure to secondsmoke in the past 25 years.

  7. Genetic deficiency of GABA differentially regulates respiratory and non-respiratory motor neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Fogarty

    Full Text Available Central nervous system GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic activity switches from postsynaptic excitation to inhibition during the stage when motor neuron numbers are being reduced, and when synaptic connections are being established onto and by motor neurons. In mice this occurs between embryonic (E day 13 and birth (postnatal day 0. Our previous work on mice lacking glycinergic transmission suggested that altered motor neuron activity levels correspondingly regulated motor neuron survival and muscle innervation for all respiratory and non respiratory motor neuron pools, during this period of development [1]. To determine if GABAergic transmission plays a similar role, we quantified motor neuron number and the extent of muscle innervation in four distinct regions of the brain stem and spinal cord; hypoglossal, phrenic, brachial and lumbar motor pools, in mice lacking the enzyme GAD67. These mice display a 90% drop in CNS GABA levels ( [2]; this study. For respiratory-based motor neurons (hypoglossal and phrenic motor pools, we have observed significant drops in motor neuron number (17% decline for hypoglossal and 23% decline for phrenic and muscle innervations (55% decrease. By contrast for non-respiratory motor neurons of the brachial lateral motor column, we have observed an increase in motor neuron number (43% increase and muscle innervations (99% increase; however for more caudally located motor neurons within the lumbar lateral motor column, we observed no change in either neuron number or muscle innervation. These results show in mice lacking physiological levels of GABA, there are distinct regional changes in motor neuron number and muscle innervation, which appear to be linked to their physiological function and to their rostral-caudal position within the developing spinal cord. Our results also suggest that for more caudal (lumbar regions of the spinal cord, the effect of GABA is less influential on motor neuron development compared to

  8. Genetic deficiency of GABA differentially regulates respiratory and non-respiratory motor neuron development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Matthew J; Smallcombe, Karen L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Bellingham, Mark C; Noakes, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic activity switches from postsynaptic excitation to inhibition during the stage when motor neuron numbers are being reduced, and when synaptic connections are being established onto and by motor neurons. In mice this occurs between embryonic (E) day 13 and birth (postnatal day 0). Our previous work on mice lacking glycinergic transmission suggested that altered motor neuron activity levels correspondingly regulated motor neuron survival and muscle innervation for all respiratory and non respiratory motor neuron pools, during this period of development [1]. To determine if GABAergic transmission plays a similar role, we quantified motor neuron number and the extent of muscle innervation in four distinct regions of the brain stem and spinal cord; hypoglossal, phrenic, brachial and lumbar motor pools, in mice lacking the enzyme GAD67. These mice display a 90% drop in CNS GABA levels ( [2]; this study). For respiratory-based motor neurons (hypoglossal and phrenic motor pools), we have observed significant drops in motor neuron number (17% decline for hypoglossal and 23% decline for phrenic) and muscle innervations (55% decrease). By contrast for non-respiratory motor neurons of the brachial lateral motor column, we have observed an increase in motor neuron number (43% increase) and muscle innervations (99% increase); however for more caudally located motor neurons within the lumbar lateral motor column, we observed no change in either neuron number or muscle innervation. These results show in mice lacking physiological levels of GABA, there are distinct regional changes in motor neuron number and muscle innervation, which appear to be linked to their physiological function and to their rostral-caudal position within the developing spinal cord. Our results also suggest that for more caudal (lumbar) regions of the spinal cord, the effect of GABA is less influential on motor neuron development compared to that of

  9. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  10. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Involved in Severe Acute Respiratory Disease in Northern Italy during the Pandemic and Postpandemic Period (2009–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pariani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 infection and the impact of other respiratory viruses during pandemic and postpandemic period (2009–2011 in northern Italy; additionally we searched for unknown viruses in those cases for which diagnosis remained negative. 206 respiratory samples were collected from SARI/ARDS cases and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR/PCR to investigate influenza viruses and other common respiratory pathogens; also, a virus discovery technique (VIDISCA-454 was applied on those samples tested negative to all pathogens. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus was detected in 58.3% of specimens, with a case fatality rate of 11.3%. The impact of other respiratory viruses was 19.4%, and the most commonly detected viruses were human rhinovirus/enterovirus and influenza A(H3N2. VIDISCA-454 enabled the identification of one previously undiagnosed measles infection. Nearly 22% of SARI/ARDS cases did not obtain a definite diagnosis. In clinical practice, great efforts should be dedicated to improving the diagnosis of severe respiratory disease; the introduction of innovative molecular technologies, as VIDISCA-454, will certainly help in reducing such “diagnostic gap.”

  11. Radial Coordinates for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hogervorst, Matthijs

    2013-01-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFT_d expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting "rho-series" and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  12. Diversity Gain through Antenna Blocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dehghanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the typical usage mode, interaction between a handheld receiver antenna and the operator's RF absorbing body and nearby objects is known to generate variability in antenna radiation characteristics through blocking and pattern changes. It is counterintuitive that random variations in blocking can result in diversity gain of practical applicability. This diversity gain is quantified from a theoretical and experimental perspective. Measurements carried out at 1947.5 MHz verify the theoretical predictions, and a diversity gain of 3.1 dB was measured through antenna blocking and based on the utilized measurement setup. The diversity gain can be exploited to enhance signal detectability of handheld receivers based on a single antenna in indoor multipath environments.

  13. Cryptanalysis of Selected Block Ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhzaimi, Hoda A.

    , pseudorandom number generators, and authenticated encryption designs. For this reason a multitude of initiatives over the years has been established to provide a secure and sound designs for block ciphers as in the calls for Data Encryption Standard (DES) and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), lightweight...... ciphers initiatives, and the Competition for Authenticated Encryption: Security, Applicability, and Robustness (CAESAR). In this thesis, we first present cryptanalytic results on different ciphers. We propose attack named the Invariant Subspace Attack. It is utilized to break the full block cipher...... on the family of lightweight block cipher SIMON that was published by the U.S National Security Agency (NSA). The ciphers are developed with optimization towards both hardware and software in mind. While the specification paper discusses design requirements and performance of the presented lightweight ciphers...

  14. Climatological features of blocking anticyclones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupo, A.R.; Smith, P.J.; Oglesby, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Several climatological studies have been previously performed using large observational data sets (i.e., 10 years or longer) in order to determine the predominant characteristics of blocking anticyclones, including favored development regions, duration, preferred seasonal occurrence, and frequency of occurrence. These studies have shown that blocking anticyclones occur most frequently from October to April over the eastern Atlantic and Pacific oceans downstream from both the North American and Asian continental regions and the storm track regions to the east of these continents. Some studies have also revealed the presence of a third region block formation in western Russia near 40 degrees E which is associated with another storm track region over the Mediterranean and western Asia

  15. Improved Motion Estimation Using Early Zero-Block Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the early zero-block detection technique into the UMHexagonS algorithm, which has already been adopted in H.264/AVC JM reference software, to speed up the motion estimation process. A nearly sufficient condition is derived for early zero-block detection. Although the conventional early zero-block detection method can achieve significant improvement in computation reduction, the PSNR loss, to whatever extent, is not negligible especially for high quantization parameter (QP or low bit-rate coding. This paper modifies the UMHexagonS algorithm with the early zero-block detection technique to improve its coding performance. The experimental results reveal that the improved UMHexagonS algorithm greatly reduces computation while maintaining very high coding efficiency.

  16. Post-anaesthetic Respiratory Complaints Following Endotracheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postanaesthetic respiratory complications represent a significant negative aspect of surgical care. Objective: To assess the incidence and possible associated risk factors for postanaesthestic respiratory complaints following endotracheal anaesthesia in lower abdominal surgery in obstetric and gynecology ...

  17. Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum KidsHealth / For Parents / Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: Sputum What's in this article? ...

