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Sample records for block neurotransmitter reuptake

  1. LeuT-Desipramine Structure Reveals How Antidepressants Block Neurotransmitter Reuptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou,Z.; Zhen, J.; Karpowich, N.; Goetz, R.; Law, C.; Reith, M.; Wang, D.

    2007-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect -- inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine -- by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  2. LeuT-desipramine structure reveals how antidepressants block neurotransmitter reuptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhen, Juan; Karpowich, Nathan K; Goetz, Regina M; Law, Christopher J; Reith, Maarten E A; Wang, Da-Neng

    2007-09-07

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect-inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine-by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  3. Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters: Caught in the Act!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinauskaite, Lina

    The neurotransmitter: sodium symporters in the neurons. Communication between neurons is mediated by the release of molecules called neurotransmitters (blue dots) from first neuron and sensed by receptors on the surface of the second (purple sphere). The signal is ended by active reuptake...... of these neurotransmitters by a family of proteins called neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS), which are driven using the large concentration difference of sodium (orange dots) between the outside and the inside of the cell...

  4. Tramadol: Effects on sexual behavior in male rats are mainly caused by its 5-HT reuptake blocking effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Esquivel Franco, Diana C; Oosting, Ronald; Waldinger, Marcel; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Olivier, Berend

    2017-04-01

    Tramadol is a well-known and effective analgesic. Recently it was shown that tramadol is also effective in human premature ejaculation. The inhibitory effect of tramadol on the ejaculation latency is probably due to its mechanism of action as a μ-opioid receptor agonist and noradrenaline/serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor. In order to test this speculation, we tested several doses of tramadol in a rat model of male sexual behavior and investigated two types of drugs interfering with the μ-opioid and the 5-HT system. First the μ-opioid receptor agonist properties of tramadol were tested with naloxone, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. Second, the effects of WAY100,635, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, were tested on the behavioral effects of tramadol. Finally the effects of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, combined with naloxone or WAY100,635 treatment, were compared to the effects of tramadol combined with these drugs. Results showed that naloxone, at a sexually inactive dose, could only partially antagonize the inhibitory effect of tramadol. Moreover, low and behaviorally inactive doses of WAY100,635, strongly decreased sexual behavior when combined with a behaviorally inactive dose of tramadol. Finally we showed that the effects of paroxetine on sexual behavior resembled the effects of tramadol, indicating that tramadol's inhibitory effects on sexual behavior are primarily and mainly caused by its SSRI properties and that its μ-opioid receptor agonistic activity only contributes marginally. These findings support the hypothesis that tramadol exerts inhibition of premature ejaculations in men by its 5-HT reuptake inhibiting properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of LeuT as a model in elucidating binding sites for substrates and inhibitors in neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mammalian neurotransmitter transporters are complex proteins playing a central role in synaptic transmission between neurons by rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters. The proteins which transport dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin belong to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters...

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  7. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  9. A short update on the structure of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielsen Mari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine (DAT, noradrenalin (NET and serotonin (SERT transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. Cocaine and the SSRI (S-citalopram block neurotransmitter reuptake competitively, but while cocaine is a non-selective reuptake inhibitor, (S-citalopram is a selective SERT inhibitor. Findings Here we present comparisons of the binding sites and the electrostatic potential surfaces (EPS of DAT, NET and SERT homology models based on two different LeuTAa templates; with a substrate (leucine in an occluded conformation (PDB id 2a65, and with an inhibitor (tryptophan in an open-to-out conformation (PDB id 3f3a. In the occluded homology models, two conserved aromatic amino acids (tyrosine and phenylalanine formed a gate between the putative binding pockets, and this contact was interrupted in the open to out conformation. The EPS of DAT and NET were generally negative in the vestibular area, whereas the EPS of the vestibular area of SERT was more neutral. Conclusions The findings presented here contribute as an update on the structure of the binding sites of DAT, NET and SERT. The updated models, which have larger ligand binding site areas than models based on other templates, may serve as improved tools for virtual ligand screening.

  10. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  11. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  12. Focus On: Neurotransmitter Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Puglia, Michael P.; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, a...

  13. Neurotransmitters affecting time perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been demonstrated that dopamine and acetylcholine are the main neurotransmitters that affect time perception,which is also affected by other neurotransmitters.OBJECTIVE:To summarize how the neurotransmitter affect the time perception,and put forward the perspectives for further study on time perception.RETRIEVE STRATEGY:An online search for related literatures published in English was conducted in Elsevier SDOL(ScienceDirect Online)database from May 1990 to March 2007 using key words of "timing neurotransmitter".Totally 69 literatures were collected,and they were primarily checked.Inclusive criteria:Reviews and experimental studies;correlative studies of timing neurotransmitter.Exclusive criteria:Repeated studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The literatures were mainly sourced from Cognitive Brain Research and Neuroscience,and they were analyzed according to the inclusive criteria.Nineteen of them were involved,and all were experimental studies and reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS:The studies on time perception are developed mainly concentrating on dopamine and acetylcholine.Dopamine D2 receptors mainly affect the speed of internal clock.Dopamine receptors play an important role in both timing excitation and inhibition,which suggests the bi-directional regulation of dopamine.Injection of dopamine agonist can affect the attention to timing information.Injection of BW813U(antagonist of acetylcholine) can induce memory disorder,which indicates the effect of acetylcholine on timing memory,and further study shows that it is the effect of acetylcholine in precentral medial area.In a word,the study on the neurotransmitters affecting time perception is still at the primary stage.CONCLUSION:Dopamine and acetylcholine are the neurotransmitters known to be related to time perception.Dopamine in the basal ganglia is related to internal-clock in the range of seconds and minutes;Acetylcholine in prefrontal cortex is related to the mechanisms of temporal memory and attention

  14. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  15. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K(+) regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Mortensen, Jonas S; Sohail, Azmat

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na(+)-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K(+) in......(+)-effect. The K(+)-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K(+) binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K(+) to regulate the LeuT transport cycle....

  16. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2015-06-03

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed.

  17. Serotonin synthesis, release and reuptake in terminals: a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Janet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that has been linked to a wide variety of behaviors including feeding and body-weight regulation, social hierarchies, aggression and suicidality, obsessive compulsive disorder, alcoholism, anxiety, and affective disorders. Full understanding of serotonergic systems in the central nervous system involves genomics, neurochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. Though associations have been found between functions at these different levels, in most cases the causal mechanisms are unknown. The scientific issues are daunting but important for human health because of the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other pharmacological agents to treat disorders in the serotonergic signaling system. Methods We construct a mathematical model of serotonin synthesis, release, and reuptake in a single serotonergic neuron terminal. The model includes the effects of autoreceptors, the transport of tryptophan into the terminal, and the metabolism of serotonin, as well as the dependence of release on the firing rate. The model is based on real physiology determined experimentally and is compared to experimental data. Results We compare the variations in serotonin and dopamine synthesis due to meals and find that dopamine synthesis is insensitive to the availability of tyrosine but serotonin synthesis is sensitive to the availability of tryptophan. We conduct in silico experiments on the clearance of extracellular serotonin, normally and in the presence of fluoxetine, and compare to experimental data. We study the effects of various polymorphisms in the genes for the serotonin transporter and for tryptophan hydroxylase on synthesis, release, and reuptake. We find that, because of the homeostatic feedback mechanisms of the autoreceptors, the polymorphisms have smaller effects than one expects. We compute the expected steady concentrations of serotonin transporter knockout mice and compare to

  18. Analytical Strategies for the Determination of Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors in Pharmaceutical Formulations and Biological Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Cafer

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs that act as reuptake inhibitors for the neurotransmitters norepinephrine and epinephrine. The present review provides an account of analytical methods published in recent years for the determination of NRI drugs. NRIs are atomoxetine, reboxetine, viloxazine and maprotiline. NRIs with less activity at other sites are mazindol, bupropion, tapentadol, and teniloxazine. This review focuses on the analytical methods including chromatographic, spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, and electrophoresis techniques for NRI analysis from pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. Among all of the published methods, liquid chromatography with UV-vis or MS-MS detection is the most popular technique. The most the common sample preparation techniques in the analytical methods for NRIs include liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction. Besides the analytical methods for single components, some of the simultaneous determinations are also included in this review.

  19. Block of a Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, L S

    2005-04-01

    The primary target for cocaine is believed to be monoamine transporters because of cocaine's high-affinity binding that prevents re-uptake of released neurotransmitter. However, direct interaction with ion channels has been shown to be important for certain pharmacological/toxicological effects of cocaine. Here I show that cocaine selectively blocks a calcium-dependent K(+) channel in hippocampal neurons grown in culture (IC(50)=approximately 30 microM). Single-channel recordings show that in the presence of cocaine, the channel openings are interrupted with brief closures (flicker block). As the concentration of cocaine is increased the open-time is reduced, whereas the duration of brief closures is independent of concentration. The association and dissociation rate constants of cocaine for the neuronal Ca(2+)-activated K(+ )channels are 261+/-37 microM: (-1)s(-1) and 11451+/-1467 s(-1). The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(B)) for cocaine, determined from single-channel parameters, is 43 microM. The lack of voltage dependence of block suggests that cocaine probably binds to a site at the mouth of the pore. Block of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels by cocaine may be involved in functions that include broadening of the action potential, which would facilitate transmitter release, enhancement of smooth muscle contraction particularly in blood vessels, and modulation of repetitive neuronal firing by altering the repolarization and afterhyperpolarization phases of the action potential.

  20. Combined Norepinephrine / Serotonergic Reuptake Inhibition: Effects on Maternal Behavior, Aggression and Oxytocin in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas Cox

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few systematic studies exist on the effects of chronic reuptake of monoamine neurotransmitter systems during pregnancy on the regulation of maternal behavior, although many drugs act primarily through one or more of these systems. Previous studies examining fluoxetine and amfonelic acid treatment during gestation on subsequent maternal behavior in rodents indicated significant alterations in postpartum maternal care, aggression and oxytocin levels. In this study, we extended our studies to include chronic gestational treatment with desipramine or amitriptyline to examine differential effects of reuptake inhibition of norepinephrine and combined noradrenergic and serotonergic systems on maternal behavior, aggression, and oxytocin system changes. METHODS: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated throughout gestation with saline or one of three doses of either desipramine, which has a high affinity for the norepinephrine monoamine transporter, or amitriptyline, an agent with high affinity for both the norepinephrine and serotonin monoamine transporters. Maternal behavior and postpartum aggression were assessed on postpartum days one and six respectively. Oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions on postpartum day seven. Predictions were that amitriptyline would decrease maternal behavior and increase aggression relative to desipramine, particularly at higher doses. Amygdaloidal oxytocin was expected to decrease with increased aggression. RESULTS: Amitriptyline and desiprimine differentially reduced maternal behavior, and at higher doses reduced aggressive behavior. Hippocampal oxytocin levels were lower after treatment with either drug but were not correlated with specific behavioral effects. These results, in combination with previous findings following gestational treatment with other selective neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitors, highlight the diverse effects of multiple monoamine systems thought to be involved in

  1. Marine Toxins Potently Affecting Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi

    Synapses are specialised structures where interneuronal communication takes place. Not only brain function is absolutely dependent on synaptic activity, but also most of our organs are intimately controlled by synaptic activity. Synapses re therefore an ideal target to act upon and poisonous species have evolved fascinating neurotoxins capable of shutting down neuronal communication by blocking or activating essential components of the synapse. By hijacking key proteins of the communication machinery, neurotoxins are therefore extremely valuable tools that have, in turn, greatly helped our understanding of synaptic biology. Moreover, analysis and understanding of the molecular strategy used by certain neurotoxins has allowed the design of entirely new classes of drugs acting on specific targets with high selectivity and efficacy. This chapter will discuss the different classes of marine neurotoxins, their effects on neurotransmitter release and how they act to incapacitate key steps in the process leading to synaptic vesicle fusion.

  2. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion......Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most...

  3. [Axolemmal transporters for neurotransmitter uptake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M

    Neurotransmission is a fundamental process in interneuronal communication. It starts with the release of the neurotransmitter following a nerve impulse and ends either by uptake by specific specific transporters or by metabolization to an inactive compound. In this review we will consider the molecular, ion dependence and electrogenic properties of the axolemal transporters for neurotransmitters and also the pathological consequences of their impairment as well as the drugs that can interact with them. Most axolemmal transporters have been cloned and grouped into two large families according to their molecular characteristics and electrogenic properties: 1. Those dependent on Na+/Cl- include transporters of GABA, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, choline, proline, betaine, glycine and taurine, and 2. Those dependent on Na+/K+, which include the transporters of glutamate, alanine, serine and cysteine. The clonation of transporters has permitted (and will continue to permit) the correlation of molecular alterations of transporters with different neuro-degenerative disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease), with brain lesions (e.g. cerebral ischemia, status epilepticus) and with psychiatric alterations (e.g. schizophrenia, depression). In this respect, chemical synthesis of new selective drugs which interact with the different systems for uptake of neurotransmitters will offer new approaches to the treatment of many disorders of the central nervous system which still have no satisfactory drug treatment.

  4. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Belcher, P.R.; Drake-Holland, A.J.; Noble, M.

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibiting drugs (SSRIs) are widely used for endogenous depression. In addition to depleting the nerve terminals of serotonin they also lower blood platelet serotonin levels. Platelet aggregation is a major component of acute coronary syndromes, including sudden death, and also of limb ischaemia. Platelet-released serotonin causes constriction of diseased blood vessels. The recent literature has revealed a number of reports of association between the treatment of...

  5. The molecular mechanism for overcoming the rate-limiting step in monoamine neurotransmitter transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinning, Steffen; Said, Saida; Malinauskaite, Lina

    structures of the bacterial homolog, LeuT, captured in a new conformation without substrate or sodium bound shows a dramatic rotation of an absolutely conserved leucine into the substrate site. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with functional studies on SERT support that this leucine must act...... membrane. The rate-limiting step in monoamine reuptake is the return of the empty transporter from an inward-facing to an outward-facing conformation without neurotransmitter and sodium bound. The molecular mechanism underlying this important conformational transition has not been described. Crystal...

  6. Desvenlafaxine succinate: A new serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecher, Darlene C; Beyer, Chad E; Johnston, Grace; Bray, Jenifer; Shah, S; Abou-Gharbia, M; Andree, Terrance H

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize a new chemical entity, desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS). DVS is a novel salt form of the isolated major active metabolite of venlafaxine. Competitive radioligand binding assays were performed using cells expressing either the human serotonin (5-HT) transporter (hSERT) or norepinephrine (NE) transporter (hNET) with K(i) values for DVS of 40.2 +/- 1.6 and 558.4 +/- 121.6 nM, respectively. DVS showed weak binding affinity (62% inhibition at 100 microM) at the human dopamine (DA) transporter. Inhibition of [3H]5-HT or [3H]NE uptake by DVS for the hSERT or hNET produced IC50 values of 47.3 +/- 19.4 and 531.3 +/- 113.0 nM, respectively. DVS (10 microM), examined at a large number of nontransporter targets, showed no significant activity. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) rapidly penetrated the male rat brain and hypothalamus. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) significantly increased extracellular NE levels compared with baseline in the male rat hypothalamus but had no effect on DA levels using microdialysis. To mimic chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment and to block the inhibitory 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, a 5-HT(1A) antagonist, N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclo hexanecarboxamide maleate salt (WAY-100635) (0.3 mg/kg s.c.), was administered with DVS (30 mg/kg orally). 5-HT increased 78% compared with baseline with no additional increase in NE or DA levels. In conclusion, DVS is a new 5-HT and NE reuptake inhibitor in vitro and in vivo that demonstrates good brain-to-plasma ratios, suggesting utility in a variety of central nervous system-related disorders.

  7. Neurotransmitters, Pharmacologic Synergy, and Clinical Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Martha

    2006-01-01

    ... of neurotransmitters and their receptor sites, more ingenious methods of drug administration, and more creative combinations of the various drugs, more than half our patients have psychiatric sympto...

  8. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patiens with refractory and non-refractory depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Yanxia Zhang; Jianxia Yang; Min Hu; Yueqi Zhang; Xia Liang

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment.

  9. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of thermodynamic measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), g-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated...... as the most important interaction by which the NTs are anchored to the membrane. These distinctive interactions could be related to nonspecific effects of these neurotransmitters and could point to a bilayer-mediated modulation of nerve transmission. However, due to the strong variability in affinity observed...... for the different NTs, this attraction is not an inherent property of all neurotransmitters....

  10. Tetanus Toxin Action : Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release Linked to Synaptobrevin Proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Egenhard; Edelmann, Lambert; Chou, Judy H.; Binz, Thomas; Yamasaki, Shinji; Eisel, Uli; Baumert, Marion; Südhof, Thomas C.; Niemann, Heiner; Jahn, Reinhard

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block

  11. Tetanus Toxin Action : Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release Linked to Synaptobrevin Proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Egenhard; Edelmann, Lambert; Chou, Judy H.; Binz, Thomas; Yamasaki, Shinji; Eisel, Uli; Baumert, Marion; Südhof, Thomas C.; Niemann, Heiner; Jahn, Reinhard

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitorprescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Ra; Jordan, S; Pierini, A;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the prescribing patterns of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before, during and after pregnancy in six European population-based databases. DESIGN: Descriptive drug utilisation study. SETTING: Six electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, the Netherlands...

  13. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  14. Zn2+ modulation of neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, K.; Gether, U.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families of neurotra......Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families...... of neurotransmitter transporters have been identified based on sequence homology: (1) the neurotransmitter sodium symporter family (NSS), which includes the Na+/C1(-)-dependent transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin; and (2) the dicarboxylate/amino acid cation symporter family (DAACS), which...... indirectly suggested the possibility that several of the transporters are modulated by Zn2+ in vivo, and thus that Zn2+ can play a role as a neuromodulator by affecting the function of neurotransmitter transporters....

  15. Transcriptional coordination of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Kerk, Sze Yen; Weinreb, Alexis; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-05-18

    During nervous system development, postmitotic neurons face the challenge of generating and structurally organizing specific synapses with appropriate synaptic partners. An important unexplored question is whether the process of synaptogenesis is coordinated with the adoption of specific signaling properties of a neuron. Such signaling properties are defined by the neurotransmitter system that a neuron uses to communicate with postsynaptic partners, the neurotransmitter receptor type used to receive input from presynaptic neurons, and, potentially, other sensory receptors that activate a neuron. Elucidating the mechanisms that coordinate synaptogenesis, neuronal activation, and neurotransmitter signaling in a postmitotic neuron represents one key approach to understanding how neurons develop as functional units. Using the SAB class of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons as a model system, we show here that the phylogenetically conserved COE-type transcription factor UNC-3 is required for synaptogenesis. UNC-3 directly controls the expression of the ADAMTS-like protein MADD-4/Punctin, a presynaptically secreted synapse-organizing molecule that clusters postsynaptic receptors. UNC-3 also controls the assembly of presynaptic specializations and ensures the coordinated expression of enzymes and transporters that define the cholinergic neurotransmitter identity of the SAB neurons. Furthermore, synaptic output properties of the SAB neurons are coordinated with neuronal activation and synaptic input, as evidenced by UNC-3 also regulating the expression of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and putative stretch receptors. Our study shows how synaptogenesis and distinct, function-defining signaling features of a postmitotic neuron are hardwired together through coordinated transcriptional control.

  16. Blocking endocytosis in Drosophila's circadian pacemaker neurons interferes with the endogenous clock in a PDF-dependent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülbeck, Corinna; Grieshaber, Eva; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2009-10-01

    The neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) plays an essential role in the circadian clock of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, but many details of PDF signaling in the clock network are still unknown. We tried to interfere with PDF signaling by blocking the GTPase Shibire in PDF neurons. Shibire is an ortholog of the mammalian Dynamins and is essential for endocytosis of clathrin-coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. Such endocytosis is used for neurotransmitter reuptake by presynaptic neurons, which is a prerequisite of synaptic vesicle recycling, and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the postsynaptic neuron, which leads to signal termination. By blocking Shibire function via overexpression of a dominant negative mutant form of Shibire in PDF neurons, we slowed down the behavioral rhythm by 3 h. This effect was absent in PDF receptor null mutants, indicating that we interfered with PDF receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because we obtained similar behavioral phenotypes by increasing the PDF level in regions close to PDF neurons, we conclude that blocking Shibire did prolong PDF signaling in the neurons that respond to PDF. Obviously, terminating the PDF signaling via receptor-mediated endocytosis is a crucial step in determining the period of behavioral rhythms.

  17. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors improve micturition control in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Redaelli

    Full Text Available Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg, to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition.

  18. Convergent Pathways for Steroid Hormone-and Neurotransmitter-Induced Rat Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, S. K.; Allen, J. M. C.; Clark, J. H.; Blaustein, J. D.; O'Malley, B. W.

    1994-08-01

    Estrogen and progesterone modulate gene expression in rodents by activation of intracellular receptors in the hypothalamus, which regulate neuronal networks that control female sexual behavior. However, the neurotransmitter dopamine has been shown to activate certain steroid receptors in a ligand-independent manner. A dopamine receptor stimulant and a D_1 receptor agonist, but not a D_2 receptor agonist, mimicked the effects of progesterone in facilitating sexual behavior in female rats. The facilitatory effect of the neurotransmitter was blocked by progesterone receptor antagonists, a D_1 receptor antagonist, or antisense oligonucleotides to the progesterone receptor. The results suggest that in rodents neurotransmitters may regulate in vivo gene expression and behavior by means of cross-talk with steroid receptors in the brain.

  19. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection).

  20. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K+ regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G.; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H.; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na+-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K+ inhibits Na+-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K+-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni2+ bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K+-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na+ and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K+-effect. The K+-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K+ binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K+ to regulate the LeuT transport cycle. PMID:27678200

  1. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K(+) regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Mortensen, Jonas S; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2016-09-28

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na(+)-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K(+) inhibits Na(+)-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K(+)-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni(2+) bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K(+)-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na(+) and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K(+)-effect. The K(+)-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K(+) binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K(+) to regulate the LeuT transport cycle.

  2. Some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kenichi; Nakashima, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2008-08-01

    Neuronal dynamin I plays a critical role in the recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We expressed and purified dynamin I to explore potentially clinically useful endocytosis inhibitors and to examine the mechanism of their action. We estimated the IC(50) of nineteen psychotropic drugs for dynamin I. The IC(50) values of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline and fluvoxamine) were 7.3+/-1.0 and 14.7+/-1.6 microM, respectively. Kinetic analyses revealed that fluvoxamine is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) with respect to guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and a competitive inhibitor with respect to L-phosphatidylserine (PS). Fluvoxamine may compete with PS for binding to the pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin I. On the other hand, sertraline was a mixed type inhibitor with respect to both GTP and PS. Our results indicate that sertraline and fluvoxamine may regulate the transportation of neurotransmitters by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via the inhibition of dynamin I GTPase.

  3. Synergistic regulation of glutamatergic transmission by serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in prefrontal cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Qin, Luye; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Aiyi; Yan, Zhen

    2014-09-05

    The monoamine system in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in various mental disorders and has been the major target of anxiolytics and antidepressants. Clinical studies show that serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) produce better therapeutic effects than single selective reuptake inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we found that low dose SNRIs, by acting on 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptors, synergistically reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPAR surface expression in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons via a mechanism involving Rab5/dynamin-mediated endocytosis of AMPARs. The synergistic effect of SNRIs on AMPARs was blocked by inhibition of activator of G protein signaling 3, a G protein modulator that prevents reassociation of G(i) protein α subunit and prolongs the βγ-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, the depression of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by SNRIs required p38 kinase activity, which was increased by 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptor co-activation in an activator of G protein signaling 3-dependent manner. These results have revealed a potential mechanism for the synergy between the serotonin and norepinephrine systems in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons.

  4. Reduced serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) function causes insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoning; Margolis, Kara J; Gershon, Michael D; Schwartz, Gary J; Sze, Ji Y

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) is a key regulator of serotonin neurotransmission and a major target of antidepressants. Antidepressants, such as selectively serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), that block SERT function are known to affect food intake and body weight. Here, we provide genetic evidence that food intake and metabolism are regulated by separable mechanisms of SERT function. SERT-deficient mice ate less during both normal diet and high fat diet feeding. The reduced food intake was accompanied with markedly elevated plasma leptin levels. Despite reduced food intake, SERT-deficient mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and progressively developed obesity and hepatic steatosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic deficits of SERT-deficient mice are attributable to reduced insulin-sensitivity in peripheral tissues. First, SERT-deficient mice exhibited beta-cell hyperplasia and islet-mass expansion. Second, biochemical analyses revealed constitutively elevated JNK activity and diminished insulin-induced AKT activation in the liver of SERT-deficient mice. SERT-deficient mice exhibited hyper-JNK activity and hyperinsulinemia prior to the development of obesity. Third, enhancing AKT signaling by PTEN deficiency corrected glucose tolerance in SERT-deficient mice. These findings have potential implications for designing selective SERT drugs for weight control and the treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  5. Reduced serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT function causes insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    Full Text Available Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT is a key regulator of serotonin neurotransmission and a major target of antidepressants. Antidepressants, such as selectively serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, that block SERT function are known to affect food intake and body weight. Here, we provide genetic evidence that food intake and metabolism are regulated by separable mechanisms of SERT function. SERT-deficient mice ate less during both normal diet and high fat diet feeding. The reduced food intake was accompanied with markedly elevated plasma leptin levels. Despite reduced food intake, SERT-deficient mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and progressively developed obesity and hepatic steatosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic deficits of SERT-deficient mice are attributable to reduced insulin-sensitivity in peripheral tissues. First, SERT-deficient mice exhibited beta-cell hyperplasia and islet-mass expansion. Second, biochemical analyses revealed constitutively elevated JNK activity and diminished insulin-induced AKT activation in the liver of SERT-deficient mice. SERT-deficient mice exhibited hyper-JNK activity and hyperinsulinemia prior to the development of obesity. Third, enhancing AKT signaling by PTEN deficiency corrected glucose tolerance in SERT-deficient mice. These findings have potential implications for designing selective SERT drugs for weight control and the treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  6. Thin film microelectrodes for electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard

    An important signaling process in the nervous system is the release of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters from neurons. In this thesis alternative thin film electrode materials for applications targeting electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters in chip devices were evaluated...

  7. Altered neurotransmitter metabolism in adolescents with high-functioning autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, G.S.; Barendse, E.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Veenendaal, T. van; Puts, N.A.J.; Edden, R.A.E.; Zinger, S.; Thoonen, G.H.J.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Jansen, J.F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alterations in excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitters might play a crucial role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can provide valuable information about abnormal brain metabolism and neurotransmitter concentration

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014, EMBASE (1946 to June 2014, and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria: We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis: Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10% difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6% and placebo (39/171 (22.8% risk difference (RD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  10. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces fertility in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørr, L; Bennedsen, Birgit; Fedder, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Clinical review of the present data on the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on male fertility was the objective of the study. PubMed and Scopus were searched for publications in English or Danish and reviewed. Human trials, animal studies and in vitro studies were included...

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a novel class of immunosuppressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobin, Veerle; Van Steendam, Katleen; Denys, D.; Deforce, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been shown to exert several immunological effects, such as reduced lymphocyte proliferation, alteration of cytokine secretion and induction of apoptosis. Based on these effects, SSRIs were proposed as drugs for the treatment o

  12. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    OpenAIRE

    William J Tyler; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2002-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provid...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of neurotransmitter disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Taylor, Jacob

    2006-11-01

    The neurotransmitter disorders represent an enigmatic and enlarging group of neurometabolic conditions caused by abnormal neurotransmitter metabolism or transport. A high index of clinical suspicion is important, given the availability of therapeutic strategies. This article covers disorders of monoamine (catecholamine and serotonin) synthesis, glycine catabolism, pyridoxine dependency, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. The technological aspects of appropriate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, shipment, study, and interpretation merit special consideration. Diagnosis of disorders of monoamines requires analysis of CSF homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, ortho-methyldopa, BH4, and neopterin. The delineation of new disorders with important therapeutic implications, such as cerebral folate deficiency and PNPO deficiency, serves to highlight the value of measuring CSF neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites. The impressive responsiveness of Segawa fluctuating dystonia to levodopa is a hallmark feature of previously unrecognized neurologic morbidity becoming treatable at any age. Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency have more severe phenotypes and show variable responsiveness to levodopa. Glycine encephalopathy usually has a poor outcome; benzoate therapy may be helpful in less affected cases. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are a refractory but treatable group of neonatal and infantile seizures; rare cases require pyridoxal-5-phosphate. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency is relatively common in comparison to the remainder of this group of disorders. Treatment directed at the metabolic defect with vigabatrin has been disappointing, and multiple therapies are targeted toward specific but protean symptoms. Other disorders of GABA metabolism, as is true of the wide spectrum of neurotransmitter disorders, will require increasing use of CSF analysis for diagnosis, and ultimately, treatment.

  14. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  15. Receptor desensitization by neurotransmitters in membranes: are neurotransmitters the endogenous anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Robert S

    2003-10-21

    A mechanism of anesthesia is proposed that addresses one of the most troubling peculiarities of general anesthesia: the remarkably small variability of sensitivity within the human population and across a broad range of animal phyla. It is hypothesized that in addition to the rapid, saturable binding of a neurotransmitter to its receptor that results in activation, the neurotransmitter also acts indirectly on the receptor by diffusing into the postsynaptic membrane and changing its physical properties, causing a shift in receptor conformational equilibrium (desensitization). Unlike binding, this slower indirect mechanism is nonspecific: each neurotransmitter will, in principle, affect all receptors in the membrane. For proteins modeled as having only resting and active conformational states, time-dependent ion currents are predicted that exhibit many characteristics of desensitization for both inhibitory and excitatory channels. If receptors have been engineered to regulate the time course of ion currents by this mechanism, then (a) mutations that significantly alter receptor sensitivity to this effect would be lethal and (b) by design, excitatory receptors would be inhibited, but inhibitory receptors activated, so that their effects are not counterproductive. The wide range of exogenous molecules that affect the physical properties of membranes as do neurotransmitters, but that do not bind to receptors, would thus inhibit excitatory channels and activate inhibitory channels, i.e., they would act as anesthesics. The endogenous anesthetics would thus be the neurotransmitters, the survival advantage conferred by their proper membrane-mediated desensitization of receptors explaining the selection pressure for anesthesic sensitivity.

  16. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  17. Selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Takotsubo translates to "octopus pot" in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC.

  18. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosein, W. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yorita, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tolosa, V. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  19. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...... umbrella sampling simulations, which were conducted for the four naturally occurring NTs. Free energy profiles for ACH and GLU show a minimum of ∼2–3 kJ/mol close to the bilayer interface, while for GABA and GLY, a minimum of respectively ∼2 kJ/mol and ∼5 kJ/mol is observed when these NTs are located...

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI antidepressants, prolactin and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eAshbury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are a widely prescribed class of anti-depressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003-2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with nonusers of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively, regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40 for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions, given the small number of exposed cases (n=12, the borderline statistical significance and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin-breast cancer hypothesis.

  1. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provide an update of recent evidence demonstrating that NTs enhance quantal neurotransmitter release at synapses through presynaptic mechanisms. The authors further propose that a potential target for NT actions at presynaptic terminals is the mechanism by which terminals retrieve synaptic vesicles after exocytosis. Depending on the temporal demands placed on synapses during high-frequency synaptic transmission, synapses may use two alternative modes of synaptic vesicle retrieval, the conventional slow endosomal recycling or a faster rapid retrieval at the active zone, referred to as “kiss-and-run.” By modulating Ca2+ microdomains associated with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones, NTs may elicit a switch from the slow to the fast mode of endocytosis of vesicles at presynaptic terminals during high-frequency synaptic transmission, allowing more reliable information transfer and neuronal signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:12467374

  2. 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with 5-HT(1B/1D) antagonistic activity: a new approach toward efficient antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzen, L; van Amsterdam, C; Rautenberg, W; Greiner, H E; Harting, J; Seyfried, C A; Böttcher, H

    2000-03-23

    As part of our research program toward new, potential antidepressants, a series of unsymmetrical ureas has been prepared and evaluated as 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with 5-HT(1B/1D) antagonistic activities. The design of these compounds was based on coupling of various indole derivatives, previously shown to inhibit 5-HT reuptake, to three different aniline moieties, which are part of known 5-HT(1B/1D) ligands. Binding experiments in rat frontal cortex using [(125)I]iodocyanopindolol, in calf striatum using [(3)H]5-HT, and in rat hippocampus using [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT as radioligands, respectively, revealed significantly higher affinity at the 5-HT(1B) receptor as compared to the affinities for the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1D) receptors for a number of compounds, among them 4-(5-fluoro-1H-indol-3-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]amide (5), the corresponding 4-fluoro-1H-indol-3-yl analogue 21a, and the corresponding 6-fluoro-1H-indol-3-yl analogue 21b. Conformational restriction of the aniline moiety in 5 only slightly enhanced the 5-HT(1B) affinity, whereas introduction of an aniline moiety with higher conformational flexibility resulted in a less potent 5-HT(1B) receptor ligand as compared to 5. The functional 5-HT(1B/1D) antagonistic activity was investigated using the rabbit saphenous vein model as well as the [(3)H]5-HT release from guinea pig cortical slices. All new compounds tested in the rabbit saphenous vein model were shown to antagonize the sumatriptan-evoked contractile responses with pA(2) values ranging from 7.3 to 8.7. These observations were consistent with the results of the cortical slice model, in which the ureas were found to block the sumatriptan-induced inhibition of potassium-evoked [(3)H]5-HT release. The 5-HT reuptake inhibition of the ureas determined in rat brain synaptosomes was found to be either increased or decreased as compared to the uncoupled indole derivatives indicating that the reuptake inhibition

  3. Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors on Interregional Relation of Serotonin Transporter Availability in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Gregory M.; Baldinger-Melich, Pia; Philippe, Cecile; Kranz, Georg S.; Vanicek, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Gryglewski, Gregor; Hienert, Marius; Spies, Marie; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) modulate serotonergic neurotransmission by blocking reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. Up to now, it remains unclear how SSRIs achieve their antidepressant effect. However, task-based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, have demonstrated connectivity changes between brain regions. Here, we use positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify SSRI’s main target, the serotonin transporter (SERT), and assess treatment-induced molecular changes in the interregional relation of SERT binding potential (BPND). Nineteen out-patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 19 healthy controls (HC) were included in this study. Patients underwent three PET measurements with the radioligand [11C]DASB: (1) at baseline, (2) after a first SSRI dose; and (3) following at least 3 weeks of daily intake. Controls were measured once with PET. Correlation analyses were restricted to brain regions repeatedly implicated in MDD pathophysiology. After 3 weeks of daily SSRI administration a significant increase in SERT BPND correlations of anterior cingulate cortex and insula with the amygdala, midbrain, hippocampus, pallidum and putamen (p < 0.05; false discovery rate, FDR corrected) was revealed. No significant differences were found when comparing MDD patients and HC at baseline. These findings are in line with the clinical observation that treatment response to SSRIs is often achieved only after a latency of several weeks. The elevated associations in interregional SERT associations may be more closely connected to clinical outcomes than regional SERT occupancy measures and could reflect a change in the regional interaction of serotonergic neurotransmission during antidepressant treatment. PMID:28220069

  4. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  5. Neurotransmitter evaluation in the hippocampus of rats after intracerebral injection of TsTX scorpion toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALA Nencioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TsTX is an α-type sodium channel toxin that stimulates the discharge of neurotransmitters from neurons. In the present study we investigated which neurotransmitters are released in the hippocampus after TsTX injection and if they are responsible for electrographic or histopathological effects. Microdialysis revealed that the toxin increased glutamate extracellular levels in the hippocampus; however, levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glycine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC were not significantly altered. Neurodegeneration in pyramidal cells of hippocampus and electroencephalographic alterations caused by the toxin were blocked by pretreatment with riluzole, a glutamate release inhibitor. The present results suggest a specific activity of TsTX in the hippocampus which affects only glutamate release.

  6. Conformational dynamics of a neurotransmitter:sodium symporter in a lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Suraj; Deredge, Daniel J; Nagarajan, Anu; Forrest, Lucy R; Wintrode, Patrick L; Singh, Satinder K

    2017-03-07

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) are integral membrane proteins responsible for the sodium-dependent reuptake of small-molecule neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. The symporters for the biogenic amines serotonin (SERT), dopamine (DAT), and norepinephrine (NET) are targets of multiple psychoactive agents, and their dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neuropsychiatric ailments. LeuT, a thermostable eubacterial NSS homolog, has been exploited as a model protein for NSS members to canvass the conformational mechanism of transport with a combination of X-ray crystallography, cysteine accessibility, and solution spectroscopy. Despite yielding remarkable insights, these studies have primarily been conducted with protein in the detergent-solubilized state rather than embedded in a membrane mimic. In addition, solution spectroscopy has required site-specific labeling of nonnative cysteines, a labor-intensive process occasionally resulting in diminished transport and/or binding activity. Here, we overcome these limitations by reconstituting unlabeled LeuT in phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs, subjecting them to hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), and facilitating interpretation of the data with molecular dynamics simulations. The data point to changes of accessibility and dynamics of structural elements previously implicated in the transport mechanism, in particular transmembrane helices (TMs) 1a and 7 as well as extracellular loops (ELs) 2 and 4. The results therefore illuminate the value of this strategy for interrogating the conformational mechanism of the more clinically significant mammalian membrane proteins including SERT and DAT, neither of which tolerates complete removal of endogenous cysteines, and whose activity is heavily influenced by neighboring lipids.