  18. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  19. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  20. Occupational Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming; Beach, Jeremy; Martin, Jonathan W.; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides have been widely used to control pest and pest-related diseases in agriculture, fishery, forestry and the food industry. In this review, we identify a number of respiratory symptoms and diseases that have been associated with occupational pesticide exposures. Impaired lung function has also been observed among people occupationally exposed to pesticides. There was strong evidence for an association between occupational pesticide exposure and asthma, especially in agricultural occupations. In addition, we found suggestive evidence for a link between occupational pesticide exposure and chronic bronchitis or COPD. There was inconclusive evidence for the association between occupational pesticide exposure and lung cancer. Better control of pesticide uses and enforcement of safety behaviors, such as using personal protection equipment (PPE) in the workplace, are critical for reducing the risk of developing pesticide-related symptoms and diseases. Educational training programs focusing on basic safety precautions and proper uses of personal protection equipment (PPE) are possible interventions that could be used to control the respiratory diseases associated with pesticide exposure in occupational setting. PMID:24287863

  1. Respiratory Information Extraction from Electrocardiogram Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Gamal El Din Fathy

    2010-12-01

    The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical activity of the heart, and it is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs. In this thesis, several methods for the extraction of respiratory process information from the ECG signal are presented. These methods allow an estimation of the lung volume and the lung pressure from the ECG signal. The potential benefit of this is to eliminate the corresponding sensors used to measure the respiration activity. A reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients will increase patients’ comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. As a further result, the efficiency of diagnosing respirational disorders will increase since the respiration activity can be monitored with a common, widely available method. The developed methods can also improve the detection of respirational disorders that occur while patients are sleeping. Such disorders are commonly diagnosed in sleeping laboratories where the patients are connected to a number of different sensors. Any reduction of these sensors will result in a more natural sleeping environment for the patients and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis.

  2. Seasonality of Acute Otitis Media and the Role of Respiratory Viral Activity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Hersh, Adam L.; Carleton, Scott T.; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming; Pavia, Andrew T.; Byington, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute otitis media (AOM) occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infections in young children. AOM and respiratory viruses both display seasonal variation. Our objective was to examine the temporal association between circulating respiratory viruses and the occurrence of pediatric ambulatory care visits for AOM. Methods This retrospective study included 9 seasons of respiratory viral activity (2002-2010) in Utah. We used Intermountain Healthcare's electronic medical records to assess community respiratory viral activity via laboratory-based active surveillance and to identify children <18 years with outpatient visits and ICD-9 codes for AOM. We assessed the strength of the association between AOM and individual respiratory viruses using interrupted time series analyses. Results During the study period, 96,418 respiratory viral tests were performed; 46,460 (48%) were positive. The most commonly identified viruses were: RSV (22%), rhinovirus (8%), influenza (8%), parainfluenza (4%), human metapneumovirus (3%), and adenovirus (3%). AOM was diagnosed during 271,268 ambulatory visits. There were significant associations between peak activity of RSV, human metapneumovirus, influenza A, and office visits for AOM. Adenovirus, parainfluenza, and rhinovirus were not associated with visits for AOM. Conclusions Seasonal RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza activity were temporally associated with increased diagnoses of AOM among children. These findings support the role of individual respiratory viruses in the development AOM. These data also underscore the potential for respiratory viral vaccines to reduce the burden of AOM. PMID:23249910

  3. Projectors, Shadows, and Conformal Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons-Duffin, David

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a method for computing conformal blocks of operators in arbitrary Lorentz representations in any spacetime dimension, making it possible to apply bootstrap techniques to operators with spin. The key idea is to implement the “shadow formalism” of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi in a setting where conformal invariance is manifest. Conformal blocks in d -dimensions can be expressed as integrals over the projective null-cone in the “embedding space” $ \\mathbb{R} $ d +1,1 . Taking ...

  4. Respiratory gated radiotherapy: current techniques and potential benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Campana, F.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Reboul, F.; Garcia, R.; Clippe, S.; Carrie, C.; Dubray, B.

    2003-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart...) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily breath-hold. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. These techniques presently investigated in several medical centers worldwide. Although promising, the first results obtained in lung and liver cancer patients require confirmation. Physical, technical and physiological questions still remain to be answered. This paper describes the most frequently used gated techniques and the main published clinical reports on the use of respiration-gated radiotherapy in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques. (author)

  5. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  6. Respiratory impairment and the aging lung: a novel paradigm for assessing pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Gill, Thomas M

    2012-03-01

    Older persons have an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment because the aging lung is likely to have experienced exposures to environmental toxins as well as reductions in physiological capacity. Systematic review of risk factors and measures of pulmonary function that are most often considered when defining respiratory impairment in aging populations. Across the adult life span, there are frequent exposures to environmental toxins, including tobacco smoke, respiratory infections, air pollution, and occupational dusts. Concurrently, there are reductions in physiological capacity that may adversely affect ventilatory control, respiratory muscle strength, respiratory mechanics, and gas exchange. Recent work has provided a strong rationale for defining respiratory impairment as an age-adjusted reduction in spirometric measures of pulmonary function that are independently associated with adverse health outcomes. Specifically, establishing respiratory impairment based on spirometric Z-scores has been shown to be strongly associated with respiratory symptoms, frailty, and mortality. Alternatively, respiratory impairment may be defined by the peak expiratory flow, as measured by a peak flow meter. The peak expiratory flow, when expressed as a Z-score, has been shown to be strongly associated with disability and mortality. However, because it has a reduced diagnostic accuracy, peak expiratory flow should only define respiratory impairment when spirometry is not readily available or an older person cannot adequately perform spirometry. Aging is associated with an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment, which is best defined by spirometric Z-scores. Alternatively, in selected cases, respiratory impairment may be defined by peak expiratory flow, also expressed as a Z-score.

  7. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Mauro, Antonella; Aliverti, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e . when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles and an increase in the load against which they must contract. In fact, both the resistive and elastic components of the work of breathing increase due to airway obstruction and chest wall and lung stiffening, respectively. The respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophy are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and sleep disordered breathing. They can be present at different rates according to the type of muscular dystrophy and its progression, leading to different onset of each symptom, prognosis and degree of respiratory involvement. A common feature of muscular dystrophy is respiratory failure, i.e. the inability of the respiratory system to provide proper oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination.In the lung, respiratory failure is caused by recurrent aspiration, and leads to hypoxaemia and hypercarbia.Ventilatory failure in muscular dystrophy is caused by increased respiratory load and respiratory muscles weakness.Respiratory load increases in muscular dystrophy because scoliosis makes chest wall compliance decrease, atelectasis and fibrosis make lung compliance decrease, and airway obstruction makes airway resistance increase.The consequences of respiratory pump failure are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and sleep disordered

  8. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Mauro, Antonella; Aliverti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e. when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles an...

  9. The Effect of Development in Respiratory Sensory Gating Measured by Electrocortical Activations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying S. Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The perception of respiratory sensations can be of significant importance to individuals for survival and greatly impact quality of life. Respiratory sensory gating, similar to somatosensory gating with exteroceptive stimuli, is indicative of brain cortices filtering out repetitive respiratory stimuli and has been investigated in adults with and without diseases. Respiratory gating can be tested with the respiratory-related evoked potential (RREP method in the electroencephalogram with a paired inspiratory occlusion paradigm. Here, the RREP N1 component elicited by the second stimulus (S2 shows reduced amplitudes compared to the RREP N1 component elicited by the first stimulus (S1. However, little is known regarding the effect of development on respiratory sensory gating. The present study examined respiratory sensory gating in 22 typically developed school-aged children and 22 healthy adults. Paired inspiratory occlusions of 150-ms each with an inter-stimulus-interval of 500-ms were delivered randomly every 2–4 breaths during recording. The main results showed a significantly larger RREP N1 S2/S1 ratio in the children group than in the adult group. In addition, children compared to adults demonstrated significantly smaller N1 peak amplitudes in response to S1. Our results suggest that school-aged children, compared to adults, display reduced respiratory sensory gating.

  10. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Lo Mauro

    2016-12-01

    To understand the mechanisms leading to respiratory disturbances in patients with muscular dystrophy. To understand the impact of respiratory disturbances in patients with muscular dystrophy. To provide a brief description of the main forms of muscular dystrophy with their respiratory implications.

  11. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  12. BIOLOGY OF HUMAN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    information about its biology which may be useful to the present and future researchers. Key words: Respiratory virus, Human Respiratory syncytial virus, biology, genome, epidemiology, immunity. INTRODUCTION. Acute lower ..... of respiratory infections in bone marrow transplant. Pneumonia develops in about one-half of ...