  7. [Selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in the treatment of paraphilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, C; Strohm, K; Hill, A; Habermann, N; Berner, W; Briken, P

    2007-06-01

    For about 15 years selective serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been used in the treatment of paraphilias. In an open, uncontrolled, retrospective study, which was the first in the German speaking countries we investigated 16 male outpatients, who have been treated for different paraphilias with SSRI and psychotherapy. There was a marked reduction in paraphilic symptoms. Despite high rates of sexual side effects most patients reported a high overall treatment satisfaction. SSRI are an important addition in pharmacological treatment of paraphilic patients, especially with a risk of so called "hands-off" delinquency.

  8. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  9. Substrate-induced unlocking of the inner gate determines the catalytic efficiency of a neurotransmitter:sodium symporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Krüger, Mie B; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Li, Zheng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Kniazeff, Julie; Gotfryd, Kamil; Mortensen, Jonas S; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik

    2015-10-30

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) mediate reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for several therapeutics and psychostimulants. The prokaryotic NSS homologue, LeuT, represents a principal structural model for Na(+)-coupled transport catalyzed by these proteins. Here, we used site-directed fluorescence quenching spectroscopy to identify in LeuT a substrate-induced conformational rearrangement at the inner gate conceivably leading to formation of a structural intermediate preceding transition to the inward-open conformation. The substrate-induced, Na(+)-dependent change required an intact primary substrate-binding site and involved increased water exposure of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The findings were supported by simulations predicting disruption of an intracellular interaction network leading to a discrete rotation of transmembrane segment 5 and the adjacent intracellular loop 2. The magnitude of the spectroscopic response correlated inversely with the transport rate for different substrates, suggesting that stability of the intermediate represents an unrecognized rate-limiting barrier in the NSS transport mechanism.

  10. Substrate-induced Unlocking of the Inner Gate Determines the Catalytic Efficiency of a Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Krüger, Mie B.; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Li, Zheng; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Kniazeff, Julie; Gotfryd, Kamil; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) mediate reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for several therapeutics and psychostimulants. The prokaryotic NSS homologue, LeuT, represents a principal structural model for Na+-coupled transport catalyzed by these proteins. Here, we used site-directed fluorescence quenching spectroscopy to identify in LeuT a substrate-induced conformational rearrangement at the inner gate conceivably leading to formation of a structural intermediate preceding transition to the inward-open conformation. The substrate-induced, Na+-dependent change required an intact primary substrate-binding site and involved increased water exposure of the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 5. The findings were supported by simulations predicting disruption of an intracellular interaction network leading to a discrete rotation of transmembrane segment 5 and the adjacent intracellular loop 2. The magnitude of the spectroscopic response correlated inversely with the transport rate for different substrates, suggesting that stability of the intermediate represents an unrecognized rate-limiting barrier in the NSS transport mechanism. PMID:26363074

  11. Fractal analysis of striatal dopamine re-uptake sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Bergstroem, K.A. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Tiihonen, J.; Raesaenen, P. [Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Karhu, J. [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Spatial variation in regional blood flow, metabolism and receptor density within the brain and in other organs is measurable even with a low spatial resolution technique such as emission tomography. It has been previously shown that the observed variance increases with increasing number of subregions in the organ/tissue studied. This resolution-dependent variance can be described by fractal analysis. We studied striatal dopamine re-uptake sites in 39 healthy volunteers with high-resolution single-photon emission tomography using iodine-123 labelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT). The mean fractal dimension was 1.15{+-}0.07. The results indicate that regional striatal dopamine re-uptake sites involve considerable spatial heterogeneity which is higher than the uniform density (dimension=1.00) but much lower than complete randomness (dimension=1.50). There was a gender difference, with females having a higher heterogeneity in both the left and the right striatum. In addition, we found striatal asymmetry (left-to-right heterogeneity ratio of 1.19{+-}0.15; P<0.001), suggesting functional hemispheric lateralization consistent with the control of motor behaviour and integrative functions. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Plasma norepinephrine in hypertensive rats reflects α2-adrenoceptor release control only when re-uptake is inhibited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available α2 adrenoceptors (AR lower central sympathetic output and peripheral catecholamine release, thereby protecting against sympathetic hyperactivity and hypertension. Norepinephrine re-uptake transporter effectively (NET removes norepinephrine from the synapse. Overflow to plasma will therefore not reflect release. Here we tested if inhibition of re-uptake allowed presynaptic α2AR release-control to be reflected as differences in norepinephrine overflow in anesthetized hypertensive (SHR and normotensive (WKY rats. We also tested if α2AR modulated the experiment-induced epinephrine secretion, and a phenylephrine-induced, α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter, and cardiac output by ascending aorta flow. After pre-treatment with NET inhibitor (desipramine, and/or α2AR antagonist (yohimbine, L-659,066 or agonist (clonidine, ST-91, we injected phenylephrine. Arterial blood was sampled 15 min later. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were not influenced by phenylephrine, and therefore reflected effects of pre-treatment. Desipramine and α2AR antagonist separately had little effect on norepinephrine overflow. Combined, they increased norepinephrine overflow, particularly in SHR. Clonidine, but not ST-91, reduced, and pertussis toxin increased norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. L-659,066+clonidine (central α2AR-stimulation normalized the high blood pressure, heart rate and vascular tension in SHR. α2AR antagonists reduced phenylephrine induced vasoconstriction equally in WKY and SHR. Conclusions: α2AAR inhibition increased norepinephrine overflow only when re-uptake was blocked, and then with particular efficacy in SHR, possibly due to their high sympathetic tone. α2AAR inhibited epinephrine secretion, particularly in SHR. α2AAR supported α1AR-induced vasoconstriction equally in the two strains. α2AR malfunctions were therefore not detected in SHR

  13. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  14. Dirty electricity, chronic stress, neurotransmitters and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, David

    2013-12-01

    Dirty electricity, also called electrical pollution, is high-frequency voltage transients riding along the 50 or 60 Hz electricity provided by the electric utilities. It is generated by arcing, by sparking and by any device that interrupts current flow, especially switching power supplies. It has been associated with cancer, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans. Epidemiological evidence also links dirty electricity to most of the diseases of civilization including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and suicide, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century. The dirty electricity level in a public library was reduced from over 10 000 Graham/Stetzer (G/S) units to below 50 G/S units by installing plug-in capacitive filters. Before cleanup, the urinary dopamine level of only one of seven volunteers was within normal levels, while four of seven phenylethylamine levels were normal. After an initial decline, over the next 18 weeks the dopamine levels gradually increased to an average of over 215 μg/g creatinine, which is well above 170 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Average phenylethylamine levels also rose gradually to slightly above 70 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Neurotransmitters may be biomarkers for dirty electricity and other electromagnetic field exposures. We believe that dirty electricity is a chronic stressor of electrified populations and is responsible for many of their disease patterns.

  15. Neuronal monoamine reuptake inhibitors enhance in vitro susceptibility to chloroquine in resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutaux, A F; Mooney, J. J.; Wirth, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was reversed in vitro by the neuronal monoamine reuptake inhibitors and antidepressants desipramine, sertraline, fluoxetine, and norfluoxetine but not by carbamazepine, an antiseizure and mood-stabilizing tricyclic drug resembling desipramine which only weakly inhibits neuronal monoamine reuptake. These findings have important clinical implications for drug combination therapy.

  16. Synthesis of symmetrical and non-symmetrical bivalent neurotransmitter ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Andersen, Jacob; Thygesen, Mikkel Boas

    2016-01-01

    A novel procedure for synthesis of bivalent neurotransmitter ligands was developed by reacting O-benzyl protected N-nosylated dopamine and serotonin with alkyl- or PEG-linked diols under Fukuyama-Mitsunobu conditions in the presence of DIAD/PPh3 generating three different bivalent neurotransmitter...... ligands in a one-pot reaction. The methodol. establishes a facile route towards bivalent neurotransmitter ligands, and libraries of in total 40 sym. and non-sym. bivalent and monovalent dopamine and serotonin compds. linked through alkyl or PEG spacers of varying length were prepd. Interestingly...

  17. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  18. [Galactorrhoea and the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels-van Middendorp, A M; Timmerman, L

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this case study is a female patient who was treated with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), citalopram, because of a depressive episode. She developed symptoms of galactorrhea; there was a time relationship between suspension of the treatment with citalopram and a reduction of the galactorrhea symptoms. The consulting internist assumed that the symptoms were due to hyperprolactinemia arising from under-supplementation of thyroid hormone and resultant hypothyroidism. Psychiatrists usually see galactorrhea in patients who are taking antipsychotics. However, few psychiatrists know that galactorrhea can also be caused by SSRIs. When a patient has symptoms of bilateral galactorrhea and has used an SSRI and when hyperprolactinemia has been found in laboratory tests it is probably advisable to stop the SSRI medication. The article mentions what additional research is needed.

  19. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  20. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  1. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters for the monoa......The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters....... Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology...

  2. Analysis of neurotransmitters, neurosteroids and their metabolites in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neurosteroids are compounds that regulate the functions of the brain. The neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play a role in several psychological conditions, including schizophrenia, depression and anxiety. DA also has an important role in Parkinson s disease. Neurosteroids are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer s disease and multiple sclerosis, the levels of neurosteroids are decreased in certain areas of the brain. Neurosteroids diff...

  3. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and abnormal bleeding: a review for clinicians and a reconsideration of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sandarsh, Surya; Chethan, Kumar B; Nagesh, Koregala S

    2010-12-01

    It is generally believed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs increase the risk of abnormal bleeding and decrease the risk of ischemic heart disease events by blocking the uptake of serotonin into platelets, leading to an impairment in the platelet hemostatic response. To perform a detailed qualitative review of existing literature on the association of abnormal bleeding with the use of SSRIs. We conducted a PubMed search during June 2009 using the search terms antidepressants and SSRIs (including the names of individual SSRIs: fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, and escitalopram) in association with bleeding, platelets, hemostasis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, antiplatelet drugs, proton pump inhibitors, peptic ulcer, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage, surgery, tooth extraction, dental bleeding, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and other terms related to the field. We then searched the reference lists of identified studies. We provide a qualitative discussion of all studies that would inform clinicians about the mechanisms of bleeding and bleeding risks associated with these drugs in different clinical contexts. Epidemiologic studies show that SSRI use is associated with roughly doubled odds of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; bleeding at other sites has been less commonly described, as has a possibly increased risk of bleeding associated with surgical procedures. The risk of SSRI-associated GI bleeding is increased with the concurrent use of NSAIDs, anticoagulants, and antiplatelet agents and is decreased by concurrent proton pump inhibitors. The risk of bleeding is increased in patients with cirrhosis of the liver or liver failure. There is, curiously, little literature on use of SSRIs and menstrual or postpartum blood loss. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear protective against ischemic heart disease events. The data are too

  4. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Selected hormonal and neurotransmitter mechanisms regulating feed intake in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartin, J L; Daniel, J A; Whitlock, B K; Wilborn, R R

    2010-11-01

    Appetite control is a major issue in normal growth and in suboptimal growth performance settings. A number of hormones, in particular leptin, activate or inhibit orexigenic or anorexigenic neurotransmitters within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where feed intake regulation is integrated. Examples of appetite regulatory neurotransmitters are the stimulatory neurotransmitters neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Examination of messenger RNA (using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR) and proteins (using immunohistochemistry) for these neurotransmitters in ruminants has indicated that physiological regulation occurs in response to fasting for several of these critical genes and proteins, especially AgRP and NPY. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of each of the four stimulatory neurotransmitters can increase feed intake in sheep and may also regulate either growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, cortisol or other hormones. In contrast, both leptin and MSH are inhibitory to feed intake in ruminants. Interestingly, the natural melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist, AgRP, as well as NPY can prevent the inhibition of feed intake after injection of endotoxin (to model disease suppression of appetite). Thus, knowledge of the mechanisms regulating feed intake in the hypothalamus may lead to mechanisms to increase feed intake in normal growing animals and prevent the wasting effects of severe disease in animals.

  6. Ligand Binding in the Extracellular Vestibule of the Neurotransmitter Transporter Homologue LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouleff, Julie; Koldsø, Heidi; Miao, Yinglong; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2017-03-15

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of monoamine neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. MATs are linked to a number of neurological diseases and are the targets of both therapeutic and illicit drugs. Until recently, no high-resolution structures of the human MATs existed, and therefore, studies of this transporter family have relied on investigations of the homologues bacterial transporters such as the leucine transporter LeuT, which has been crystallized in several conformational states. A two-substrate transport mechanism has been suggested for this transporter family, which entails that high-affinity binding of a second substrate in an extracellular site is necessary for the substrate in the central binding site to be transported. Compelling evidence for this mechanism has been presented, however, a number of equally compelling accounts suggest that the transporters function through a mechanism involving only a single substrate and a single high-affinity site. To shed light on this apparent contradiction, we have performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of LeuT in the outward-occluded conformation with either one or two substrates bound to the transporter. We have also calculated the substrate binding affinity in each of the two proposed binding sites through rigorous free energy simulations. Results show that substrate binding is unstable in the extracellular vestibule and the substrate binding affinity within the suggested extracellular site is very low (0.2 and 3.3 M for the two dominant binding modes) compared to the central substrate binding site (14 nM). This suggests that for LeuT in the outward-occluded conformation only a single high-affinity substrate binding site exists.

  7. A concise total synthesis of (R)-fluoxetine, a potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Angelo de; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: pilli@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-05-15

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (author)

  8. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Uutela, PÀivi

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters transfer chemically the electrical impulse from one neuron to another in the brain. The concentration of neurotransmitters in many neurological disorders is altered. The measurement of neurotransmitters in the brain is needed to understand how these diseases develop and how they can be treated. Neurotransmitters can be extracted from the brains of freely moving, alert animals by microdialysis technique. The concentration of neurotransmitters and their metabolites in brain mi...

  9. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Albert Godfrey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25 years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, loud sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus.

  10. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  11. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  12. Improvement of social adaptation in depression with serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Briley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mike Briley, Chantal MoretNeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Depression is a disabling condition resulting in significant impairment in social functioning, involving the patient’s family, friends, work colleagues, and society at large. Although both psychologic and pharmacologic treatments generally improve many depressive symptoms, they do not always result in significant improvement in social functioning. The importance of recovery of social functioning in depressed patients is now widely appreciated, and studies are beginning to include it in evaluations of therapeutic efficacy. Among the various social adjustment evaluation rating scales, the Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale, a social motivation and behavior scale, has been found to be simple to use and sensitive to change. Using this scale, the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, reboxetine, has been shown to be significantly more effective in improving social functioning than the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. These findings are consistent with the notion that improvement in social adaptation involves functions depending primarily on noradrenergic neurotransmission. This hypothesis suggests that the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine, duloxetine, and milnacipran, could be particularly helpful in improving social functioning. Preliminary studies with the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors suggest that they significantly improve social functioning. Comparative studies with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on the effects on social functioning should be encouraged.Keywords: Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale, social functioning, depression, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic neurotransmission

  13. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...... with respect to calorimetric measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied an anionic (glutamate), a cationic (acetylcholine), and two zwitterionic (-aminobutyric acid and glycine) neurotransmitters, and membranes of pure dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), DMPC doped with 10% anionic lipid...

  14. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Induces Neurotransmitter Switching in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Bruce A.; Masters, Brian A.; Hoyle, Gary W.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    1994-08-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine growth factor that induces rat sympathetic neurons to switch their neurotransmitter phenotype from noradrenergic to cholinergic in vitro. To test whether LIF can influence neuronal differentiation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that expressed LIF in pancreatic islets under the control of the insulin promoter and evaluated the neurotransmitter phenotype of the pancreatic sympathetic innervation. We also used the insulin promoter to coexpress nerve growth factor in the islets, which greatly increased the density of sympathetic innervation and facilitated analysis of the effects of LIF. Our data demonstrate that tyrosine hydroxylase and catecholamines declined and choline acetyltransferase increased in response to LIF. We conclude that LIF can induce neurotransmitter switching of sympathetic neurons in vivo.

  15. [Effect of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Lian, Yulong; Tao, Ning; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers. 178 petroleum workers with the length of service ≥ 1 year were recruited to the subjects by the questionnaire of OSI-R. The levels of 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P (SP) in serum were measured. The subjects were classified into 3 groups according to the scores of occupational stress. The levels of 5-HT NE and SP for over 15 working years were higher than those of less than 15 years (P petroleum workers (P petroleum workers is correlated with serum monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters, and it may affect serum levels of monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters.

  16. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  17. Effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on aggressive behavior in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents: results of an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, J N; Liberman, M; Kincaid, M

    1997-01-01

    Low concentrations of the neurotransmitter serotonin and its 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid metabolite in the central nervous system have been associated with increased aggressive behavior in animals and humans. Controlled clinical trials of serotonin agonists in depressed adults have suggested that aggressive behavior is less likely during treatment with these medications than with placebo, but there have been no previous studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aggression in children. We prospectively followed the course of aggressive behavior in 19 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (not selected for aggressiveness) who received open clinical trials of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline. The patients received standard doses (equivalent to fluoxetine 10-40 mg daily) for a minimum of 5 weeks. The starting dose was 15 +/- 5 mg, and dosages were raised at a mean rate of 5 mg every 4 days up to a mean dose of 25 +/- 10 mg daily. Results from trials of the three SSRIs were clustered because the sample sizes were not sufficient for separate analyses. Overall, there were no statistically meaningful improvements in the level of aggressive behavior, as measured on a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale, over the course of these patients' SSRI trials. Symptoms of physical aggression toward others or self were manifest in 12 of the 19 patients while on SSRIs. Of the 19 patients, 13 were assessed both on and off SSRIs: verbal aggression (p = 0.04), physical aggression toward objects (p = 0.05), and physical aggression toward self (p < 0.02) occurred significantly more frequently on SSRIs than off; no increase was observed in physical aggression toward others. Patients with the highest baseline aggressivity scores did not show greater improvement during SSRI treatment. Further research is warranted, particularly to explore whether SSRIs may have therapeutic effects on aggression at higher (or lower) doses than were administered in this

  18. Persistent sexual dysfunction after discontinuation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoka, Antonei B; Csoka, A; Bahrick, Audrey; Mehtonen, Olli-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions such as low libido, anorgasmia, genital anesthesia, and erectile dysfunction are very common in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). It has been assumed that these side effects always resolve after discontinuing treatment, but recently, four cases were presented in which sexual function did not return to baseline. Here, we describe three more cases. Case #1: A 29-year-old with apparently permanent erectile dysfunction after taking fluoxetine 20 mg once daily for a 4-month period in 1996. Case #2: A 44-year-old male with persistent loss of libido, genital anesthesia, ejaculatory anhedonia, and erectile dysfunction after taking 20-mg once daily citalopram for 18 months. Case #3: A 28-year-old male with persistent loss of libido, genital anesthesia, and ejaculatory anhedonia since taking several different SSRIs over a 2-year period from 2003-2005. No psychological issues related to sexuality were found in any of the three cases, and all common causes of sexual dysfunction such as decreased testosterone, increased prolactin or diabetes were ruled out. Erectile capacity is temporarily restored for Case #1 with injectable alprostadil, and for Case #2 with oral sildenafil, but their other symptoms remain. Case #3 has had some reversal of symptoms with extended-release methylphenidate, although it is not yet known if these prosexual effects will persist when the drug is discontinued. SSRIs can cause long-term effects on all aspects of the sexual response cycle that may persist after they are discontinued. Mechanistic hypotheses including persistent endocrine and epigenetic gene expression alterations were briefly discussed.

  19. Early Onset of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressant Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew J.; Freemantle, Nick; Geddes, John R.; Bhagwagar, Zubin

    2008-01-01

    Context: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often described as having a delayed onset of effect in the treatment of depression. However, some trials have reported clinical improvement as early as the first week of treatment. Objective: To test the alternative hypotheses of delayed vs early onset of antidepressant action with SSRIs in patients with unipolar depression. Data Sources: Trials identified by searching CENTRAL, The Cochrane Collaboration database of controlled trials (2005), and the reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials of SSRIs vs placebo for the treatment of unipolar depression in adults that reported outcomes for at least 2 time points in the first 4 weeks of treatment (50 trials from >500 citations identified). Trials were excluded if limited to participants older than 65 years or specific comorbidities. Data Extraction: Data were extracted on trial design, participant characteristics, and outcomes by a single reviewer. Data Synthesis: Pooled estimates of treatment effect on depressive symptom rating scales were calculated for weeks 1 through 6 of treatment. In the primary analysis, the pattern of response seen was tested against alternative models of onset of response. The primary analysis incorporated data from 28 randomized controlled trials (n=5872). A model of early treatment response best fit the experimental data. Treatment with SSRIs rather than placebo was associated with clinical improvement by the end of the first week of use. A secondary analysis indicated an increased chance of achieving a 50% reduction in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores by 1 week (relative risk, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.25) with SSRI treatment compared with placebo. Conclusions: Treatment with SSRIs is associated with symptomatic improvement in depression by the end of the first week of use, and the improvement continues at a decreasing rate for at least 6

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of premature ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-fu; CHANG Le; Suks Minhas; David J Ralph

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review and assess the update studies regarding se lective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) and then provide practical recommendations and possible mechanisms concerning state of the art knowledge for the use of SSRIs in alleviating PE.Data sources Using the Medline, 48 articles published from January 1st, 1996 to August 1st, 2006 concerning the use of SSRIs and their possible mechanisms in alleviating PE were found and reviewed.Study selection PE, rapid ejaculation, early ejaculation and SSRIs were employed as the keywords, and relevant articles about the use of SSRIs and their possible mechanisms in the treatment of PE were selected.Results Many kinds of SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and citalopram, have widely been employed to treat PE. However, their effects are moderate and there is no a universal agreement about the kind, dose, protocol and duration. Dapoxetine, as the first prescription treatment of PE, may change this bottle-neck situation. SSRIs are suggested to be used in young men with lifelong PE, and acquired PE when etiological factors are removed but PE still exists. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) are suggested to be employed alone or combined with SSRIs when SSRIs fail to treat PE or sexual dysfunction associated with SSRIs occurs. The protocol of taking drugs on demand based on taking them daily for a suitable period is proposed to be chosen firstly. The possible mechanisms include increasing serotonergic neurotransmission and activating 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptors, then switching the ejaculatory threshold to a higher level, decreasing the penile sensitivity and their own effect of antidepression.Conclusion The efficacies of the current SSRIs are moderate in the treatment of PE and they have not been approved by the FDA, therefore new SSRI like dapoxetine needs to be further evaluated.

  1. Enhanced responsiveness to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Jury

    Full Text Available The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST and marble burying task (MBT. Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although

  2. Antidepressants are selective serotonin neuronal reuptake inhibitors: 40-year history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Danilov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents historical prerequisites for designing antidepressants from a group of selective serotonin neuronal reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs: to determine a lower serotonin concentration in the different tissues of depressed patients; to establish a higher serotonin concentration in the treatment of depressed patients with tricyclic antidepressants, and to formulate the serotonergic theory of depression. It also provides a consecutive account of the history of clinical introduction of individual SSRI representatives, such as fluoxetine, zimelidine, fluvoxamine, indalpine, citalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, and escitalopram. There are data from the history of studying the mechanism of SSRI action: from the theory of the importance of an increase in the concentration of serotonin in the synaptic cleft to the current understanding of complex successive intracellular rearrangements at the level of the postsynaptic neuron. The history of studying the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression is considered in detail. Emphasis is laid on the reasons for a paradoxical difference in the evaluations of the efficiency of therapy with SSRIs versus other groups of antidepressants at different developmental stages of psychopharmacology. The role of marketing technologies in disseminating the data on the efficacy of this or that group of antidepressants is described. The practical significance of differences in individual SSRI representatives (the potency of serotonin uptake inhibition; the degree of selectivity and activity against the serotonergic system; the likelihood of an unfavorable pharmacokinetic interaction with other drugs; the half-life of elimination; the quickness of achieving a therapeutic dose is analyzed. Whether it is possible and reasonable to differentially choose different SSRI representatives in the treatment of depressions at the present stage is discussed. The authors state their belief that researches should be continued to

  3. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  4. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  5. Zitongdong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Zitongdong Block (Eastern Zitong Block) is located in the northwest of the Sichuan Basin. Tectonically, it is situated in the east part of Zitong Depression, southeast of mid-Longmenshan folded and faulted belt( as shown on Fig. 8 ), covering an area of 1 730 km2. The traffic is very convenient, the No. 108 national highway passes through the north of the block. Topographically, the area belongs to low hilly land at the elevation of 500-700 m.

  6. Ricardo Miledi and the calcium hypothesis of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Jade-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Ricardo Miledi has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of how synapses work. Here I discuss aspects of Miledi's research that helped to establish the requirement of presynaptic calcium for neurotransmitter release, from his earliest scientific studies to his classic experiments in the squid giant synapse.

  7. Bound to be different: neurotransmitter transporters meet their bacterial cousins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L Keith; Meiler, Jens; Blakely, Randy D

    2007-12-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, including the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAT), norepinephrine (NET), serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters are extremely important drug targets of great clinical relevance. These Na+, Cl(-)-dependent transporters primarily function following neurotransmission to reset neuronal signaling by transporting neurotransmitter out of the synapse and back into the pre-synaptic neuron. Recent studies have tracked down an elusive binding site for Cl(-) that facilitates neurotransmitter transport using structural differences evident with bacterial family members (e.g., the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter LeuT Aa) that lack Cl(-) dependence. Additionally, the crystal structures of antidepressant-bound LeuT Aa reveals a surprising mode of drug interaction that may have relevance for medication development. The study of sequence and structural divergence between LeuT Aa and human SLC6 family transporters can thus inform us as to how and why neurotransmitter transporters evolved a reliance on extracellular Cl(-) to propel the transport cycle; what residue changes and helical rearrangements give rise to recognition of different substrates; and how drugs such as antidepressants, cocaine, and amphetamines halt (or reverse) the transport process.

  8. Inherited disorders of brain neurotransmitters: pathogenesis and diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) play a central role in the efficient communication between neurons necessary for normal functioning of the nervous system. NTs can be divided into two groups: small molecule NTs and larger neuropeptide NTs. Inherited disorders of NTs result from a primary disturbance of NTs metabolism or transport. This group of disorders requires sophisticated diagnostic procedures. In this review we discuss disturbances in the metabolism of tetrahydrobiopterin, biogenic amines, γ-aminobutyric acid, foliate, pyridoxine-dependent enzymes, and also the glycine-dependent encephalopathy. We point to pathologic alterations of proteins involved in synaptic neurotransmission that may cause neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We postulate that synaptic receptors and transporter proteins for neurotransmitters should be investigated in unresolved cases. Patients with inherited neurotransmitters disorders present various clinical presentations such as mental retardation, refractory seizures, pyramidal and extrapyramidal syndromes, impaired locomotor patterns, and progressive encephalopathy. Every patient with suspected inherited neurotransmitter disorder should undergo a structured interview and a careful examination including neurological, biochemical, and imaging.

  9. The Top 5 Neurotransmitters from a Clinical Neurologist's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists are proficient in neuroanatomy and -physiology but their understanding of neurochemistry tends to be mediocre. As a rule, we do not think in biochemical pathways and complex metabolic interactions but rather associate a few neurotransmitters with well-known brain diseases or drugs th...

  10. Noradrenaline as a putative neurotransmitter mediating hypotension—induced FOs—like immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENEH; XIASUN

    1995-01-01

    Hemorrhage or hypotension induces extensive Fos-like immunoreactivity in the magnocellular neurosecretory cells in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus in rat,especially in the vasopressin neurons.The present study was to explore the neurotransmitter mediating this effect,Microinfusion of the alpha-adrenergic blocker into the supraoptic nucleus reduced the hypotension-induced FOs.whereas beta-antagonist did not affect it significantly.Alaha1-and alpha2-antagonist,prazosin and yohimbine,both reduced the Fos-Positive cell counts.However,the effective dosage of yohimbine was much larger,Alpha1-agonist,methoxamine,induced abundant Fos-like immunoreactivity in the vasopressin cells in this nucleus,while beta-and alpha2-agonist did not elicit such effect.Administration of the noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor desipramine,to this nucleus to locally accumulate the spontaneously released noradrenaline from the nerve terminals also induced Fos expression,mostly in the vasopressin cells.

  11. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  12. Mechanism of chloride interaction with neurotransmitter:sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomot, Elia; Bendahan, Annie; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Yongfang; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kanner, Baruch I

    2007-10-11

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) have a critical role in regulating neurotransmission and are targets for psychostimulants, anti-depressants and other drugs. Whereas the non-homologous glutamate transporters mediate chloride conductance, in the eukaryotic NSS chloride is transported together with the neurotransmitter. In contrast, transport by the bacterial NSS family members LeuT, Tyt1 and TnaT is chloride independent. The crystal structure of LeuT reveals an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and two sodium ions, and is highly relevant for the neurotransmitter transporters. However, the precise role of chloride in neurotransmitter transport and the location of its binding site remain elusive. Here we show that introduction of a negatively charged amino acid at or near one of the two putative sodium-binding sites of the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transporter GAT-1 from rat brain (also called SLC6A1) renders both net flux and exchange of GABA largely chloride independent. In contrast to wild-type GAT-1, a marked stimulation of the rate of net flux, but not of exchange, was observed when the internal pH was lowered. Equivalent mutations introduced in the mouse GABA transporter GAT4 (SLC6A11) and the human dopamine transporter DAT (SLC6A3) also result in chloride-independent transport, whereas the reciprocal mutations in LeuT and Tyt1 render substrate binding and/or uptake by these bacterial NSS chloride dependent. Our data indicate that the negative charge, provided either by chloride or by the transporter itself, is required during binding and translocation of the neurotransmitter, probably to counterbalance the charge of the co-transported sodium ions.

  13. Endophilin mutations block clathrin-mediated endocytosis but not neurotransmitter release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verstreken, Patrik; Kjaerulff, Ole; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    We have identified mutations in Drosophila endophilin to study its function in vivo. Endophilin is required presynaptically at the neuromuscular junction, and absence of Endophilin dramatically impairs endocytosis in vivo. Mutant larvae that lack Endophilin fail to take up FM1-43 dye in synaptic ...

  14. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  15. Repeated otilonium bromide administration prevents neurotransmitter changes in colon of rats underwent to wrap restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Chiara; Evangelista, Stefano; Girod, Vincent; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana

    2017-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic drug successfully used for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Its efficacy has been attributed to the block of L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels and muscarinic and tachykinin receptors in the smooth muscle. Furthermore, in healthy rats, repeated OB administration modified neurotransmitter expression and function suggesting other mechanisms of action. On this basis, we investigated whether repeated OB treatment prevented the functional and neurochemical changes observed in the colon of rats underwent to wrap restrain stress (WRS) a psychosocial stressor considered suitable to reproduce the main IBS signs and symptoms. In control, WRS and OB/WRS rats functional parameters were measured in vivo and morphological investigations were done ex vivo in the colon. The results showed that OB counteracts most of the neurotransmitters changes caused by WRS. In particular, the drug prevents the decrease in SP-, NK1r-, nNOS-, VIP-, and S100β-immunoreactivity (IR) and the increase in CGRP-, and CRF1r-IR. On the contrary, OB does not affect the increase in CRF2r-IR neurons observed in WRS rats and does not interfere with the mild mucosal inflammation due to WRS. Finally, OB per se increases the Mr2 expression in the muscle wall and decreases the number of the myenteric ChAT-IR neurons. Functional findings show a significantly reduction in the number of spontaneous abdominal contraction in OB treated rats. The ability of OB to block L-type Ca(2+) channels, also expressed by enteric neurons, might represent a possible mechanism through which OB exerts its actions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Bepaling van enkele neurotransmitters, monoaminen, en metabolieten, met behulp van Continuous Flowapparatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigeman L; Schonewille F; Borst M; van der Laan JW

    1986-01-01

    Bij het onderzoek in de psychofarmacologie kan kennis van de effecten van stoffen op de omzettingssnelheid van neurotransmitters een belangrijk aspect zijn. Met de huidige psychofarmaca lijken vooral de klassieke neurotransmitters zoals de monoaminen, noradrenaline, dopamine en serotonine van

  17. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  18. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Molero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain.From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.32, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 1.0%. With age stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19-1.73, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 3.0%. However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25-34 y (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95-1.52, p = 0.125, absolute risk = 1.6%, in those aged 35-44 y (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.83-1.35, p = 0.666, absolute risk = 1.2%, or in those aged 45 y or older (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.84-1.35, p = 0.594, absolute risk = 0.3%. Associations in those aged 15 to 24 y were also found for violent crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41, p < 0.001, non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.34, p < 0.001, non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.20, p < 0.001, non-fatal injuries from accidents (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.22-1.36, p < 0.001, and emergency inpatient or outpatient treatment for alcohol intoxication or misuse (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.76-2.21, p < 0.001. With

  19. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects.

  20. Chengzikou Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Chengzikou Block is located in the north of Hekou district, Dongying City, Shandong Province, adjacent to Bohai Bay. It can be geographically divided into three units: onshore, transitional zone and offshore ultrashallow zone, totally covering an area of 470 km2. The southern onshore area is low and gentle in topography;the northern shallow sea is at water depths of 2-8 m below sea level, and the transitional zone occupies more than 60% of the whole block. The climate belongs to temperate zone with seasonal wind. Highways are welldeveloped here, and the traffic is very convenient. The Chengzikou Block is about 80 km away from Dongying City and 290 km from Jinan City in the south. The northern offshore area of the block is 160 km away from Longkou port in the east and only 38 km away in the west from Zhuangxi port.

  1. Determining the neurotransmitter concentration profile at active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, Annalisa; Beato, Marco

    2009-12-01

    Establishing the temporal and concentration profiles of neurotransmitters during synaptic release is an essential step towards understanding the basic properties of inter-neuronal communication in the central nervous system. A variety of ingenious attempts has been made to gain insights into this process, but the general inaccessibility of central synapses, intrinsic limitations of the techniques used, and natural variety of different synaptic environments have hindered a comprehensive description of this fundamental phenomenon. Here, we describe a number of experimental and theoretical findings that has been instrumental for advancing our knowledge of various features of neurotransmitter release, as well as newly developed tools that could overcome some limits of traditional pharmacological approaches and bring new impetus to the description of the complex mechanisms of synaptic transmission.

  2. Longmenshan Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Longmenshan Block is located in Jiange County of Jiangyou City in the northwest of Sichuan Basin. covering an area of 2 628 km2. Geologically, it is situated in the Mid-Longmenshan fault and fold belt, neighbouring Zitong Depression in its southeast. There are mountains surrounding its northwest , the rest area being hilly land,with the elevation of 500-700 m. The BaoCheng railway and the No. 108 highway run through the block, the traffic is very convenient.

  3. Appearance and distribution of peptidergic neurotransmitters in hippocampal primary culture

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    The internal structure of the hippocampus, especially the development of neuronal circuits, is the subject of current research. The hippocampal primary culture represents a suitable model to study neuronal development and the impact of isolated stimuli and noxious. Focus of the following considerations are the neurons of the hippocampus, especially the peptidergic neurotransmitters somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and cholecystokinin (CCK). By us...

  4. Application of PEDOT-CNT Microelectrodes for Neurotransmitter Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Samba, Ramona; Fuchsberber, Kai; Matiychyn, Ilona; Epple, Sebastian; Kiesel, Lydia; Stett, Alfred; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Stelzle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, composite microelectrodes from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) are characterized as electrochemical sensing material for neurotransmitters. Dopamine can be detected using square wave voltammetry at these microelectrodes. The CNTs improve the sensitivity by a factor of two. In addition, the selectivity towards dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid was examined. While both electrodes, PEDOT and PEDOT-CNT are able to detect all ...

  5. Terahertz identification and quantification of neurotransmitter and neurotrophy mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yan; Yuan, Xiaorong; Zou, Xiang; Chen, Wanqing; Huang, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been widely used for investigating the fingerprint spectrum of different substances. For cancerous tissues, the greatest difficulty is the absorption peaks of various substances contained in tissues overlap with each other, which are hard to identify and quantitative analyze. As a result, it is very hard to measure the presence of cancer cell and then to diagnose accurately. In this paper, we select three typical neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid, L-glutamic ac...

  6. Role of antioxidants in the protection of the nitrergic neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2002-06-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway generates the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter which mediates smooth muscle relaxation in a variety of nitrergically-innervated tissues. However, one strange aspect of this nitrergic neurotransmission process is that certain drugs (i.e. superoxide generators and NO-scavengers) powerfully inhibit relaxations to exogenous NO, but have little or no effect on relaxations to electrical field stimulation. This thesis examined the possibility that in the nitrergically-innervated gastric fundus of the pig tissue antioxidants present in the neuroeffector junction might protect the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter (free radical NO) from attack by superoxide anions and scavenging activity, while exogenous NO would still be vulnerable before it reaches the nitrergic synapses within the tissue. We found that several antioxidants (in casu Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, bilirubin) exerted a partial or complete protection of the relaxation induced by exogenous NO against the differentiating drugs under investigation. A close interrelationship between the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter and the antioxidants Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and bilirubin (produced by the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase system) was corroborated by immunohistochemical data showing the presence of these latter defense systems in all nitrergic neurons. Pharmacological depletion further established a role for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in peripheral nitrergic neurotransmission. For glutathione, only a partial depletion could be obtained and this did not influence nitrergic neurotransmission.

  7. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  8. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (≤200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 μm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents.

  9. Neurotransmitter receptor-mediated signaling pathways as modulators of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system with its two antagonistic branches, the sympathicus and the parasympathicus, regulates the activities of all body functions that are not under voluntary control. While the autonomic regulation of organ functions has been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the potential role of neurohumoral transmission at the cellular level in the development of cancer. Studies conducted by our laboratory first showed that binding of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, as well as nicotine or its nitrosated cancer-causing derivative, NNK, to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors comprised of alpha7 subunits activated a mitogenic signal transduction pathway in normal and neoplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. On the other hand, beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs), which transmit signals initiated by binding of the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathicus, were identified by our laboratory as important regulators of cell proliferation in cell lines derived from human adenocarcinomas of the lungs, pancreas, and breast. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK bound with high affinity to Beta1- and Beta2-ARs, thus activating cAMP, protein kinase A, and the transcription factor CREB. Collectively, neurotransmitter receptors of the nicotinic and Beta-adrenergic families appear to regulate cellular functions essential for the development and survival of the most common human cancers.

  10. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time.......Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time....

  11. Effects of systemic injections of vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin 1A receptor agonist, on anxiety induced by predator stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Robert; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Burton, Paul

    2004-11-03

    We examined the effect of Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor agonist [Bartoszyk, G.D., Hegenbart, R., Ziegler, H., 1997. EMD 68843, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor with selective presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonistic properties. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 322, 147-153.], on change in affect following predator stress. Vilazodone and vehicle injection (intraperitoneal) occurred either 10 min after predator stress (prophylactic testing), or 90 min prior to behavioral testing for the effects of predator stress (therapeutic testing). Predator stress involved unprotected exposure of rats to a domestic cat. Behavioral effects of stress were evaluated with hole board, plus-maze, and acoustic startle tests 1 week after stress. Predator stress increased anxiety-like behavior in the plus-maze and elevated response to acoustic startle. In prophylactic testing, Vilazodone affected stress potentiation of startle at doses above 5 mg/kg. Vilazodone increased stress elevation of startle at 10 mg/kg. Higher doses of Vilazodone (20 and 40 mg/kg) blocked stress potentiation of startle. In contrast, Vilazodone had no effect on stress potentiation of anxiety in the plus-maze. In therapeutic testing, Vilazodone increased stress elevation of startle at all doses. In contrast, therapeutic Vilazodone had no effect on stress potentiation of anxiety in the plus-maze. Taken together, the data suggest a prophylactic potential for Vilazodone in the treatment of changes in hypervigilance following severe stress.

  12. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  13. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  14. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Akerud, H; Kaihola, H; Pawluski, J L; Skalkidou, A; Högberg, U; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well-documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) which are

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association be...

  16. The age-dependent effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in humans and rodents : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Blom, T; Arentsen, T; Homberg, J R

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is widely prescribed for the treatment of depression and anxiety-related disorders. While extensive research has established that fluoxetine is safe for adults, safety is not guaranteed for (unborn) children and adolescents. Some

  17. Extrapyramidal syndromes associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors : a case-control study using spontaneous reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; van Puijenbroek, E P; de Boer, Anthonius; Roos, R A C; Jansen, Paul A F; Leufkens, H G M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS). We analysed the spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected by The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb in the period 198

  18. QT interval prolongation in users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in an elderly surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the occurrence of QT interval prolongation in an elderly surgical population. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients (> 60 years) scheduled for outpatient preanes...

  19. Do selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors acutely increase frontal cortex levels of serotonin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Chad E.; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) exert their effects by inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake. Although blockade occurs almost immediately, the neurochemical effects on 5-HT, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, have been a matter of considerable debate. In particular, literature repor

  20. Increased Bleeding Risk With Concurrent Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors and Coumarins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, Tom; Klungel, Olaf H; Souverein, Patrick C; de Boer, Anthonius

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Because use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is also associated with an increased risk of bleeding, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) of abnormal bleeding associated with SS

  1. Extrapyramidal syndromes associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors : a case-control study using spontaneous reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, I; van Puijenbroek, E P; de Boer, Anthonius; Roos, R A C; Jansen, Paul A F; Leufkens, H G M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS). We analysed the spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) collected by The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb in the period 198

  2. Helicobacter pylori and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Michael; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Møller Hansen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have reported a possible association between use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB). We conducted this case-control study to assess if Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) potentiates the risk of serious UGB in SSRI ...

  3. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  4. Are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Safe for Drivers? What is the Evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravera, Silvia; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; de Gier, Johan J.; de Jong-van den Berg, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used medications to treat several psychiatric diseases and, above all, depression. They seem to be as effective as older antidepressants but have a different adverse effect profile. Despite their favorable safety profile, little

  5. In Utero Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor; Yudell, Michael; Mortensen, Erik L.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status. There…

  6. Increased Bleeding Risk With Concurrent Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors and Coumarins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, Tom; Klungel, Olaf H; Souverein, Patrick C; de Boer, Anthonius

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Because use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is also associated with an increased risk of bleeding, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) of abnormal bleeding associated with

  7. Sertraline causes strong coronary vasodilation : Possible relevance for cardioprotection by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, JP; Buikema, H; van den Berg, MP; van Buiten, A; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Boonstra, PW; van Gilst, WH

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are important antidepressant drugs, knowledge of their vaso active effects is limited. Vaso active effects of the SSRI sertraline were studied in rings of rat aorta, human Internal Mammary Arteries (IMAs) and in Langendorff perfused

  8. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  9. The effects of combining serotonin reuptake inhibition and 5-HT7 receptor blockade on circadian rhythm regulation in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Ligia; Sprouse, Jeffrey; Sánchez, Connie

    2013-02-17

    Disruption of circadian rhythms may lead to mood disorders. The present study investigated the potential therapeutic utility of combining a 5-HT7 antagonist with a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), the standard of care in depression, on circadian rhythm regulation. In tissue explants of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from PER2::LUC mice genetically modified to report changes in the expression of a key clock protein, the period length of PER2 bioluminescence was shortened in the presence of AS19, a 5-HT7 partial agonist. This reduction was blocked by SB269970, a selective 5-HT7 antagonist. The SSRI, escitalopram, had no effect alone on period length, but a combination with SB269970, yielded significant increases. Dosed in vivo, escitalopram had little impact on the occurrence of activity onsets in rats given access to running wheels, whether the drug was given acutely or sub-chronically. However, preceding the escitalopram treatment with a single acute dose of SB269970 produced robust phase delays, in keeping with the in vitro explant data. Taken together, these findings suggest that the combination of an SSRI and a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist has a greater impact on circadian rhythms than that observed with either agent alone, and that such a multimodal approach may be of therapeutic value in treating patients with poor clock function.

  10. Chadong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Chadong Block, located in the east of Qaidam Basin, Qinghai Province, covers an area of 12 452 km2. It is bounded by Kunlum Mountains in the south and the northwest is closely adjacent to Aimunike Mountain.Rivers are widely distributed, which always run in NWSE direction, including the Sulunguole, Qaidam and Haluwusu Rivers. The traffic condition is good, the Qinghai-Tibet highway stretching through the whole area and the Lan-Qing railway, 20-50 km away from the block, passing from north to west. A lot of Mongolia minority people have settled there, of which herdsmen always live nearby the Qaidam River drainage area.

  11. Research progress in monoamine transporters and monoamine transmitter reuptake inhibitors%单胺转运蛋白与单胺重摄取抑制剂研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亭亭; 薛瑞; 李云峰; 洪浩; 张有志

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic membrane serotonin transporters ( SERT ) and norepinephrine transporter ( NET ), which are important neurotransmitter transporters, are responsible for reuptake of released serotonin ( 5-HT ) and norepinephrine ( NE ), respectively. The major function of these transporters is to terminate monoamine transmission by mediating uptake of neurotransmitters from extracellular space into neurons and glial cells. Drugs that inhibit the activity of monoamine transporters produce increased neurotransmitter levels in the synaptic cleft, leading to their therapeutic use in depression. As SERT and NET are pharmacological targets for most antidepressants, understanding about the molecular pharmacology of these transporters, including their localization and function, molecular structure and regulation, as well as drug binding sites and mechanism of action, is important to new antidepressant development.%5-羟色胺转运蛋白(serotonin transporter,SERT)和去甲肾上腺素转运蛋白(norepinephrine transporter,NET)是单胺类神经递质转运体,其功能是将释放到突触间隙的5-羟色胺(serotonin,5-HT)和去甲肾上腺素(norepinephrine,NE)分别转运入突触前神经细胞,以终止相应的突触信号传递.SERT、NET抑制剂可阻断5-HT和NE的重摄取,提高突触间隙单胺递质水平,从而发挥抗抑郁效应.SERT、NET作为主流抗抑郁药物的作用靶标,了解其分布与功能、分子结构和活性调节因素,以及单胺重摄取抑制剂的作用机制对抗抑郁药物研发及应用具有重要意义.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for premature ejaculation in healthy male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dongseong Shin,1 SeungHwan Lee,2 Sojeong Yi,2 Seo Hyun Yoon,2 Joo-Youn Cho,2 Mi Young Bahng,3 In-Jin Jang,2 Kyung-Sang Yu2 1Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 3Department of Product Development, Dong-A ST, Seoul, Korea Objective: DA-8031 is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor under development for the treatment of premature ejaculation. This is the first-in-human study aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031 and its metabolites (M1, M2, M4, and M5 in the plasma and urine after administration of a single oral dose in healthy male subjects.Methods: A dose block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was conducted. Subjects received either placebo or a single dose of DA-8031 at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 120 mg. DA-8031 and its four metabolites were analyzed in the plasma and urine for pharmacokinetic evaluation. The effect of genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome-P450 (CYP enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of DA-8031 was evaluated.Results: After a single dose, plasma DA-8031 reached the maximum concentration at a median of 2–3 h and was eliminated with terminal elimination half-life of 17.9–28.7 h. The mean renal clearance was 3.7–5.6 L/h. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed over the dose range of 20–80 mg. Among the metabolites, M4 had the greatest plasma concentration, followed by M5 and M1. Subjects with CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizer had significantly greater dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0–t of DA-8031 as well as smaller metabolic ratios than those subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and headache, and no serious adverse events were reported.Conclusion: In conclusion, the systemic exposure of DA-8031 was increased proportionally to the dose within 20

  13. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  14. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    The interest in glucagon-like petide-1 (GLP-1) and other pre-proglucagon derived peptides has risen almost exponentially since seminal papers in the early 1990s proposed to use GLP-1 agonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of type 2 diabetes. A wealth of interesting studies covering both...... normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter...

  15. Name that neurotransmitter: using music to teach psychopharmacology concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Melinda; Lilly, Mary LuAnne; Wilson, Kathy; Russell, Nathan Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of music (i.e., two original songs, "Neurotransmitter Twitter" and "Parkinson's Shuffle") to teach aspects of psychopharmacology to students in the course Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. Songs were incorporated in both the clinical and classroom settings. This innovative teaching method allowed students the opportunity to revisit the information through multiple exposures of the content for reinforcement and enhancement of student learning in a fun, creative approach. Brain-based research will be discussed, along with the process of development.

  16. Simultaneous administration of fluoxetine and simvastatin ameliorates lipid profile, improves brain level of neurotransmitters, and increases bioavailability of simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Masoudi, Aqeel Salman; Ahmad, Ishtiaque

    2017-01-01

    Simvastatin (STT), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, is widely prescribed for dyslipidemia, whereas fluoxetine (FLX) is the first-choice drug for the treatment of depression and anxiety. A recent report suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can interact with the cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate, and another one suggests that STT enhances the antidepressant activity of FLX. However, the data are inconclusive. The present study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of coadministration of STT and FLX in experimental animals. For this, Wistar rats weighing 250±10 g were divided into four groups, including control, STT (40 mg/kg/day), FLX (20 mg/kg/day), and STT+FLX group, respectively. After the dosing period of 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and brain samples were collected for the analysis of STT, simvastatin acid (STA), FLX, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and hydroxy indole acetic acid. It was found that the coadministration resulted in a significant increase in the bioavailability of STT in the plasma (41.8%) and brain (68.7%) compared to administration of STT alone (pSTT was also found to be increased significantly in the plasma and brain compared to that achieved after monotherapy (pSTT failed to improve the pharmacokinetics of FLX up to a significant level. The results of this study showed that the combined regimen significantly reduced the level of cholesterol and triglyceride and increased the level of HDL when compared to STT monotherapy. Furthermore, the coadministration of STT with FLX led to an elevated level of neurotransmitters in the brain (pSTT in the plasma and brain. The coadministration of these drugs also led to an improved lipid profile. However, in the long-term, this interaction may have a vital clinical importance because the increase in STT level may lead to life-threatening side

  17. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  18. "Stiff neonate" with mitochondrial DNA depletion and secondary neurotransmitter defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Margaret M

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders comprise a heterogenous group. A neonate who presented with episodes of severe truncal hypertonia and apnea progressed to a hypokinetic rigid syndrome characterized by hypokinesia, tremulousness, profound head lag, absent suck and gag reflexes, brisk deep tendon reflexes, ankle and jaw clonus, and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters from age 7 weeks demonstrated low levels of amine metabolites (homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid), tetrahydrobiopterin, and pyridoxal phosphate. Mitochondrial DNA quantitative studies on muscle homogenate demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA depletion disorder. Respiratory chain enzymology demonstrated decreased complex IV activity. Screening for mitochondrial DNA rearrangement disorders and sequencing relevant mitochondrial genes produced negative results. No clinical or biochemical response to treatment with pyridoxal phosphate, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-dopa occurred. The clinical course was progressive, and the patient died at age 19 months. Mitochondrial disorders causing secondary neurotransmitter diseases are usually severe, but are rarely reported. This diagnosis should be considered in neonates or infants who present with hypertonia, hypokinesia rigidity, and progressive neurodegeneration.

  19. Identification of catecholamine neurotransmitters using fluorescence sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Forough [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hormozi-Nezhad, M. Reza, E-mail: hormozi@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Morteza, E-mail: mahmoudi@stanford.edu [Department of Nanotechnology and Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 13169-43551 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5101 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    A nano-based sensor array has been developed for identification and discrimination of catecholamine neurotransmitters based on optical properties of their oxidation products under alkaline conditions. To produce distinct fluorescence response patterns for individual catecholamine, quenching of thioglycolic acid functionalized cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots, by oxidation products, were employed along with the variation of fluorescence spectra of oxidation products. The spectral changes were analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify catecholamine patterns. The proposed sensor could efficiently discriminate the individual catecholamine (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and L-DOPA) and their mixtures in the concentration range of 0.25–30 μmol L{sup −1}. Finally, we found that the sensor had capability to identify the various catecholamines in urine sample. - Highlights: • We have proposed a fluorescence sensor array to detect catecholamine neurotransmitters. • Visual differentiation of catecholamines is provided by fluorescence array fingerprints. • Discrimination of catecholamines from each other, and from their mixture is obtained on a PCA plot. • Proposed sensor array can be used for detection of catecholamines in urine samples.

  20. The amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen F S; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Duff, Karen; Bennett, David A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-11-01

    Past studies using transgenic models of early-staged amyloid pathology, have suggested that the amyloid pathology progresses in a neurotransmitter-specific manner where cholinergic terminals appear most vulnerable, followed by glutamatergic terminals and finally by somewhat more resistant GABAergic terminals. To determine whether this neurotransmitter-specific progression persists at later pathological stages, presynaptic bouton densities, and the areas of occupation and localization of plaque adjacent dystrophic neurites were quantified in 18-month-old APP(K670N, M671L)+PS1(M146L) doubly transgenic mice. Quantification revealed that transgenic animals had significantly lower cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic presynaptic bouton densities. Cholinergic and glutamatergic dystrophic neurites appear to be heavily influenced by fibrillar Abeta as both types displayed a decreasing area of occupation with respect to increasing plaque size. Furthermore, cholinergic dystrophic neurites reside in closer proximity to plaques than glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, while GABAergic dystrophic neurites were minimal regardless of plaque size. To investigate whether similarities exist in the human AD pathology, a monoclonal antibody (McKA1) against the human vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGluT1) was developed. Subsequent staining in AD brain tissue revealed the novel presence of glutamatergic dystrophic neurites, to our knowledge the first evidence of a structural glutamatergic deficit in the AD pathology.

  1. Serotonin reuptake inhibition vs. norepinephrine reuptake inhibition: a double-blind differential-therapeutic study with fluvoxamine and oxaprotiline in endogenous and neurotic depressives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, H M; Berger, M; Riemann, D; von Zerssen, D

    1987-03-01

    The antidepressive properties of the specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine and the specific norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor oxaprotiline were investigated in a sequential design with the aim of evaluating the hypothesis that two distinct biochemical subtypes of depression exist. Responders were treated for 7 weeks with the compound to which they had responded. After 1 placebo week, the nonresponders were switched to the alternative compound. An evaluation of the data obtained during the 3-week treatment periods from 24 patients (37 trials) with major depression revealed a highly significant reduction of Hamilton Scores with both compounds, oxaprotiline and fluvoxamine. If the patients with major depression are subdivided into two groups, endogenous depressives and neurotic depressives, there is no significant difference between the therapeutic improvements (both compounds) achieved in the two groups. The data shows that only about 20% of the nonresponders on one compound responded to the alternative drug, whereas 90% of responders (within 3 weeks) were still responders after 7 weeks. The data are at variance with the concept of two distinct biochemical subtypes of depression (serotonergic vs. norepinephrinergic). Dexamethasone suppression tests, performed in 23 patients, gave no prognostic hint as to whether the patients reacted well to drug therapy or not.

  2. Tramadol : Effects on sexual behavior in male rats are mainly caused by its 5-HT reuptake blocking effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Esquivel Franco, Diana C; Oosting, Ronald; Waldinger, Marcel; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Olivier, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a well-known and effective analgesic. Recently it was shown that tramadol is also effective in human premature ejaculation. The inhibitory effect of tramadol on the ejaculation latency is probably due to its mechanism of action as a μ-opioid receptor agonist and noradrenaline/serotonin

  3. Tramadol : Effects on sexual behavior in male rats are mainly caused by its 5-HT reuptake blocking effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Esquivel Franco, Diana C; Oosting, Ronald; Waldinger, Marcel; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Olivier, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a well-known and effective analgesic. Recently it was shown that tramadol is also effective in human premature ejaculation. The inhibitory effect of tramadol on the ejaculation latency is probably due to its mechanism of action as a μ-opioid receptor agonist and noradrenaline/serotonin (

  4. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  5. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland.

  6. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  7. Acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors regulate the dorsal raphe nucleus causing amplification of terminal serotonin release

    OpenAIRE

    Dankoski, Elyse C.; Carroll, Susan; Wightman, Robert Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were designed to treat depression by increasing serotonin levels throughout the brain via inhibition of clearance from the extracellular space. Although increases in serotonin levels are observed after acute SSRI exposure, 3–6 weeks of continuous use is required for relief from the symptoms of depression. Thus, it is now believed that plasticity in multiple brain systems that are downstream of serotonergic inputs contributes to the ther...

  8. Prevalence of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Pilot Fatalities of Civil Aviation Accidents, 1990-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Some of the drugs—such as atropine, lidocaine , etomidate, and analgesics—found in the pilot fatalities could have been administered by emergency...system of the pilots prior to the accidents. Thus, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic- level interactions of SSRIs and their active metabolites...2002. 17 6. Baumann P. Pharmacokinetic- pharmacodynamic relationship of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Clin Pharmacokinet 1996; 31:444

  9. Relationship between brain serotonin transporter binding, plasma concentration and behavioural effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterise the relationship between in vivo brain serotonin transporter (SERT) binding, plasma concentration and pharmacological effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in mice. Oral administration of fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline at pharmacologically relevant doses exerted dose- and time-dependent binding activity of brain SERT as revealed by significant increases in KD for specific [3H]paroxetine binding, and the i...

  10. The Role of TM5 in Na2 Release and the Conformational Transition of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters toward the Inward-Open State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Li, Zheng; Quick, Matthias; Malinauskaite, Lina; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Shi, Lei

    2017-03-20

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate neurotransmission by the reuptake of released neurotransmitters. This active accumulation of substrate against its concentration gradient is driven by the transmembrane Na+ gradient and requires that the transporter traverses several conformational states. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homolog, has been crystallized in outward-open, outward-occluded and inward-open states. Two crystal structures of another prokaryotic NSS homolog, the multi-hydrophobic amino acid transporter (MhsT) from Bacillus halodurans have been resolved in novel inward-occluded states, with the extracellular vestibule closed and the intracellular portion of TM5 (TM5i) in either an unwound or a helical conformation. We have investigated the potential involvement of TM5i in binding and unbinding of Na2, i.e. the Na(+) bound in the Na2 site, by carrying out comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the models derived from the two MhsT structures. We find that the helical TM5i conformation is associated with a higher propensity for Na2 release, which leads to the repositioning of the N terminus (NT) and transition to an inward-open state. By using comparative interaction network analysis, we also identify allosteric pathways connecting TM5i and the Na2 binding site to the extracellular and intracellular regions. Based on our combined computational and mutagenesis studies of MhsT and LeuT, we propose that TM5i plays a key role in Na2 binding and release associated with the conformational transition toward the inward-open state, a role that is likely to be shared across the NSS family.

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  12. Biophysics of risk aversion based on neurotransmitter receptor theory

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Taiki

    2011-01-01

    Decision under risk and uncertainty has been attracting attention in neuroeconomics and neuroendocrinology of decision-making. This paper demonstrated that the neurotransmitter receptor theory-based value (utility) function can account for human and animal risk-taking behavior. The theory predicts that (i) when dopaminergic neuronal response is efficiently coupled to the formation of ligand-receptor complex, subjects are risk-aversive (irrespective of their satisfaction level) and (ii) when the coupling is inefficient, subjects are risk-seeking at low satisfaction levels, consistent with risk-sensitive foraging theory in ecology. It is further suggested that some anomalies in decision under risk are due to inefficiency of the coupling between dopamine receptor activation and neuronal response. Future directions in the application of the model to studies in neuroeconomics of addiction and neuroendocrine modulation of risk-taking behavior are discussed.

  13. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-09-23

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  14. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong M. Nguyen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu. A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  15. Neurotransmitter GABA activates muscle but not α7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Leonardo; Bergé, Ignacio; Bravo, Matías; Esandi, María Del Carmen; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are neurotransmitter-activated ion channels involved in synaptic and extrasynaptic transmission in the brain and are also present in non-neuronal cells. As GABAA and nicotinic receptors (nAChR) belong to this family, we explored by macroscopic and single-channel recordings whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA has the ability to activate excitatory nAChRs. GABA differentially activates nAChR subtypes. It activates muscle nAChRs, with maximal peak currents of about 10% of those elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) and 15-fold higher EC50 with respect to ACh. At the single-channel level, the weak agonism is revealed by the requirement of 20-fold higher concentration of GABA for detectable channel openings, a major population of brief openings, and absence of clusters of openings when compared with ACh. Mutations at key residues of the principal binding-site face of muscle nAChRs (αY190 and αG153) affect GABA activation similarly as ACh activation, whereas a mutation at the complementary face (εG57) shows a selective effect for GABA. Studies with subunit-lacking receptors show that GABA can activate muscle nAChRs through the α/δ interface. Interestingly, single-channel activity elicited by GABA is similar to that elicited by ACh in gain-of-function nAChR mutants associated to congenital myasthenic syndromes, which could be important in the progression of the disorders due to steady exposure to serum GABA. In contrast, GABA cannot elicit single-channel or macroscopic currents of α7 or the chimeric α7-serotonin-type 3 receptor, a feature important for preserving an adequate excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain as well as for avoiding activation of non-neuronal receptors by serum GABA. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 Trigger Synchronous and Asynchronous Phases of Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacaj, Taulant; Wu, Dick; Yang, Xiaofei; Morishita, Wade; Zhou, Peng; Xu, Wei; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    In forebrain neurons, knockout of synaptotagmin-1 blocks fast Ca2+-triggered synchronous neurotransmitter release, but enables manifestation of slow Ca2+-triggered asynchronous release. Here, we show using single-cell PCR that individual hippocampal neurons abundantly co-express two Ca2+-binding synaptotagmin isoforms, synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-7. In synaptotagmin-1 deficient synapses of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, loss-of-function of synaptotagmin-7 suppressed asynchronous release. This phenotype was rescued by wild-type but not mutant synaptotagmin-7 lacking functional Ca2+-binding sites. Even in synaptotagmin-1 containing neurons, synaptotagmin-7 ablation partly impaired asynchronous release induced by extended high-frequency stimulus trains. Synaptotagmins bind Ca2+ via two C2-domains, the C2A- and C2B-domains. Surprisingly, synaptotagmin-7 function selectively required its C2A-domain Ca2+-binding sites, whereas synaptotagmin-1 function required its C2B-domain Ca2+-binding sites. Our data show that nearly all Ca2+-triggered release at a synapse is due to synaptotagmins, with synaptotagmin-7 mediating a slower form of Ca2+-triggered release that is normally occluded by faster synaptotagmin-1-induced release, but becomes manifest upon synaptotagmin-1 deletion. PMID:24267651

  17. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for premature ejaculation in healthy male subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongseong; Lee, SeungHwan; Yi, Sojeong; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Bahng, Mi Young; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2017-01-01

    Objective DA-8031 is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor under development for the treatment of premature ejaculation. This is the first-in-human study aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031 and its metabolites (M1, M2, M4, and M5) in the plasma and urine after administration of a single oral dose in healthy male subjects. Methods A dose block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was conducted. Subjects received either placebo or a single dose of DA-8031 at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 120 mg. DA-8031 and its four metabolites were analyzed in the plasma and urine for pharmacokinetic evaluation. The effect of genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome-P450 (CYP) enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of DA-8031 was evaluated. Results After a single dose, plasma DA-8031 reached the maximum concentration at a median of 2–3 h and was eliminated with terminal elimination half-life of 17.9–28.7 h. The mean renal clearance was 3.7–5.6 L/h. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed over the dose range of 20–80 mg. Among the metabolites, M4 had the greatest plasma concentration, followed by M5 and M1. Subjects with CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizer had significantly greater dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0–t of DA-8031 as well as smaller metabolic ratios than those subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and headache, and no serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion In conclusion, the systemic exposure of DA-8031 was increased proportionally to the dose within 20–80 mg. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 had an effect on the systemic exposure of DA-8031. DA-8031 was well tolerated after single doses of 80 mg or less. PMID:28331291

  18. Regulation of extrasynaptic 5-HT by serotonin reuptake transporter function in 5-HT-absorbing neurons underscores adaptation behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Gholamali; Xie, Yusu; Kullyev, Andrey; Liang, Bin; Sze, Ji Ying

    2011-06-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]-absorbing neurons use serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) to uptake 5-HT from extracellular space but do not synthesize it. While 5-HT-absorbing neurons have been identified in diverse organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, their function has not been elucidated. Here, we show that SERT in 5-HT-absorbing neurons controls behavioral response to food deprivation in C. elegans. The AIM and RIH interneurons uptake 5-HT released from chemosensory neurons and secretory neurons. Genetic analyses suggest that 5-HT secreted by both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles diffuse readily to the extrasynaptic space adjacent to the AIM and RIH neurons. Loss of mod-5/SERT function blocks the 5-HT absorption. mod-5/SERT mutants have been shown to exhibit exaggerated locomotor response to food deprivation. We found that transgenic expression of MOD-5/SERT in the 5-HT-absorbing neurons fully corrected the exaggerated behavior. Experiments of cell-specific inhibition of synaptic transmission suggest that the synaptic release of 5-HT from the 5-HT-absorbing neurons is not required for this behavioral modulation. Our data point to the role of 5-HT-absorbing neurons as temporal-spatial regulators of extrasynaptic 5-HT. Regulation of extrasynaptic 5-HT levels by 5-HT-absorbing neurons may represent a fundamental mechanism of 5-HT homeostasis, integrating the activity of 5-HT-producing neurons with distant targets in the neural circuits, and could be relevant to some actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in humans.

  19. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline: its profile and use in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, G; Born, L; Steiner, M

    2001-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals. Sertraline has a linear pharmacokinetic profile and a half-life of about 26 h. Its major metabolite, desmethylsertraline does not appear to inhibit serotonin reuptake. Sertraline mildly inhibits the CYP2D6 isoform of the cytochrome P450 system but has little effect on CYP1A2, CYP3A3/4, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19. It is, however, highly protein bound and may alter blood levels of other highly protein bound agents. Sertraline is a widely used serotonin reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. Many clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in depression compared with both placebo and other antidepressant drugs. Its efficacy has also been demonstrated in randomized, controlled trials of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. In short-term, open-label studies it has appeared efficacious and tolerable in children and adolescents and in the elderly, and data are positive for its use in pregnant or lactating women. Typical side effects include gastrointestinal and central nervous system effects as well as treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction; withdrawal reactions may be associated with abrupt discontinuation of the agent. The safety profile of sertraline in overdose is very favorable. Sertraline's efficacy for both mood and anxiety disorders, relatively weak effect on the cytochrome P450 system, and tolerability profile and safety in overdose are factors that contribute to make it a first-line agent for treatment in both primary and tertiary care settings.

  20. Paediatric outcomes following intrauterine exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Grøn, Jesper; Thomsen, Morten; Andersen, Kristian Skytte

    2011-01-01

    The use of serotonine reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) is increasing among Danish pregnant women. This systematic review addresses the potential adverse effects on the foetus and child of maternal SRI medication. The literature indicates a slightly increased risk of cardiovascular malformations...... and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the new-born, while evidence regarding the risk of preterm labour, low birth weight, low Apgar score, prolonged QT interval and miscarriage is less clear. An estimated 20-30% of infants will have neonatal symptoms following intrauterine SRI exposure. The symptoms may...

  1. Mixture and single-substance toxicity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors toward algae and crustaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Munch; Faaborg-Andersen, S.; Ingerslev, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    with an identical mechanism of action in mammals (inhibit reuptake of serotonin), and they have been found in different aqeous as well as biological samples collected in the environment. In the present study, we tested the toxicities of five SSRIs (citalopram, fluoxetine, fluoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline......) as single substances and of citalopram, fluoxetine. and sertraline in binary mixtures in two standardized bioassays. Test organisms were the freshwater algae Pseudo-kirchneriella subcapitata and the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna. In algae, test median effect concentrations (EC50s) ranged from 0...

  2. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the aquatic environment: an ecopharmacovigilance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliana J G; Lino, Celeste M; Meisel, Leonor M; Pena, Angelina

    2012-10-15

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are among the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. The occurrence of these widely used compounds in different environmental compartments (wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments), justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. Viewing an ecopharmacovigilance approach, a comprehensive discussion of the state of the art regarding different contamination sources, fate, degradation and occurrence is presented. Information on the current distribution levels and fate in different environmental matrices continues to be sparse and measures are imperative to improve awareness and encourage precautionary actions to minimize SSRIs' environmental impact.

  3. Evaluation of the analgesic effects of ammoxetine, a novel potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Xue, Rui; Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Fan, Qiong-yin; Zhong, Bo-hua; Li, Yun-Feng; Ye, Cai-ying; Zhang, You-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are commonly used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Ammoxetine ((±)-3-(benzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-N-methyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-amine) has been identified as a novel potent SNRI. In this study, we evaluated the acute analgesic properties of ammoxetine in different animal models of pain, and examined the involvement of monoamines in its analgesic actions. Methods: The analgesic...

  4. [HYPERPROLACTINEMIA AND SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS. A NARRATIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosón-González, Mirian; Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Montañés-Rada, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A large number of scientific papers have reported the relationship between the development of hyperprolactinemia and the use of psychotropic drugs, especially the role of antipsychotics which are antidopaminergic drugs. However, less information is known about the role of antidepressants in the development of hyperprolactinemia, specially the selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia as a pharmacological side effect of SSRIs is still unknown, despite the widespread use over the last decade. The aim of this review is to explore the relationship between hyperprolactinemia and SSRIs.

  5. Maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Rie Laurine Rosenthal; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy has been associated with miscarriage, but the association may be biased by maternal mental illness, lifestyle and exposure misclassification. METHODS: A register study on all pregnancies in Denmark between 1996......-exposed pregnancies were characterised by an unhealthier maternal lifestyle and mental health profile than unexposed pregnancies, whereas no convincing differences were observed between pregnancies exposed to SSRIs during versus before pregnancy. Substantial disagreement was found between prescriptions and self......-reported use of SSRIs, but it did not affect the estimated hazard ratios. CONCLUSION: Confounding by indication and lifestyle in pregnancy may explain the association between SSRI use and miscarriage....

  6. Retrospective review of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and falling in older nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Wilson, J G; Aronson, S M

    2001-03-01

    We compared the rate of falling in older nursing home residents who had been prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other classes of antidepressants, and no antidepressants. Data were obtained from pharmacy records, medical records, fall logs, and incidence reports for one nursing home (1995 data). Older adults on SSRIs were more likely to fall than older adults not on antidepressants (p = .003) and were more likely to have an injurious fall (p = .03). The association with falling remained significant even when including potential confounders (p = .007). Older nursing home residents should be treated for depression. However, SSRIs may also carry an increased risk for falling.

  7. REM sleep at its core—Circuits, neurotransmitters and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePeever

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available REM sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla (VMM, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie cataplexy/narcolepsy and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD. This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  8. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Peever, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  9. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann eGo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions.

  10. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  11. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  12. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    PART I DESCRIBES IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS MADE BY SOME JAPANESE PIONEERS IN THE FIELD OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson's disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters.

  13. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  14. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  15. Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators controlling the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneoka, Y; Fujisawa, Y; Matsuura, M; Ikeda, T

    1991-01-01

    1. The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis is innervated by at least two kinds of nerves, excitatory and relaxing nerves. The principal neurotransmitters released from these nerves have been shown to be acetylcholine and serotonin, respectively. 2. Some other monoamines, such as dopamine and octopamine, and various peptides, such as FMRFamide-related peptides, Mytilus inhibitory peptides, SCP-related peptides and a catch-relaxing peptide, may also be involved in the regulation of the muscle as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. 3. The ABRM seems to be typical of invertebrate muscles controlled by multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators.

  16. Hospital patients' perceptions during treatment and early discontinuation of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Stephen B; Fredman, Lisa; Goethe, John W; Lincoln, Alisa K; Heeren, Timothy

    2010-12-01

    Studies have suggested that discontinuation of treatment in depressed patients is associated with their perceptions about their treatment. We surveyed 403 adults treated for major depressive disorder with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) 3 months after onset of treatment to assess their interactions with clinicians, reasons they stopped SSRI treatment, and SSRI side effects (SEs). Bothersome SEs, poorer instruction by physicians about SSRI SEs, and self-reported change in depression, sex, marital status, and employment were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with discontinuation. Logistic regression examined the associations between patients' perceptions during treatment planning and SSRI discontinuation. Seventeen percent of patients felt uninvolved in treatment decisions, 9% disagreed with the diagnosis, and 24% subsequently stopped treatment. Elevated risk of discontinuation was found among patients who felt uninvolved in treatment decisions (unadjusted risk ratio [RR], 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-4.3) and those who disagreed with the diagnosis (RR, 2.0; CI, 0.9-4.4). Patients who both felt uninvolved and disagreed with the diagnosis were 7-fold as likely to discontinue their SSRI (RR, 7.3; CI, 1.5-36.3) compared with those who felt neither uninvolved nor disagreed. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor SEs, specific interactions with clinicians, self-assessed outcomes, and sociodemographics did not explain these associations. To improve adherence to medications, clinicians should consider patients' perceptions about their involvement in treatment decisions and agreement with their diagnosis.

  17. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: A Review of its Effects on Intraocular Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Ciro; Parmeggiani, Francesco; Semeraro, Francesco; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    The increase in serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission is considered to be one of the most efficacious medical approach to depression and its related disorders. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the most widely antidepressive drugs utilized in the medical treatment of depressed patients. Currently available SSRIs include fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram and escitalopram. The primary SSRIs pharmacological action’s mechanism consists in the presynaptic inhibition on the serotonin reuptake, with an increased availability of this amine into the synaptic cleft. Serotonin produces its effects as a consequence of interactions with appropriate receptors. Seven distinct families of 5-HT receptors have been identified (5-HT1 to 5-HT7), and subpopulations have been described for several of these. The interaction between serotonin and post-synaptic receptors mediates a wide range of functions. The SSRIs have a very favorable safety profile, although clinical signs of several unexpected pathologic events are often misdiagnosed, in particular, those regarding the eye. In all cases reported in the literature the angle-closure glaucoma represents the most important SSRIs-related ocular adverse event. Thus, it is not quite hazardous to hypothesize that also the other reported and unspecified visual disturbances could be attributed - at least in some cases - to IOP modifications. The knowledge of SSRIs individual tolerability, angle-closure predisposition and critical IOP could be important goals able to avoid further and more dangerous ocular side effects. PMID:19587851

  18. Cocaine synergism with alpha agonists in rat aorta: computational analysis reveals an action beyond reuptake inhibition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, Neil S.; Raffa, Robert B.; Tallarida, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cocaine has long been known to increase blood pressure, but the degree and mechanism of vasoconstricting action remain poorly understood. Here we examine the interaction between cocaine and alpha-adrenoceptor agonists, with the action of reuptake inhibition minimized. METHODS Cocaine was administered to isolated rings of rat thoracic aorta, alone and in combination with three different adrenoceptor agonists: phenylephrine, methoxamine, and norepinephrine. Synergy analysis begins with the predicted additive effect of the combination of two agonists, based upon dose equivalence theory. This case where one agonist (cocaine) has no effect when administered alone requires only a t-test to demonstrate that a departure from additivity has occurred. RESULTS At doses where cocaine alone produced no vasoconstriction, it potentiated the vasoconstriction produced by all three alpha agonists, a clear indication of synergism between cocaine and these agents. Higher doses of cocaine in combination with alpha adrenoceptor agents gave an inverted-U shaped (hormetic) dose-effect curve, i.e., dose-related relaxation at higher doses. The hormetic dose-effect relation was analyzed using computational methodology based on dose equivalence to derive the unknown second component of action that causes relaxation. CONCLUSIONS Cocaine exhibits both vasoconstricting and vasorelaxant effects. This relaxing component, possibly related to activation of myosin light chain phosphatase, was quantified as a dose-effect curve. Most important is the synergism between cocaine and alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation which cannot be explained as an action due to reuptake inhibition, and has not been previously described. PMID:23270987

  19. Levomilnacipran (Fetzima): A New Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceni, Megan M; Venci, Jineane V; Gandhi, Mona A

    2014-08-01

    In July 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration approved levomilnacipran extended release (ER; Fetzima), a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Levomilnacipran is an active enantiomer of the racemic drug milnacipran that is currently approved in the United States for the treatment of fibromyalgia. This article provides an overview of the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of levomilnacipran ER. Relevant information was identified through a search of databases using the key word levomilnacipran. Additional information was obtained from fda.gov, by a review of the reference lists of identified articles, and from posters and abstracts from scientific meetings. Levomilnacipran ER, dosed once daily, is generally well tolerated and has demonstrated favorable effects compared to placebo in clinical trials of patients with major depressive disorder. The increased potency for norepinephrine reuptake inhibition is a characteristic that may represent a novel contribution for levomilnacipran. Additional studies comparing levomilnacipran ER to other commonly prescribed antidepressants are needed to further evaluate its place in therapy.