  13. Delayed antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey Kp; Del Mar, Chris B; Dooley, Liz; Foxlee, Ruth; Farley, Rebecca

    2017-09-07

    Concerns exist regarding antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) owing to adverse reactions, cost, and antibacterial resistance. One proposed strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing is to provide prescriptions, but to advise delay in antibiotic use with the expectation that symptoms will resolve first. This is an update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2007, and updated in 2010 and 2013. To evaluate the effects on clinical outcomes, antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and patient satisfaction of advising a delayed prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections. For this 2017 update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2017), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialised Register; Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to 25 May 2017); Ovid Embase (2013 to 2017 Week 21); EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1984 to 25 May 2017); Web of Science (2013 to 25 May 2017); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (1 September 2017); and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2017). Randomised controlled trials involving participants of all ages defined as having an RTI, where delayed antibiotics were compared to immediate antibiotics or no antibiotics. We defined a delayed antibiotic as advice to delay the filling of an antibiotic prescription by at least 48 hours. We considered all RTIs regardless of whether antibiotics were recommended or not. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Three review authors independently extracted and collated data. We assessed the risk of bias of all included trials. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. For this 2017 update we added one new trial involving 405 participants with uncomplicated acute respiratory infection. Overall, this review included 11 studies with a total of 3555 participants. These 11 studies involved acute respiratory infections including acute otitis media (three studies

  14. Main-chain supramolecular block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si Kyung; Ambade, Ashootosh V; Weck, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Block copolymers are key building blocks for a variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to drug delivery. The material properties of block copolymers can be tuned and potentially improved by introducing noncovalent interactions in place of covalent linkages between polymeric blocks resulting in the formation of supramolecular block copolymers. Such materials combine the microphase separation behavior inherent to block copolymers with the responsiveness of supramolecular materials thereby affording dynamic and reversible materials. This tutorial review covers recent advances in main-chain supramolecular block copolymers and describes the design principles, synthetic approaches, advantages, and potential applications.

  15. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  16. Control rod removal blocking device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent excess power increase resulted from erroneous control rod removal during high power operation in BWR type reactor by decreasing the continuous removal enabling distance for the control rods along with increase in the reactor power where the reactor power is greater than a predetermined level. Constitution: When control rod selection signals are supplied from a control unit to a control rod removal blocking device, the blocking device judges whether the reactor core power is greater than a predetermined value A or not, using reactor core power signals outputted from an average power monitor. Where the reactor core power exceeds the predetermined value A and if the reactor core power is relatively low, a large continuous removal enabling distance N 1 is calculated in the blocking device to allow the continuous removal as far as the notch N 1 . The continuous removal enabling distance is shortened as the reactor core power increases and the removal is blocked, for example, at notch N 2 . While on the other hand, if the reactor core power is below the predetermined value A, both of the notchwise removal and the continuous removal are enabled. (Seki, T.)

  17. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  18. Vagal Blocking for Obesity Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Helene; Revesz, David; Kodama, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the US FDA has approved "vagal blocking therapy or vBLoc® therapy" as a new treatment for obesity. The aim of the present study was to study the mechanism-of-action of "VBLOC" in rat models. METHODS: Rats were implanted with VBLOC, an intra-abdominal electrical device...

  19. Thermo-responsive block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocan Cetintas, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Block copolymers (BCPs) are remarkable materials because of their self-assembly behavior into nano-sized regular structures and high tunable properties. BCPs are in used various applications such as surfactants, nanolithography, biomedicine and nanoporous membranes. In these thesis, we aimed to

  20. Scintigraphic visualization of 'Blocking' thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeonova, A.; Kostadinova, I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: An important problem in nuclear endocrinology is 'blocking' of thyroid gland, which necessitates postpone of the investigation, adverse clinical effect of stopping medications and a delay of making diagnosis. The aim of the study was to introduce and to determine the clinical value of the scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI in patients (Pts) with 'blocked thyroid'. In 365 Pts (aged 38-75 years), indicated for a thyroid scintigraphy after proper preparation, an investigation was performed with 74 MBq 99mTc-pertechnetate, 20 min. p.i. In 14 of them (3.8%), the thyroid was 'blocked' and additional scintigraphy was done with 370-555 MBq 99mTc-MIBI, 15 and 120 min.p.i. It was estimated that in all Pts there was a visualization of thyroid. In 1 of them, a large 'hot' nodule was visualized in the early and late image. Later on a differentiated thyroid carcinoma was proved histologically. In the rest of the patients 'cold' nodules with different size were visualized, eventually as a result of cysts. As a conclusion we consider, that a scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI is a useful tool in Pts with 'blocked' thyroid. In addition an evaluation of the thyroid nodule could be done and therefore- a recommendation for therapy

  1. Respiratory Muscle Training and Exercise Endurance at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Samuel; Quackenbush, Joseph; Fletcher, Michael; Pendergast, David R

    2016-08-01

    Climbing and trekking at altitude are common recreational and military activities. Physiological effects of altitude are hypoxia and hyperventilation. The hyperventilatory response to altitude may cause respiratory muscle fatigue and reduce sustained submaximal exercise. Voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea respiratory muscle training (VIHT) improves exercise endurance at sea level and at depth. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that VIHT would improve exercise time at altitude [3600 m (11,811 ft)] compared to control and placebo groups. Subjects pedaled an ergometer until exhaustion at simulated altitude in a hypobaric chamber while noninvasive arterial saturation (Sao2), ventilation (VE), and oxygen consumption (Vo2) were measured. As expected, Sao2 decreased to 88 ± 4% saturation at rest and to 81 ± 2% during exercise, and was not affected by VIHT. VIHT resulted in a 40% increase in maximal training VE compared to pre-VIHT. Exercise endurance significantly increased 44% after VIHT (P = altitude post-VIHT increased more (49%) for longer (21 min) and decreased less (11% at 25.4 ± 6.7 min). VIHT improved exercise time at altitude and sustained VE. This suggests that VIHT reduced respiratory muscle fatigue and would be useful to trekkers and military personnel working at altitude. Helfer S, Quackenbush J, Fletcher M, Pendergast DR. Respiratory muscle training and exercise endurance at altitutde. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):704-711.

  2. Cigarette smoke facilitates allergen penetration across respiratory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, K; Reininger, R; Bernhard, D; Campana, R; Pree, I; Reisinger, J; Kneidinger, M; Kundi, M; Dolznig, H; Thurnher, D; Valent, P; Chen, K-W; Vrtala, S; Spitzauer, S; Valenta, R; Niederberger, V

    2009-03-01

    The association between cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway disease is a matter for debate. We sought to investigate in an in vitro system whether active smoking reduces the integrity and barrier function of the respiratory epithelium and thus facilitates allergen penetration. We cultured the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o- in a transwell culture system as a surrogate for the intact respiratory epithelium. The cell monolayer was exposed to standardized cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The extent and effects of trans-epithelial allergen penetration were measured using 125I-labelled purified major respiratory allergens (rBet v 1, rPhl p 5 and rDer p 2) and histamine release experiments. Exposure of cells to concentrations of CSE similar to those found in smokers induced the development of para-cellular gaps and a decrease in trans-epithelial resistance. CSE exposure induced a more than threefold increase in allergen penetration. Increased subepithelial allergen concentrations provoked a substantial augmentation of histamine release from sensitized basophils. Our results indicate that cigarette smoke is a potent factor capable of reducing the barrier function of the respiratory epithelium for allergens and may contribute to increased allergic inflammation, exacerbation of allergic disease and boosting of IgE memory.

  3. Altered Pathogenesis of Porcine Respiratory Coronavirus in Pigs due to Immunosuppressive Effects of Dexamethasone: Implications for Corticosteroid Use in Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Kwonil; Alekseev, Konstantin P.; Zhang, Xinsheng; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and optimal treatments for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are unclear, although corticosteroids were used to reduce lung and systemic inflammation. Because the pulmonary pathology of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) in pigs resembles SARS, we used PRCV as a model to clarify the effects of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (DEX) on coronavirus (CoV)-induced pneumonia. Conventional weaned pigs (n = 130) in one of four groups (PRCV/phosphate-buffered saline [PBS] ...

  4. Physical training in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Cecilia Vargas

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Title: Exercise Training in Chronic RespiratoryDisease.Patients with chronic pulmonary disease havean inactive lifestyle with a progressive viciouscycle of physical inactivity, deconditioning andmore dyspnea. Physical Therapy attempts toimprove cardiopulmonary function andphysical conditioning. In PulmonaryRehabilitation, exercise training is consideredthe most important aspect because improvesaerobic exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function, and reduces breathlessness. Endurancetraining can include lower extremity trainingwith treadmill or cycle ergometer and upperlimbs exercises specialy in patients that haveproblems with arms movement. The use of highintensity training has showed better results,including less dyspnea and more functionalcapacity.Complementary therapies include ventilatoryassistance with pressure support or proportionalventilatory assistance during training, anabolichormones, nutritional support and functionalelectric stimulation.

  5. Minimum-block-generated flexible-grouping-based spectrum assignment for flex-grid optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yang; Xu, Jing

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the spectrum fragmentation issue in flex-grid optical networks and propose a minimum-block-generated flexible-grouping-based spectrum assignment algorithm. By dividing the spectrum resources into several flexible groups according to the bandwidth requirements of service requests for their accommodation and minimizing the generated isolated spectrum blocks inside each spectrum group, the proposed algorithm can not only reduce spectrum fragments but also enhance networking performance (e.g. blocking probability) due to the improved spectrum contiguity inside each spectrum group with no traffic disruption or any extra components. The simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can remarkably reduce spectrum fragments with a low blocking probability.