  20. Exploration of structure-activity relationships for dual serotonin transporter reuptake inhibitors-histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Emily M; Letavic, Michael A; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carruthers, Nicholas I

    2010-01-01

    Depression is a major health issue, which is routinely treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, although these agents display a favorable effect on mood, they often fail to improve conditions that accompany depression including cognitive impairment and fatigue. In pre-clinical studies histamine H(3) receptor antagonists have demonstrated both pro-cognitive and wake-promoting effects suggesting that the combination of a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist and a serotonin reuptake inhibitor may have utility as an antidepressant therapy. To this end we sought to introduce histamine H(3) receptor antagonist activity into both known selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and novel templates. These efforts have afforded several series of compounds with the desired activities. Selected examples demonstrated in vivo efficacy both in pre-clinical models of depression and wakefulness.

  1. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  2. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  3. Dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) "inverse agonism"--a novel hypothesis to explain the enigmatic pharmacology of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, David J; Gosden, Jane; Smith, Sharon L

    2014-12-01

    The long held view is cocaine's pharmacological effects are mediated by monoamine reuptake inhibition. However, drugs with rapid brain penetration like sibutramine, bupropion, mazindol and tesofensine, which are equal to or more potent than cocaine as dopamine reuptake inhibitors, produce no discernable subjective effects such as drug "highs" or euphoria in drug-experienced human volunteers. Moreover they are dysphoric and aversive when given at high doses. In vivo experiments in animals demonstrate that cocaine's monoaminergic pharmacology is profoundly different from that of other prescribed monoamine reuptake inhibitors, with the exception of methylphenidate. These findings led us to conclude that the highly unusual stimulant profile of cocaine and related compounds, eg methylphenidate, is not mediated by monoamine reuptake inhibition alone. We describe the experimental findings which suggest cocaine serves as a negative allosteric modulator to alter the function of the dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) and reverse its direction of transport. This results in a firing-dependent, retro-transport of dopamine into the synaptic cleft. The proposed mechanism of cocaine is, therefore, different from other small molecule negative allostereric modulators of the monoamine reuptake transporters, eg SoRI-6238, which merely reduce the rate of inward transport. Because the physiological role of DAT is to remove dopamine from the synapse and the action of cocaine is the opposite of this, we have postulated that cocaine's effect is analogous to an inverse agonist. If this hypothesis is validated then cocaine is the prototypical compound that exemplifies a new class of monoaminergic drugs; DAT "inverse agonists". This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  4. Modulation of the storage of social recognition memory by neurotransmitter systems in the insular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Lorena E S; Zinn, Carolina G; Schmidt, Scheila D; Saenger, Bruna F; Ferreira, Flávia F; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2017-09-15

    The insular cortex (IC) receives projections from prefrontal, entorhinal and cingulate cortex, olfactory bulb and basal nuclei and has reciprocal connections with the amygdala and entorhinal cortex. These connections suggest a possible involvement in memory processes; this has been borne out by data on several behaviors. Social recognition memory (SRM) is essential to form social groups and to establish hierarchies and social and affective ties. Despite its importance, knowledge about the brain structures and the neurotransmitter mechanisms involved in its processing is still scarce. Here we study the participation of NMDA-glutamatergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, H2-histaminergic, β-adrenergic and 5-HT1A-serotoninergic receptors of the IC in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-IC infusions of substances acting on these receptors immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24h later were exposed to a 5-min retention test. The intra-IC infusion of antagonists of D1/D5, β-adrenergic or 5-HT1A receptors immediately after the sample phase impaired the consolidation of SRM. These effects were blocked by the concomitant intra-IC infusion of agonists of these receptors. Antagonists and agonists of NMDA and H2 receptors had no effect on SRM. The results suggest that the dopaminergic D1/D5, β-adrenergic and serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors in the IC, but not glutamatergic NMDA and the histaminergic H2 receptors, participate in the consolidation of SRM in the IC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning. Involvement of neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Ekwerike, Alphonsus; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-10-01

    The extensive projection of orexigenic neurons and the diffuse expression of orexin receptors suggest that endogenous orexins are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including learning and memory. Our previous study demonstrated that orexin A improves learning, consolidation and retrieval processes, which involves α- and β-adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-A-ergic, opiate and nitrergic neurotransmissions. However, we have little evidence about the action of orexin B on memory processes and the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of orexin B on passive avoidance learning and the involvement of neurotransmitters in this action in rats. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with the selective orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist, EMPA; the γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, the bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone; the non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; the nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Our results demonstrate that orexin B can improve learning, consolidation of memory and retrieval. EMPA reversed completely the action of orexin B on memory consolidation. Bicuculline blocked fully; naloxone, nitro-l-arginine, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol attenuated the orexin B-induced memory consolidation, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. These data suggest that orexin B improves memory functions through OX2R and GABA-ergic, opiate, nitrergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions are also involved in this action.

  6. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on neural activity related to risky decisions and monetary rewards in healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Fisher, Patrick M; Haahr, Mette E

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs targeting the dysfunctional serotonin (5-HT) system, yet little is known about the functional effects of prolonged serotonin reuptake inhibition in healthy individuals. Here we used...... functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate how a three-week fluoxetine intervention influences neural activity related to risk taking and reward processing. Employing a double-blinded parallel-group design, 29 healthy young males were randomly assigned to receive 3 weeks of a daily dose of 40 mg fluoxetine...

  7. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivatives as novel triple reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Eiji; Ishichi, Yuji; Kimura, Eiji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Terao, Yasuko; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kawai, Takayuki; Arakawa, Yuuichi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Terauchi, Jun

    2014-08-15

    A novel series of triple reuptake inhibitors were explored by ligand-based drug design. A cyclic structure was designed from cyclopropane derivative 5 using the core structure of reported monoamine reuptake inhibitors, leading to the formation of the 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivative 23j-S. Compound 23j-S was shown to act as a potent TRI with an excellent ADME-Tox profile. Oral administration of 23j-S significantly enhanced norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and showed significant antidepressant-like activity in tail suspension tests in mouse.

  8. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-10

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  9. 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor crosstalk in the regulation of emotional memory: implications for effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Therese M; Holst, Sarah; Stan, Tiberiu L; Hager, Torben; Sjögren, Benita; Ogren, Sven Öve; Svenningsson, Per; Stiedl, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    This study utilized pharmacological manipulations to analyze the role of direct and indirect activation of 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in passive avoidance learning by assessing emotional memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Additionally, 5-HT(7)R binding affinity and 5-HT(7)R-mediated protein phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets were determined. Elevation of 5-HT by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine had no effect by itself, but facilitated emotional memory performance when combined with the 5-HT(1A)R antagonist NAD-299. This facilitation was blocked by the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970, revealing excitatory effects of the SSRI via 5-HT(7)Rs. The enhanced memory retention by NAD-299 was blocked by SB269970, indicating that reduced activation of 5-HT(1A)Rs results in enhanced 5-HT stimulation of 5-HT(7)Rs. The putative 5-HT(7)R agonists LP-44 when administered systemically and AS19 when administered both systemically and into the dorsal hippocampus failed to facilitate memory. This finding is consistent with the low efficacy of LP-44 and AS19 to stimulate protein phosphorylation of 5-HT(7)R-activated signaling cascades. In contrast, increasing doses of the dual 5-HT(1A)R/5-HT(7)R agonist 8-OH-DPAT impaired memory, while co-administration with NAD-299 facilitated of emotional memory in a dose-dependent manner. This facilitation was blocked by SB269970 indicating 5-HT(7)R activation by 8-OH-DPAT. Dorsohippocampal infusion of 8-OH-DPAT impaired passive avoidance retention through hippocampal 5-HT(1A)R activation, while 5-HT(7)Rs appear to facilitate memory processes in a broader cortico-limbic network and not the hippocampus alone.

  10. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely r...

  11. Complexins facilitate neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mingshan; Stradomska, Alicja; Chen, Hongmei; Brose, Nils; Zhang, Weiqi; Rosenmund, Christian; Reim, Kerstin

    2008-06-03

    Complexins (Cplxs) are key regulators of synaptic exocytosis, but whether they act as facilitators or inhibitors is currently being disputed controversially. We show that genetic deletion of all Cplxs expressed in the mouse brain causes a reduction in Ca(2+)-triggered and spontaneous neurotransmitter release at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Our results demonstrate that at mammalian central nervous system synapses, Cplxs facilitate neurotransmitter release and do not simply act as inhibitory clamps of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  12. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  13. Immunohistochemical profile of some neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in the seminiferous tubules of rats treated by lonidamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Artico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Lonidamine (LND or [1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl-1H-indazole-3- carboxylic acid] is an anticancer and antispermatogenic drug that exerts a large number of effects on tumor cells and germ cells. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed at 22°C on a 12-h light/12-h dark cycle 1 week before the experiments, with free access to food and water. LND was suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose at a concentration of 10 mg/mL and administered orally at the dose of 10 mL/kg (b.w. as a single dose. Control rats received an equal amount of vehicle. Testes were removed, fixed for 24 h in 2% glutaraldehyde and 2% paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M sodium phosphate (pH 7.2 at 22°C, rinsed with the same buffer, and stored at room temperature. From each sample, a block of tissue was removed by sectioning through the organ. After dehydration in ethanol at increasing concentrations (70-100%, each block was embedded in paraffin and serial 5 mm thick sections were cut using a rotatory microtome. The immunoreactivity for NTs has been observed in spermatogonia of untreated rats, while the rats treated with LND showed an immunohistochemical localization in all the stages of germinal cells. The generally well-expressed immunoreactivity for the neurotrophins receptors in treated rats observed in our study is presumably attributable to alterations of the receptors’ structure and/or expression leading to changes of the activity, affinity, localization or protein interactions that may depend on sensitization of ion channels (induced by LND. Neurotrophins (NTs appear to be interesting proteins for the modulation of sperm maturation and motility with a prominent role for the nerve growth factor (NGF, that may exert an autocrine or paracrine role.We therefore investigated the location and distribution of immunoreactivity for some neurotransmitters (SP, VIP, CGRP, nNOS, Chat, neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and their own receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC, p75 in the seminiferous tubules of

  14. The effects of LPM570065, a novel triple reuptake inhibitor, on extracellular serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine levels in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs are currently being developed as a new class of promising antidepressants that block serotonin (5-HT, dopamine (DA and norepinephrine (NE transporters, thereby increasing extracellular monoamine concentrations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of LPM570065, a novel TRI and a desvenlafaxine prodrug, on extracellular 5-HT, DA and NE levels in the rat striatum after acute and chronic administration relative to desvenlafaxine, using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and microdialysis. Acute administration was performed by providing rodents with oral solutions (0.06 mmol·kg(-1 p.o., oral suspensions (0.06 mmol·kg(-1 p.o. and intravenous solutions (0.04 mmol·kg(-1 i.v. of LPM570065 and desvenlafaxine. Oral suspensions (0.06 mmol·kg(-1·day(-1 of the two drugs were also administered for a 14-day chronic period. HPLC analysis revealed that LPM570065 rapidly penetrated the rat striatum, converted into desvenlafaxine and exhibited larger total exposure compared with the administration of desvenlafaxine. Microdialysis revealed that acute and chronic administration of oral suspension of LPM570065 increased the 5-HT, DA and NE levels more than the relative administration of desvenlafaxine. Unlike desvenlafaxine, acute administration of an intravenous LPM570065 solution did not induce the undesirable 90% decrease in extracellular 5-HT levels. In contrast to the fully dose-dependent elevation of 5-HT induced by desvenlafaxine, the acute administration of LPM570065 showed a capped increase in extracellular 5-HT levels when combined with WAY-100635. Additionally, forced swim test demonstrated that acute and chronic administration of LPM570065 reduced the immobility time more than the relative administration of desvenlafaxine. These data suggest that LPM570065 may have greater efficacy and/or a more rapid onset of antidepressant action than desvenlafaxine and also counterbalance the harmful

  15. Evaluation of neurotransmitters involved in the anxiolytic and panicolytic effect of the aqueous fraction of Paullinia cupana (guaraná in elevated T maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel P. Rangel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of repeatedly administration of an aqueous fraction of Paullinia cupana Kunth, Sapindaceae (guaraná seeds (8 mg/kg on rats submitted to the elevated T-maze, model of generalized anxiety and panic disorders. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (3 mg/kg, was used as a positive control. To evaluate possible neurotransmissions involvement, ineffective doses of metergoline (3 mg/kg - non-selective serotonin receptor antagonist, sulpiride (20 mg/kg - non-selective dopaminergic receptor antagonist or ketamine (0.125 mg/kg - non-selective glutamate receptor antagonist were acutely administered in association with the aqueous fraction of P. cupana. Both aqueous fraction and paroxetine decrease the inhibitory avoidance latencies of the elevated T-maze, indicating anxiolytic effect and increased one-way escape latencies from the open arm of the elevated T-maze, indicating a panicolytic effect. The pre-treatment with metergoline, sulpiride and ketamine blocked the anxiolytic effect of aqueous fraction. The panicolytic effect of aqueous fraction was blocked by both metergoline and sulpiride. These results show that the serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems are involved in anxiolytic effect promoted by aqueous fraction, whereas only the serotonergic and the dopaminergic neurotransmission systems are involved in the panicolytic effect promoted by aqueous fraction of P. cupana. The effects produced by paroxetine, were blocked only by metergoline, validating this experimental procedure.

  16. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliana J G; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2015-02-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacogenetics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pediatric depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Sefi; Frisch, Amos; Rotberg, Beni; Carmel, Miri; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are now an accepted and widely used first-line treatment for pediatric depression and anxiety. However, the data indicate that SSRI treatment achieves a clinical response in only 55-60% of children, and some may develop drug-induced suicidal behavior. Clinicians have no reliable tools to help them identify in advance those youths who are not likely to respond to an SSRI, or who are likely to develop SSRI-induced suicidality. Pharmacogenetic research attempts to identify genetic markers that are associated with response and side-effect profile. This review covers all the pharmacogenetic studies conducted as yet on pediatric samples and compares them with available data on adult samples. An emphasis is put on serotonergic genes such as the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and additional genes known to be active in the CNS.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of a novel mixed monoamine reuptake inhibitor in adults with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesnes Keith

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NS2359 is a potent reuptake blocker of noradrenalin, dopamine, and serotonin. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy, safety and cognitive function of NS2359 in adults with a DSM IV diagnosis of ADHD. Methods The study was a multi-centre, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled, parallel group design in outpatient adults (18–55 years testing 0.5 mg NS2359 vs. placebo for 8 weeks. Multiple assessments including computerized neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Results There was no significant difference between NS2359 (n = 63 versus placebo (n = 63 on the primary outcome measure reduction in investigator rated ADHD-RS total score (7.8 versus 6.4; p Conclusion No overall effect of NS2359 was found on overall symptoms of ADHD. There was also a modest signal of improvement in the inattentive adults with ADHD and cognition warranting further exploration using differing doses.

  19. In utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidaya, Nicole B; Lee, Brian K; Burstyn, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD...... diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status. There were 1.5 % of cases and 0.7 % of controls exposed to SSRIs during the pregnancy period, and higher effect estimates observed with longer use. We found evidence that in utero exposure to SSRIs increases a child's risk associated with ASD. These results......, while adding to the limited knowledge on prenatal pharmacological exposures as potential ASD risk factors, need to be balanced against the benefits of indicated medication use by pregnant mothers....

  20. Severe hyponatremia associated with the combined use of thiazide diuretics and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H

    2004-02-01

    Thiazide diuretics and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are among the most commonly prescribed medications. Each medication has been associated with the development of severe hyponatremia. The mechanisms involved in the development of hyponatremia differ for each medication. Thiazide diuretics induce hyponatremia by impairment of urinary dilution, renal loss of sodium and potassium, stimulation of antidiuretic hormone (ADH), and perhaps from a dipsogenic effect. SSRIs cause hyponatremia through the syndrome of inappropriate ADH release. Two cases of severe hyponatremia in patients taking both a thiazide diuretic and an SSRI highlight the possibility of a synergistic effect in impairment of renal free water clearance when both medications are given. These two cases serve as a cautionary example and should prompt careful monitoring of patients prescribed both an SSRI and a thiazide diuretic (especially in elderly women, who seem to be at increased risk for this complication).

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemakor, A.; Casson, K.; Garne, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective / Background The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are widely prescribed in pregnancy, but there is evidence that they may cause congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD). Objective: To determine the specificity of association between...... first trimester pregnancy exposure to individual SSRI and specific congenital anomalies (CAs). Methods Population-based case-malformed control study covering 3.3 million births from 12 EUROCAT registries 1995-2009. CAs included non-syndromic live births, fetal deaths and terminations of pregnancy...... % CI 1.67-6.75, n=9), and Ebstein's anomaly (OR 8.23, 95 % CI 2.91-23.28, n=4) were detected. Statistically significant associations between SSRI and four of the 15 non- CHDsignals (anorectal atresia and stenosis, gastroschisis, renal dysplasia, clubfoot) were found. In all the statistically...

  2. Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Andersen, Nadia Lyhne; Horwitz, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage. METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study identifying all registered pregnancies in Denmark from 1997 to 2010. All births were identified using...... the Medical Birth Registry, and all records of induced abortion or miscarriage were gathered from the National Hospital Register. Data on SSRI use were gathered from the National Prescription Register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard of miscarriage in women exposed......,883) ended in miscarriage compared with 11.1% among unexposed. The adjusted hazard ratio of having a miscarriage after exposure to an SSRI was 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.33) compared with unexposed. Women discontinuing SSRI treatment 3-12 months before pregnancy also had an increased hazard...

  3. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Antidepressants in Pregnancy and Congenital Anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Sue; Morris, Joan K; Davies, Gareth I;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothesised associations between in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD), remain controversial. We investigated the putative teratogenicity of SSRI prescription in the 91 days either side......-analyses. SSRI prescription 91 days either side of LMP was associated with increased prevalence of severe congenital heart defects (CHD) (as defined by EUROCAT guide 1.3, 2005) (34/12,962 [0.26%] vs. 865/506,155 [0.17%] OR 1.50, 1.06-2.11), and the composite adverse outcome of 'anomaly or stillbirth' (473...... of first day of last menstrual period (LMP). METHODS AND FINDINGS: Three population-based EUROCAT congenital anomaly registries- Norway (2004-2010), Wales (2000-2010) and Funen, Denmark (2000-2010)-were linked to the electronic healthcare databases holding prospectively collected prescription information...

  4. Possible role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline on oxidative stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, D; Yalin, S; Eker, E D; Aktas, A; Sahin, N O; Cebo, M; Berköz, M

    2014-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals and the most widely used that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. In the present study the possible role of sertraline (acute and chronically doses) was evaluated on lipid peroxidation levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma and brain tissues of (10, 40, 80 mg/kg) sertraline treated Wistar albino rats (n=48). Lipid peroxidation levels (MDA) of plasma and brain tissue increased in all acute and chronic sertraline treated rats (p sertraline administration enhances oxidative stress. Therefore, dose adjustment in depression patients seems significant as it may help prevention of further prognosis of the diseases.

  5. Effects of sustained serotonin reuptake inhibition on the firing of dopamine neurons in the rat ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dremencov, Eliyahu; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are efficacious in depression because of their ability to increase 5-HT neurotransmission. However, owing to a purported inhibitory effect of 5- HT on dopamine (DA) neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), this increase

  6. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  7. Contribution of depressed reuptake to the depletion of norepinephrine from rat heart and spleen during endotoxin shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, B.J.; Jones, S.B.; Filkins, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Norepinephrine content (microgram/g) was depressed in hearts and spleens of fasted male Holtzman rats treated intravenously with Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (14-17 mg/kg). To investigate the mechanism of norepinephrine depletion during endotoxicosis, in vivo norepinephrine reuptake was evaluated in control and severely shocked rats using the incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine into hearts and spleens. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine into spleens of endotoxic rats was reduced 88%. In contrast, cardiac tissue incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was not significantly impaired. In vitro analysis of total norepinephrine retained in cardiac and splenic tissue slices incubated with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine yielded results consistent with in vivo experiments: Splenic norepinephrine reuptake was significantly decreased on the order of 50% in preparations from endotoxic rats, while myocardial norepinephrine reuptake was the same in both groups. The results indicate that depression of norepinephrine reuptake is a mechanism of norepinephrine depletion in spleens but not hearts of endotoxic rats.

  8. The selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors fluvoxamine and paroxetine differ in sexual inhibitory effects after chronic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, M.D.; Plas, A.; Pattij, T.; Oorschot, R. van; Coolen, L.M.; Veening, J.G.; Olivier, B.

    2002-01-01

    RATIONALE: The selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) delay orgasm and ejaculation in men. In men with rapid ejaculation it was shown that, of the SSRIs, paroxetine exerted the strongest delay in ejaculation and fluvoxamine the weakest. OBJECTIVES: In the present study, we compared the acu

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor prescribing before, during and after pregnancy : a population-based study in six European regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlton, R. A.; Jordan, S.; Pierini, A.; Garne, E.; Neville, A. J.; Hansen, A. V.; Gini, R.; Thayer, D.; Tingay, K.; Puccini, A.; Bos, H. J.; Andersen, A. M. Nybo; Sinclair, M.; Dolk, H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L. T. W.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the prescribing patterns of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before, during and after pregnancy in six European population-based databases. DesignDescriptive drug utilisation study. SettingSix electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy (Emil

  10. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaihola, Helena; Olivier, Jocelien; Poromaa, Inger Sundström; Åkerud, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a chi

  11. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  12. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiradentes, R.V. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Silva, N.F. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Ramage, A.G. [Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Futuro, H.A. Neto [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  13. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  14. Perinatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram alters spatial learning and memory, anxiety, depression, and startle in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowles, Jenna L N; Hufgard, Jillian R; Gutierrez, Arnold; Bailey, Rebecca A; Jablonski, Sarah A; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2016-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) block the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake transporter (SERT) and increase synaptic 5-HT. 5-HT is also important in brain development; hence when SSRIs are taken during pregnancy there exists the potential for these drugs to affect CNS ontogeny. Prenatal SSRI exposure has been associated with an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and peripheral 5-HT is elevated in some ASD patients. Perinatal SSRI exposure in rodents has been associated with increased depression and anxiety-like behavior, decreased sociability, and impaired learning in the offspring, behaviors often seen in ASD. The present study investigated whether perinatal exposure to citalopram causes persistent neurobehavioral effects. Gravid Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups and subcutaneously injected twice per day with citalopram (10mg/kg; Cit) or saline (Sal) 6h apart on embryonic day (E)6-21, and then drug was given directly to the pups after delivery from postnatal day (P)1-20. Starting on P60, one male/female from each litter was tested in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and open-field before and after MK-801. A second pair from each litter was tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) and open-field before and after (+)-amphetamine. A third pair was tested as follows: elevated zero-maze, open-field, marble burying, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, social preference, and forced swim. Cit-exposed rats were impaired in the MWM during acquisition and probe, but not during reversal, shift, or cued trials. Cit-exposed rats also showed increased marble burying, decreased time in the center of the open-field, decreased latency to immobility in forced swim, and increased acoustic startle across prepulse intensities with no effects on CWM. The results are consistent with citalopram inducing several ASD-like effects. The findings add to concerns about use of SSRIs during pregnancy. Further research on different classes of

  15. Role of N-Arachidonoyl-Serotonin (AA-5-HT in Sleep-Wake Cycle Architecture, Sleep Homeostasis, and Neurotransmitters Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Murillo-Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system comprises several molecular entities such as endogenous ligands [anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG], receptors (CB1 and CB2, enzymes such as [fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAHH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL], as well as the anandamide membrane transporter. Although the role of this complex neurobiological system in the sleep–wake cycle modulation has been studied, the contribution of the blocker of FAAH/transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1, N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT in sleep has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, varying doses of AA-5-HT (5, 10, or 20 mg/Kg, i.p. injected at the beginning of the lights-on period of rats, caused no statistical changes in sleep patterns. However, similar pharmacological treatment given to animals at the beginning of the dark period decreased wakefulness (W and increased slow wave sleep (SWS as well as rapid eye movement sleep (REMS. Power spectra analysis of states of vigilance showed that injection of AA-5-HT during the lights-off period diminished alpha spectrum across alertness in a dose-dependent fashion. In opposition, delta power spectra was enhanced as well as theta spectrum, during SWS and REMS, respectively. Moreover, the highest dose of AA-5-HT decreased wake-related contents of neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA, norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (EP, serotonin (5-HT whereas the levels of adenosine (AD were enhanced. In addition, the sleep-inducing properties of AA-5-HT were confirmed since this compound blocked the increase in W caused by stimulants such as cannabidiol (CBD or modafinil (MOD during the lights-on period. Additionally, administration of AA-5-HT also prevented the enhancement in contents of DA, NE, EP, 5-HT and AD after CBD of MOD injection. Lastly, the role of AA-5-HT in sleep homeostasis was tested in animals that received either CBD or MOD after total sleep deprivation (TSD. The

  16. Role of N-Arachidonoyl-Serotonin (AA-5-HT) in Sleep-Wake Cycle Architecture, Sleep Homeostasis, and Neurotransmitters Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Machado, Sergio; Rocha, Nuno B.; Veras, André B.; Neto, Geraldo A. M.; Budde, Henning; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises several molecular entities such as endogenous ligands [anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)], receptors (CB1 and CB2), enzymes such as [fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAHH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL)], as well as the anandamide membrane transporter. Although the role of this complex neurobiological system in the sleep–wake cycle modulation has been studied, the contribution of the blocker of FAAH/transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) in sleep has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, varying doses of AA-5-HT (5, 10, or 20 mg/Kg, i.p.) injected at the beginning of the lights-on period of rats, caused no statistical changes in sleep patterns. However, similar pharmacological treatment given to animals at the beginning of the dark period decreased wakefulness (W) and increased slow wave sleep (SWS) as well as rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Power spectra analysis of states of vigilance showed that injection of AA-5-HT during the lights-off period diminished alpha spectrum across alertness in a dose-dependent fashion. In opposition, delta power spectra was enhanced as well as theta spectrum, during SWS and REMS, respectively. Moreover, the highest dose of AA-5-HT decreased wake-related contents of neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), serotonin (5-HT) whereas the levels of adenosine (AD) were enhanced. In addition, the sleep-inducing properties of AA-5-HT were confirmed since this compound blocked the increase in W caused by stimulants such as cannabidiol (CBD) or modafinil (MOD) during the lights-on period. Additionally, administration of AA-5-HT also prevented the enhancement in contents of DA, NE, EP, 5-HT and AD after CBD of MOD injection. Lastly, the role of AA-5-HT in sleep homeostasis was tested in animals that received either CBD or MOD after total sleep deprivation (TSD). The

  17. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  18. Neurotransmitter transporters expressed in glial cells as regulators of synapse function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenburg, Volker; Gomeza, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission at high temporal and spatial resolutions requires efficient removal and/or inactivation of presynaptically released transmitter to prevent spatial spreading of transmitter by diffusion and allow for fast termination of the postsynaptic response. This action must be carefully regulated to result in the fine tuning of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, necessary for the proper processing of information in the central nervous system. At many synapses, high-affinity neurotransmitter transporters are responsible for transmitter deactivation by removing it from the synaptic cleft. The most prevailing neurotransmitters, glutamate, which mediates excitatory neurotransmission, as well as GABA and glycine, which act as inhibitory neurotransmitters, use these uptake systems. Neurotransmitter transporters have been found in both neuronal and glial cells, thus suggesting high cooperativity between these cell types in the control of extracellular transmitter concentrations. The generation and analysis of animals carrying targeted disruptions of transporter genes together with the use of selective inhibitors have allowed examining the contribution of individual transporter subtypes to synaptic transmission. This revealed the predominant role of glial expressed transporters in maintaining low extrasynaptic neurotransmitter levels. Additionally, transport activity has been shown to be actively regulated on both transcriptional and post-translational levels, which has important implications for synapse function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The analysis of these mechanisms will enhance not only our understanding of synapse function but will reveal new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human neurological diseases.

  19. Growth cone neurotransmitter receptor activation modulates electric field-guided nerve growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, L; McCaig, C D

    1995-10-01

    We have studied the interactions between two nerve guidance cues, which alone induce substantial growth cone turning: endogenous neurotransmitters and small dc electric fields. d-tubocurarine, a nicotinic AChR (acetylcholine receptor) antagonist, inhibited field-induced cathodal orientation of cultured neurites, whereas atropine, a muscarinic AChR blocker, and suramin, a P2-purinoceptor antagonist, markedly enhanced the guidance properties of the applied field. These experiments implicate the activation of growth cone nicotinic AChRs by self-released acetylcholine in the mechanism underpinning electric field-induced neurite orientation and raise the possibility that growth cones release neurotransmitter prior to target interaction in order to assist their own pathfinding. Additionally, they provide the first evidence that coactivation of several neurotransmitter receptors may interact to regulate directed nerve growth. Such interaction in vivo, where guidance signals coexist, would add further levels of control to neurite guidance.

  20. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses.

  1. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Forati

    Full Text Available Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs with two different geometries (sphere and rod and quantum dots (QDs with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach.

  2. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  3. Wide-range, picoampere-sensitivity multichannel VLSI potentiostat for neurotransmitter sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya; Thakor, Nitish; Stanacevic, Milutin; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2004-01-01

    Neurotransmitter sensing is critical in studying nervous pathways and neurological disorders. A 16-channel current-measuring VLSI potentiostat with multiple ranges from picoamperes to microamperes is presented for electrochemical detection of electroactive neurotransmitters like dopamine, nitric oxide etc. The analog-to-digital converter design employs a current-mode, first-order single-bit delta-sigma modulator architecture with a two-stage, digitally reconfigurable oversampling ratio for ranging the conversion scale. An integrated prototype is fabricated in CMOS technology, and experimentally characterized. Real-time multi-channel acquisition of dopamine concentration in vitro is performed with a microfabricated sensor array.

  4. Astrocytic control of biosynthesis and turnover of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis....... Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA...

  5. Microfluidic platform for neurotransmitter sensing based on cyclic voltammetry and dielectrophoresis for in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathault, Jessy; Zamprogno, Pauline; Greener, Jesse; Miled, Amine

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new microfluidic platform that can simultaneously measure and locally modulate neurotransmitter concentration in a neuron network. This work focuses on the development of a first prototype including a potentiostat and electrode functionalization to detect several neurotransmitter's simultaneously. We tested dopamine as proof of concept to validate functionality. The system is based on 320 bidirectional electrode array for dielectrophoretic manipulation and cyclic voltammetry. Each electrode is connected to a mechanical multiplexer in order to reduce noise interference and fully isolate the electrode. The multiplexing rate is 476 kHz and each electrode can drive a signal with an amplitude of 60 V pp for dielectrophoretic manipulation.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy L; Bang, Hyoweon; Bae, Young Min; Park, Won Sun

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertraline decreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 mu M and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 mu M sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves, sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From these results, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptake inhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  7. Effects of combined exercise on physical fitness and neurotransmitters in children with ADHD: a pilot randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Kyoung; Lee, Chung-Moo; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a jump rope and ball combined exercise program on the physical fitness the neurotransmitter (epinephrine, serotonin) levels of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 boys attending elementary school, whose grade levels ranged from 1–4. The block randomization method was used to distribute the participants between the combined exercise group (n = 6) and control group (n = 6). The program consisted of a 60-min exercise (10-min warm-up, 40-min main exercise, and 10-min cool down) performed three times a week, for a total of 12 weeks. [Results] The exercise group showed a significant improvement in cardiorespiratory endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance and flexibility after 12 weeks. A significant increase in the epinephrine level was observed in the exercise group. [Conclusion] The 12-week combined exercise program in the current study (jump rope and ball exercises) had a positive effect on overall fitness level, and neurotransmission in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:26504324

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and oral bleeding complications after invasive dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napeñas, Joel J; Hong, Catherine H L; Kempter, Eric; Brennan, Michael T; Furney, Scott L; Lockhart, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of oral bleeding complications after invasive dental procedures in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications. In this retrospective cohort study, we included dental patients who had invasive dental treatment and were taking an SSRI medication. Data collected included demographics, medical history, dental visits and procedures, and use of adjunctive measures to control bleeding. Primary outcomes included documentation of return visits or phone calls to the dental clinic or emergency department (ED) for oral bleeding, and oral bleeding or use of blood products for inpatients. There were 92 patients taking SSRIs who had 145 invasive procedure visits, consisting of extractions, implant surgery, alveoloplasty, periodontal surgery, subgingival scaling and root planning, and biopsy. There were 110 extraction visits yielding a total of 167 extractions. Among all patients, there was 1 return visit to the clinic and 1 telephone call with a chief complaint of oral bleeding. The frequency of oral bleeding complications after invasive dental treatment is low to negligible in patients on SSRI medications. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on primate cardiovascular disease, behavior, and neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Carol A; Silverstein-Metzler, Marnie; Justice, Jamie; Willard, Stephanie L

    2017-03-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is ubiquitous because they are widely prescribed for a number of disorders in addition to depression. Depression increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hence, treating depression with SSRIs could reduce CHD risk. However, the effects of long term antidepressant treatment on CHD risk, as well as other aspects of health, remain poorly understood. Thus, we undertook an investigation of multisystem effects of SSRI treatment with a physiologically relevant dose in middle-aged adult female cynomolgus monkeys, a primate species shown to be a useful model of both depression and coronary and carotid artery atherosclerosis. Sertraline had no effect on depressive behavior, reduced anxious behavior, increased affiliation, reduced aggression, changed serotonin neurotransmission and volumes of neural areas critical to mood disorders, and exacerbated coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. These data suggest that a conservative approach to prescribing SSRIs for cardiovascular or other disorders for long periods may be warranted, and that further study is critical given the widespread use of these medications.

  10. Plasma cytokine profiles in depressed patients who fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Approximately 30% of patients with depression fail to respond to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Few studies have attempted to define these patients from a biological perspective. Studies suggest that overall patients with depression show increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. We examined pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in patients who were SSRI resistant. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and sIL-6R were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in DSM-1V major depressives who were SSRI resistant, in formerly SSRI resistant patients currently euthymic and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with SSRI-resistant depression had significantly higher production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p=0.01) and TNF-alpha (p=0.004) compared to normal controls. Euthymic patients who were formerly SSRI resistant had proinflammatory cytokine levels which were similar to the healthy subject group. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels did not differ across the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines does not occur in depressed patients who fail to respond to SSRIs and is necessary for clinical recovery.

  11. Temporal Expression of Mutant LRRK2 in Adult Rats Impairs Dopamine Reuptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Jianbin Tong, Weimin C Hong, Yong-Jian Liu, Xu-Gang Xia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD results from progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Most PD cases are sporadic, but some have pathogenic mutation in the individual genes. Mutation of the leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2 gene is associated with familial and sporadic PD, as exemplified by G2019S substitution. While constitutive expression of mutant LRRK2 in transgenic mice fails to induce neuron death, transient expression of the disease gene by viral delivery causes a substantial loss of dopaminergic neurons in mice. To further assess LRRK2 pathogenesis, we created inducible transgenic rats expressing human LRRK2 with G2019S substitution. Temporal overexpression of LRRK2G2019S in adult rats impaired dopamine reuptake by dopamine transporter (DAT and thus enhanced locomotor activity, the phenotypes that were not observed in transgenic rats constitutively expressing the gene throughout life time. Reduced DAT binding activity is an early sign of dopaminergic dysfunction in asymptomatic subjects carrying pathogenic mutation in LRRK2. Our transgenic rats recapitulated the initiation process of dopaminergic dysfunction caused by pathogenic mutation in LRRK2. Inducible transgenic approach uncovered phenotypes that may be obscured by developmental compensation in constitutive transgenic rats. Finding in inducible LRRK2 transgenic rats would guide developing effective strategy in transgenic studies: Inducible expression of transgene may induce greater phenotypes than constitutive gene expression, particularly in rodents with short life time.

  12. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Human Pregnancy: To Treat or Not to Treat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orna Diav-Citrin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are increasingly prescribed during pregnancy. The purpose of the present paper is to summarize and evaluate the current evidence for the risk/benefit analysis of SSRI use in human pregnancy. The literature has been inconsistent. Although most studies have not shown an increase in the overall risk of major malformations, several studies have suggested that SSRIs may be associated with a small increased risk for cardiovascular malformations. Others have noted associations between SSRIs and specific types of rare major malformations. In some studies, there appears to be a small increased risk for miscarriages, which may be associated with the underlying maternal condition. Neonatal effects have been described in up to 30% of neonates exposed to SSRIs late in pregnancy. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn has also been described with an absolute risk of <1%. The risk associated with treatment discontinuation, for example, higher frequency of relapse and increased risk of preterm delivery, should also be considered. The overall benefit of treatment seems to outweigh the potential risks.

  13. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on the offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelien DA Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the question arises as to whether children of women taking antidepressants are at risk for altered neurodevelopmental outcomes and, if so, whether the risks are due to SSRI medication exposure or to the underlying maternal depression. This review considers the effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure on offspring development in both clinical and preclinical populations. As it is impossible in humans to study the effects of SSRIs without taking into account the possible underlying effects of maternal depression (healthy pregnant women do not take SSRIs, animal models are of great value. For example, rodents can be used to determine the effects of maternal depression and/or perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring outcomes. Unraveling the joint (or separate effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure will provide more insights into the risks or benefits of SSRI exposure during gestation and will help women make informed decisions about using SSRIs during pregnancy.

  14. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Drug-drug interactions associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely known. A major interaction by SSRIs is the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated hepatic drug metabolism. The SSRI, sertraline, is also reported to increase the blood concentration of co-administered drugs. The potency of sertraline directly to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism is relatively weak compared with the other SSRIs, implying that additional mechanisms are involved in the interactions. The study examined whether sertraline produces time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 and/or other P450 enzymes. Incubation of human liver microsomes with sertraline in the presence of NADPH resulted in marked decreases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activities, indicating that sertraline metabolism leads to CYP3A4 inactivation. This inactivation required NADPH and was not protected by glutathione. No significant inactivation was observed for other P450 enzymes. Spectroscopic evaluation revealed that microsomes with and without sertraline in the presence of NADPH gave a Soret peak at 455 nm, suggesting the formation of metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes of sertraline metabolite(s) with the reduced form of P450. This is the first report indicating that sertraline produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4, which may be associated with MI complex formation.

  15. Metabolic interactions of central nervous system medications and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, C A; Sproule, B A; Knoke, D M

    1999-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are prescribed alone and in combination with other psychotropic medications in the treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders. Such combinations create the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions by affecting the activity of the cytochromes P450 (CYP450), drug metabolizing oxidative enzymes. SSRIs are not equivalent in their potential for interactions when combined with other central nervous system (CNS) medication. Generally citalopram and sertraline are characterized by weaker inhibition of CYP450 enzymes and, therefore, hold less potential for interaction than the other SSRIs. Paroxetine potently inhibits CYP2D6, which can result in increased neuroleptic serum concentrations, accompanied by increased CNS side-effects. Similarly, as a potent inhibitor of CYP2D6, fluoxetine can increase serum concentrations of neuroleptics and antidepressants and numerous case reports have documented concomitant adverse events. Fluoxetine also inhibits CYP3A and CYP2C19, increasing serum concentrations of some benzodiazepines. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A and a mild inhibitor of CYP2D6. Therefore, interactions with clozapine and benzodiazepines are evident.

  16. The effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on platelet function in whole blood and platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reikvam, Anne-Grete; Hustad, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Nepstad, Ina; Hervig, Tor Audun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies report that patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression may have increased risk of bleeding, particularly from the gastrointestinal tract. This may be related to low intraplatelet serotonin concentrations. Several blood banks do not store platelets from donors using SSRIs for transfusion, although the possible effects of SSRIs on platelet storage are not documented. We conducted a case-control pilot study of apheresis platelet concentrates prepared from donors using SSRIs (n=8) and from donors without medication (n=10). The platelet concentrates were stored for 5 days. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA), thrombelastography (TEG), and flow cytometric analyses were preformed for in vitro measurements of platelet function. Platelet function and platelet serotonin content were investigated in whole blood and in platelet concentrates stored for up to 5 days. LTA, TEG, and flow cytometric analysis of glycoprotein expression did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. All 18 platelet concentrates performed well according to the standards set for platelet quality in relation to transfusion. Blood donors using SSRIs had significantly lower platelet serotonin compared to blood donors without medication. The results from our pilot study indicate that platelets from donors using SSRIs may be suitable for transfusion after storage for 5 days, but further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

  17. Antiparkinsonian treatment for depression in Parkinson’s disease:Are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors recommended?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe De Deurwaerdre; Yuqiang Ding

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a frequent comorbid syndrome in Parkinson’s disease. It is a difficult symptom to manage, as patients continuously receive antiparkinsonian medication and may also have to be treated for the amelioration of the side-effects of antiparkinsonian therapy. The first-line treatment for depression in Parkinson’s disease is the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The clinical efficacy of these medications in patients with Parkinson’s disease is questionable. In fact, based on their mechanism of action, which requires at least a functional serotonergic system, it is predicted that SSRIs will have lower efficacy in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Here, we consider the mechanism of action of SSRIs in the context of Parkinson’s disease by investigating the fall in the levels of serotonergic markers and the inhibitory outcomes of antiparkinsonian treatment on serotonergic nerve activity. Because certain classes of antidepressant drugs are widely available, it is necessary to perform translational research to address different strategies used to manage depression in Parkinson’s disease.

  18. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB.

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: A European register-based study in 12 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemakor, A.; Casson, K.; Garne, E.; Bakker, Marian; Tucker, D.; Khoshnood, B.; Nelen, V.; O'Mahoney, M.; Pierini, A.; Klungsoyr, K.; Gatt, M.; Addor, C.M.; Rissmann, A.; Arriola, L.; Boyle, B.; De Jong-Van Den Berg, L.; Dolk, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective / Background The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are widely prescribed in pregnancy, but there is evidence that they may cause congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD). Objective: To determine the specificity of association between fir

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: A European register-based study in 12 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemakor, A.; Casson, K.; Garne, E.; Bakker, Marian; Tucker, D.; Khoshnood, B.; Nelen, V.; O'Mahoney, M.; Pierini, A.; Klungsoyr, K.; Gatt, M.; Addor, C.M.; Rissmann, A.; Arriola, L.; Boyle, B.; De Jong-Van Den Berg, L.; Dolk, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective / Background The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are widely prescribed in pregnancy, but there is evidence that they may cause congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD). Objective: To determine the specificity of association between

  1. Receptor visualization and the atomic bomb. A historical account of the development of the chemical neuroanatomy of receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs during the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J M; Mengod, G

    2017-07-26

    This is a historical account of how receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs got to be seen at the regional, cellular, and subcellular levels in brain, in the years going from the end of the World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Cold War (1945-1991). The realization in the US of the problem of mental health care, as a consequence of the results of medical evaluation for military service during the war, let the US Government to act creating among other things the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). Coincident with that, new drug treatments for these disorders were introduced. War science also created an important number of tools and instruments, such as the radioisotopes, that played a significant role in the development of our story. The scientific context was marked by the development of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and the introduction in the early 80's of the DNA recombinant technologies. The concepts of chemical neurotransmission in the brain and of receptors for drugs and transmitters, although proposed before the war, where not generally accepted. Neurotransmitters were identified and the mechanisms of biosynthesis, storage, release and termination of action by mechanisms such as reuptake, elucidated. Furthermore, the synapse was seen with the electron microscope and more important for our account, neurons and their processes visualized in the brain first by fluorescence histochemistry, then using radioisotopes and autoradiography, and later by immunohistochemistry (IHC), originating the Chemical Neuroanatomy. The concept of chemical neurotransmission evolved from the amines, expanded to excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, then to neuropeptides and finally to gases and other "atypical" neurotransmitters. In addition, coexpression of more than one transmitter in a neuron, changed the initial ideas of neurotransmission. The concept of receptors for these and other messengers underwent a significant evolution from an abstract

  2. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui; He, Xin-Hua; Yuan, Li; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yong, Zheng; Yu, Gang; Fan, Shi-Yong; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5-20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  3. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5–20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  4. Partial purification of the 5-hydroxytryptophan-reuptake system from human blood platelets using a citalopram-derived affinity resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biessen, E.A.L; Horn, A.S.; Robillard, G.T. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-04-03

    This paper describes a procedure for the synthesis and application of a citalopram-derived affinity resin in purifying the 5HT-reuptake system from human blood platelets. A two-step scheme has been developed for partial purification, based on wheat germ agglutinin-lectin (WGA) affinity and citalopram affinity chromatographies. Upon solubilization of the carrier with 1% digitonin, a 50-70-fold increase in specific ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity with a 70% recovery could be accomplished through WGA-lectin chromatography. The WGA pool was then subjected to affinity chromatography on citalopram-agarose. At least 90% of the binding capacity adsorbed to the column. Specific elution using 10 {mu}M citalopram resulted in a 22% recovery of binding activity. A 10,000-fold overall purification was obtained by using this two-step procedure. Analysis of the fractions on SDS-PAGE after {sup 125}I labeling revealed specific elution of 78- and 55-kDa proteins concomitant with the appearance of ({sup 3}H) imipramine binding activity. The pharmacological profile of the partially purified reuptake system correlated well with that derived from the crude membrane-bound reuptake system, suggesting a copurification of the 5HT binding activity and ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding activity.

  5. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shen

    Full Text Available Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid

  6. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  7. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E.; Kleijn, R.; Colzato, L.S.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Nieuwenhuis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benef

  8. Effect of methylmercury on some neurotransmitters and oxidative damage of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin-ping; YANG Yi-chen; HU Wei-xuan; YANG Liu; WANG Wen-hua; JIA Jin-ping; LIN Xue-yu

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanism of injury in rat organs induced by methylmercury, and the relationship between neurotransmitter and oxidative damage in the toxicity process of rat injury by methylmercury was studied. The control group was AChE, ACh, NOS, NO, MDA, SOD, GSH-Px and GSH in different organs of rats were determined with conventional methods. The results showed that after exposure to methylmercury for 7 d, the mercury content in brain of exposure groups increased clearly and had significant difference compared with the control group( P< 0.01). In rat's brain, serum, liver and kidney, the content of ACh and AChE were all decreased; the content of NOS and NO were all increased; the content of MDA was increased compared with the control group,the exposure groups had significant difference ( P < 0.01 ); the content of SOD, GSH and GSH-Px was decreased compared with the control group, the exposure groups had significant difference( P < 0.01). It could be concluded that methylmercury did effect the change of neurotransmitter and free radical. They participated in the toxicity process of injury by methylmercury. The damage of neurotransmitter maybe cause the chaos of free radical and the chaos of free radical may also do more damage to neurotransmitter vice versa.

  9. Decreased cerebral spinal fluid neurotransmitter levels in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, S E; Wassif, C A; Goodwin, H; Conley, S K; Lanham, D C; Kratz, L E; Hyland, K; Gropman, A; Tierney, E; Porter, F D

    2014-05-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with cognitive impairment and a distinct behavioral phenotype that includes autistic features. SLOS is caused by a defect in 3β-hydroxysterol Δ(7)-reductase which leads to decreased cholesterol levels and elevated cholesterol precursors, specifically 7- and 8-dehydrocholesterol. However, the pathological processes contributing to the neurological abnormalities in SLOS have not been defined. In view of prior data suggesting defects in SLOS in vesicular release and given the association of altered serotonin metabolism with autism, we were interested in measuring neurotransmitter metabolite levels in SLOS to assess their potential to be used as biomarkers in therapeutic trials. We measured cerebral spinal fluid levels of serotonin and dopamine metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) respectively, in 21 SLOS subjects. Results were correlated with the SLOS anatomical severity score, Aberrant Behavior Checklist scores and concurrent sterol biochemistry. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were significantly reduced in SLOS subjects. In individual patients, the levels of both 5HIAA and HVA were reduced to a similar degree. CSF neurotransmitter metabolite levels did not correlate with either CSF sterols or behavioral measures. This is the first study demonstrating decreased levels of CSF neurotransmitter metabolites in SLOS. We propose that decreased levels of neurotransmitters in SLOS are caused by a sterol-related defect in synaptic vesicle formation and that CSF 5HIAA and HVA will be useful biomarkers in development of future therapeutic trials.

  10. Treatment with Tyrosine a Neurotransmitter Precursor Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    brain norepinephrine and dopamine. catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. In animals, administration of tyrosine, a food constituent and precursor of the...Profile of Mood States. Stanford Sleepiness Scale) ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS that have been employed to evaluate a variety of psychoactive drugs foods ... tyramine . However. Plasma tyrosine levels were significantly elevated during behav- this amine is not detectable in the plasma of animals after they

  11. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening.

  12. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis was inves...

  13. 神经递质在睡眠中的作用%Effect of neurotransmitter in sleep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初建平; 孟昭义

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Sleep- wake rhythm is isolated from day- night rhythm of natural world;Sleep depends on the regulation of special structure of central nerve system and correlated neurotransmitters.This paper mainly introduces the research progress of neurotransmitter correlated to sleep.It benefits the comprehension of physiology,pathology and pharmacology of sleep and recognition of sleep.

  14. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2017-01-01

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been ...

  15. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  16. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides/neurotransmitters

  17. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  18. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  19. Escitalopram block of hERG potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yun Ju; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hong Joon; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2014-01-01

    Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the pharmacologically active S-enantiomer of the racemic mixture of RS-citalopram and is widely used in the treatment of depression. The effects of escitalopram and citalopram on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were investigated using voltage-clamp and Western blot analyses. Both drugs blocked hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.6 μM for escitalopram and an IC50 value of 3.2 μM for citalopram. The blocking of hERG by escitalopram was voltage-dependent, with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. However, voltage independence was observed over the full range of activation. The blocking by escitalopram was frequency dependent. A rapid application of escitalopram induced a rapid and reversible blocking of the tail current of hERG. The extent of the blocking by escitalopram during the depolarizing pulse was less than that during the repolarizing pulse, suggesting that escitalopram has a high affinity for the open state of the hERG channel, with a relatively lower affinity for the inactivated state. Both escitalopram and citalopram produced a reduction of hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane but did not affect the short-term internalization of the hERG channel. These results suggest that escitalopram blocked hERG currents at a supratherapeutic concentration and that it did so by preferentially binding to both the open and the inactivated states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking of hERG channel protein to the plasma membrane.

  20. Block TERM factorization of block matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Yiyuan; HAO Pengwei

    2004-01-01

    Reversible integer mapping (or integer transform) is a useful way to realize Iossless coding, and this technique has been used for multi-component image compression in the new international image compression standard JPEG 2000. For any nonsingular linear transform of finite dimension, its integer transform can be implemented by factorizing the transform matrix into 3 triangular elementary reversible matrices (TERMs) or a series of single-row elementary reversible matrices (SERMs). To speed up and parallelize integer transforms, we study block TERM and SERM factorizations in this paper. First, to guarantee flexible scaling manners, the classical determinant (det) is generalized to a matrix function, DET, which is shown to have many important properties analogous to those of det. Then based on DET, a generic block TERM factorization,BLUS, is presented for any nonsingular block matrix. Our conclusions can cover the early optimal point factorizations and provide an efficient way to implement integer transforms for large matrices.

  1. Bioimpedance in monitoring of effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznecova LV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vasiliy Grigorievich Alexeev, Ludmila Vasilievna KuznecovaDepartment of Physiology, SP Botkin Moscow City Clinical Hospital, Moscow, RussiaBackground: Bioimpedance has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. In this study, we used the Electro Interstitial Scan (EIS to perform bioimpedance measurements to follow up the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment in subjects diagnosed to have major depressive disorder.Methods: We recruited 59 subjects (38 women, 21 men aged 17–76 (mean 47 years diagnosed with major depressive disorder by psychiatric assessment at the Botkin Hospital according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Baseline Clinical Global Impression scores and EIS (electrical conductivity and dispersion α parameter measurements were done before starting SSRI therapy. Treatment follow-up was undertaken using EIS bioimpedance measurements and by treatment response based on the Hamilton Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression, every 15 days for 60 days. At day 45, we classified the patients into two groups, ie, Group 1, including treatment responders, and Group 2, including nonresponders. At day 60, patients were classified into two further groups, ie, Group 3, comprising treatment responders, and Group 4, comprising nonresponders.Results: Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, electrical conductivity measurement of the pathway between the two forehead electrodes had a specificity of 72% and a sensitivity of 85.3% (P < 0.0001, with a cutoff >4.32. Comparing Group 3 and Group 4, electrical conductivity measurements in the same pathway had a specificity of 47.6% and a sensitivity of 76.3% (P < 0.16, with a cutoff >5.92. Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, the electrical dispersion α parameter of the pathway between the two disposable forehead electrodes had a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 85.2% (P < 0.0001 with a

  2. [Efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Daniel

    2006-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been used increasingly since the early 1990s to treat anxiety disorders and depression in children and adolescents. Several recent reports, however, cast doubt on their efficacy and especially raise questions about their role in serious adverse effects (increase in suicidal ideation and suicide attempts as well as reactions involving irritability, hostility, self-harm and self-destructive actions). The efficacy of SSRIs (fluoxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, paroxetine) in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorders in this population is clear today, although their effects are globally relatively modest. SSRIs remain notably less effective than clomipramine for this indication, although a variety of factors (age, family history, and psychiatric comorbidity) are also likely to influence response to treatment. Only several placebo-controlled studies suggest that the SSRIs (fluoxetine, sertraline and fluvoxamine) may have some utility in the treatment of anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, social phobias) in children and teens. The additional benefits from SSRIs for this indication nonetheless require confirmation. Imipramine and related tricyclic antidepressants are ineffective in the treatment of depressive disorders in children and adolescents. Among the SSRIs, only fluoxetine has proven its efficacy for this indication, although its effect here too appears relatively modest. The efficacy of sertraline and paroxetine cannot be considered more than probable, requiring confirmation, and that of citalopram has not been demonstrated. Moreover, because of the risk of suicidal behavior observed in some studies, SSRIs are inadvisable for the treatment of depressive disorders in this population. Overall, although the currently available data show SSRIs to be moderately effective and useful in treating anxiety disorders and depression in children and adolescents, future studies must focus on

  3. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  5. Serotonin transporter occupancy in rats exposed to serotonin reuptake inhibitors in utero or via breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, Catherine F; Bourke, Chase H; Ritchie, James C; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Nemeroff, Amanda; Owens, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Rigorous data regarding fetal central nervous system (CNS) exposure after antidepressant exposure are sparse. The magnitude of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) CNS exposure was measured in three groups of rats using ex vivo autoradiography of the serotonin transporter (SERT): 1) in utero, 2) postnatal clearance after birth, and 3) exposure through lactation. Rats were exposed to one of five SRI-type antidepressants (escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine) administered continuously via osmotic minipumps to pregnant or nursing dams. Dam dosing was adjusted to reflect the 50th and 85th percentiles of serum concentrations observed in pregnant women. Embryonic day 21 rat pups exposed in utero exhibited >80% SERT occupancy in brain tissue, which is equivalent to that of the pregnant dam and similar to that reported for human pharmacotherapy. Venlafaxine was the exception with occupancies ranging from 61 to 92% across different litters. The magnitude of SERT occupancy is essentially equivalent between dams and fetuses. By postnatal day 4, high SERT occupancy was observed only in fluoxetine-exposed pups (41-92% occupancy). Significantly less, but measurable, exposure occurred via breast milk exposure even in the absence of detectable drug concentrations in nursing pup sera. Pups exposed to SRIs via breast milk for 3 or 7 days exhibited varying SERT occupancies (0-57% depending on the individual medication and dam dose). These data highlight the need for animal modeling of fetal and nursing infant drug exposure using clinically meaningful dosing strategies and appropriate CNS measures to develop rational treatment guidelines that systematically minimize fetal and neonatal medication exposure in humans.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to improve outcome in acute ischemic stroke: possible mechanisms and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Timo; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Kepplinger, Jessica; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Weidner, Kerstin; Reichmann, Heinz; Barlinn, Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Several clinical studies have indicated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) administered in patients after acute ischemic stroke can improve clinical recovery independently of depression. Due to small sample sizes and heterogeneous study designs interpretability was limited in these studies. The mechanisms of action whereby SSRI might improve recovery from acute ischemic stroke are not fully elucidated. We searched MEDLINE using the PubMed interface to identify evidence of SSRI mediated improvement of recovery from acute ischemic stroke and reviewed the literature on the potential underlying mechanisms of action. Among identified clinical studies, a well-designed randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study (FLAME - fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischemic stroke) demonstrated improved recovery of motor function in stroke patients receiving fluoxetine. The positive effects of SSRIs on stroke recovery were further supported by a meta-analysis of 52 trials in a total of 4060 participants published by the Cochrane collaboration. Based on animal models, the mechanisms whereby SSRIs might ameliorate functional and structural ischemic-brain damage were suggested to include stimulation of neurogenesis with migration of newly generated cells toward ischemic-brain regions, anti-inflammatory neuroprotection, improved regulation of cerebral blood flow, and modulation of the adrenergic neurohormonal system. However, to date, it remains speculative if and to what degree these mechanisms convert into humans and randomized controlled trials in large populations of stroke patients comparing different SSRIs are still lacking. In addition to the need of comprehensive-clinical evidence, further elucidation of the beneficial mechanisms whereby SSRIs may improve structural and functional recovery from ischemic-brain damage is needed to form a basis for translation into clinical practice.

  7. Improved preclinical cardiovascular therapeutic indices with long-term inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake using reboxetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossa, Anthony A., E-mail: anthony.fossa@icardiac.com [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wisialowski, Todd A. [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Cremers, Thomas; Hart, Marieke van der [Brains On-Line B.V., University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Tseng, Elaine; Deng, Shibing; Rollema, Hans; Wang, Ellen Q. [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) acutely increase norepinephrine (NE) levels, but therapeutic antidepressant activity is only observed after weeks of treatment because central NE levels progressively increase during continued drug exposure. Similarly, while NRIs acutely increase blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) due to enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission, chronic treatment changes the responsiveness of the central noradrenergic system and suppresses these effects via autonomic regulation. To better understand the relationship between NE increases and cardiovascular safety, we investigated acute and chronic effects of the NRI reboxetine on central NE release and on BP and HR and electrical alternans, a measure of arrhythmia liability, in guinea pigs. NE release was assessed by microdialysis in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN); BP and HR were measured by telemetry. Animals were treated for 28 days with 15 mg/kg/day of reboxetine or vehicle via an osmotic minipump and then challenged with acute intravenous doses of reboxetine. Animals chronically treated with reboxetine had 2-fold higher extracellular basal NE levels in mPFC and PVN compared to basal levels after chronic vehicle treatment. BP was significantly increased after the first day of treatment, and gradually returned to vehicle levels by day 21. These data indicate that chronic NRI treatment may lead to an increase in central NE levels and a concomitant reduction in BP based on exposure–response curves compared to vehicle treatment, suggesting a larger separation between preclinical estimates of efficacy vs. safety compared to acute NRI treatment. -- Highlights: ► Acute RBX produces blood pressure increases acutely that decrease with chronic RBX ► Chronic RBX increases brain NE levels, a preclinical surrogate of improved efficacy ► Short-term screening of NRI often underestimates the chronic therapeutic index ► Chronic cardiovascular

  8. Neuroimaging of the serotonin reuptake site requires high-affinity ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, Betina; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2007-11-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop suitable radiolabeled tracers for positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography imaging of the serotonin transporter (SERT), but most often, negative outcomes are reported. The aim of this study is to define characteristics of a good SERT radioligand and to investigate species differences. We examined seven different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and that except for one all have been previously tested as emission tomography ligands. The outcome of the ligands as emission tomography tracers was compared in relation with receptor density (Bmax) and/or ligand affinity (Kd) in rat and monkey cerebrum and cerebellum (reference region) membranes. [3H]-(S)-Citalopram and [3H]-(+)-McN5652 display statistically significantly lower affinity, whereas [3H]paroxetine displays statistically significantly higher affinity for SERT in monkey cortex when compared with the rat cerebrum. The affinity of [3H]MADAM, [123I]ADAM, and [11C]DASB for SERT obtained with rat cerebrum and monkey cortex are similar. In monkey cortex, Kd and Bmax could not be determined with [3H]fluoxetine. Of the seven SSRIs, [3H]-(S)-citalopram, [3H]MADAM, and [11C]DASB displayed significant specific binding to SERT in monkey cerebellum, with Bmax cortex:cerebellum ratios being 17, 3, and 4, respectively. In rat brain tissue the ratios were 12, 6, and 3, respectively. In conclusion, it can be estimated that imaging of the human SERT in a high-density region requires radioligands with Kd values between 0.03 and a maximum of 0.3 nM (at 37 degrees C). The differential specific cerebellar binding raises the question of the suitability of cerebellum as a reference region for nonspecific binding.

  9. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor discontinuation syndrome: a hypothetical definition. Discontinuation Consensus panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzberg, A F; Haddad, P; Kaplan, E M; Lejoyeux, M; Rosenbaum, J F; Young, A H; Zajecka, J

    1997-01-01

    Adverse events following discontinuation from serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are being reported in the literature with increasing frequency; the frequency and severity of these symptoms appear to vary according to the half-life of the SRI, e.g., the incidence appears higher with the shorter half-life agents than with fluoxetine, which has an extended half-life. Yet, there have been no systematic studies of the phenomenon to date. Therefore, a group of experts convened in Phoenix, Arizona, to develop a clear description or definition of the phenomenon based on these reports. The SRI discontinuation syndrome, referred to as "withdrawal symptoms" in many anecdotal case reports, is distinctly different from the classic withdrawal syndrome associated with alcohol and barbiturates. Anti-depressants are not associated with dependence or drug-seeking behavior. SRI discontinuation symptoms tend to be short-lived and self-limiting, but can be troublesome. They may emerge when an SRI is abruptly discontinued, when doses are missed, and less frequently, during dosage reduction. In addition, the symptoms are not attributable to any other cause and can be reversed when the original agent is reinstituted, or one that is pharmacologically similar is substituted. SRI discontinuation symptoms, in most cases, may be minimized by slowly tapering antidepressant therapy, but there have been several case reports where symptoms occurred consistently even through repeated attempts to taper therapy. Physical symptoms include problems with balance, gastrointestinal and flu-like symptoms, and sensory and sleep disturbances. Psychological symptoms include anxiety and/or agitation, crying spells, and irritability. Further analyses of data bases and clinical studies are needed to define this proposed syndrome more clearly.

  10. Lesson Thirteen Trifascicular Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2005-01-01

    @@ A complete trifascicular block would result in complete AV block. The idio ventricular rhythm has a slower rate and a wide QRS complex because the pacemaker is located at the peripheral part of the conduction system distal to the sites of the block1. Such a rhythm may be difficult to differentiate from bifascicular or bundle branch block combined with complete block at a higher level such as the AV node or His bundle2. Besides a slower ventricular rate, a change in the morphology of the QRS complex from a previous known bifascicular pattern would be strongly suggestive of a trifascicular origin of the complete AV block3. A His bundle recording is required for a definitive diagnosis, however.

  11. Lack of serotonin reuptake during brain development alters rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Storm Witteveen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Besides its ‘classical’ neurotransmitter function, serotonin (5-HT has been found to also act as a neurodevelopmental signal. During development, the 5-HT projection system represents one of the earliest neurotransmitter systems to innervate the brain. One of the targets of the 5-HT projection system, originating in the brainstem raphe nuclei, is the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, an area involved in higher cognitive functions and important in the etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders. Little is known however about the exact role of 5-HT and its signaling molecules in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. Using explant essays, we here studied the role of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, an important modulator of the 5-HT signal, in rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation. We found that the chemotrophic nature of the interaction between the origin (rostral raphe cluster and a target (mPFC of the 5-HT projection system was affected in rats lacking the 5-HTT (5-HTT-/-. While 5-HTT deficiency did not affect the dorsal raphe 5-HT-positive outgrowing neurites, the median raphe 5-HT neurites switched from a strong repulsive to an attractive interaction when co-cultured with the mPFC. Furthermore, the fasciculation of the mPFC outgrowing neurites was dependent on the amount of 5-HTT. In the mPFC of 5-HTT-/- pups, we observed clear differences in 5-HT innervation and the identity of a class of projection neurons of the mPFC. In the absence of the 5-HTT, the 5-HT innervation in all subareas of the early postnatal mPFC increased dramatically and the number of Satb2-positive callosal projection neurons was decreased. Together, these results suggest a 5-HTT dependency during early development of these brain areas and in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. The tremendous complexity of the 5-HT projection system and its role in several neurodevelopmental disorders highlights the need for further research in this largely

  12. Effect of canagliflozin and metformin on cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Nadia M S; Marie, Mohamed-Assem S; AlAzimi, Sara Abdullah Mubarak

    2016-10-25

    The rapid economic development in the Arabian Gulf has resulted in lifestyle changes that have increased the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with the greatest increases observed in Kuwait. Dyslipidemia and diabetes are risk factors for disruptions in cortical neurotransmitter homeostasis. This study investigated the effect of the antidiabetic medications canagliflozin (CAN) and metformin (MET) on the levels of cortical neurotransmitters in a diabetic rat model. The rats were assigned to the control (C) group, the diabetic group that did not receive treatment (D) or the diabetic group treated with either CAN (10 mg/kg) or MET (100 mg/kg) for 2 or 4 weeks. Blood and urine glucose levels and cortical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were assayed, and amino acid and monoamine levels were measured using HPLC. The diabetic group exhibited a significant increase in AChE activity and a decrease in monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitter levels. In the CAN group, AChE was significantly lower than that in the D and D + MET groups after 2 weeks of treatment. In addition, a significant increase in some cortical monoamines and amino acids was observed in the D + MET and D + CAN groups compared with the D group. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of severe focal hemorrhage, neuronal degeneration, and cerebral blood vessel congestion, with gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the D group. The CAN-treated group exhibited severe cerebral blood vessel congestion after 2 weeks of treatment and focal gliosis in the cerebrum after 4 weeks of treatment. Focal gliosis in the cerebrum of rats in the MET-treated group was observed after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. We conclude that the effect of CAN and MET on neurotransmitters is potentially mediated by their antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects. In addition, the effects of CAN on neurotransmitters might be associated with its receptor activity, and the effect of MET on neurotransmitters

  13. The Met receptor tyrosine kinase prevents zebrafish primary motoneurons from expressing an incorrect neurotransmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisen Judith S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of correct neurotransmitters is crucial for normal nervous system function. How neurotransmitter expression is regulated is not well-understood; however, previous studies provide evidence that both environmental signals and intrinsic differentiation programs are involved. One environmental signal known to regulate neurotransmitter expression in vertebrate motoneurons is Hepatocyte growth factor, which acts through the Met receptor tyrosine kinase and also affects other aspects of motoneuron differentiation, including axonal extension. Here we test the role of Met in development of motoneurons in embryonic zebrafish. Results We found that met is expressed in all early developing, individually identified primary motoneurons and in at least some later developing secondary motoneurons. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Met function and found that Met has distinct roles in primary and secondary motoneurons. Most secondary motoneurons were absent from met morpholino-injected embryos, suggesting that Met is required for their formation. We used chemical inhibitors to test several downstream pathways activated by Met and found that secondary motoneuron development may depend on the p38 and/or Akt pathways. In contrast, primary motoneurons were present in met morpholino-injected embryos. However, a significant fraction of them had truncated axons. Surprisingly, some CaPs in met morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO-injected embryos developed a hybrid morphology in which they had both a peripheral axon innervating muscle and an interneuron-like axon within the spinal cord. In addition, in met MO-injected embryos primary motoneurons co-expressed mRNA encoding Choline acetyltransferase, the synthetic enzyme for their normal neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, and mRNA encoding Glutamate decarboxylase 1, the synthetic enzyme for GABA, a neurotransmitter never normally found in these motoneurons, but

  14. Laurate Biosensors Image Brain Neurotransmitters In Vivo: Can an Antihypertensive Medication Alter Psychostimulant Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Murthy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuromolecular Imaging (NMI with novel biosensors enables the selective detection of neurotransmitters in vivo within seconds, on line and in real time. Biosensors remain in place for continuing studies over a period of months. This biotechnological advance is based on conventional electrochemistry; the biosensors detect neurotransmitters by electron transfer. Simply stated, biosensors adsorb electrons from each neurotransmitter at specific oxidation potentials; the current derived from electron transfer is proportional to neurotransmitter concentration. Selective electron transfer properties of these biosensors permit the imaging of neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors. The novel BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors we have developed, differ in formulation and detection capabilities from biosensors/electrodes used in conventional electrochemistry/ voltammetry. In these studies, NMI, specifically, the BRODERICK PROBE® laurate biosensor images neurotransmitter signals within mesolimbic neuronal terminals, nucleus accumbens (NAc; dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, homovanillic acid (HVA and Ltryptophan (L-TP are selectively imaged. Simultaneously, we use infrared photobeams to monitor open-field movement behaviors on line with NMI in the same animal subjects. The goals are to investigate integrated neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine and caffeine alone and co-administered and further, to use ketanserin to decipher receptor profiles for these psychostimulants, alone and co-administered. The rationale for selecting this medication is: ketanserin (a is an antihypertensive and cocaine and caffeine produce hypertension and (b acts at 5-HT2A/2C receptors, prevalent in NAc and implicated in hypertension and cocaine addiction. Key findings are: (a the moderate dose of caffeine simultaneously potentiates cocaine's neurochemical and behavioral responses. (b ketanserin simultaneously inhibits cocaine-increased DA and 5-HT release in

  15. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Douglas Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507 in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45 and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31 and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27 were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation.

  16. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blocked Urethral Valves Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Blocked Urethral Valves Page Content Article Body Urine leaves the bladder through a tube called the urethra, which in boys passes through the penis. Rarely, small membranes form across the urethra in ...

  17. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix. Inde

  18. Types of Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... P wave as it normally would. If an electrical signal is blocked before it reaches the ventricles, they won't contract and pump blood to the lungs and the rest of the body. Second-degree heart block is divided into two ...

  19. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix. Inde

  20. The Block Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We define the block neighborhood of a reversible CA, which is related both to its decomposition into a product of block permutations and to quantum computing. We give a purely combinatorial characterization of the block neighborhood, which helps in two ways. First, it makes the computation of the block neighborhood of a given CA relatively easy. Second, it allows us to derive upper bounds on the block neighborhood: for a single CA as function of the classical and inverse neighborhoods, and for the composition of several CAs. One consequence of that is a characterization of a class of "elementary" CAs that cannot be written as the composition of two simpler parts whose neighborhoods and inverse neighborhoods would be reduced by one half.

  1. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  2. Miniaturized and Wireless Optical Neurotransmitter Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Dopamine in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min H. Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Real-time monitoring of extracellular neurotransmitter concentration offers great benefits for diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and diseases. This paper presents the study design and results of a miniaturized and wireless optical neurotransmitter sensor (MWONS for real-time monitoring of brain dopamine concentration. MWONS is based on fluorescent sensing principles and comprises a microspectrometer unit, a microcontroller for data acquisition, and a Bluetooth wireless network for real-time monitoring. MWONS has a custom-designed application software that controls the operation parameters for excitation light sources, data acquisition, and signal processing. MWONS successfully demonstrated a measurement capability with a limit of detection down to a 100 nanomole dopamine concentration, and high selectivity to ascorbic acid (90:1 and uric acid (36:1.

  3. Microfluidic in-channel multi-electrode platform for neurotransmitter sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, A.; Mathault, J.; Reitz, A.; Boisvert, M.; Tessier, F.; Greener, J.; Miled, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this project we present a microfluidic platform with in-channel micro-electrodes for in situ screening of bio/chemical samples through a lab-on-chip system. We used a novel method to incorporate electrochemical sensors array (16x20) connected to a PCB, which opens the way for imaging applications. A 200 μm height microfluidic channel was bonded to electrochemical sensors. The micro-channel contains 3 inlets used to introduce phosphate buffer saline (PBS), ferrocynide and neurotransmitters. The flow rate was controlled through automated micro-pumps. A multiplexer was used to scan electrodes and perform individual cyclic voltammograms by a custom potentiostat. The behavior of the system was linear in terms of variation of current versus concentration. It was used to detect the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and glutamate.

  4. Parallel expression of synaptophysin and evoked neurotransmitter release during development of cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Treiman, M; Hansen, Gert Helge;

    1991-01-01

    and neurotransmitter release were measured in each of the culture types as a function of development for up to 8 days in vitro, using the same batch of cells for both sets of measurements to obtain optimal comparisons. The content and the distribution of synaptophysin in the developing cells were assessed...... by quantitative immunoblotting and light microscope immunocytochemistry, respectively. In both cell types, a close parallelism was found between the temporal pattern of development in synaptophysin expression and neurotransmitter release. This temporal pattern differed between the two types of neurons....... The cerebral cortex neurons showed a biphasic time course of increase in synaptophysin content, paralleled by a biphasic pattern of development in their ability to release [3H]GABA in response to depolarization by glutamate or elevated K+ concentrations. In contrast, a monophasic, approximately linear increase...

  5. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-05-28

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions.