  6. Respiratory challenge MRI: Practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona C. Moreton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory challenge MRI is the modification of arterial oxygen (PaO2 and/or carbon dioxide (PaCO2 concentration to induce a change in cerebral function or metabolism which is then measured by MRI. Alterations in arterial gas concentrations can lead to profound changes in cerebral haemodynamics which can be studied using a variety of MRI sequences. Whilst such experiments may provide a wealth of information, conducting them can be complex and challenging. In this paper we review the rationale for respiratory challenge MRI including the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the cerebral circulation. We also discuss the planning, equipment, monitoring and techniques that have been used to undertake these experiments. We finally propose some recommendations in this evolving area for conducting these experiments to enhance data quality and comparison between techniques.

  7. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin D and respiratory disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Hushmand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The active form of vitamin D is synthesized in some body organs following sun exposure and dietary intake. Vitamin D exhibits its major and critical effects not only through regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism but also by influencing on respiratory and immune system. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D below the optimum limit lead to vitamin D insufficiency or maybe deficiency. These inappropriate concentrations of vitamin D lead to different types of pulmonary diseases such as viral and bacterial respiratory infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. In this review we described the association between vitamin D deficiency and severe therapy resistant asthma. We also reviewed the underlying molecular mechanism of vitamin D deficiency in children with severe- therapy resistant asthma. Based on current information, future clinical trial are needed to study the role of vitamin D supplementation on different groups of patients with severe asthma including infants, children of school age, and ethnic minorities.

  9. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) β and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects

  10. Endocytosis is required for exocytosis and priming of respiratory burst activity in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-10-01

    Neutrophil generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced by exposure to pro-inflammatory agents in a process termed priming. Priming is depending on exocytosis of neutrophil granules and p47 phox phosphorylation-dependent translocation of cytosolic NADPH oxidase components. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was recently reported to be necessary for priming, but the mechanism linking endocytosis to priming was not identified. The present study examined the hypothesis that endocytosis regulates neutrophil priming by controlling granule exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis by isolated human neutrophils was inhibited by chlorpromazine, monodansylcadaverine, and sucrose. Exocytosis of granule subsets was measured as release of granule components by ELISA or chemiluminescence. ROS generation was measured as extracellular release of superoxide as reduction of ferrocytochrome c. p38 MAPK activation and p47 phox phosphorylation were measured by immunoblot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA with the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test. Inhibition of endocytosis prevented priming of superoxide release by TNFα and inhibited TNFα stimulation and priming of exocytosis of all four granule subsets. Inhibition of endocytosis did not reduce TNFα-stimulated p38 MAPK activation or p47 phox phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked TNFα stimulation of secretory vesicle and gelatinase granule exocytosis. Endocytosis is linked to priming of respiratory burst activity through ROS-mediated control of granule exocytosis.

  11. [Community-acquired respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Vivas, J; Rubio Alonso, M; Corral, O; Pacheco, S; Agudo, E; Picazo, J J

    1997-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the most frequent reason for primary health care consultation. Although generally not severe, they are responsible for a large number of days of laboral and scholar absenteeism and an excessive use of antibiotics. The clinical and epidemiologic data of extrahospitalary infections in primary health care centers throughout Spain were collected according to the one day cut off system repeated trimestrally over one year. Data of 3,732 days of consultation were collected in which a total of 144,608 patients were attended. Of these, 20,614 had respiratory infections and 11,684 extrarespiratory infections. The most frequent processes were pharyngitis (33.7%), common cold (31.7%) followed by bronchitis (18.7%), otitis (11%), influenza (4.6%), laryngitis (4%), sinusitis (3.6%) and pneumonia (1.8%). Antibiotic treatment was prescribed in 13,488 patients (65%). The type of antibiotic was analyzed in the 11,977 patients treated for only one infection. Penicillins were the antibiotics most used followed by cephalosporins. The antibiotic prescribed was considered adequate in 70% of the 8,484 patients treated for potentially bacterial infection. A total of 3,493 patients had infection considered to be of viral etiology. Twenty-two percent of the patients attending a primary health care center presented infection and of these two out of three cases had respiratory infection. Pharyngitis and common cold were the most frequent processes observed. Two thirds of the patients consulting for respiratory infection received antibiotic treatment, with 29.2% being diagnosed with infections considered to be of viral etiology. The empiric treatment chosen for the two thirds of the potentially bacterial infections was considered as adequate.

  12. Zonography in acute respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinina, V.S.; Fetisova, V.M.; Kozorez, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiography was performed in 94 patients whose initial condition was assessed as acute respiratory disease. Radioscopy with x-ray image amplifier, roentgenography and zonography were used. Pulmonary changes were found in 61 persons. In 45 of them acute pneumonia was revealed, in 16 changes in the pulmonary pattern assessed as residual manifestations of pneumonia. Changes in 30 patients with pneumonia and 16 patients with residual manifestations were detected by zonography only

  13. Acute respiratory distress after transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jožef Gradišek

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO are clinical syndromes with predominant pulmonary injury and respiratory distress. Anaphylactic reaction, hemolytic transfusion reaction and transfusion of contaminated blood products also impair lung function but are less frequent. Transfusion in critically ill and injured patient is an independent risk factor for acute lung injury. It remains to be determined whether transfusion is the cause of increased mortality or only an indicator of disease severity

  14. Recurrent Respiratory Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yurochko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers a problem of recurrent respiratory infections (RRI in children. Their description, risk factors, diagnostic algorithm have been dwelt. A special attention is paid to the treatment. An optimal antibiotic in RRI of bacterial genesis is a high-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate (registered as Augmentin™ ES in Ukraine, the efficacy of which is 94.6–96.3 % according to different data.

  15. Respiratory function among Malaysian aboriginals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, A. E.; Bolton, J. M.; Ganendran, A.

    1971-01-01

    Respiratory function tests have been performed on 43 Malaysian aboriginals. The forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were considerably below, and the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) slightly below, the predicted values. The FEV1 and PEFR decreased more rapidly with advancing age than predicted from western standards. These findings may be due to physiological differences or may be the result of chronic purulent bronchitis which is common among the aboriginals. Images PMID:5144653

  16. Baby swimming and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E; London, Stephanie J; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per

    2008-05-01

    To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.

  17. Incidence of respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, T.; Mahmud, S.; Ali, S.; Dogar, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in hospital born babies. Subjects and Methods: All live born infants delivered at the hospital and who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were included in the study. Results: Ninety-four neonates developed RDS. Out of these, 88 (93.61%) were preterm and 06 (6.38%) were term infants. There was a male preponderance (65.95%). RDS was documented in 1.72% of total live births. 37.28% of preterm and 0.11% of term neonates born at the hospital. The incidence of RDS was 100% at 26 or less weeks of gestation, 57.14% at 32 weeks, and 3.70% at 36 weeks. The mortality with RDS was 41 (43.61%). Conclusion: RDS is the commonest cause of respiratory distress in the newborn, particularly, in preterm infants. It carries a high mortality rate and the incidence is more than that documented in the Western world. (author)

  18. Respiratory analysis system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system is described for monitoring the respiratory process in which the gas flow rate and the frequency of respiration and expiration cycles can be determined on a real time basis. A face mask is provided with one-way inlet and outlet valves where the gas flow is through independent flowmeters and through a mass spectrometer. The opening and closing of a valve operates an electrical switch, and the combination of the two switches produces a low frequency electrical signal of the respiratory inhalation and exhalation cycles. During the time a switch is operated, the corresponsing flowmeter produces electric pulses representative of the flow rate; the electrical pulses being at a higher frequency than that of the breathing cycle and combined with the low frequency signal. The high frequency pulses are supplied to conventional analyzer computer which also receives temperature and pressure inputs and computes mass flow rate and totalized mass flow of gas. From the mass spectrometer, components of the gas are separately computed as to flow rate. The electrical switches cause operation of up-down inputs of a reversible counter. The respective up and down cycles can be individually monitored and combined for various respiratory measurements.

  19. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...