  6. [Detection of neurotransmitter interactions with PET and SPECT by pharmacological challenge paradigms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlösser, R

    2000-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) enables the in vivo study of specific neurochemical processes in the context of normal regulatory mechanisms and pathophysiological alterations of the brain. By combining these methods with pharmacological challenge-paradigms, the study of functional interactions of different neurotransmitter systems is possible. This review will present data from animal and healthy volunteer studies as well as first data from investigations in different patient populations with regard to this research direction. Especially, interactions of different neurotransmitter systems with the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system will be discussed. The database acquired so far confirms existing models of neuronal feedback-circuits, and the first clinical results are consistent with the hypothesis of an increased dopaminergic responsivity in schizophrenic patients. These results open up new perspectives for a further evaluation of treatment response predictors from drug-challenge studies and for the development of new drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-18

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released.

  8. The magnitude and significance of Ca2+ domains for release of neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, S; Parnas, H; Parnas, I

    1994-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that localized high concentrations of Ca2+ (Ca2+ domains) play a major role in controlling the time course of neurotransmitter release. In the present work we calculate the magnitude and the time course of Ca2+ domains that evolve in the vicinity of a Ca2+ channel and an adjacent release site. In the calculations we consider a accurately dimensioned Ca2+ channel. Moreover, the Ca2+ current is continuously adjusted with regard to the accumulated intracellular Ca2+ and, in addition, endogenous buffers are considered. The calculations, carried out by the software FIDAP, based on finite element method, show that the Ca2+ concentrations achieved near the release sites are significantly lower than claimed by other investigators. Furthermore, we present arguments indicating that the Ca2+ domains, regardless of their magnitude, do not play a role in controlling the time course of release of neurotransmitter.

  9. Effects of the Bee Venom Herbal Acupuncture on the Neurotransmitters of the Rat Brain Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Seok Yun

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of bee venom Herbal Acupuncture on neurotransmitters in the rat brain cortex, herbal acupuncture with bee venom group and normal saline group was performed at LI4 bilaterally of the rat. the average optical density of neurotransmitters from the cerebral cortex was analysed 30 minutes after the herbal aqupuncture, by the immunohistochemistry. The results were as follows: 1. The density of NADPH-diaphorase in bee venom group was increased significantly at the motor cortex, visual cortex, auditory cortex, cingulate cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex compared to the normal saline group. 2. The average optical density of vasoactive intestinal peptide in bee venom group had significant changes at the insular cortex, retrosplenial cortex and perirhinal cortex, compared to the normal saline group. 3. The average optical density of neuropeptide-Y in bee venom group increased significantly at the visual cortex and cingulate cortex, compared to the normal saline group.

  10. Influence of ketamine on amino acid neurotransmitters secretion by nerve cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxian Shi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence of amino acid neurotransmitters secreted by the nerve cells after ketamine treatment, the nerve cells were cultured in vitro to exclude the interference of other factors in vivo and treated with three different doses of ketamine (1, 3 and 5 µg/mL. Then, the concentration of neuronal amino acid neurotransmitters was examined at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 min after treatment. The trends of each amino acid concentration after ketamine treatment were nearly the same among the different treatment doses. After 15 min of adapting time, ketamine decreased the excitatory amino acid glutamic acid and aspartic acid concentration, and increased the concentration of the inhibitory amino acid glycine. Their concentrations showed a tendency to return approximately to the original level after 120 min.

  11. Corticosterone modulation of neurotransmitter receptors in rat hippocampus: a quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A. (Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, NJ (USA). Dept. of Pharmacology); Rainbow, T.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). School of Medicine); McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA))

    1985-04-22

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on neurotransmitter receptors was studied in dorsal hippocampus of rat using quantitative autoradiography. ADX for one week causes an increase in (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding to 5-HT/sub 1/ receptors which is significant in the CA1 cell field. CORT treatment of ADX rats for 3-5 days results in localized reductions of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding including a partial reversal of the increase observed after ADX in CA1. CORT treatment of ADX animals also decreases binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB to muscarinic receptors in the dorsal hippocampus, with a significant effect in an area designated as subiculum. No influence of CORT was detected on (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding to alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in dorsal hippocampus. Possible mechanisms for hormone effects on neurotransmitter receptor levels are discussed.

  12. Swim pacemaker response to bath applied neurotransmitters in the cubozoan Tripedalia cystophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Jan; Nachman, Gösta; Garm, Anders

    2013-09-01

    The four rhopalia of cubomedusae are integrated parts of the central nervous system carrying their many eyes and thought to be the centres of visual information processing. Rhopalial pacemakers control locomotion through a complex neural signal transmitted to the ring nerve and the signal frequency is modulated by the visual input. Since electrical synapses have never been found in the cubozoan nervous system all signals are thought to be transmitted across chemical synapses, and so far information about the neurotransmitters involved are based on immunocytochemical or behavioural data. Here we present the first direct physiological evidence for the types of neurotransmitters involved in sensory information processing in the rhopalial nervous system. FMRFamide, serotonin and dopamine are shown to have inhibitory effect on the pacemaker frequency. There are some indications that the fast acting acetylcholine and glycine have an initial effect and then rapidly desensitise. Other tested neuroactive compounds (GABA, glutamate, and taurine) could not be shown to have a significant effect.

  13. Synapsin II desynchronizes neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses by interacting with presynaptic calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrihan, Lucian; Cesca, Fabrizia; Raimondi, Andrea; Lignani, Gabriele; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system, most synapses show a fast mode of neurotransmitter release known as synchronous release followed by a phase of asynchronous release, which extends over tens of milliseconds to seconds. Synapsin II (SYN2) is a member of the multigene synapsin family (SYN1/2/3) of synaptic vesicle phosphoproteins that modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity, and are mutated in epileptic patients. Here we report that inhibitory synapses of the dentate gyrus of Syn II knockout mice display an upregulation of synchronous neurotransmitter release and a concomitant loss of delayed asynchronous release. Syn II promotes γ-aminobutyric acid asynchronous release in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner by a functional interaction with presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, revealing a new role in synaptic transmission for synapsins.

  14. CDK5 serves as a major control point in neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryan, Timothy A

    2010-09-09

    CDK5 is an important kinase in nervous system function, controlling neural development and postsynaptic signal integration. Here we show that CDK5 plays a major role in controlling neurotransmitter release. Inhibition of CDK5 activity, by either acute or genetic means, leads to profound potentiation of presynaptic function, including unmasking of previously "silent" synapses. Removal of CDK5 activity additionally unlocks access to the resting synaptic vesicle pool, which normally remains recalcitrant to exocytosis and recycling even following prolonged action potential stimuli. Presynaptic CDK5 levels are additionally severely depleted by chronic neuronal silencing, a treatment that is functionally similar to CDK5 knockdown with regard to presynaptic potentiation. Thus CDK5 appears to be an integral element in presynaptic homeostatic scaling, and the resting vesicle pool appears to provide a potent functional presynaptic homeostatic control parameter. These studies thus pinpoint CDK5 as a major control point for modulation of neurotransmitter release in mammalian neurons.

  15. Activity-dependent neurotransmitter-receptor matching at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2007-01-02

    Signaling in the nervous system requires matching of neurotransmitter receptors with cognate neurotransmitters at synapses. The vertebrate neuromuscular junction is the best studied cholinergic synapse, but the mechanisms by which acetylcholine is matched with acetylcholine receptors are not fully understood. Because alterations in neuronal calcium spike activity alter transmitter specification in embryonic spinal neurons, we hypothesized that receptor expression in postsynaptic cells follows changes in transmitter expression to achieve this specific match. We find that embryonic vertebrate striated muscle cells normally express receptors for glutamate, GABA, and glycine as well as for acetylcholine. As maturation progresses, acetylcholine receptor expression prevails. Receptor selection is altered when early neuronal calcium-dependent activity is perturbed, and remaining receptor populations parallel changes in transmitter phenotype. In these cases, glutamatergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic synaptic currents are recorded from muscle cells, demonstrating that activity regulates matching of transmitters and their receptors in the assembly of functional synapses.

  16. Duck cerebellum participates in regulation of food intake via the neurotransmitters serotonin and neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua Z; Li, Xin Y; Tong, Jing J; Qiu, Zheng Y; Zhan, Han C; Sha, Jun N; Peng, Ke M

    2008-10-01

    Two important neurotransmitters, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), have been confirmed to be involved in food intake regulation. To clarify whether the cerebellum participates in modulation of food intake through these two neurotransmitters, we investigated the distribution and expression levels of 5-HT and NPY in cerebellum of the duck. Our results showed that 5-HT and NPY were distributed only at the Purkinje cell layer of the duck cerebellum. Moreover, the expression level of 5-HT in fasted (4 h) and tryptophan (100-200 mg/kg)-treated ducks was significantly higher than that in control animals (Pfood intake respectively increased and decreased cerebellar 5-HT and NPY in the duck.

  17. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms.

  18. Analysis of neurotransmitter tissue content of Drosophila melanogaster in different life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-21

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development.

  19. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  20. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynapt...

  1. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  2. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on glaucoma: A nationwide population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung; McIntyre, Roger S.; Lee, Yena; Lin, Tsang-Yaw; Weng, Jun-Cheng; Chen, Pau-Chung; Hsu, Chung-Yao

    2017-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antidepressants. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness globally and iatrogenic glaucoma has been implicated across disparate medication classes. Available studies that have sought to determine the association between SSRI exposure and glaucoma have provided mixed results. The aim of the study herein was to investigate whether an association exists between SSRI exposure and glaucoma incidence. Methods Glaucoma cases were identified from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database with a new primary diagnosis of glaucoma between 1997 and 2009. The date wherein the cases were diagnosed with glaucoma was operationalized as the index date. The control group was comprised of individuals within the database who were not diagnosed with glaucoma. 15,865 glaucoma cases were compared to 77,014 sex-, age-, residence- and insurance premium-matched controls on measures of prescribed duration and dosage of SSRIs up to 365 days before index date to proxy SSRIs exposure. Results Individuals receiving SSRIs were at greater risk of glaucoma incidence (OR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.29–1.50); the foregoing increased likelihood was reduced after adjusting for confounding variables (aOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.00,1.18). SSRI treatment of longer duration (i.e. >365 days) and higher doses (≥1 defined daily dose) were associated with greater risk of glaucoma incidence (aOR = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.08–1.71). Subgroup analysis showed that the effect of SSRIs on glaucoma was limited to individuals younger than 65 years of age (aOR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.25–1.50), without diabetes (aOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.27–1.52), without hypertension (aOR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.31–1.63) or hypercholesterolemia (aOR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.23–1.48). Conclusion Treatment with SSRIs was associated with greater risk of having a diagnosis of glaucoma, particularly in individuals with longer duration

  3. An analysis of psychotropic drug sales. Increasing sales of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors anre closely related to number of products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    by changes in sales of the benzodiazepines and SSRIs. We found a decline in the sales of benzodiazepines after a peak in 1986, likely due to the recognition that they cause dependence. From a low level in 1992, we found that the sales of SSRIs increased almost linearly by a factor of 18, up to 44 DDD per......BACKGROUND: Prescribing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased dramatically. OBJECTIVE: To compare the sales of benzodiazepines and SSRIs within the primary care sector in Denmark and relate changes in usage to number of indications and products on the market. METHODS: We...

  4. Synthesis and carbon-11 labeling of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, potential radioligands for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurra Filannino, Maria [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Matarrese, Mario [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: matarrese.mario@hsr.it; Turolla, Elia Anna; Masiello, Valeria; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Todde, Sergio; Verza, Elisa [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Magni, Fulvio [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Kienle, Marzia Galli [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Fazio, Ferruccio [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Standards and des-methyl precursors of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, potent and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, were synthesized and radiolabeled with carbon-11. Both enantiomers of the N-methyl-3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropanamine and the 3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine were obtained via multi-step syntheses, while the radiosyntheses were carried out using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. The radiochemical yields were 26%, decay corrected and the specific radioactivity ranging from 2 to 3 Ci/{mu}mol. The HPLC analyses were performed using a chiral column: during the radiolabeling, no racemization occurred and the isomers were synthesized with high enantiomeric purity.

  5. Effect of paroxetine combined with climen on hormone levels and neurotransmitters in patients with perimenopausal depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ling Huang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of paroxetine combined with climen on hormone levels and neurotransmitters in patients with perimenopausal depression. Methods:A total of 96 cases of perimenopausal women who met the diagnosis of depression and were treated in our hospital from July 2012 to March 2015 were selected as research subjects and randomly divided into observation group and control group, each group with 48 cases. Control group received paroxetine therapy alone, observation group received paroxetine combined with climen therapy, serum hormone and neurotransmitter levels of two groups were compared, and severity of menopause and depression was detected after treatment. Results:E2 level of observation group after treatment was higher than that of control group, and levels of FSH and LH were lower than those of control group;serum NE, 5-HT, DA, Glu and Asp values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group, and values of GABA and Gly were lower than those of control group;KI, MRS and HAMD scores of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group. Conclusion:Paroxetine combined with climen therapy for patients with perimenopausal depression can effectively optimize the levels of hormones and neurotransmitters in patients and reduce the symptom severity of menopause and depression.

  6. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  7. [Single and combining effects of Calculus Bovis and zolpidem on inhibitive neurotransmitter of rat striatum corpora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; He, Xinrong; Guo, Mei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the correlation effects between single or combined administration of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem and changes of inhibitive neurotransmitter in rat striatum corpora. Sampling from rat striatum corpora was carried out through microdialysis. The content of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat corpus striatum- glycine (Gly) and gama aminobutyric acid (GABA), was determined by HPLC, which involved pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde, reversed-phase gradient elution and fluorescence detection. GABA content of rat striatum corpora in Calculus Bovis group was significantly increased compared with saline group (P Calculus Boris plus zolpidem group were increased largely compared with saline group as well (P Calculus Bovis group was higher than combination group (P Calculus Bovis or zolpidem group was markedly increased compared with saline group or combination group (P Calculus Bovis group, zolpidem group and combination group. The magnitude of increase was lower in combination group than in Calculus Bovis group and Zolpidem group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis promoted encephalon inhibition is more powerful than zolpidem. The increase in two inhibitive neurotransmitters did not show reinforcing effect in combination group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis and zolpidem may compete the same receptors. Therefore, combination of Calculus Bovis containing drugs and zolpidem has no clinical significance. Calculus Bovis shouldn't as an aperture-opening drugs be used for resuscitation therapy.

  8. Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the generation and degeneration of hippocampal neuroarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Kater, S B

    1989-01-30

    The possibility that excitatory and inhibitory inputs to neurons can affect the generation and degeneration of neuroarchitecture was examined in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in isolated cell culture. Dendritic outgrowth and cell survival were directly monitored in neurons exposed to: the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, the inhibitory transmitter GABA, anticonvulsants or combinations of these agents. Glutamate caused a graded series of changes in pyramidal neuron cytoarchitecture: a selective inhibition in dendritic outgrowth and dendritic pruning was observed with subtoxic levels of glutamate while cell death was induced by higher levels. Low levels of GABA alone or in combination with diazepam, carbamazepine, phenobarbital or phenytoin were without effect on dendrite outgrowth while higher levels caused moderate reductions in outgrowth. Neither GABA nor the anticonvulsants affected cell survival. GABA plus diazepam, phenobarbital, carbamazepine and phenytoin each significantly reduced the dendritic regression and cell death normally caused by glutamate. Elevation of extracellular K+ to 50 mM caused dendritic regression and 100 mM K+ caused cell death; these effects were greatly reduced by GABA and anticonvulsants. The calcium channel blocker Co2+ prevented the dendritic regression and cell death caused by both glutamate and K+ indicating that calcium influx was required for the neuroarchitectural responses. Taken together, these results demonstrate that neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory drugs can have direct and interactive effects on both neurite outgrowth and cell survival. Such neurotransmitter actions may play roles in both the formation and degeneration of the neuronal circuits in which they participate in information coding.

  9. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Muschter

    Full Text Available Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh, noradrenaline (NA vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10(-6 M NA whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors.

  10. Neuromodulating mice and men: Are there functional species differences in neurotransmitter concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    I examine evidence that the concentration of certain modulatory neurotransmitters varies across species, including differences between rodents and primates. Microdialysis studies indicate that the baseline concentration of serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and acetylcholine, as measured in the prefrontal cortex of awake animals, may differ between rats and macaque monkeys. These differences may extend to mice and humans, as well. If there are differences in the tonic concentration of these neurotransmitters, this may affect the functioning of these transmitter systems in multiple ways, including potential effects on neuropsychiatric conditions such as the various mental illnesses and modeling of them in animals. Species differences in transmitter concentration may also have neuropharmacological implications, and may be relevant to the phenomenon of differences in speed of drug response between humans and rodents. This paper is divided into three sections that address related questions about the potential concentration differences: (1) Are there species differences in baseline neurotransmitter concentration? (2) Are the putative differences functional? (3) What might the functional differences be? Consideration of the existing evidence indicates that there may indeed be functional species differences in the modulatory transmitter systems.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of multiple neurotransmitters by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufi, Sara; Lamoree, Marja; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim

    2015-05-22

    Neurotransmitters are endogenous metabolites that allow the signal transmission across neuronal synapses. Their biological role is crucial for many physiological functions and their levels can be changed by several diseases. Because of their high polarity, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a promising tool for neurotransmitter analysis. Due to the large number of HILIC stationary phases available, an evaluation of the column performances and retention behaviors has been performed on five different commercial HILIC packing materials (silica, amino, amide and two zwitterionic stationary phases). Several parameters like the linear correlation between retention and the distribution coefficient (logD), the separation factor k and the column resolution Rs have been investigated and the column performances have been visualized with a heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis. An optimized and validated HILIC-MS/MS method based on the ZIC-cHILIC column is proposed for the simultaneous detection and quantification of twenty compounds consisting of neurotransmitters, precursors and metabolites: 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 5-hydroxy-L-tripthophan, acetylcholine, choline, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, epinephrine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glutamine, histamine, histidine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, norepinephrine, normetanephrine, phenylalanine, serotonin and tyramine. The method was applied to neuronal metabolite profiling of the central nervous system of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. This method is suitable to explore neuronal metabolism and its alteration in different biological matrices.

  12. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporter trafficking in vivo: moving from cells to flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoruk, Anna; Fei, Hao; Daniels, Richard W; Miller, Bradley R; Chen, Audrey; DiAntonio, Aaron; Krantz, David E

    2010-01-01

    During exocytosis, classical and amino acid neurotransmitters are released from the lumen of synaptic vesicles to allow signaling at the synapse. The storage of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles requires the activity of specific vesicular transporters. Glutamate and monoamines such as dopamine are packaged by VGLUTs and VMATs respectively. Changes in the localization of either protein have the potential to up- or down regulate neurotransmitter release, and some of the mechanisms for sorting these proteins to secretory vesicles have been investigated in cultured cells in vitro. We have used Drosophila molecular genetic techniques to study vesicular transporter trafficking in an intact organism and have identified a motif required for localizing Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT) to synaptic vesicles in vivo. In contrast to DVMAT, large deletions of Drosophila VGLUT (DVGLUT) show relatively modest deficits in localizing to synaptic vesicles, suggesting that DVMAT and DVGLUT may undergo different modes of trafficking at the synapse. Further in vivo studies of DVMAT trafficking mutants will allow us to determine how changes in the localization of vesicular transporters affect the nervous system as a whole and complex behaviors mediated by aminergic circuits.

  13. The Molecular Basis of Memory. Part 3: Tagging with emotive neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard eMarx

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission. The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix (neural extracellular matrix (nECM+ diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the neutrix. Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo, metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory.Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device.The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with > 10 NMs and > 90 NTs for encoding (flavoring cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology.

  14. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  15. Environment- and activity-dependent dopamine neurotransmitter plasticity in the adult substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Tim D

    2016-04-01

    The ability of neurons to change the amount or type of neurotransmitter they use, or 'neurotransmitter plasticity', is an emerging new form of adult brain plasticity. For example, it has recently been shown that neurons in the adult rat hypothalamus up- or down-regulate dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in response to the amount of light the animal receives (photoperiod), and that this in turn affects anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (Dulcis et al., 2013). In this Chapter I consolidate recent evidence from my laboratory suggesting neurons in the adult mouse substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) also undergo DA neurotransmitter plasticity in response to persistent changes in their electrical activity, including that driven by the mouse's environment or behavior. Specifically, we have shown that the amounts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) gene promoter activity, TH mRNA and TH protein in SNc neurons increases or decreases after ∼20h of altered electrical activity. Also, infusion of ion-channel agonists or antagonists into the midbrain for 2 weeks results in ∼10% (∼500 neurons) more or fewer TH immunoreactive (TH+) SNc neurons, with no change in the total number of SNc neurons (TH+ and TH-). Targeting ion-channels mediating cell-autonomous pacemaker activity in, or synaptic input and afferent pathways to, SNc neurons are equally effective in this regard. In addition, exposing mice to different environments (sex pairing or environment enrichment) for 1-2 weeks induces ∼10% more or fewer TH+ SNc (and ventral tegmental area or VTA) neurons and this is abolished by concurrent blockade of synaptic transmission in midbrain. Although further research is required to establish SNc (and VTA) DA neurotransmitter plasticity, and to determine whether it alters brain function and behavior, it is an exciting prospect because: (1) It may play important roles in movement, motor learning, reward, motivation, memory and cognition; and (2

  16. Neurotransmitter matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian

    2004-01-01

    It weighs like half a bag of flour and has more holes than a sponge, but if we look closely, we find that the brain is also a complex and vibrant part of our body, one that undergoes physical changes as we learn. Join neuroscience for a brief sojourn into the realm of memory ? a world of neurons...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na+/Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters in a membrane-aqueous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology model of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in a membrane environment and in complex with either the natural substrate S-HT or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitaloprom. We have also included a transporter homologue...

  18. Block copolymer battery separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  19. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups...

  20. Using the Stern Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from "Experimenting with Numbers" by Margaret Stern demonstrate the use of Stern Blocks to develop the conceptual base on which learning disabled students can build further mathematical skills. (DB)

  1. Steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, JMKH; Mori, K; Ohmura, A; Toyooka, H; Hatano, Y; Shingu, K; Fukuda, K

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964 approximately 20 steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents have been evaluated clinically. Pancuronium, a bisquaternary compound designed on the drawingboard, was the first steroidal relaxant introduced into clinical practice worldwide in the 1970's. Although a major improvement, pancuroniu

  2. Block copolymer battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  3. Recipient block TMA technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlacher, Martina; Simon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput screening technologies have led to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. One way to prioritize the leads obtained in such studies is to analyze a large number of tissues for candidate gene expression. The TMA methodology is now an established and frequently used tool for high-throughput tissue analysis. The recipient block technology is the "classical" method of TMA making. In this method, minute cylindrical tissue punches typically measuring 0.6 mm in diameter are removed from donor tissue blocks and are transferred into empty "recipient" paraffin blocks. Up to 1,000 different tissues can be analyzed in one TMA block. The equipment is affordable and easy to use in places where basic skills in histology are available.

  4. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  5. Block Cipher Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miolane, Charlotte Vikkelsø

    ensurethat no attack violatesthe securitybounds specifiedbygeneric attack namely exhaustivekey search and table lookup attacks. This thesis contains a general introduction to cryptography with focus on block ciphers and important block cipher designs, in particular the Advanced Encryption Standard...... by an analytic and systematic approach that allows insight to the techniques. Moreover a new procedure of generating and applying probabilistic equations in algebraic attacks on block cipher is proposed and examined. Also, we present practical results, which to our knowledge are the best algebraic results...... on small scale variants of AES. In the final part of the thesis we present a new block cipher proposal Present and examine its security against algebraic and differential cryptanalysis in particular....

  6. Coupled Global and Local Changes Direct Substrate Translocation by Neurotransmitter-Sodium Symporter Ortholog LeuT

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2013-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in characterizing neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family structure and function. Yet, many time-resolved events and intermediates that control the various stages of transport cycle remain to be elucidated. Whether NSSs harbor one or two sites for binding their substrates (neurotransmitters or amino acids), and what the role of the secondary site S2 is, if any, are still unresolved. Using molecular modeling and simulations for LeuT, a...

  7. Microtransplantation of membranes from cultured cells to Xenopus oocytes: A method to study neurotransmitter receptors embedded in native lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia; Fucile, Sergio; Renzi, Massimiliano; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is used as a convenient cell expression system to study the structure and function of heterogenic transmitter receptors and ion channels. Recently, we introduced a method to microtransplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from the human brain to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. The same approach was used here to transplant neurotransmitter receptors expressed from cultured cells to the oocytes. Membrane vesicles prepared from a human embryonic kidney cel...

  8. Dezocine exhibits antihypersensitivity activities in neuropathy through spinal μ-opioid receptor activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Mao, Xiao-Fang; Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Zhang, Ma-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Dezocine is the number one opioid painkiller prescribed and sold in China, occupying 44% of the nation’s opioid analgesics market today and far ahead of the gold-standard morphine. We discovered the mechanisms underlying dezocine antihypersensitivity activity and assessed their implications to antihypersensitivity tolerance. Dezocine, given subcutaneously in spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic rats, time- and dose-dependently produced mechanical antiallodynia and thermal antihyperalgesia, significantly increased ipsilateral spinal norepinephrine and serotonin levels, and induced less antiallodynic tolerance than morphine. Its mechanical antiallodynia was partially (40% or 60%) and completely (100%) attenuated by spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonism or norepinephrine depletion/α2-adrenoceptor antagonism and combined antagonism of MORs and α2-adenoceptors, respectively. In contrast, antagonism of spinal κ-opioid receptors (KORs) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) or depletion of spinal serotonin did not significantly alter dezocine antiallodynia. In addition, dezocine-delayed antiallodynic tolerance was accelerated by spinal norepinephrine depletion/α2-adenoceptor antagonism. Thus dezocine produces antihypersensitivity activity through spinal MOR activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI), but apparently not through spinal KOR and DOR activation, serotonin reuptake inhibition or other mechanisms. Our findings reclassify dezocine as the first analgesic of the recently proposed MOR-NRI, and reveal its potential as an alternative to as well as concurrent use with morphine in treating pain. PMID:28230181

  9. Pharmacological and behavioral characterization of D-473, an orally active triple reuptake inhibitor targeting dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloke K Dutta

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule.

  10. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 versus Homer1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine re-uptake inhibitor), for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine, in conjunction with methylphenidate, in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine-blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate.

  11. Lamotrigine Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Severe and Long-Term Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arrojo-Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment recommendations in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD after lack of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs include augmentation with other drugs, particularly clomipramine, a more potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI, or antipsychotics. We present two cases of response to lamotrigine augmentation in treatment-refractory OCD; each received multiple SRI trials over a >10-year period. The first patient had eleven years of treatment with multiple combinations including clomipramine and SSRIs. She had a >50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 29 to 14 by augmenting paroxetine (60 mg/day with lamotrigine (100 mg/day. The second patient had 22 years of treatment with multiple combinations, including combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and risperidone. She had an almost 50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 30 to 16 and disappearance of tics by augmenting clomipramine (225 mg/d with lamotrigine (200 mg/day. These two patients were characterized by lack of response to multiple treatments, making a placebo response to lamotrigine augmentation unlikely. Prospective randomized trials in treatment-resistant OCD patients who do not respond to combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and/or antipsychotics are needed, including augmentation with lamotrigine. Until these trials are available, our cases suggest that clinicians may consider lamotrigine augmentation in such treatment-resistant OCD patients.

  12. Tricyclic isoxazolines: identification of R226161 as a potential new antidepressant that combines potent serotonin reuptake inhibition and alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, J Ignacio; Alcázar, Jesús; Alonso, José M; Alvarez, Rosa M; Bakker, Margot H; Biesmans, Ilse; Cid, José M; De Lucas, Ana I; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Fernández, Javier; Font, Luis M; Iturrino, Laura; Langlois, Xavier; Lenaerts, Ilse; Martínez, Sonia; Megens, Anton A; Pastor, Joaquín; Pullan, Shirley; Steckler, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    In previous articles we have described the discovery of a new series of tricyclic isoxazolines combining central serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibition with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonistic activity. We report now on the synthesis, the in vitro binding potency and the primary in vivo activity of six enantiomers within this series, one of which was selected for further pharmacological evaluation and assigned as R226161. Some additional in vivo studies in rats are described with this compound, which proved to be centrally and orally active as a combined 5-HT reuptake inhibitor and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist.

  13. Cofactor-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GAD65 and its role in autoimmunity and neurotransmitter homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Itamar; Hoke, David E; Costa, Mauricio G S; Reboul, Cyril F; Porebski, Benjamin T; Cowieson, Nathan P; Leh, Hervé; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; McCoey, Julia; Kleifeld, Oded; Borri Voltattorni, Carla; Langley, David; Roome, Brendan; Mackay, Ian R; Christ, Daniel; Perahia, David; Buckle, Malcolm; Paiardini, Alessandro; De Biase, Daniela; Buckle, Ashley M

    2014-06-24

    The human neuroendocrine enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyses the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. GAD exists as two isoforms named according to their respective molecular weights: GAD65 and GAD67. Although cytosolic GAD67 is typically saturated with the cofactor (holoGAD67) and constitutively active to produce basal levels of GABA, the membrane-associated GAD65 exists mainly as the inactive apo form. GAD65, but not GAD67, is a prevalent autoantigen, with autoantibodies to GAD65 being detected at high frequency in patients with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes and certain other autoimmune disorders. The significance of GAD65 autoinactivation into the apo form for regulation of neurotransmitter levels and autoantibody reactivity is not understood. We have used computational and experimental approaches to decipher the nature of the holo → apo conversion in GAD65 and thus, its mechanism of autoinactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations of GAD65 reveal coupling between the C-terminal domain, catalytic loop, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-binding domain that drives structural rearrangement, dimer opening, and autoinactivation, consistent with limited proteolysis fragmentation patterns. Together with small-angle X-ray scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy data, our findings are consistent with apoGAD65 existing as an ensemble of conformations. Antibody-binding kinetics suggest a mechanism of mutually induced conformational changes, implicating the flexibility of apoGAD65 in its autoantigenicity. Although conformational diversity may provide a mechanism for cofactor-controlled regulation of neurotransmitter biosynthesis, it may also come at a cost of insufficient development of immune self-tolerance that favors the production of GAD65 autoantibodies.

  14. Acute Exposure to Pacific Ciguatoxin Reduces Electroencephalogram Activity and Disrupts Neurotransmitter Metabolic Pathways in Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Lei, Elva Ngai Yu; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Lam, Michael Hon Wah; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-09-10

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a common human food poisoning caused by consumption of ciguatoxin (CTX)-contaminated fish affecting over 50,000 people worldwide each year. CTXs are classified depending on their origin from the Pacific (P-CTXs), Indian Ocean (I-CTXs), and Caribbean (C-CTXs). P-CTX-1 is the most toxic CTX known and the major source of CFP causing an array of neurological symptoms. Neurological symptoms in some CFP patients last for several months or years; however, the underlying electrophysiological properties of acute exposure to CTXs remain unknown. Here, we used CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced in the Pacific Ocean (P-CTX-1). Delta and theta electroencephalography (EEG) activity was reduced remarkably in 2 h and returned to normal in 6 h after a single exposure. However, second exposure to P-CTX-1 induced not only a further reduction in EEG activities but also a 2-week delay in returning to baseline EEG values. Ciguatoxicity was detected in the brain hours after the first and second exposure by mouse neuroblastoma assay. The spontaneous firing rate of single motor cortex neuron was reduced significantly measured by single-unit recording with high spatial resolution. Expression profile study of neurotransmitters using targeted profiling approach based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the motor cortex. Our study provides a possible link between the brain oscillations and neurotransmitter release after acute exposure to P-CTX-1. Identification of EEG signatures and major metabolic pathways affected by P-CTX-1 provides new insight into potential biomarker development and therapeutic interventions.

  15. Chemical stimulation of rat retinal neurons: feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter-based prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Samsoon; Rountree, Corey M.; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2015-02-01

    Objective. No cure currently exists for photoreceptor degenerative diseases, which cause partial or total blindness in millions of people worldwide. Electrical retinal prostheses have been developed by several groups with the goal of restoring vision lost to these diseases, but electrical stimulation has limitations. It excites both somas and axons, activating retinal pathways nonphysiologically, and limits spatial resolution because of current spread. Chemical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using the neurotransmitter glutamate has been suggested as an alternative to electrical stimulation with some significant advantages. However, sufficient scientific data to support developing a chemical-based retinal prosthesis is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis and determine therapeutic stimulation parameters. Approach. We injected controlled amounts of glutamate into rat retinas from the epiretinal side ex vivo via micropipettes using a pressure injection system and recorded RGC responses with a multielectrode array. Responsive units were identified using a spike rate threshold of 3 Hz. Main results. We recorded both somal and axonal units and demonstrated successful glutamatergic stimulation across different RGC subtypes. Analyses show that exogenous glutamate acts on RGC synapses similar to endogenous glutamate and, unlike electrical prostheses, stimulates only RGC somata. The spatial spread of glutamate stimulation was ˜ 290 μm from the injection site, comparable to current electrical prostheses. Further, the glutamate injections produced spatially differential responses in OFF, ON, and ON-OFF RGC subtypes, suggesting that differential stimulation of the OFF and ON systems may be possible. A temporal resolution of 3.2 Hz was obtained, which is a rate suitable for spatial vision. Significance. We provide strong support for the feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter

  16. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such that occupancy of the S2 site is required for the cytoplasmic release of substrate from the S1 site. Here we address this controversy by performing direct measurement of substrate binding to wild-type LeuT and to S2 site mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis and scintillation proximity assays. In addition, we perform uptake experiments to determine whether the proposed allosteric coupling between the putative S2 site and the S1 site manifests itself in the kinetics of substrate flux. We conclude that LeuT harbours a single, centrally located, high-affinity substrate-binding site and that transport is well described by a simple, single-substrate kinetic mechanism.

  17. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In Vivo Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Modulators with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Yang, Shaolin; Fischer, Bernard A.; Rowland, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo measurement of neurotransmitters and modulators is now feasible with advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) techniques. This review provides a basic tutorial of MRS, describes the methods available to measure brain glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutathione, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glycine, and serine at magnetic field strengths of 3Tesla or higher, and summarizes the neurochemical findings in schizophrenia. Overall, 1H-MRS holds great promise for producing biomarkers that can serve as treatment targets, prediction of disease onset, or illness exacerbation in schizophrenia and other brain diseases. PMID:25614132

  19. The molecular mechanism for overcoming the rate-limiting step in monoamine neurotransmitter transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinning, Steffen; Said, Saida; Malinauskaite, Lina

    as an endogenous substrate mimic in the empty transporter in order for it to overcome the transition from the inward-facing to the outward-facing conformation. We also show that the local conformational changes associated with the rotation of this conserved leucine explains how cation sites are perturbed...... and are targets for drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamine and ecstasy as well as anxiolytics and antidepressants. The transporters undergo a series of concerted conformational changes in order to harness the driving force of co-transported cations to translocate the neurotransmitter across the neuronal...

  20. Exploration of inclusion complexes of neurotransmitters with β-cyclodextrin by physicochemical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Saha, Subhadeep; Kundu, Mitali; Saha, Binoy Chandra; Barman, Siti

    2016-07-01

    Molecular assemblies of β-cyclodextrin with few of the most important neurotransmitters, viz., dopamine hydrochloride, tyramine hydrochloride and (±)-epinephrine hydrochloride in aqueous medium have been explored by reliable spectroscopic and physicochemical techniques as potential drug delivery systems. Job plots confirm the 1:1 host-guest inclusion complexes, while surface tension and conductivity studies illustrate the inclusion process. The inclusion complexes were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and association constants have been calculated by using Benesi-Hildebrand method. Thermodynamic parameters for the formation of inclusion complexes have been derived by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrate that the overall inclusion processes are thermodynamically favorable.

  1. Role of putative neurotransmitters in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Puurunen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The role of putative neurotransmitters of the central nervous system in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. Pretreatment of the rats with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prevented the antisecretory effect of the i.c.v. administration of PGE2, whereas pretreatment with 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) had no effect. I.c.v.-administered phentol...

  2. Galactorrhea-a strong clinical clue towards the diagnosis of neurotransmitter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Wai Lan; Lam, Ching Wan; Hui, Joannie; Tong, Sui Fan; Wu, Shun Ping

    2006-07-01

    Two siblings from a Hong Kong Chinese family are diagnosed to have heterozygous mutation in tyrosine hydroxylase gene-a novel mutation R169X and the common Dutch mutation R233H. Presented with developmental delay and dystonia before 6 months of age, both had hyperprolactinemia with persistent galactorrhea present in the elder brother since birth. Serum prolactin level is a good screening test for those suspected of underlying neurotransmitter diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first Chinese family diagnosed with such condition. Clinicians must be aware of this rare disease especially in those unexplained 'cerebral palsy' like children.

  3. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  4. 31 CFR 547.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 547.302 Section 547.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 547.302 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked property shall mean any account or property subject to the prohibitions in § 547.201...

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAN SOL KIM; HONGLIANG LI; HYE WON KIM; SUNG EUN SHIN; IL-WHAN CHOI; AMY L FIRTH; HYOWEON BANG; YOUNG MIN BAE; WON SUN PARK

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv)channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertralinedecreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 μM and a slope value (Hillcoefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 μM sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves,sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine,had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From theseresults, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptakeinhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  6. Prediction of clinical response based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of 5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Smith, D. G.; Brennum, L. T.

    2008-01-01

    Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) mod....../PD) modelling approach to evaluate the predictive validity of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) transporter (SERT) occupancy and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-potentiated behavioral syndrome induced by 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants in mice.......Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK...