  20. Smoking and respiratory irregularity in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldirola, Daniela; Bellodi, Laura; Cammino, Stefania; Perna, Giampaolo

    2004-09-15

    The biological mechanisms underlying the link between smoking and panic attacks are unknown. Smoking might increase the risk of panic by impairing respiratory system function. We evaluated the effect of smoking on respiratory irregularity in patients with panic disorder (PD) and healthy comparison subjects and the role of the respiratory disorders in this effect. We applied the Approximate Entropy index (ApEn), a nonlinear measure of irregularity, to study breath-by-breath baseline respiratory patterns in our sample. Both smoker and nonsmoker patients had more irregular respiratory patterns than healthy subjects. Smoker patients showed higher ApEn indices of baseline respiratory rate and tidal volume than nonsmoker patients (R = 5.4, df = 2,55, p smoking in healthy subjects did not influence the regularity of respiratory patterns. Respiratory disorders did not account for the influence of smoking on respiratory irregularity. Smokers had more severe panic attacks than nonsmokers. Smoking may impair vulnerable respiratory function and act as disruptive factor on intrinsic baseline respiratory instability in patients with PD, possibly influencing the onset or maintenance of the disorder.

  1. The respiratory physiotherapy causes pain in newborns? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zanelat, Camila Ferreira; Rocha, Flávia Rodrigues; Lopes, Gabriela Menezes; Ferreira, Juliana Rodrigues; Gabriel, Letícia Silva; Oliveira, Trícia Guerra e

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Neonatal respiratory physicaltherapy plays an important role in prevention and treatment of respiratory pathologies. In preterm neonates, immaturity of respiratory system can let development of various respiratory diseases. Meanwhile, it is discussed if respiratory physiotherapy can cause pain. Objective: Investigate presence of pain in neonates undergone to respiratory physiotherapy by a systematic review. Methods: Scientific search in electronic databases: Medli...

  2. Sugammadex and Reversal of Neuromuscular Block in Adult Patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Wefki Abdelgawwad Shousha, Ahmed Abdelgawwad; Sanfilippo, Maria; Sabba, Antonio; Pinchera, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe form of myopathy. Patients with DMD are more sensitive to sedative, anesthetic, and neuromuscular blocking agents which may result in intraoperative and early postoperative cardiovascular and respiratory complications, as well as prolonged recovery from anesthesia. In this case report, we describe a 25-year-old male patient admitted for cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. We induced our anesthesia by oxygen, propofol, fen...

  3. Respiratory Changes in Patients with Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ocko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review published literature concerning the major changes that occur in the respiratory system after stroke, and also the impact of respiratory muscle training in these patients. The literature search was conducted through electronic databases (PubMed, SciELO and Pedro in Portuguese and English languages on themes related to changes in the respiratory system and methods of assessment and rehabilitation of respiratory muscle strength in individuals affected by stroke. There is scientific evidence that individuals affected by stroke may show decreased inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength. Studies suggest that respiratory muscle training through threshold load can bring benefits by improving respiratory function and respiratory muscle strength. However, more studies should be conducted to deepen the knowledge about the benefits and long-term effects of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with stroke.

  4. A Review on Human Respiratory Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafarian, Pardis; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Input impedance of the respiratory system is measured by forced oscillation technique (FOT). Multiple prior studies have attempted to match the electromechanical models of the respiratory system to impedance data. Since the mechanical behavior of airways and the respiratory system as a whole are similar to an electrical circuit in a combination of series and parallel formats some theories were introduced according to this issue. It should be noted that, the number of elements used in these models might be less than those required due to the complexity of the pulmonary-chest wall anatomy. Various respiratory models have been proposed based on this idea in order to demonstrate and assess the different parts of respiratory system related to children and adults data. With regard to our knowledge, some of famous respiratory models in related to obstructive, restrictive diseases and also Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are reviewed in this article.

  5. Preoperatıve ultrasound-guıded suprascapular nerve block for postthoracotomy shoulder paın.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyuvaci, Emine; Akyol, Onat; Sitilci, Tolga; Dübüs, Türkan; Topac Ogˇlu, Hakan; Leblebici, Hülya; Ac Ikgöz, Alican

    2013-06-01

    Acute postthoracotomy pain is a well-known potential problem, with pulmonary complications, ineffective respiratory rehabilitation, and delayed mobilization in the initial postoperative period, and it is followed by chronic pain. The type of thoracotomy, intercostal nerve damage, muscle retraction, costal fractures, pleural irritation, and incision scar are the most responsible mechanisms. Our aim was to assess whether preoperative ultrasound suprascapular nerve block with thoracic epidural analgesia was effective for postthoracotomy shoulder pain relief. Thirty-six American Society of Anesthesiologist classification physical status I-III patients (2011-2012), with a diagnosis of lung cancer and scheduled for elective open-lung surgery, were prospectively included in the study. Eighteen of the patients received an ultrasound-guided suprascapular nerve block with 10-mL 0.5% levobupivacaine, using a 22-gauge spinal needle, 1 hour before operation (group S); 18 other patients had thoracic epidural analgesia only, and no nerve block was performed. Standard general anesthesia was administered. Degree of shoulder pain was assessed by a blinded observer when discharging patients from the recovery room, and thereafter at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours on infusion at rest and 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours on coughing. The same blinded observer also recorded the total amount of epidural levobupivacaine and fentanyl used by the 2 groups. In the suprascapular block group, the total amount of levobupivacaine (P = 0.0001) and fentanyl (P = 0.005) used postoperatively was statistically lower than in the epidural group. Visual analogue scale measurements in the suprascapular group were statistically significantly lower at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours than those in the epidural group, both at rest and coughing. Postthoracotomy shoulder pain reduces patient function and postsurgical rehabilitation potential after thoracotomy, and various studies on explaining the

  6. Pulmonary function tests and work-related respiratory and allergic symptoms in Iranian bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hosein; Taheri, Ehsan; Ahmadi, Sina; Ebrahimi, Kolsoumeh; Soudaneh, Malihe; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Sabourhasanzadeh, Alireza

    2009-06-01

    Bakers are frequently exposed to various irritant chemicals during work which can induce respiratory problems. In this study, pulmonary function tests and self-reported respiratory and allergic symptoms in bakers were compared with matched control subjects. The frequency of respiratory and allergic symptoms was evaluated in a sample of 58 Iranian bakers and 58 control subjects using a questionnaire. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) were also measured in all participants. All respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in bakers than control croup (pbakers were also significantly greater than control group (pbakers compared to rest period (pbakers than control subjects (pbakers have a higher frequency of work related respiratory symptoms and to a lesser extend allergic symptoms particularly during the work period. PFT values were also significantly reduced among bakers.

  7. 31 CFR 585.216 - Expenses of maintaining blocked property; liquidation into blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... property; liquidation into blocked account. 585.216 Section 585.216 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... blocked property; liquidation into blocked account. (a) Except as otherwise authorized, and... expenses incident to the blocking and maintenance of property blocked pursuant to § 585.201 or § 585.215(a...

  8. On the Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of Block Triangular Preconditioned Block Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Block lower triangular matrices and block upper triangular matrices are popular preconditioners for 2×2 block matrices. In this note we show that a block lower triangular preconditioner gives the same spectrum as a block upper triangular preconditioner and that the eigenvectors of the two preconditioned matrices are related. © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  9. Block-Matching Based Multifocus Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multifocus image fusion method is proposed. Two image blocks are selected by sliding the window from the two source images at the same position, discrete cosine transform (DCT is implemented, respectively, on these two blocks, and the alternating component (AC energy of these blocks is then calculated to decide which is the well-focused one. In addition, block matching is used to determine a group of image blocks that are all similar to the well-focused reference block. Finally, all the blocks are returned to their original positions through weighted average. The weight is decided with the AC energy of the well-focused block. Experimental results demonstrate that, unlike other spatial methods, the proposed method effectively avoids block artifacts. The proposed method also significantly improves the objective evaluation results, which are obtained by some transform domain methods.

  10. Transversus abdominis plane block after Caesarean section in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    part of multimodal pain management following Caesarean section in an area with limited resources. The study also looked at the advantage of this block in reducing the consumption of morphine and diclofenac postoperatively. Methods: After approval by the institutional ethics committee and informed consent of participants ...

  11. Mechanical properties of millet husk ash bitumen stabilized soil block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents an investigation into the improvement of strength and durability properties of lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA) and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples were selected and treated with 0%, ...

  12. Asymptotic results for bifurcations in pure bending of rubber blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Coman, Ciprian; Destrade, Michel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The bifurcation of an incompressible neo-Hookean thick block with a ratio of thickness to length {eta}, subject to pure bending, is considered. The two incremental equilibrium equations corresponding to a nonlinear pre-buckling state of strain are reduced to a fourth-order linear eigenproblem that displays a multiple turning point. It is found that for 0 {infty} dege...

  13. Total-Count Calibration Blocks for use in uranium Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif

    Transportable calibration blocks for field scintillometers and borehole probes were manufactured from concrete and installed at calibration sites in Denmark and Greece. The concrete mixes were prepared from aggregates of quartz sand and crushed uranium-thorium ore. Hater-reducing agents and silica...