  7. Prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) increases aggression and modulates maternal behavior in offspring mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, Natali; Levy, Sigal; Avitsur, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs in pregnant women. SSRIs cross the placental barrier and affect serotonergic neurotransmission in the fetus. Although no gross SSRI-related teratogenic effects were reported, infants born following prenatal exposure to SSRIs are at higher risk for various developmental abnormalities. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of prenatal SSRI on social and maternal behavior in mice. To this end, pregnant female dams were exposed to saline or fluoxetine (FLX) throughout pregnancy, and the behavior of the offspring was examined. The results indicate that in utero FLX increased aggression in adult males and delayed emergence of maternal behavior in adult females. Social exploration and recognition memory were not affected by prenatal FLX exposure. These findings support the notion that alterations in the development of serotonergic pathways following prenatal exposure to SSRIs are associated with changes in social and maternal behavior throughout life.

  8. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and sellective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. METHODS: Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA......, UK, and Denmark for documents mentioning benzodiazepines or SSRIs. We supplemented with other relevant literature that could contribute to our study. The searches were performed in 2009 in PubMed, Google, BMJ and JAMA. RESULTS: It took many years before the drug regulators acknowledged benzodiazepine...... the problems. CONCLUSION: Given the experience with the benzodiazepines, we believe the regulatory bodies should have required studies from the manufacturers that could have elucidated the dependence potential of the SSRIs before marketing authorization was granted....

  9. Effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine on platelet function is modified by a SLC6A4 serotonin transporter polymorphism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelmalik, N.; Ruhé, H.G.; Barwari, K.; Van Den Dool, E.-J.; Meijers, J.C.M.; Middeldorp, S.; Büller, H.R.; Schene, A.H.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with an increased bleeding tendency. Objectives: To prospectively quantify the dose-response effects of paroxetine and the influence of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on platele

  10. Effect of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with tPA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Horvath, K M; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; Lahr, Maarten; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of ischemic stroke by effects on neuronal cell survival and the plasticity of brain processes. In the present study, we investigated whether prior treatment with a SSRI is associated with mor

  11. Disturbed development of the enteric nervous system after in utero exposure of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. Part 1 : Literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, C.M.; Ter Horst, P.G.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.; Wilffert, B.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy, questions concerning abnormal development of the enteric nervous system (ENS), increase in laxative use in children and the association of fluoxetine with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) gave rise to

  12. Effect of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with tPA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Horvath, K M; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; Lahr, Maarten; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of ischemic stroke by effects on neuronal cell survival and the plasticity of brain processes. In the present study, we investigated whether prior treatment with a SSRI is associated with

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies : a European register-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester; Bakker, Marian; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahoney, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Boyle, Breidge; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Dolk, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association betwe

  14. Use of dihydro-isobenzofuran in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors for CNS disease e.g. depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    NOVELTY - For treatment of a CNS disease in a patient, dihydro-isobenzofuran compound (I) in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used. USE - For treatment of CNS disease (claimed) including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsory disorder, post traumatic stress...

  15. Block That Pain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... along with the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). This finding shows that a specific combination of two molecules can block only pain-related neurons. It holds the promise of major ...

  16. Concrete Block Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    1967, Cedergren 1974, Federal Highway .’,U .. V,47 -’":: 37 Administration 1980). Block pavements have essentially the same prob- lems with moisture...Vicksburg, Miss. Cedergren , H. R. 1974. Drainage of Highway and Airfield Pavements, John Wiley and Sons, New VOk. I Cement and Concrete Association

  17. TWIN BLOCK (Studi Pustaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie Lamtiur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Young patients with class II skeletal malocclusion are often found. To avoid further discrepancy of this case, myofunctional therapy is one of the options. Functional appliance often used for such treatment. Functional appliance has been modified since activator was introduced by Andresen. With its bulky shape, activator makes difficulty for patient to speak and eat. Patient unable to wear it full time due to uncomfortness and negative facial appearance. In 1977, Clark developed twin block to overcome the weakness of previous appliances. A more simple design allows patient to be more comfortable and willing to wear it longer. Twin block is myofunctional appliance to reposition the mandible forward for skeletal class II correction with retruded mandible. This paper describes the design, clinical management effects of twin block treatment and brief case presentation using twin block appliance. Similar to the study reports found, this case revealed improvement of facial appearance, decrease overjet and overbite, improvement of molar relationship and good compliance of patient.

  18. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In ord

  19. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  20. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozel, Rifat Emrah [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Wallace, Kenneth N. [Department of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States); Andreescu, Silvana, E-mail: eandrees@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science, 8 Clarkson Ave, Potsdam, NY 136995810 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Graphical abstract: Chitosan coated fiber electrodes are sensitive to serotonin detection while rejecting physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences. - Abstract: We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/{mu}M, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n = 6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  1. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  2. The role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the descending control of electroreception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, J

    1993-05-01

    The roles of amino acid neurotransmitters in determining the processing characteristics of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) in Apteronotus leptorhynchus were investigated by studying the responses of ELL output neurons to pressure ejection of various neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists alone and in combination with simple electrosensory stimuli. 1. Pressure ejection of L-glutamate into the ELL dorsal molecular layer caused either excitation or inhibition of ELL efferent neurons (pyramidal cells). The sign of these responses reversed with changes in the position of the pressure pipette. Histological verification of drug ejection sites relative to recorded cells and diffusion estimates indicate that excitatory and inhibitory responses result from glutamate activation of pyramidal cells and of inhibitory interneurons, respectively. 2. ELL output cells respond to both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate agonists and the responses are attenuated by co-ejection of specific antagonists indicating that both AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors exist on pyramidal cell apical dendrites. 3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibits basilar and nonbasilar pyramidal cells when ejected near their apical dendrites and disinhibits them when ejected near surrounding inhibitory interneurons confirming the presence of GABA receptors on these cell types. 4. An NMDA antagonist did not alter pyramidal cell responses to electrosensory stimuli but a non-NMDA antagonist altered both responses to the stimuli and firing frequency shortly following stimulus cessation.

  3. Fine-tuning of defensive behaviors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray by atypical neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fogaça

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the evidence indicating that atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO and endocannabinoids (eCBs play an important role in the regulation of aversive responses in the periaqueductal gray (PAG. Among the results supporting this role, several studies have shown that inhibitors of neuronal NO synthase or cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor agonists cause clear anxiolytic responses when injected into this region. The nitrergic and eCB systems can regulate the activity of classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA that control PAG activity. We propose that they exert a ‘fine-tuning’ regulatory control of defensive responses in this area. This control, however, is probably complex, which may explain the usually bell-shaped dose-response curves observed with drugs that act on NO- or CB1-mediated neurotransmission. Even if the mechanisms responsible for this complex interaction are still poorly understood, they are beginning to be recognized. For example, activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1 receptors by anandamide seems to counteract the anxiolytic effects induced by CB1 receptor activation caused by this compound. Further studies, however, are needed to identify other mechanisms responsible for this fine-tuning effect.

  4. Vitis vinifera juice ameliorates depression-like behavior in mice by modulating biogenic amine neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The advantageous effects of Vitis vinifera juice on depressive model mice were examined utilizing a blend of behavioral evaluations and biogenic amine neurotransmitter estimations. During the behavioral evaluations, immobility time on the forced swimming test and tail suspension test were measured in unstressed and immobilization-induced stressed mice. V. vinifera juice (4 mL/kg and 8 mL/kg and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg produced a significant decrease in immobility time of both unstressed and stressed mice when compared with their respective saline-treated control groups in both paradigms. Neurotransmitters were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detector. V. vinifera juice raised the levels of both serotonin (p<0.001 and noradrenalin (p<0.001 in brain tissue. These outcomes give significant mechanistic insights into the protective effect of V. vinifera juice against depressive disorders. Our results showed that V. vinifera juice could relieve depressive manifestations in the rodent model of depression.

  5. Chitosan coated carbon fiber microelectrode for selective in vivo detection of neurotransmitters in live zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Rıfat Emrah; Wallace, Kenneth N; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-06-10

    We report the development of a chitosan modified carbon fiber microelectrode for in vivo detection of serotonin. We find that chitosan has the ability to reject physiological levels of ascorbic acid interferences and facilitate selective and sensitive detection of in vivo levels of serotonin, a common catecholamine neurotransmitter. Presence of chitosan on the microelectrode surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode was characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A detection limit of 1.6 nM serotonin with a sensitivity of 5.12 nA/μM, a linear range from 2 to 100 nM and a reproducibility of 6.5% for n=6 electrodes were obtained. Chitosan modified microelectrodes selectively measure serotonin in presence of physiological levels of ascorbic acid. In vivo measurements were performed to measure concentration of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine. The sensor quantifies in vivo intestinal levels of serotonin while successfully rejecting ascorbic acid interferences. We demonstrate that chitosan can be used as an effective coating to reject ascorbic acid interferences at carbon fiber microelectrodes, as an alternative to Nafion, and that chitosan modified microelectrodes are reliable tools for in vivo monitoring of changes in neurotransmitter levels.

  6. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K; Pal, Aritra

    2015-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cholinergic and other neurotransmitter mechanisms in Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Paul T; Perry, Elaine K

    2007-09-01

    It is now 30 years since the beginning of intensive efforts to understand the neurotransmitter biochemistry of dementia as exemplified by Alzheimer's disease and such studies have led to the development of rational treatment strategies, which are continuing to benefit patients. However, as studies became more sophisticated and clinicians rediscovered an interest in dementia, because of the potential for symptomatic treatment, it has become clear that there are several different neurodegenerative conditions that gives rise to dementia syndromes and that each has distinct neurochemical pathology. This has important treatment implications since what works for one may not work for another or at the extreme, may make matters worse. Therefore it is clear that a detailed understanding of the neurotransmitter function in each condition is not merely academic but can lead to rationale drug design and treatment strategies appropriate for that group of patients. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) has clinico-pathological features, which overlap with either AD or Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as features that help to distinguish it, such as fluctuations in cognitive impairment and a higher prevalence of visual hallucinations. On this basis, it would be expected that the neurochemistry would have some similarities with both disorders.

  8. 白质内的神经递质信号%Neurotransmitter signaling in white matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐颖馨(编译)

    2014-01-01

    脑白质是由许多有髓鞘的轴突组成,白质和灰质共同组成中枢神经系统,白质是中枢神经系统内信息快速传递的基础。有髓神经通路主要是由少突胶质细胞、星形胶质细胞及少量的小胶质细胞和少突胶质前体细胞构成。大部分白质内的神经递质信号主要存在于神经细胞胞体外,这提示这些神经递质除了具有完成神经元与神经元之间信息传递的功能外,还有其他生理功能。白质中的神经递质信号种类很多,已经证实的有谷氨酸能、嘌呤能(ATP和腺苷)、GABA能、甘氨酸能、肾上腺素能、胆碱能、多巴胺能、血清素能等信号递质,通过与各种离子型或代谢型受体结合发挥作用。轴突和胶质细胞都可以释放神经递质,也可以表达相应的受体。白质内神经递质信号的生理功能还需进一步研究,但研究已经证实谷氨酸和ATP介导的信号可激活胶质细胞上的钙离子通道,并调节轴突的传导功能。某项研究显示,在动作电位传播的过程中,轴突释放神经递质并与胶质细胞上的受体结合,通过少突胶质细胞来调节星形胶质细胞的稳态和髓鞘形成。星形胶质细胞也释放神经递质,与轴突上的受体相结合,增强动作电位的传播,维持信号电位沿长的轴突传播。白质内神经递质种类的多样性,提示它们有多种功能,对信号的传递有重要作用。白质内的神经递质信号现象很有可能也存在于大脑皮质和灰质,在这些部位的神经递质对于大脑的高级认知功能有更重要的作用。%White matter (WM) tracts are bundles of myelinated axons that provide for rapid communication throughout the CNS and integration in grey matter (GM). The main cells in myelinated tracts are oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with small populations of microglia and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. The prominence of neurotransmitter

  9. Determination of neurotransmitter levels in models of Parkinson's disease by HPLC-ECD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M Flint

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder caused by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal area of the brain. The decrease in dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta is a neurochemistry hallmark of PD. Therefore, determination of dopamine and its metabolites levels in biological samples provides an important key to understanding the neurochemistry profile of PD. This chapter describes the use of reversed-phase HPLC with electrochemical detection (ECD) for simultaneously measuring monoamine neurotransmitters, including dopamine and its metabolites, norepinephrine as well as serotonin and its metabolite. ECD provides an ultrasensitive measurement, which detects at the picogram level. One run for each sample finishes within 18 min, shows clear chromatographic peaks and a complete separation, and produces excellent precision and reproducibility. Once set up, HPLC-ECD is economic and efficient for analyzing a large number of samples. This method has been broadly used for analyzing a variety of biological samples, such as cerebrospinal fluids, plasma, microdialysis elutes, tissues, and cultured cells. In recent days, it has been reported to be able to detect the dopamine level in a single drosophila head.

  10. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity.

  11. Near-future carbon dioxide levels alter fish behaviour by interfering with neurotransmitter function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E.; Dixson, Danielle L.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Sørensen, Christina; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2012-03-01

    Predicted future CO2 levels have been found to alter sensory responses and behaviour of marine fishes. Changes include increased boldness and activity, loss of behavioural lateralization, altered auditory preferences and impaired olfactory function. Impaired olfactory function makes larval fish attracted to odours they normally avoid, including ones from predators and unfavourable habitats. These behavioural alterations have significant effects on mortality that may have far-reaching implications for population replenishment, community structure and ecosystem function. However, the underlying mechanism linking high CO2 to these diverse responses has been unknown. Here we show that abnormal olfactory preferences and loss of behavioural lateralization exhibited by two species of larval coral reef fish exposed to high CO2 can be rapidly and effectively reversed by treatment with an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor. GABA-A is a major neurotransmitter receptor in the vertebrate brain. Thus, our results indicate that high CO2 interferes with neurotransmitter function, a hitherto unrecognized threat to marine populations and ecosystems. Given the ubiquity and conserved function of GABA-A receptors, we predict that rising CO2 levels could cause sensory and behavioural impairment in a wide range of marine species, especially those that tightly control their acid-base balance through regulatory changes in HCO3- and Cl- levels.

  12. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl− channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to γ-aminobutyric acid, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders. PMID:12237406

  13. Effect of Dimerization on the Dynamics of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Mert; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Zomot, Elia; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-02-07

    Dimerization is a common feature among the members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins. Yet, the effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of NSS members is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the collective dynamics of two members of the family, leucine transporter (LeuT) and dopamine transporter (DAT), to assess the significance of dimerization in modulating the functional motions of the monomers. We used to this aim the anisotropic network model (ANM), an efficient and robust method for modeling the intrinsic motions of proteins and their complexes. Transporters belonging to the NSS family are known to alternate between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, which enables the uptake and release of their substrate (neurotransmitter) respectively, as the substrate is transported from the exterior to the interior of the cell. In both LeuT and DAT, dimerization is found to alter the collective motions intrinsically accessible to the individual monomers in favor of the functional transitions (OF ↔ IF), suggesting that dimerization may play a role in facilitating transport.

  14. Modulation of electrogenic transport processes in the porcine proximal colon by enteric neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, H; Mauksch, A; Gäbel, G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the involvement of essential pro- and antisecretory neurotransmitters in regulation of secretion in porcine proximal colon. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were located immunohistochemically in the epithelium and subepithelial layer. Modulation of epithelial secretion was studied in Ussing chambers. Application of carbachol (CA), sodium nitroprussid (SNP), VIP and SP but not of NPY or SOM resulted in a chloride dependent increase in short circuit current (I(sc) ). I(sc) increase induced by CA, VIP or SNP was not altered by preincubation with tetrodotoxin or indomethacin. In contrast, SP-induced I(sc) increase was diminished by preincubation with tetrodotoxin, indomethacin, L-nitro-arginin-methyl-ester, and atropine but not hexamethonium. Simultaneous application of CA and VIP, or CA and SNP increased the I(sc) stronger as expected. Applying SP/CA led to a smaller increase in I(sc) as calculated. It is concluded that mainly prosecretory neurotransmitters are involved in regulation of colonic secretion. Cross-potentiations of acetylcholine and nitric oxide and acetylcholine and VIP suggest activation of different intracellular cascades. Similar intracellular pathways may be stimulated by acetylcholine and SP, thus preventing an additive effect of the transmitters.

  15. The fax-1 nuclear hormone receptor regulates axon pathfinding and neurotransmitter expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, J W; Slade, D J; Klampert, K; Garriga, G; Wightman, B

    2000-02-01

    Specification of neuron identity requires the activation of a number of discrete developmental programs. Among these is pathway selection by growth cones: in order for a neuron's growth cone to respond appropriately to guidance cues presented by other cells or the extracellular matrix, the neuron must express genes to mediate the response. The fax-1 gene of C. elegans is required for pathfinding of axons that extend along the ventral nerve cord. We show that fax-1 is also required for pathfinding of axons in the nerve ring, the largest nerve bundle in the nematode, and for normal expression of FMRFamide-like neurotransmitters in the AVK interneurons. The fax-1 gene encodes a member of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors and has a DNA-binding domain related to the human PNR and Drosophila Tailless proteins. We observe fax-1 expression in embryonic neurons, including the AVK interneurons, just prior to axon extension, but after neurogenesis. These data suggest that fax-1 coordinately regulates the transcription of genes that function in the selection of axon pathways, neurotransmitter expression and, perhaps, other aspects of the specification of neuron identity.

  16. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K.; Pal, Aritra

    2016-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. PMID:25950965

  17. A Yang-invigorating compound mixture alters neurotransmitters in rat telencephalon after exercise-induced fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongzhen Liu; Li Zeng; Xiliang Kong; Lei Zhu; Benhua Hou

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the changes in monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the telencephalon of rats at four functional states after exhaustive exercise and treatment with a Yang-invigorating compound recipe.The main components of this Chinese traditional medicine preparation included Radix Ginseng,Rhizoma Chuanxiong,Fructus Schisandrae,Cortex Cinnamomi,Cornu Cervi Pantotrichum,Radix Morindae Officinalis,and Gecko.This experiment showed that dopamine (DA),5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA),and γ-aminobutyric acid levels noticeably decreased,while DA/5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) increased.Furthermore,glutamate (Glu) and Glu/γ-aminobutyric acid significantly increased after 1 hour of exercise in rats in the exercise + medication group.The 5-HT and 5-HT/5-HIAA levels noticeably decreased,and DA/5-HT and Glu levels showed a robust and significant increase immediately after exhaustive exercise.The 5-HT,5-HT/5-HIAA levels sharply decreased,while DA/5-HT,Glu and γ-aminobutyric acid levels increased at 12 hours after exhaustion recovery.The results prove that Chinese herbal formula for strengthening Yang can induce changes in neurotransmitters in the telencephalon of rats after exhaustive exercise during the recovery process,and further improve central nervous system function.

  18. Evolution of neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid,glutamate and their receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiheng GOU; Xiao WANG; Wen WANG

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are two important amino acid neurotransmitters widely present in the nervous systems of ammals,insects,round worm,and platyhelminths,while their receptors are quite diversified across different animal phyla.However,the evolutionary mechanisms between the two conserved neurotransmitters and their diversified receptors remain elusive,and antagonistic interactions between GABA and glutamate signal transduction systems,in particular,have begun to attract significant attention.In this review,we summarize the extant results on the origin and evolution of GABA and glutamate,as well as their receptors,and analyze possible evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships of various GABAs and glutamate receptors.We further discuss the evolutionary history of Excitatory/Neutral Amino Acid Transporter (EAAT),a transport protein,which plays an important role in the GABA-glutamate "yin and yang" balanced regulation.Finally,based on current advances,we propose several potential directions of future research.

  19. Probing interactions of neurotransmitters with twin tailed anionic surfactant: A detailed physicochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajwinder; Sanan, Reshu; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Keeping in view the role of neurotransmitters (NTs) in central nervous system diseases and in controlling various physiological processes, present study is aimed to study the binding of neurotransmitters (NTs) such as norepinephrine hydrochloride (NE) and serotonin hydrochloride (5-HT) with twin tailed surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements combined with microcalorimetric measurements were used to characterize the interactions between AOT and NTs. Meteoric modifications to emission profile and absorption spectra of NTs upon addition of AOT are indicative of the binding of NTs with AOT. Distinct interactional states such as formation of ion-pairs, induced and regular micelles with adsorbed NTs molecules have been observed in different concentration regimes of AOT. The formation of ion-pairs from oppositely charged NTs and AOT is confirmed by the reduced absorbance, quenched fluorescence intensity and decrease in peak current (ipa) as well as shifts in peak potential (Epa) values. The stoichiometry and formation of the NTs-AOT complexes has been judged and the extent of interactions is quantitatively discussed in terms of binding constant (K) and free energy of binding (ΔG°). The enthalpy (ΔH°mic) and free energy of micellization (ΔG°mic) for AOT in presence and absence of NTs are determined from the enthalpy curves.

  20. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 stimulates exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 cells and cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S; Ong, W Y; Thwin, M M; Fong, C W; Farooqui, A A; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Hong, W

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may play a role in membrane fusion and fission, and may thus affect neurotransmission. The present study therefore aimed to elucidate the effects of sPLA2 on vesicle exocytosis. External application of group IIA sPLA2 (purified crotoxin subunit B or purified human synovial sPLA2) caused an immediate increase in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in pheochromocytoma-12 (PC12) cells, detected by carbon fiber electrodes placed near the cells, or by changes in membrane capacitance of the cells. EGTA and a specific inhibitor of sPLA2 activity, 12-epi-scalaradial, abolished the increase in neurotransmitter release, indicating that the effect of sPLA2 was dependent on calcium and sPLA2 enzymatic activity. A similar increase in neurotransmitter release was also observed in hippocampal neurons after external application of sPLA2, as detected by changes in membrane capacitance of the neurons. In contrast to external application, internal application of sPLA2 to PC12 cells and neurons produced blockade of neurotransmitter release. Our recent studies showed high levels of sPLA2 activity in the normal rat hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cerebral neocortex. The sPLA2 activity in the hippocampus was significantly increased, after kainate-induced neuronal injury. The observed effects of sPLA2 on neurotransmitter release in this study may therefore have a physiological, as well as a pathological role.

  2. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Kyu Kwon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance.

  3. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  4. Liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection for studying the effects of tetrahydrobiopterin on monoamine neurotransmitters in rat striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Wen; ZHU; Wei; XU; Haihong; WAN; Fangli; GU; Jing; HA

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential co-factor in the biosynthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters.A nano-Pt/Pd modified electrode as the electrochemical detector (ED) for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with microdialysis sampling, is used to explore the effect of administration of BH4 on the monoamine neurotransmitters in the rat striatum.The researches demonstrate that the contents of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) increase significantly with the administration of BH4.The pharmaceutical kinetics is carried out to research into the time course of BH4 effect on the concentration of monoamine neurotransmitters in rat striatum, which provides reliable data for pathology and pharmacology research on neuroscience.

  5. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Jens; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.......  Recent findings Ultrasound guidance is now considered the golden standard for abdominal wall blocks in adults, even though some landmark-based blocks are still being investigated. The efficiency of USG transversus abdominis plane blocks in relation to many surgical procedures involving the abdominal wall...... been introduced with success. Future research should also investigate the effect of specific abdominal wall blocks on neuroendocrine and inflammatory stress response after surgery.  Summary USG abdominal wall blocks in adults are commonplace techniques today. Most abdominal wall blocks are assigned...

  6. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  7. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  8. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  9. Managing access block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  10. Spintronic characteristics of self-assembled neurotransmitter acetylcholine molecular complexes enable quantum information processing in neural networks and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Majauskaite, Kristina; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zborowski, Krzysztof; Adhikari, Kapil; Krisciukaitis, Sarunas

    2016-09-01

    Implementation of liquid state quantum information processing based on spatially localized electronic spin in the neurotransmitter stable acetylcholine (ACh) neutral molecular radical is discussed. Using DFT quantum calculations we proved that this molecule possesses stable localized electron spin, which may represent a qubit in quantum information processing. The necessary operating conditions for ACh molecule are formulated in self-assembled dimer and more complex systems. The main quantum mechanical research result of this paper is that the neurotransmitter ACh systems, which were proposed, include the use of quantum molecular spintronics arrays to control the neurotransmission in neural networks.

  11. E-Block: A Tangible Programming Tool with Graphical Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danli Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs a tangible programming tool, E-Block, for children aged 5 to 9 to experience the preliminary understanding of programming by building blocks. With embedded artificial intelligence, the tool defines the programming blocks with the sensors as the input and enables children to write programs to complete the tasks in the computer. The symbol on the programming block's surface is used to help children understanding the function of each block. The sequence information is transferred to computer by microcomputers and then translated into semantic information. The system applies wireless and infrared technologies and provides user with feedbacks on both screen and programming blocks. Preliminary user studies using observation and user interview methods are shown for E-Block's prototype. The test results prove that E-Block is attractive to children and easy to learn and use. The project also highlights potential advantages of using single chip microcomputer (SCM technology to develop tangible programming tools for children.

  12. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beryl Luk

    Full Text Available The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  13. Polymeric bilayer modified microelectrodes for in-vivo determi nation of neurotransmitter dopamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG, Li-Jua; PENG, Tu-Zhi; YANG, F. Catherine

    2000-01-01

    A composite polymer carbon fiber electrode modified with Nafion and cellulose acetate is described. The modified elec trode discriminates agninst both anionic reactants and big molecular organic compounds. The bilayer configuration is prepared in two steps, First, the carbon fiber electrode is coated with Nafion, then followed by air evaporation of the solvent, the electrode is dipped in a cellulose acetate solution and hydrolyzed for a selected time. The permeability of the film is explored by use of rotating disk electrode measure ments. Parameters affecting the fihm electrochemistry are in vestigated. The resulting electrodes show high selectivity and stability in body fluids. For in-vivo voltammetry, the com posite polymer modified electrode has been used for detection of the oxidative current of neurotransmitter dopamine in rat brain, while it inhabits the oxidation of anionic neurotransmit ter metabolites and some electroactive compounds.

  14. Microelectronics-Based Biosensors Dedicated to the Detection of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mirzaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of neurotransmitters (NTs in the human body are related to diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The mechanisms of several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, have been linked to NTs. Because the number of diagnosed cases is increasing, the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases are important. To detect biomolecules including NTs, microtechnology, micro and nanoelectronics have become popular in the form of the miniaturization of medical and clinical devices. They offer high-performance features in terms of sensitivity, as well as low-background noise. In this paper, we review various devices and circuit techniques used for monitoring NTs in vitro and in vivo and compare various methods described in recent publications.

  15. Neurotransmitter CART as a New Therapeutic Candidate for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Thuillier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. To date, there is no effective treatment that halts its progression. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondria play an important role in the development of PD. Hence mitochondria-targeted approaches or agents may have therapeutic promise for treatment of the disease. Neuropeptide CART (cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript, a hypothalamus and midbrain enriched neurotransmitter with an antioxidant property, can be found in mitochondria, which is the main source of reactive oxygen species. Systemic administration of CART has been found to ameliorate dopaminergic neuronal loss and improve motor functions in a mouse model of PD. In this article, we summarize recent progress in studies investigating the relationship between CART, dopamine, and the pathophysiology of PD, with a focus on mitochondria-related topics.

  16. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Valente

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2 underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  17. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca(2+)-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-04-05

    Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca(2+) sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  18. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  19. VLSI Potentiostat Array With Oversampling Gain Modulation for Wide-Range Neurotransmitter Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanacevic, M; Murari, K; Rege, A; Cauwenberghs, G; Thakor, N V

    2007-03-01

    A 16-channel current-measuring very large-scale integration (VLSI) sensor array system for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of electroactive neurotransmiters like dopamine and nitric-oxide is presented. Each channel embeds a current integrating potentiostat within a switched-capacitor first-order single-bit delta-sigma modulator implementing an incremental analog-to-digital converter. The duty-cycle modulation of current feedback in the delta-sigma loop together with variable oversampling ratio provide a programmable digital range selection of the input current spanning over six orders of magnitude from picoamperes to microamperes. The array offers 100-fA input current sensitivity at 3.4-muW power consumption per channel. The operation of the 3 mm times3 mm chip fabricated in 0.5-mum CMOS technology is demonstrated with real-time multichannel acquisition of neurotransmitter concentration.

  20. Microelectronics-based biosensors dedicated to the detection of neurotransmitters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-09-26

    Dysregulation of neurotransmitters (NTs) in the human body are related to diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The mechanisms of several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, have been linked to NTs. Because the number of diagnosed cases is increasing, the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases are important. To detect biomolecules including NTs, microtechnology, micro and nanoelectronics have become popular in the form of the miniaturization of medical and clinical devices. They offer high-performance features in terms of sensitivity, as well as low-background noise. In this paper, we review various devices and circuit techniques used for monitoring NTs in vitro and in vivo and compare various methods described in recent publications.

  1. Alzheimer-like neurotransmitter deficits in adult Down's syndrome brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godridge, H; Reynolds, G P; Czudek, C; Calcutt, N A; Benton, M

    1987-01-01

    Brain tissue taken at necropsy from five cases of Down's syndrome and six controls was analysed for changes in neurotransmitter markers. Concentrations of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and its major metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) were determined by means of HPLC, whilst choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was measured by a radiochemical technique. Significant reductions in NA, 5HT and ChAT were found in most cortical and subcortical regions of the Down's syndrome tissue investigated. The neuropathological lesions were assessed using a fluorescent stain for neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. These were present to varying extents in every Down's syndrome case except the youngest but were not found in control tissue of comparable age. The results indicate profound transmitter deficits and neuropathological abnormalities in adult patients with Down's syndrome, which closely resemble those of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:2440994

  2. Activities of autonomic neurotransmitters in meibomian gland tissues are associated with menopausal dry eye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianxiang Li; Dongling Jin; Jinsheng Gao; Liguang Wang; Xianjun Liu; Jingzhang Wang; Zhongxin Xu

    2012-01-01

    The secretory activities of meibomian glands are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. The change in density and activity of autonomic nerves in meibomian glands during menopause play an important role in the pathogenesis of dry eye. In view of this, we established a dry eye rat model by removing the bilateral ovaries. We used neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as markers of autonomic neurotransmitters. Our results showed that the concentration of estradiol in serum significantly decreased, the density of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly increased, the density of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in nerve fibers significantly decreased, and the ratio of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/neuropeptide Y positive staining significantly decreased. These results suggest that a decrease in ovary activity may lead to autonomic nervous system dysfunction, thereby affecting the secretory activity of the meibomian gland, which participates in sexual hormone imbalance-induced dry eye.

  3. In-capillary derivatization and capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid neurotransmitters from brain microdialysis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine; Renaud, Louis; Renaud, Bernard; Zimmer, Luc

    2008-09-26

    A new in-capillary derivatization method with naphtalene-2,3-dicarboxyaldehyde (NDA)/CN(-) has been developed for capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of brain microdialysate amino acids. Samples are sandwiched between two plugs of reagent mixture at the capillary inlet and subsequently separated. Highest derivatization yields are obtained by using a reagent to sample plug length ratio equal to 4, performing a first electrophoretic mixing followed by a zero potential amplification step before applying the separation voltage and using a NaCN to NDA concentration ratio equal to 1. This new single-step methodology allows the analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  4. Microtransplantation of neurotransmitter receptors from postmortem autistic brains to Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Autism is a complex disorder that arises from the pervasive action of genetic and epigenetic factors that alter synaptic connectivity of the brain. Although GABA and glutamate receptors seem to be two of those factors, very little is known about the functional properties of the autistic receptors. Autistic tissue samples stored in brain banks usually have relatively long postmortem times, and it is highly desirable to know whether neurotransmitter receptors in such tissues are still functional. Here we demonstrate that native receptors microtransplanted from autistic brains, as well as de novo mRNA-expressed receptors, are still functional and susceptible to detailed electrophysiological characterization even after long postmortem intervals. The opportunity to study the properties of human receptors present in diseased brains not only opens new avenues toward understanding autism and other neurological disorders, but it also makes the microtransplantation method a useful translational system to evaluate and develop novel medicinal drugs. PMID:18645182

  5. The influence of anesthetics, neurotransmitters and antibiotics on the relaxation processes in lipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, H M; Heimburg, T; Gudmundsson, Marie L.; Heimburg, Thomas; Seeger, Heiko M.

    2007-01-01

    In the proximity of melting transitions of artificial and biological membranes fluctuations in enthalpy, area, volume and concentration are enhanced. This results in domain formation, changes of the elastic constants, changes in permeability and slowing down of relaxation processes. In this study we used pressure perturbation calorimetry to investigate the relaxation time scale after a jump into the melting transition regime of artificial lipid membranes. This time corresponds to the characteristic rate of domain growth. The studies were performed on single-component large unilamellar and multilamellar vesicle systems with and without the addition of small molecules such as general anesthetics, neurotransmitters and antibiotics. These drugs interact with membranes and affect melting points and profiles. In all systems we found that heat capacity and relaxation times are related to each other in a simple manner. The maximum relaxation time depends on the cooperativity of the heat capacity profile and decreases...

  6. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  7. Effects of Acupuncture on Monoamine Neurotransmitters in Raphe Nuclei in Obese Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏群利; 刘志诚

    2003-01-01

    Effects of acupuncture on the levels of neurotransmitters in the raphe nuclei were investigated in obese rats. It was found that the levels of tryptophan (Trp) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were increased, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level and 5-HT/5-HIAA ratio decreased in the raphe nuclei of the obese group as compared with the normal group; and that acupuncture could produce weight reduction, increase the 5-HT level and 5-HT/5-HIAA ratio, and decrease the contents of Trp and 5-HIAA, but did not change the levels of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA). It is indicated that benign regulative action of acupuncture on 5-HT and its metabolism in the raphe nuclei is possibly one of the factors for reducing weight by acupuncture.

  8. Agrin promotes synaptic differentiation by counteracting an inhibitory effect of neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misgeld, Thomas; Kummer, Terrance T; Lichtman, Jeff W; Sanes, Joshua R

    2005-08-02

    Synaptic organizing molecules and neurotransmission regulate synapse development. Here, we use the skeletal neuromuscular junction to assess the interdependence of effects evoked by an essential synaptic organizing protein, agrin, and the neuromuscular transmitter, acetylcholine (ACh). Mice lacking agrin fail to maintain neuromuscular junctions, whereas neuromuscular synapses differentiate extensively in the absence of ACh. We now demonstrate that agrin's action in vivo depends critically on cholinergic neurotransmission. Using double-mutant mice, we show that synapses do form in the absence of agrin provided that ACh is also absent. We provide evidence that ACh destabilizes nascent postsynaptic sites, and that one major physiological role of agrin is to counteract this "antisynaptogenic" influence. Similar interactions between neurotransmitters and synaptic organizing molecules may operate at synapses in the central nervous system.

  9. Phorbol esters and neurotransmitter release: more than just protein kinase C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silinsky, Eugene M; Searl, Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of phorbol esters and the role of phorbol ester receptors in the secretion of neurotransmitter substances. We begin with a brief background on the historical use of phorbol esters as tools to decipher the role of the enzyme protein kinase C in signal transduction cascades. Next, we illustrate the structural differences between active and inactive phorbol esters and the mechanism by which the binding of phorbol to its recognition sites (C1 domains) on a particular protein acts to translocate that protein to the membrane. We then discuss the evidence that the most important nerve terminal receptor for phorbol esters (and their endogenous counterpart diacylglycerol) is likely to be Munc13. Indeed, Munc13 and its invertebrate homologues are the main players in priming the secretory apparatus for its critical function in the exocytosis process. PMID:12711617

  10. 'Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering ('Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called 'full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of 'full fusion'.

  11. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Faget

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  12. Evidence for genetic influences on neurotransmitter content of identified neurones of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; McCaman, R E; Ono, J K

    1985-01-01

    Neurotransmitter content was measured in two identified giant neurones in isogenic and wild-type populations of the freshwater pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The paired serotonergic cerebral giant neurones (LC1 and RC1) have higher transmitter levels and less variability in inbred animals than in wild-type animals. The transmitter content of the unpaired dopaminergic right pedal giant neurone (RPeD1) does not differ between inbred and wild-type animals in either level or variability. It is proposed that serotonin content of the cerebral giant neurones is under partial genetic control, and that animals of the wild-type population may possess a number of different alleles for the genes influencing serotonin levels. Inbreeding resulted in fixation of an allele promoting high serotonin levels. This particular wild-type population is probably already isogenic for genes influencing dopamine content in the right pedal giant neurone.

  13. Effect of handling on neurotransmitter profile in pig brain according to fear related behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Laura; Carreras, Ricard; Valent, Daniel; Peña, Raquel; Mainau, Eva; Velarde, Antonio; Sabrià, Josefa; Bassols, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Chemical neurotransmitters (NT) are principal actors in all neuronal networks of animals. The central nervous system plays an important role in stress susceptibility and organizes the response to a stressful situation through the interaction of the dopaminergic and the serotonergic pathways, leading to the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). This study was designed to investigate: a) the effects of stressful handling of pigs at the slaughterhouse on the neurotransmitter profile in four brain areas: amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and hypothalamus, and b) whether the alterations in the brain NT profile after stressful handling were associated with fear, determined by the tonic immobility (TI) test. In the first place, the characterization of the NT profile allowed to distinguish the four brain areas in a principal component analysis. The most crucial pathway involved in the reaction of pigs to a stressful handling was the serotonergic system, and changes were observed in the amygdala with a decrease in serotonin (5-HT) and total indoleamines, and in the hippocampus, where this pathway was activated. Fearful and non-fearful pigs did not show significant differences in their NT profile in control conditions, but when subjected to a stressful handling in the slaughterhouse, fearful animals showed a significant variation in the serotonin pathway and, in a lesser extent, the dopamine (DA) pathway. In conclusion, the existence of an underlying biological trait - possibly fearfulness - may be involved in the pig's response toward stressful challenges, and the serotonergic system seems to play a central role in this response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochemical evidence that L-glutamate is a neurotransmitter of primary vagal afferent nerve fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, M.H. (Cornell Univ., New York (USA). Medical Coll.)