  14. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because

  15. Blocking incidental frustration during bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Maria Esperanza S; Brown, Anna-Leigh; Durkee, Cassandra M; Sim, Hoeun

    2018-02-08

    The current study examined the effects of an intervention aimed at blocking the transfer of frustration from a previous experience (i.e. recall task) to a subsequent and unrelated task (i.e. ultimatum bargaining task). Participants who went through the intervention were more likely to accept unfair offers in the ultimatum bargaining task than those who did not go through the intervention. These results show that participants who were blocked from transferring their feelings of frustration from the recall task to the subsequent bargaining task (no-transfer condition) more likely accepted unfair offers than those who inadvertently transferred their feelings of frustration (transfer condition). The effect of conditions on accept-reject decisions in the ultimatum bargaining was mediated by reported feelings of frustration.

  16. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, Paul; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer

  17. UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY: BLOCK TRIANGULATION COMPARISONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord", useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey, allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma, Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  18. Effect of concrete block weight and wall height on electromyographic activity and heart rate of masons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, D; Rosecrance, J C; Gerr, F; Merlino, L A; Cook, T M

    2005-08-15

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are common among construction workers, such as masons. Few interventions are available to reduce masons' exposure to heavy lifting, a risk factor for MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether one such intervention, the use of light-weight concrete blocks (LWBs), reduces physiological loads compared to standard-weight blocks (SWBs). Using a repeated measures design, 21 masons each constructed two 32-block walls, seven courses (rows) high, entirely of either SWBs or LWBs. Surface electromyography (EMG), from arm and back muscles, and heart rate was sampled. For certain muscles, EMG amplitudes were slightly lower when masons were laying LWBs compared to SWBs. Upper back and forearm extensor EMG amplitudes were greater for the higher wall courses for both block weights. There were no significant differences in heart rate between the two blocks. Interventions that address block weight and course height may be effective for masons.

  19. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I(e)) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I(e). In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 microM), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  20. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  1. Non.Invasive Ventilation for Adult Acute Respiratory Failure. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, G J; Bersten, A D

    1999-06-01

    To discuss the clinical indications and complications of non-invasive ventilation. A review of articles published in peer-reviewed journals from 1966 to 1998 and identified through a MEDLINE search on non-invasive ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used in patients with respiratory failure caused by cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, in patients with acute respiratory failure, it appears that acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and acute respiratory failure associated with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia are the only disorders in which significant benefits have been associated with the use of the NIV mode of CPAP. The potential clinical benefit of CPAP in acute asthma and blunt chest trauma remains unclear. Pressure support ventilation is beneficial in patients with hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to respiratory muscle insufficiency, high inspiratory work loads, or reduced alveolar ventilation. It appears also to be associated with an improved outcome in COPD patients with hypercapnic ARF. Non-invasive ventilation using the modes of CPAP, PSV, BiPAP and NIPPV should be considered in patients with respiratory disorders who remain in acute respiratory failure despite conventional therapy, before considering invasive mechanical ventilation.

  2. Effect of Hexavalent Chromium on Electron Leakage of Respiratory Chain in Mitochondria Isolated from Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the present study, we explored reactive axygen species (ROS production in mitochondria, the mechanism of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI hepatotoxicity, and the role of protection by GSH. Methods: Intact mitochondria were isolated from rat liver tissues and mitochondrial basal respiratory rates of NADH and FADH2 respiratory chains were determined. Mitochondria were treated with Cr(VI, GSH and several complex inhibitors. Mitochondria energized by glutamate/malate were separately or jointly treated with Rotenone (Rot, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI and antimycinA (Ant, while mitochondria energized by succinate were separately or jointly treated with Rot, DPI ‚ thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA and Ant. Results: Cr(VI concentration-dependently induced ROS production in the NADH and FADH2 respiratory chain in liver mitochondria. Basal respiratory rate of the mitochondrial FADH2 respiratory chain was significantly higher than that of NADH respiratory chain. Hepatic mitochondrial electron leakage induced by Cr(VI from NADH respiratory chain were mainly from ubiquinone binding sites of complex I and complex III. Conclusion: Treatment with 50µM Cr(VI enhances forward movement of electrons through FADH2 respiratory chain and leaking through the ubiquinone binding site of complex III. Moreover, the protective effect of GSH on liver mitochondria electron leakage is through removing excess H2O2 and reducing total ROS.

  3. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  4. [THE TECHNOLOGY "CELL BLOCK" IN CYTOLOGICAL PRACTICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenko, N N; Borisova, O V; Baranova, I B

    2015-08-01

    The article presents summary information concerning application of "cell block" technology in cytological practice. The possibilities of implementation of various modern techniques (immune cytochemnical analysis. FISH, CISH, polymerase chain reaction) with application of "cell block" method are demonstrated. The original results of study of "cell block" technology made with gelatin, AgarCyto and Shadon Cyoblock set are presented. The diagnostic effectiveness of "cell block" technology and common cytological smear and also immune cytochemical analysis on samples of "cell block" technology and fluid cytology were compared. Actually application of "cell block" technology is necessary for ensuring preservation of cell elements for subsequent immune cytochemical and molecular genetic analysis.

  5. Neonatal total liquid ventilation: is low-frequency forced oscillation technique suitable for respiratory mechanics assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Dominick; Beaulieu, Alexandre; Avoine, Olivier; Micheau, Philippe; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to implement low-frequency forced oscillation technique (LFFOT) in neonatal total liquid ventilation (TLV) and to provide the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. Thirteen newborn lambs, weighing 2.5 + or - 0.4 kg (mean + or - SD), were premedicated, intubated, anesthetized, and then placed under TLV using a specially design liquid ventilator and a perfluorocarbon. The respiratory mechanics measurements protocol was started immediately after TLV initiation. Three blocks of measurements were first performed: one during initial respiratory system adaptation to TLV, followed by two other series during steady-state conditions. Lambs were then divided into two groups before undergoing another three blocks of measurements: the first group received a 10-min intravenous infusion of salbutamol (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) after continuous infusion of methacholine (9 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)), while the second group of lambs was chest strapped. Respiratory impedance was measured using serial single-frequency tests at frequencies ranging between 0.05 and 2 Hz and then fitted with a constant-phase model. Harmonic test signals of 0.2 Hz were also launched every 10 min throughout the measurement protocol. Airway resistance and inertance were starkly increased in TLV compared with gas ventilation, with a resonant frequency < or = 1.2 Hz. Resistance of 0.2 Hz and reactance were sensitive to bronchoconstriction and dilation, as well as during compliance reduction. We report successful implementation of LFFOT to neonatal TLV and present the first insight into respiratory impedance under this new modality of ventilation. We show that LFFOT is an effective tool to track respiratory mechanics under TLV.

  6. Image coding using adaptive resizing in the block-DCT domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivusaari, Jari J.; Takala, Jarmo H.; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an image coding scheme using adaptive resizing algorithm to obtain more compact coefficient representation in the block-DCT domain. Standard coding systems, e.g. JPEG baseline, utilize the block-DCT transform to reduce spatial correlation and to represent the image information with a small number of visually significant transform coefficients. Because the neighboring coefficient blocks may include only a few low-frequency coefficients, we can use downsizing operation to combine the information of two neighboring blocks into a single block. Fast and elegant image resizing methods operating in transform domain have been introduced previously. In this paper, we introduce a way to use these algorithms to reduce the number of coefficient blocks that need to be encoded. At the encoder, the downsizing operation should be performed delicately to gain compression efficiency. The information of neighboring blocks can be efficiently combined if the blocks do not contain significant highfrequency components and if the blocks share similar characteristics. Based on our experiments, the proposed method can offer from 0 to 4 dB PSNR gain for block-DCT based coding processes. Best performance can be expected for large images containing smooth homogenous areas.

  7. Respiratory muscle activity and respiratory obstruction after abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A; Drummond, G B

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory movements in patients after abdominal surgery are frequently abnormal, with associated disturbances in the pattern of inspiratory pressure generation. The reasons for these abnormalities are not clear and have been attributed to impaired action of the diaphragm. However, an alternative is that partial airway obstruction could trigger reflex activation of the inspiratory ribcage muscles, which would cause a similar pattern of inspiratory pressure change. Direct measurement of electrical activity can indicate if reflex activation of inspiratory muscles occurs when partial airway obstruction is present. In an open study, we implanted electrodes to measure the EMG of scalene, intercostal and external oblique abdominal muscles in patients after lower abdominal surgery. Analgesia was with morphine i.v. by patient control. We used nasal cannulae to measure nasal airflow and compared EMG activity when airway obstruction was present with activity when breathing was not obstructed. The pattern of activity of the different muscles was distinct. Intercostal activity reached a maximum during inspiration, before the scalene muscles, whereas scalene activity increased in phase with increasing lung volume. Abdominal muscle activity commenced when expiratory flow had ceased and continued until the next inspiration. In all three muscle groups, partial airway obstruction did not alter muscle activity. Partial airway obstruction does not activate inspiratory ribcage muscles, in patients receiving morphine for postoperative analgesia after lower abdominal surgery. Changes in respiratory pressures and abnormalities of chest wall movement described in previous studies cannot be attributed to reflex responses and probably result from increased airway resistance and abdominal muscle action.

  8. Block division carrier slot setting for satellite SCPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashima, Hiroyuki; Sasase, Iwao; Mori, Shinsaku

    1991-01-01

    A carrier slot setting plan is proposed to reduce intermodulation (IM) effects for satellite single-channel-per-carrier (SCPC) systems. Carrier slots are divided into blocks and slight frequency gaps are set among blocks. This setting introduces frequency offset between the center frequencies of carrier slots and the center frequencies of the IM components. A method of deriving optimum division in order to derive the upper bound of improvement of the C/IM ratio in the worst channel is developed. The results show that the setting plan achieves significant improvement of IM effects at a cost of only slight bandwidth expansion, even in fully loaded SCPC systems.

  9. Partial transpose of two disjoint blocks in XY spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coser, Andrea; Tonni, Erik; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    We consider the partial transpose of the spin reduced density matrix of two disjoint blocks in spin chains admitting a representation in terms of free fermions, such as XY chains. We exploit the solution of the model in terms of Majorana fermions and show that such partial transpose in the spin variables is a linear combination of four Gaussian fermionic operators. This representation allows to explicitly construct and evaluate the integer moments of the partial transpose. We numerically study critical XX and Ising chains and we show that the asymptotic results for large blocks agree with conformal field theory predictions if corrections to the scaling are properly taken into account. (paper)

  10. Respiratory Complications Due to Sulfur Mustard Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Hossein; Javadi, Iraj; Shirali, Saeed

    2016-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) or bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide is a vesicant and alkylating chemical weapon. SM was used in the 1980s against Iran by Iraqi forces. After exposure to SM in initial acute phase the greatest damage is incurred by the eyes, skin and lungs and the highest damage is caused to the lungs. This injury not only in the acute phase but also in the long-term has the highest prevalence among these patients. Clinical symptoms of people after exposure to SM start with irritation of the nose and sinuses in the mild doses to the runny nose and pain at higher doses and even irritation of the airways and bronchial engagement in very high doses. Respiratory complications in patients exposed to SM have been associated with long-term symptoms and these symptoms add to the intensity of the complication. Bloody sputum, feeling of tightness in the chest and shortness of breath over nights are among common symptoms; also the main respiratory symptoms including generalized wheezing, rale (crackle), decreased breath sounds and cyanosis and Apparently FEV1 is reduced by 50 mL/year. In these patients there are changes in blood cells especially in white blood cells and neutrophils and systemic inflammation and systemic changes with other comorbidities are observed. Although SM pulmonary patients' treatment is based on bronchodilators and long-acting-β2 agonists, paying attention to the comorbidities with prior systemic changes in these patients is a reason for the need to change treatment strategies of these patients with systemic and extra-pulmonary therapy.

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Prior

    Full Text Available Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III (BTP, a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  13. Comparison between respiratory muscle strength in sedentary and active elderly. A Transversal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taismara Castelli dos Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging results in decreased respiratory muscle strength and physical activity can minimize this effect. The aim of this study was to analyze if the strength of respiratory muscles differs between sedentary and active elderly. The sample consisted of 16 subjects divided in active and inactive groups. It was measured the maximal inspiratory pressure (PImáx and the maximal expiratory pressure (PEmáx. The active group had higher values. We conclude that physical activity reduced the loss of respiratory muscle strength in the study group.

  14. Blocking device especially for circulating pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susil, J.; Vychodil, V.; Lorenc, P.

    1976-01-01

    The claim of the invention is a blocking device which blocks reverse flow occurring after the shutdown of circulating pumps, namely in the operation of nuclear power plants or in pumps with a high delivery head. (F.M.)

  15. Demographic Data - MDC_BlockGroup

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade County Census 2000 Block Groups. A census Block Group is a statistical subdivision of a census Tract consisting of a cluster of...

  16. Alteration in respiratory physiology in obesity for anesthesia-critical care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porhomayon, J; Papadakos, P; Singh, A; Nader, N D

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is known to be a major risk factor of a whole range of cardiovascular, metabolic and respiratory disorders. The pattern of regional fat distribution plays an important role in the pre-disposition of obese subjects to respiratory complications. Obesity is responsible for important changes in respiratory function both during spontaneous breathing as well as during general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. The most characteristic abnormalities consist of decreased functional residual capacity, reduced expiratory reserve volume, decreased compliance and increased resistance of the respiratory system. Breathing at low lung volume promotes airway closure in the dependent lung zones with consequent gas exchange abnormalities even though lung carbon monoxide-diffusing capacity is normal or increased. Weight loss can reduce many of the alterations in pulmonary function related to obesity.

  17. Equation Discovery for Model Identification in Respiratory Mechanics of the Mechanically Ventilated Human Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzert, Steven; Guttmann, Josef; Steinmann, Daniel; Kramer, Stefan

    Lung protective ventilation strategies reduce the risk of ventilator associated lung injury. To develop such strategies, knowledge about mechanical properties of the mechanically ventilated human lung is essential. This study was designed to develop an equation discovery system to identify mathematical models of the respiratory system in time-series data obtained from mechanically ventilated patients. Two techniques were combined: (i) the usage of declarative bias to reduce search space complexity and inherently providing the processing of background knowledge. (ii) A newly developed heuristic for traversing the hypothesis space with a greedy, randomized strategy analogical to the GSAT algorithm. In 96.8% of all runs the applied equation discovery system was capable to detect the well-established equation of motion model of the respiratory system in the provided data. We see the potential of this semi-automatic approach to detect more complex mathematical descriptions of the respiratory system from respiratory data.

  18. Usefulness of Downe Score as clinical assessment tool and Bubble CPAP as primary respiratory support in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Buch, Pankaj; Makwana, Aarti; Chudasama, Dr Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: In preterm neonates respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the common causes of morbidity and mortality. Application of Bubble CPAP has been shown to be beneficial in terms of reduced need of invasive ventilation and prolonged hospital stay in newborns with RDS. Objective: Present study was conducted to assess the outcome of Bubble CPAP in newborns and usefulness of Downe score in predicting outcome and use as an assessment tool by medical/ nursing staff in resource limi...

  19. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaudi, L R; Rossi, E; Mantaras, M C; Perrone, M S; Siri, L Nicola

    2007-01-01

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display

  20. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Kale Cekinmez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing efforts. Respiratory distress syndrome or complications caused by respiratory distress syndrome are the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in premature infants. This article briefly reviews respiratory distress syndrome and its complications. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 615-630

  1. Respiratory and Systemic Effects of LASSBio596 Plus Surfactant in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnatas Dutra Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Exogenous surfactant has been proposed as adjunctive therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but it is inactivated by different factors present in the alveolar space. We hypothesized that co-administration of LASSBio596, a molecule with significant anti-inflammatory properties, and exogenous surfactant could reduce lung inflammation, thus enabling the surfactant to reduce edema and improve lung function, in experimental ARDS. Methods: ARDS was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in BALB/c mice. A sham-operated group was used as control (CTRL. After surgery (6 hours, CTRL and ARDS animals were assigned to receive: (1 sterile saline solution; (2 LASSBio596; (3 exogenous surfactant or (4 LASSBio596 plus exogenous surfactant (n = 22/group. Results: Regardless of exogenous surfactant administration, LASSBio596 improved survival rate and reduced collagen fiber content, total number of cells and neutrophils in PLF and blood, cell apoptosis, protein content in BALF, and urea and creatinine levels. LASSBio596 plus surfactant yielded all of the aforementioned beneficial effects, as well as increased BALF lipid content and reduced surface tension. Conclusion: LASSBio596 exhibited major anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic effects in experimental sepsis-induced ARDS. Its association with surfactant may provide further advantages, potentially by reducing surface tension.

  2. Respiratory system involvement in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Kuo, Christin; Ananth, Amitha Lakshmi; Myers, Angela; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Stevenson, David A; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Hudgins, Louanne

    2016-07-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the HRAS proto-oncogene. Respiratory system complications have been reported in individuals with CS, but a comprehensive description of the full spectrum and incidence of respiratory symptoms in these patients is not available. Here, we report the clinical course of four CS patients with respiratory complications as a major cause of morbidity. Review of the literature identified 56 CS patients with descriptions of their neonatal course and 17 patients in childhood/adulthood. We found that in the neonatal period, respiratory complications are seen in approximately 78% of patients with transient respiratory distress reported in 45% of neonates. Other more specific respiratory diagnoses were reported in 62% of patients, the majority of which comprised disorders of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Symptoms of upper airway obstruction were reported in CS neonates but were more commonly diagnosed in childhood/adulthood (71%). Analysis of HRAS mutations and their respiratory phenotype revealed that the common p.Gly12Ser mutation is more often associated with transient respiratory distress and other respiratory diagnoses. Respiratory failure and dependence on mechanical ventilation occurs almost exclusively with rare mutations. In cases of prenatally diagnosed CS, the high incidence of respiratory complications in the neonatal period should prompt anticipatory guidance and development of a postnatal management plan. This may be important in cases involving rarer mutations. Furthermore, the high frequency of airway obstruction in CS patients suggests that otorhinolaryngological evaluation and sleep studies should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Eren Kale Cekinmez; Hacer Yapicioglu Yildizdas; Ferda Ozlu

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing effor...

  4. Used, Blocking and Sleeping Patents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrisi, Salvatore; Gambardella, Alfonso; Giuri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    patents are being utilized. A substantial share of patents is neither used internally nor for market transactions, which confirms the importance of strategic patenting and inefficiency in the management of intellectual property. We investigate different types of unused patents—unused blocking patents...... and sleeping patents. We also examine the association between used and unused patents and their characteristics such as family size, scope, generality and overlapping claims, technology area, type of applicant, and the competitive environment from where these patents originate. We discuss our results...

  5. Large block test status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.; Lin, W.; Blair, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a status report, which essentially transmits the data that have been collected to date on the Large Block Test (LBT). The analyses of data will be performed during FY98, and then a complete report will be prepared. This status report includes introductory material that is not needed merely to transmit data but is available at this time and therefore included. As such, this status report will serve as the template for the future report, and the information is thus preserved

  6. Micellization and Dynamics of a Block Copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Triblock copolymers of the type EPE, where E and P denote ethylene oxide and propylene oxide blocks, respectively, are industrially important copolymers often called Pluronics or Poloxamers. EPE copolymers form micelles with a core of P blocks and different micellar shapes depending on block leng...

  7. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or other...

  8. 31 CFR 500.319 - Blocked account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 500.319 Section 500... § 500.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals of other...

  9. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  10. 21 CFR 882.5070 - Bite block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bite block. 882.5070 Section 882.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5070 Bite block. (a) Identification. A bite block...

  11. Comparison between respiratory muscle strength in sedentary and active elderly. A Transversal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Taismara Castelli dos; Travensolo, Cristiane de Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Aging results in decreased respiratory muscle strength and physical activity can minimize this effect. The aim of this study was to analyze if the strength of respiratory muscles differs between sedentary and active elderly. The sample consisted of 16 subjects divided in active and inactive groups. It was measured the maximal inspiratory pressure (PImáx) and the maximal expiratory pressure (PEmáx). The active group had higher values. We conclude that physical activity reduced the loss of resp...

  12. A Quick Reference on Respiratory Alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory alkalosis, or primary hypocapnia, occurs when alveolar ventilation exceeds that required to eliminate the carbon dioxide produced by tissues. Concurrent decreases in Paco 2 , increases in pH, and compensatory decreases in blood HCO 3 - levels are associated with respiratory alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis can be acute or chronic, with metabolic compensation initially consisting of cellular uptake of HCO 3 - and buffering by intracellular phosphates and proteins. Chronic respiratory alkalosis results in longer-lasting decreases in renal reabsorption of HCO 3 - ; the arterial pH can approach near-normal values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  14. Novel therapies for perioperative respiratory complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahan Porhomayon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative respiratory complications are of paramount clinical importance as they prolong the hospitalization, increase the costs of treatment and contribute to the perioperative mortality. Obesity, preexisting pulmonary disease and advanced age are known risk factors for developing postoperative respiratory complications, which affect exceeding number of patients. Hereby, we present a review on the pathogenesis of post-operative respiratory complications particularly in obese and older patients. We further focus on the standard management and emerging therapies for the post-operative respiratory complications.

  15. Respiratory disease mortality among uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, V.E.; Gillam, J.D.; Wagoner, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    A mortality analysis of a group of white and Indian uranium miners was done by a life-table method. A significant excess of respiratory cancer among both whites and Indians was found. Nonmalignant respiratory disease deaths among the whites are approaching cancer in importance as a cause of death, probably as a result of diffuse parenchymal radiation damage. Exposure-response curves for nonsmokers are linear for both respiratory cancer and ''other respiratory disease''. Cigaret smoking elevates and distorts that curve. Light cigaret smokers appear to be most vulnerable to lung parenchymal damage. The predominant histologic cancer among nonsmokers is small-cell undifferentiated, just as it is among cigaret smokers

  16. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Helena Antoniassi da Silva; Fernando Rosado Spilki; Adriana Gut Lopes Riccetto; Emilio Elias Baracat; Clarice Weis Arns

    2009-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and the human metapneumovírus (hMPV) are main etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARI). The ARI is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide.  hRSV and hMPV are members of the Paramyxoviridae. They are enveloped, non-segmented viruses, with negative-sense single stranded genomes. Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the best characterized agent viral of this group, associated with respiratory diseases in...

  17. Data Blocks : Hybrid OLTP and OLAP on compressed storage using both vectorization and compilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, Harald; Mühlbauer, Tobias; Funke, Florian; Boncz, Peter; Neumann, Thomas; Kemper, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at reducing the main-memory footprint in high performance hybrid OLTP&OLAP databases, while retaining high query performance and transactional throughput. For this purpose, an innovative compressed columnar storage format for cold data, called Data Blocks is introduced. Data Blocks

  18. Poly(phenylene ether Based Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward N. Peters

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenylene ether (PPE telechelic macromonomers are unique hydrophobic polyols which have been used to prepare amphiphilic block copolymers. Various polymer compositions have been synthesized with hydrophilic blocks. Their macromolecular nature affords a range of structures including random, alternating, and di- and triblock copolymers. New macromolecular architectures can offer tailored property profiles for optimum performance. Besides reducing moisture uptake and making the polymer surface more hydrophobic, the PPE hydrophobic segment has good compatibility with polystyrene (polystyrene-philic. In general, the PPE contributes to the toughness, strength, and thermal performance. Hydrophilic segments go beyond their affinity for water. Improvements in the interfacial adhesion between polymers and polar substrates via hydrogen bonding and good compatibility with polyesters (polyester-philic have been exhibited. The heterogeneity of domains in these PPE based block copolymer offers important contributions to diverse applications.

  19. Flexible Triangle Search Algorithm for Block-Based Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Antoniou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fast algorithm for block-based motion estimation, the flexible triangle search (FTS algorithm, is presented. The algorithm is based on the simplex method of optimization adapted to an integer grid. The proposed algorithm is highly flexible due to its ability to quickly change its search direction and to move towards the target of the search criterion. It is also capable of increasing or decreasing its search step size to allow coarser or finer search. Unlike other fast search algorithms, the FTS can escape from inferior local minima and thus converge to better solutions. The FTS was implemented as part of the H.264 encoder and was compared with several other block matching algorithms. The results obtained show that the FTS can reduce the number of block matching comparisons by around 30–60% with negligible effect on the image quality and compression ratio.

  20. Suprascapular block in the therapy of chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint: Suprascapular block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palibrk Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint is a very common pathology in modern human population. The etiology of chronic pain is often unknown, although the trauma, degenerative diseases, inflammation, tumors and neurological disease appear as common etiologic factors. Patients with this pain had a significantly reduced quality of life.1,2 Method: During the two years, twelve patients diagnosed painful shoulder syndrome. Eleven of the twelve patients involved in the study had started physical therapy. Under the physical treatment pain intensity decreased, but not completely. Hand had reduced mobility. We applied a suprascapular block. We used 1 ml (7 mg betamethasone. Results: Suprascapular block was applied to the eleven patients in physical therapy. After three days of application, the pain was significantly reduced, by 50% in seven patients. Mobility of the hand was greatly improved. In three of the remaining four patients the block was repeated after one month. The pain was significantly smaller after that. Physical therapy is done all the time. Conclusion: The treatment of chronic pain in the shoulder and the shoulder joint is multidisciplinary. In some cases, the use of corticosteroids suprascapular block is very useful.