    1981-12-28

    To determine in rat if vagal afferent fibers projecting into the intermediate one third of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of termination of baroafferents, utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter, the high-affinity uptake of (/sup 3/H)L-glutamate and content of glutamate were analyzed in micropunches of rat brain stem. The intermediate NTS contains a high-affinity synaptosomal uptake system for (/sup 3/H)L-glutamate that is greater in capacity than that in areas adjacent to the NTS; it is almost two-fold higher than uptake in medial septum and nucleus accumbens and equal to that of hippocampal regions purportedly containing a rich glutamatergic innervation. Unilateral ablation of the nodose ganglion (i.e. cells of origin of vagal afferents) resulted, within 24 h in a prolonged significant reduction, to 56% of control, of (/sup 3/H)L-glutamate uptake, bilaterally in the NTS. The reduction of Na/sup +/-dependent synaptosomal uptake of (/sup 3/H)L-glutamate, resulted from a decrease in Vsub(max) without change in the Ksub(m) of the process, was anatomically restricted to the intermediate NTS, and was not associated with changes in (/sup 3/H)GABA uptake. The content of glutamate in the NTS was significantly (P < 0.01) decreased by 30% 7 days following unilateral extirpation of the nodose ganglion without changes in the concentrations of aspartate, glycine, glutamine, or GABA. A population of vagal afferent fibers projecting to NTS are glutamatergic. The results are consistent with the hypothesis obtained by physiological and pharmacological techniques that glutamate is a neurotransmitter of baroafferents.

  15. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia.

  16. Developmental origins of neurotransmitter and transcriptome alterations in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Weber, Gregory J; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Xiao, Changhe; Cannon, Jason R; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2015-07-03

    Atrazine is an herbicide applied to agricultural crops and is indicated to be an endocrine disruptor. Atrazine is frequently found to contaminate potable water supplies above the maximum contaminant level of 3μg/L as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The developmental origin of adult disease hypothesis suggests that toxicant exposure during development can increase the risk of certain diseases during adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression are still unknown. In this study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3, or 30μg/L atrazine throughout embryogenesis. Larvae were then allowed to mature under normal laboratory conditions with no further chemical treatment until 7 days post fertilization (dpf) or adulthood and neurotransmitter analysis completed. No significant alterations in neurotransmitter levels was observed at 7dpf or in adult males, but a significant decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and serotonin turnover was seen in adult female brain tissue. Transcriptomic analysis was completed on adult female brain tissue to identify molecular pathways underlying the observed neurological alterations. Altered expression of 1928, 89, and 435 genes in the females exposed to 0.3, 3, or 30μg/L atrazine during embryogenesis were identified, respectively. There was a high level of overlap between the biological processes and molecular pathways in which the altered genes were associated. Moreover, a subset of genes was down regulated throughout the serotonergic pathway. These results provide support of the developmental origins of neurological alterations observed in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  18. Demographic Data - MDC_Block

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade Census 2000 Blocks. Census blocks are areas bounded on all sides by visible and/or invisible features shown on a map prepared...

  19. Demographic Data - MDC_Block

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of Miami-Dade Census 2000 Blocks. Census blocks are areas bounded on all sides by visible and/or invisible features shown on a map prepared...

  20. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear (the space deep to the eardrum) and the ...

  1. Habitat Blocks and Wildlife Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Habitat blocks are areas of contiguous forest and other natural habitats that are unfragmented by roads, development, or agriculture. Vermonts habitat blocks are...

  2. Antidepressant stimulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis does not require monoamine reuptake inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboukhatwa Marwa A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that diverse antidepressant agents increase the cellular production of the nucleolipid CDP-diacylglycerol and its synthetic derivative, phosphatidylinositol, in depression-relevant brain regions. Pharmacological blockade of downstream phosphatidylinositide signaling disrupted the behavioral antidepressant effects in rats. However, the nucleolipid responses were resistant to inhibition by serotonin receptor antagonists, even though antidepressant-facilitated inositol phosphate accumulation was blocked. Could the neurochemical effects be additional to the known effects of the drugs on monoamine transmitter transporters? To examine this question, we tested selected agents in serotonin-depleted brain tissues, in PC12 cells devoid of serotonin transporters, and on the enzymatic activity of brain CDP-diacylglycerol synthase - the enzyme that catalyzes the physiological synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol. Results Imipramine, paroxetine, and maprotiline concentration-dependently increased the levels of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositides in PC12 cells. Rat forebrain tissues depleted of serotonin by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine showed responses to imipramine or maprotiline that were comparable to respective responses from saline-injected controls. With fluoxetine, nucleolipid responses in the serotonin-depleted cortex or hippocampus were significantly reduced, but not abolished. Each drug significantly increased the enzymatic activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase following incubations with cortical or hippocampal brain tissues. Conclusion Antidepressants probably induce the activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase leading to increased production of CDP-diacylglycerol and facilitation of downstream phosphatidylinositol synthesis. Phosphatidylinositol-dependent signaling cascades exert diverse salutary effects in neural cells, including facilitation of BDNF signaling and neurogenesis. Hence

  3. Appropriate schemata and building blocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Haijun; Li Minqiang

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate schemata as a novel concept to characterize building blocks are introduced, and then, the traits of appropriate schemata are presented. The effects of building blocks by search operators are analyzed. Hence, the experiments on RR-8X8 are employed to verify that appropriate schemata construct the building blocks. The validity of appropriate schemata and building blocks from the views of theory and practice is presented.

  4. Properties of blocked linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weitian; Anderson, Brian D O; Deistler, Manfred; Filler, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the properties of blocked linear systems that have resulted from blocking discrete-time linear time invariant systems. The main idea is to explore the relationship between the blocked and the unblocked systems. Existing results are reviewed and a number of important new results are derived. Focus is given particularly on the zero properties of the blocked system as no such study has been found in the literature.

  5. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  6. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  7. A Preliminary Study of Gene Polymorphisms Involved in the Neurotransmitters Metabolism of a Homogeneous Spanish Autistic Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Alejandre, Encarna; Anaya, Nuria; Guijarro, Teresa; Sanz, Yolanza; Romero, Auxiliadora; Tienda, Pilar; Burgos, Rafael; Gay, Eudoxia; Sanchez, Vicente; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies have shown a strong genetic component for autism. Neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and catecholamines, have been suggested to play a role in the disease since they have an essential function in synaptogenesis and brain development. In this preliminary study, polymorphism of genes implicated in the serotonergic and dopaminergic…

  8. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Johansen, Maja L.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 µ...

  9. Design and Synthesis of High-Affinity Dimeric Inhibitors Targeting the Interactions between Gephyrin and Inhibitory Neurotransmitter Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans-Michael; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard

    2015-01-01

    Gephyrin is the central scaffolding protein for inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Here we describe the development of dimeric peptides that inhibit the interaction between gephyrin and these receptors, a process which is fundamental to numerous synaptic functions and diseases...

  10. Electrochemical Label-Free Aptasensor for Specific Analysis of Dopamine in Serum in the Presence of Structurally Related Neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and brain metabolism of dopamine can be correlated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, and as such, in vivo analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters (NT) represents a holy grail of neuroscience. Interference from those NTs generally does...

  11. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  12. Simultaneous determination of vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in brain microdialysates by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benturquia, Nadia; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) coupled to in vivo microdialysis sampling was used in order to monitor simultaneously a drug and several neurotransmitters in the brain extracellular fluid. Determination of the antiepileptic drug vigabatrin and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (l-Asp) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was performed on low-concentration samples which were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated using a pH 9.2 75 mM sodium borate running buffer containing 60 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 5mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). Glu, l-Asp and vigabatrin derivatized at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(-9) M, and GABA derivatized at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-9) M, produced peaks with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1, 8:1, 4:1 and 5:1, respectively. The nature of the neurotransmitter peaks found in rat brain microdialysates was confirmed by both electrophoretic and pharmacological validations. This method was used for monitoring vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in microdialysates from the rat striatum during intracerebral infusion of the drug and revealed rapid vigabatrin-induced changes in GABA and Glu levels. This original application of CE-LIFD coupled to microdialysis represents a powerful tool for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigations.

  13. Fetal growth-retardation and brain-sparing by malnutrition are associated to changes in neurotransmitters profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, C; Valent, D; Vázquez-Gómez, M; Arroyo, L; Isabel, B; Astiz, S; Bassols, A; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study assesses possible changes in the levels of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines) in fetuses affected by nutrient shortage. Hence, we determined the concentration of catecholamines and indoleamines at the hypothalamus of 56 swine fetuses obtained at both 70 and 90days of pregnancy (n=33 and 23 fetuses, respectively). The degree of fetal development and the fetal sex affected the neurotransmitters profile at both stages. At Day 70, there were found higher mean concentrations of l-DOPA in both female and male fetuses with severe IUGR; male fetuses with severe IUGR also showed higher concentrations of TRP than normal male littermates. At Day 90 of pregnancy, the differences between sexes were more evident. There were no significant effects from either severe IUGR on the neurotransmitter profile in male fetuses. However, in the females, a lower body-weight was related to lower concentrations of l-DOPA and TRP and those female fetuses affected by severe IUGR evidenced lower HVA concentration. In conclusion, the fetal synthesis and use of neurotransmitters increase with time of pregnancy but, in case of IUGR, both catecholamines and indoleamines pathways are affected by sex-related effects. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  15. Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hirofumi; Koike, Minoru; Takeuchi, Seiichi; Douhara, Noriyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK (robot block system) and the rational formula of robots were proposed. ROBO-BLOCK is composed of servo motors, the parts for servomotor rotor, the brackets for servomotor fixation, the board parts and the controllers. A robot can be assembled easily by ROBO-BLOCK. Meanwhile, it is convenient when the structure of the robot can be described easily as a character. The whole structure of the robot is expressed as rational formula of the robot to show molecule structure in chemistry. ROBO-BLOCK can be useful for not only the research but also the education. Creative student experiment was done in the college of industrial technology.

  16. Compound stimulus presentation and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine enhance long-term extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Patricia H; Bowers, M Scott; Corbit, Laura H

    2012-03-01

    Drug abstinence is frequently compromised when addicted individuals are re-exposed to environmental stimuli previously associated with drug use. Research with human addicts and in animal models has demonstrated that extinction learning (non-reinforced cue-exposure) can reduce the capacity of such stimuli to induce relapse, yet extinction therapies have limited long-term success under real-world conditions (Bouton, 2002; O'Brien, 2008). We hypothesized that enhancing extinction would reduce the later ability of drug-predictive cues to precipitate drug-seeking behavior. We, therefore, tested whether compound stimulus presentation and pharmacological treatments that augment noradrenergic activity (atomoxetine; norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) during extinction training would facilitate the extinction of drug-seeking behaviors, thus reducing relapse. Rats were trained that the presentation of a discrete cue signaled that a lever press response would result in cocaine reinforcement. Rats were subsequently extinguished and spontaneous recovery of drug-seeking behavior following presentation of previously drug-predictive cues was tested 4 weeks later. We find that compound stimulus presentations or pharmacologically increasing noradrenergic activity during extinction training results in less future recovery of responding, whereas propranolol treatment reduced the benefit seen with compound stimulus presentation. These data may have important implications for understanding the biological basis of extinction learning, as well as for improving the outcome of extinction-based therapies.

  17. Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Immunomodulator on Cytokines Levels: An Alternative Therapy for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Mendieta, Danelia; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Bojalil, Rafael; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric illness that presents as a deficit of serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. MDD patients also experience alterations in cortisol and cytokines levels. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the first-line antidepressant regimen for MDD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of SSRIs and an immunomodulator—human dialyzable leukocyte extract (hDLE)—on cortisol and cytokines levels. Patients received SSRIs or SSRIs plus hDLE. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, and IFN-γ; anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-13 and IL-10; and 24-h urine cortisol were measured at weeks (W) 0, 5, 20, 36, and 52 of treatment. The reduction in cortisol levels in the SSRI-treated group was 30% until W52, in contrast, the combined treatment induced a 54% decrease at W36. The decline in cortisol in patients who were treated with SSRI plus hDLE correlated with reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines and increases levels of proinflammatory cytokines at the study conclusion. These results suggest that the immune-stimulating activity of hDLE, in combination with SSRIs, restored the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and cortisol levels in depressed patients versus those who were given SSRIs alone. PMID:24348675

  18. Anti-inflammatory drugs as moderators of antidepressant effects, especially those of the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Sefi

    2011-09-01

    Large studies examining remission rates obtained by antidepressants have yielded somewhat dismal results. In the well-reported Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study, only 36.8% of patients exhibited remission with the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram and the cumulative remission rate was 67% after multiple treatments were attempted. Warner-Schmidt et al. recently published an interesting paper that suggests specific mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit the antidepressant effects of SSRIs. They employed well-established mouse models of depression: the tail suspension test and the forced swim test. In their experiment, ibuprofen significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs in both tests. The authors also presented data from the STAR*D study itself. These data - demonstrating higher remission rates for depressed patients receiving citalopram without concomitant NSAIDs (55.2%) than those receiving citalopram with NSAIDs (44.5%) - serve to illustrate the potential hindering effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Differences in the dynamics of serotonin reuptake transporter occupancy may explain superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram versus citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Sacher, Julia; Klein, Nikolas; Mossaheb, Nilufar; Attarbaschi-Steiner, Trawat; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Spindelegger, Christoph; Asenbaum, Susanne; Holik, Alexander; Dudczak, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Escitalopram the S-enantiomer of the racemate citalopram, is clinically more effective than citalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder. However, the precise mechanism by which escitalopram achieves superiority over citalopram is yet to be determined. It has been hypothesized that the therapeutically inactive R-enantiomer competes with the serotonin-enhancing S-enantiomer at a low-affinity allosteric site on serotonin reuptake transporters (SERTs), and reduces the effectiveness of the S-enantiomer at the primary, high-affinity serotonin-binding site. This study summarizes the results of two recent single-photon emission computerized tomography studies measuring SERT occupancy in citalopram-treated and escitalopram-treated healthy volunteers, after a single dose and multiple doses (i.e. under steady-state conditions). The single-dose study showed no attenuating effect of R-citalopram. After multiple dosing, however, SERT occupancy was significantly reduced in the presence of R-citalopram. Under steady-state conditions, R-enantiomer concentrations were greater than for the S-enantiomer because of slower clearance of R-citalopram. A pooled analysis suggests that build-up of the R-enantiomer after repeated citalopram dosing may lead to increased inhibition of S-enantiomer occupancy of SERT. This review adds to the growing body of evidence regarding differences in the dynamics of SERT occupancy, that is, molecular mechanisms underlying the often-observed superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram compared with citalopram in major depressive disorder.

  20. Comparison of paroxetine and dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the treatment of premature ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdulmuttalip Simsek; Sinan Levent Kirecci; Onur Kucuktopcu; Faruk Ozgor; Mehmet Fatih Akbulut; Omer Sarilar; Unsal Ozkuvanci; Zafer Gokhan Gurbuz

    2014-01-01

    Dapoxetine hydrochloride is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and the ifrst drug approved for the on‑demand treatment of premature ejaculation(PE). Our objective in this study was to characterize the efifcacy of on‑demand dapoxetine(30 and 60mg) and daily paroxetine(20mg) usage in treating PE. We conducted a 1 month study involving a total of 150patients. Patients were divided into three groups of 50. Group1 were treated with on‑demand dapoxetine(30mg), Group2 with on‑demand dapoxetine(60mg) and Group3 with daily paroxetine(20mg). Our outcome measurement was increased from baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time(IELT) after treatment. The IELT increased from baseline to posttreatment by 117%, 117% and 170% in the paroxetine group(P0.05), while the 60mg dapoxetine group had a larger posttreatment IELT increase compared with the 30mg dapoxetine(P<0.05) and paroxetine(P<0.01) groups. Dapoxetine(60mg) 1–3h before planned intercourse is a very effective treatment modality for PE. However, an on‑demand dose of 30mg dapoxetine is no more effective than the currently prescribed paroxetine treatment.

  1. The gender difference of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine in adult rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Sater, Khaled A; Abdel-Daiem, Wafaa M; Sayyed Bakheet, Mohamad

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the gender difference of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine in adult rats with stress-induced gastric ulcer. The rats were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, control males and group II, control females; group III, acute cold restraint stressed males and group IV, acute cold restraint stressed females; group V, fluoxetine-treated stressed males and group VI, fluoxetine-treated stressed females. Acute cold restraint stress was established by fixing the four limbs of the rat and placing it in a refrigerator at 4°C for 3h. Fluoxetine was given intraperitoneal in a single dose of 10mg/kg/day. After 2 weeks, stomach and brain tissues were collected for the assay of gastric malonaldehyde (MDA), catalase, nitric oxide (NO) and cortical gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Stressed animals exhibited increased total acidity in association with decreased gastric secretion volume. Gastric MDA was increased while gastric catalase, NO, and cortical GABA were decreased in stressed male rats when compared to stressed females. However, fluoxetine administration attenuated these stress-induced changes especially in stressed male animals. Stressed male rats were more responsive to the antiulcer effect of fluoxetine more than stressed females. However, fluoxetine might be considered to be the first-choice drug in depressive patients with gastric ulcers in the future.

  2. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on treating tinnitus in patients stratified for presence of depression or anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Shinden, Seiichi; Saito, Hideyuki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, on treating tinnitus.Tinnitus patients stratified for the presence of depression and anxiety were studied retrospectively. Fifty-six patients were observed for more than 6 months. They were initially treated with paroxetine only at a dose of 10 mg/day for 2-4 weeks; thereafter, the dose was increased to 20 mg/day. Tinnitus distress was evaluated with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and with visual analog scales (VASs) for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the trait section of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The patients were grouped according to their SDS and STAI scores, and each variable was compared at baseline and the 6-month follow-up. Changes among these variables were also examined to determine whether reduced tinnitus distress was related to the improvement of depression or anxiety. Patients with both depression and anxiety showed better results (decrease in THI, VASs, SDS and STAI scores) than patients with anxiety alone, or patients without depression and anxiety. In patients with depression and anxiety, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were strongly correlated. In other patients, however, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were not correlated. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective in treating distressed tinnitus patients with depression and anxiety by reducing their tinnitus severity as well as their depression and anxiety.

  3. Comparison of paroxetine and dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the treatment of premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmuttalip Simsek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dapoxetine hydrochloride is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and the first drug approved for the on-demand treatment of premature ejaculation (PE. Our objective in this study was to characterize the efficacy of on-demand dapoxetine (30 and 60 mg and daily paroxetine (20 mg usage in treating PE. We conducted a 1 month study involving a total of 150 patients. Patients were divided into three groups of 50. Group 1 were treated with on-demand dapoxetine (30 mg, Group 2 with on-demand dapoxetine (60 mg and Group 3 with daily paroxetine (20 mg. Our outcome measurement was increased from baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT after treatment. The IELT increased from baseline to posttreatment by 117%, 117% and 170% in the paroxetine group (P 0.05, while the 60 mg dapoxetine group had a larger posttreatment IELT increase compared with the 30 mg dapoxetine (P < 0.05 and paroxetine (P < 0.01 groups. Dapoxetine (60 mg 1-3 h before planned intercourse is a very effective treatment modality for PE. However, an on-demand dose of 30 mg dapoxetine is no more effective than the currently prescribed paroxetine treatment.

  4. Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Immunomodulator on Cytokines Levels: An Alternative Therapy for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a psychiatric illness that presents as a deficit of serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. MDD patients also experience alterations in cortisol and cytokines levels. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs is the first-line antidepressant regimen for MDD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of SSRIs and an immunomodulator—human dialyzable leukocyte extract (hDLE—on cortisol and cytokines levels. Patients received SSRIs or SSRIs plus hDLE. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, and IFN-γ; anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-13 and IL-10; and 24-h urine cortisol were measured at weeks (W 0, 5, 20, 36, and 52 of treatment. The reduction in cortisol levels in the SSRI-treated group was 30% until W52, in contrast, the combined treatment induced a 54% decrease at W36. The decline in cortisol in patients who were treated with SSRI plus hDLE correlated with reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines and increases levels of proinflammatory cytokines at the study conclusion. These results suggest that the immune-stimulating activity of hDLE, in combination with SSRIs, restored the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and cortisol levels in depressed patients versus those who were given SSRIs alone.

  5. Desvenlafaxine for major depressive disorder: incremental clinical benefits from a second-generation serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Alice I; Tourian, Karen A; Tse, Susanna Y; Paul, Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    genetic and pharmacologically-driven variations in common mechanisms involved in the disposition of antidepressant medications may contribute to variable interpatient response. This review describes the pharmacological properties underlying the safety and efficacy of desvenlafaxine, a second-generation serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). literature published between January 2006 and September 2010 evaluating desvenlafaxine was reviewed. Desvenlafaxine therapy is initiated at the therapeutic dose (50 mg/day) without a need for dose titration. Desvenlafaxine metabolism and distribution are not appreciably affected by altered function of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes or permeability glycoprotein (P-gp). Desvenlafaxine has clinically insignificant effects on the activity of CYP and P-gp. The efficacy of desvenlafaxine in treating major depressive disorder has been established. Adverse events are characteristic of the SNRI class. Notably, the rate of discontinuation due to adverse events with the 50 mg/day recommended therapeutic dose is comparable to that seen with placebo. incremental benefits with desvenlafaxine, derived from straight-forward dosing, a simple metabolic profile and lack of interaction with active transporter P-gp and CYP enzymes may contribute to more consistent response, good tolerability and lower incidence of drug-drug interactions with concomitant medications.

  6. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA, UK, and Denmark for documents mentioning benzodiazepines or SSRIs. We supplemented with other relevant literature that could contribute to our study. The searches were performed in 2009 in PubMed, Google, BMJ and JAMA. It took many years before the drug regulators acknowledged benzodiazepine dependence and SSRI withdrawal reactions and before the prescribers and the public were informed. Drug regulators relied mainly on the definitions of dependence and withdrawal reactions from the diagnostic psychiatric manuals, which contributed to the idea that SSRIs do not cause dependence, although it is difficult for many patients to stop treatment. In the perspective of a precautionary principle, drug agencies have failed to acknowledge that SSRIs can cause dependence and have minimised the problem with regard to its frequency and severity. In the perspective of a risk management principle, the drug agencies have reacted in concordance with the slowly growing knowledge of adverse drug reactions and have sharpened the information to the prescribers and the public over time. However, solely relying on spontaneous reporting of adverse effects leads to underestimation and delayed information about the problems. Given the experience with the benzodiazepines, we believe the regulatory bodies should have required studies from the manufacturers that could have elucidated the dependence potential of the SSRIs before marketing authorization was granted.

  7. Early malnourished rats are not affected by anorexia induced by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Medeiros, J M; Cabral Filho, J E; De Souza, S L; Freitas Silva, S R; Mendes Da Silva, C; Deiró, T C B J; Monteiro, J M; Guedes, R C A; De Castro, C M M B; Manhães De Castro, R

    2002-06-01

    The effect of early postnatal malnutrition upon food intake and its modulation by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, was investigated in adult rats. Sixty four Wistar rats were allocated to two groups, according to their mother's diet during lactation. Mothers receiving a 23% protein diet fed the well-nourished group; mothers receiving 8% protein diet fed the malnourished. After weaning, all rats received the 23% protein diet ad libitum. On the 120th day after birth, each nutritional group was divided in two subgroups (each one, n = 16) which received a single daily injection of citalopram (10 mg/kg) or saline (0.9% NaCl) for 14 days. Chronic treatment with citalopram decreased both the food intake and weight gain in the well-nourished rats, but not in the malnourished ones. These data are consistent with findings concerning the nutritional manipulation of the nervous system during its higher vulnerable phase, suggesting that early malnutrition alters the effect of treatment of SSRI in adult rats, and that malnutrition during the critical period of brain development affects the serotoninergic system.

  8. The Risk of Congenital Heart Anomalies Following Prenatal Exposure to Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors—Is Pharmacogenetics the Key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are often prescribed during pregnancy. Previous studies that found an increased risk of congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart anomalies (CHA), with SRI use during pregnancy have created concern among pregnant women and healthcare professionals about the safety of these drugs. However, subsequent studies have reported conflicting results on the association between CHA and SRI use during pregnancy. These discrepancies in the risk estimates can potentially be explained by genetic differences among exposed individuals. In this review, we explore the potential pharmacogenetic predictors involved in the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of SRIs, and their relation to the risk of CHA. In general, the risk is dependent on the maternal concentration of SRIs and the foetal serotonin level/effect, which can be modulated by the alteration in the expression and/or function of the metabolic enzymes, transporter proteins and serotonin receptors involved in the serotonin signalling of the foetal heart development. Pharmacogenetics might be the key to understanding why some children exposed to SRIs develop a congenital heart anomaly and others do not. PMID:27529241

  9. Megalin-mediated reuptake of retinol in the kidneys of mice is essential for vitamin A homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raila, Jens; Willnow, Thomas E; Schweigert, Florian J

    2005-11-01

    The reuptake of retinol (ROH) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) in the kidneys is mediated by the endocytic receptor megalin, suggesting an important role for this receptor in vitamin A (VA) metabolism. We examined the extent to which megalin deficiency may affect urinary ROH excretion, levels of ROH and RBP in plasma, as well as storage of VA in liver and kidney. For this purpose, mice with a kidney-specific megalin gene defect (megalin(lox/lox); apoE(Cre)) and control mice (megalin(lox/lox)) were fed either a basal diet containing 4500 retinol equivalents (RE)/kg diet or a diet without VA during experimental periods of 42 and 84 d. Urinary ROH excretion was observed only in megalin(lox/lox); apoE(Cre) mice (P levels in the liver (P levels of VA were not affected by the receptor gene defect. The findings demonstrate that urinary ROH excretion caused by megalin deficiency requires accelerated mobilization of hepatic VA stores to maintain normal plasma ROH levels, which suggests that megalin plays an essential role in systemic VA homeostasis.

  10. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and immunomodulator on cytokines levels: an alternative therapy for patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Mendieta, Danelia; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Bojalil, Rafael; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric illness that presents as a deficit of serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. MDD patients also experience alterations in cortisol and cytokines levels. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the first-line antidepressant regimen for MDD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of SSRIs and an immunomodulator-human dialyzable leukocyte extract (hDLE)-on cortisol and cytokines levels. Patients received SSRIs or SSRIs plus hDLE. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 β , IL-2, and IFN- γ ; anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-13 and IL-10; and 24-h urine cortisol were measured at weeks (W) 0, 5, 20, 36, and 52 of treatment. The reduction in cortisol levels in the SSRI-treated group was 30% until W52, in contrast, the combined treatment induced a 54% decrease at W36. The decline in cortisol in patients who were treated with SSRI plus hDLE correlated with reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines and increases levels of proinflammatory cytokines at the study conclusion. These results suggest that the immune-stimulating activity of hDLE, in combination with SSRIs, restored the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and cortisol levels in depressed patients versus those who were given SSRIs alone.

  11. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Scallet, A C; Gee, K W; Paule, M G; Brown, R M; Slikker, W

    1989-01-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the [35S]TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects. Results from these experiments suggest that chronic exposure to THC does not produce significant alterations in catecholamine or indoleamine neurotransmitter systems or in opiate or GABA receptor systems in the rat brain.

  12. High-Fat Diet-Induced Alterations in the Feeding Suppression of Low-Dose Nisoxetine, a Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Walters, Amy L.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Priscila P. Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Central noradrenergic pathways are involved in feeding and cardiovascular control, physiological processes altered by obesity. The present studies determined how high-fat feeding and body weight gain alter the sensitivity to the feeding suppression and neural activation to a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, nisoxetine. Acute administration of nisoxetine (saline: 0, 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg; IP) resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the 24 h refeeding response in male Sprague Dawley...

  13. A meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of St John's wort extract in depression therapy in comparison with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cui YH; Zheng Y.

    2016-01-01

    Yong-hua Cui,1 Yi Zheng1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, Beijing An’ding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Beijing Institutes of Brain Disorders, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of St John’s wort extract and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of depression.Methods: Databases were searched for studies compa...

  14. [The comparative study on the efficacy of the combination of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and antipsychotics in the treatment of recurrent depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakonov, A L; Lobanova, I V

    2012-01-01

    A combination of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (prozac and stimulaton) with atypical antipsychotics (zyprexa and solian) reduced depression in patients with recurrent depressive disorders during 10 days. The effect was evenly distributed between 10, 20 and 40 days of treatment. Other symptoms had a peculiar dynamics depending on the therapy. By the end of the study, similar effects were achieved for all groups. The addition of antipsychotics to antidepressant treatment insignificantly increased the number of adverse events.

  15. Comparison of monoamine reuptake inhibitors for the immobility time and serotonin levels in the hippocampus and plasma of sub-chronically forced swim stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Naqvi, Sabira; Dar, Ahsana

    2012-04-01

    The current study was aimed at comparing the behavioral and biochemical (5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels) effects of monoamine reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, venlafaxine and imipramine) in sub-chronically forced swim stressed rats. At the given doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, among aforesaid antidepressants, the imipramine treatment alone caused significant decline in the immobility time of rats (IC(50) 20 mg/kg). In the hippocampus of rats, the imipramine treatment caused significant elevation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) whereas, the fluoxetine and venlafaxine elicited significant increase in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. Likewise, in the plasma of rats, the imipramine treatment significantly increased the 5-HIAA levels whereas, the fluoxetine and venlafaxine treatment significantly elevate the 5-HT levels. It can therefore be inferred that the imipramine did not act like other monoamine reuptake inhibitors in biochemical study, which could possibly underlie its ability to be detected in forced swim test (behavioral study). Moreover, the re-uptake inhibition of 5-HT is not accountable for the antidepressant action exhibited in forced swim test.

  16. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  17. Spintronics: Conceptual Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    The purpose of this introduction to spintronics is to provide some elementary description of its conceptual building blocks. Thus, it is intended for a newcomer to the field. After recalling rudimentary descriptions of spin precession and spin relaxation, spin-dependent transport is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. This suffices to introduce key notions such as the spin asymmetry of the conductivities in the two-current model, the spin diffusion length, and spin accumulation. Two basic mechanisms of spin relaxation are then presented, one arising from spin-orbit scattering and the other from electron-magnon collisions. Finally, the action of a spin-polarized current on magnetization is presented in a thermodynamics framework. This introduces the notion of spin torque and the characteristic length scale over which the transverse spin polarization of conduction electron decays as it is injected into a magnet.

  18. Rotating ice blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  19. Celiac ganglia block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: oakhan@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2005-09-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation.

  20. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...... efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...

  1. Substrate-modulated gating dynamics in a Na+-coupled neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongfang; Terry, Daniel S; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Weinstein, Harel; Blanchard, Scott C; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2011-06-02

    Neurotransmitter/Na(+) symporters (NSSs) terminate neuronal signalling by recapturing neurotransmitter released into the synapse in a co-transport (symport) mechanism driven by the Na(+) electrochemical gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, as well as by antidepressants. The crystal structure of LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homologue, revealed an occluded conformation in which a leucine (Leu) and two Na(+) are bound deep within the protein. This structure has been the basis for extensive structural and computational exploration of the functional mechanisms of proteins with a LeuT-like fold. Subsequently, an 'outward-open' conformation was determined in the presence of the inhibitor tryptophan, and the Na(+)-dependent formation of a dynamic outward-facing intermediate was identified using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging has been used to reveal reversible transitions to an inward-open LeuT conformation, which involve the movement of transmembrane helix TM1a away from the transmembrane helical bundle. We investigated how substrate binding is coupled to structural transitions in LeuT during Na(+)-coupled transport. Here we report a process whereby substrate binding from the extracellular side of LeuT facilitates intracellular gate opening and substrate release at the intracellular face of the protein. In the presence of alanine, a substrate that is transported ∼10-fold faster than leucine, we observed alanine-induced dynamics in the intracellular gate region of LeuT that directly correlate with transport efficiency. Collectively, our data reveal functionally relevant and previously hidden aspects of the NSS transport mechanism that emphasize the functional importance of a second substrate (S2) binding site within the extracellular vestibule. Substrate binding in this S2 site appears to act cooperatively

  2. Large Block Test Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  3. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  4. CXCL12 chemokine and GABA neurotransmitter systems crosstalk and their putative roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon eAlice

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been found in the brain, the role of this chemokine has been expanded from chemoattractant in the immune system to neuromodulatory in the brain. Several pieces of evidence suggest that this chemokine system could crosstalk with the GABAergic system, known to be the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the brain. Indeed, GABA and CXCL12 as well as their receptors are colocalized in many cell types including neurons and there are several examples in which these two systems interact. Several mechanisms can be proposed to explain how these systems interact, including receptor-receptor interactions, crosstalk at the level of second messenger cascades, or direct pharmacological interactions, as GABA and GABAB receptor agonists/antagonists have been shown to be allosteric modulators of CXCR4.The interplay between CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 and GABA/GABAA-GABAB receptors systems could have many physiological implications in neurotransmission, cancer and inflammation. In addition, the GABAB agonist baclofen is currently used in medicine to treat spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and other disorders. More recently it has also been used in the treatment of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. The allosteric effects of this agent on CXCR4 could contribute to these beneficial effects or at the opposite, to its side effects.

  5. Early Antipsychotic Treatment in Juvenile Rats Elicits Long-Term Alterations to the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Michael; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2016-11-22

    Prescription of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) to children has substantially increased in recent years. Whilst current investigations into potential long-term effects have uncovered some alterations to adult behaviours, further investigations into potential changes to neurotransmitter systems are required. The current study investigated potential long-term changes to the adult dopamine (DA) system following aripiprazole, olanzapine and risperidone treatment in female and male juvenile rats. Levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phosphorylated-TH (p-TH), dopamine active transporter (DAT), and D₁ and D₂ receptors were measured via Western blot and/or receptor autoradiography. Aripiprazole decreased TH and D₁ receptor levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and p-TH levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of females, whilst TH levels decreased in the PFC of males. Olanzapine decreased PFC p-TH levels and increased D₂ receptor expression in the PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females only. Additionally, risperidone treatment increased D₁ receptor levels in the hippocampus of females, whilst, in males, p-TH levels increased in the PFC and hippocampus, D₁ receptor expression decreased in the NAc, and DAT levels decreased in the caudate putamen (CPu), and elevated in the VTA. These results suggest that early treatment with various APDs can cause different long-term alterations in the adult brain, across both treatment groups and genders.

  6. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  7. Short- and long-term memory: differential involvement of neurotransmitter systems and signal transduction cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÔNICA R.M. VIANNA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Since William James (1890 first distinguished primary from secondary memory, equivalent to short- and long-term memory, respectively, it has been assumed that short-term memory processes are in charge of cognition while long-term memory is being consolidated. From those days a major question has been whether short-term memory is merely a initial phase of long-term memory, or a separate phenomena. Recent experiments have shown that many treatments with specific molecular actions given into the hippocampus and related brain areas after one-trial avoidance learning can effectively cancel short-term memory without affecting long-term memory formation. This shows that short-term memory and long-term memory involve separate mechanisms and are independently processed. Other treatments, however, influence both memory types similarly, suggesting links between both at the receptor and at the post-receptor level, which should not be surprising as they both deal with nearly the same sensorimotor representations. This review examines recent advances in short- and long-term memory mechanisms based on the effect of intra-hippocampal infusion of drugs acting upon neurotransmitter and signal transduction systems on both memory types.

  8. Soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of selected neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' dell' Universita, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Giuliano, Barbara M. [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Plekan, Oksana [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Feyer, Vitaliy [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Electronic Properties (PGI-6), Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Strasse, 52428 Juelich (Germany); Richter, Robert [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Prince, Kevin C., E-mail: kevin.prince@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurotransmitter molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectron spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak hydrogen bonding. -- Abstract: The valence molecular orbitals and core levels of tyramine, tryptamine and tryptophol in the gas phase have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and theoretical methods. The energies of the outer valence region spectrum are found to be in agreement with previously reported He I spectra, while new data on the inner valence molecular orbitals are reported. The structures in the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen core level spectra of these molecules have been identified and assigned. These compounds are characterised by conformers with hydrogen bonding in which the {pi} systems of the phenol and indole groups act as hydrogen acceptors, but a spectroscopic signature of this hydrogen bond was not observed. This is in contrast with our previous spectra of amino acids, where conformers with specific hydrogen bonding showed strong effects in core level spectra. We attribute the difference to the weaker strength of the {pi}-hydrogen bonding.

  9. Electrochemical performance of porous diamond-like carbon electrodes for sensing hormones, neurotransmitters, and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago A; Zanin, Hudson; May, Paul W; Corat, Evaldo J; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-12-10

    Porous diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes have been prepared, and their electrochemical performance was explored. For electrode preparation, a thin DLC film was deposited onto a densely packed forest of highly porous, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the carbon nanotubes to clump together to form a microstructured surface with an enlarged surface area. DLC:VACNT electrodes show fast charge transfer, which is promising for several electrochemical applications, including electroanalysis. DLC:VACNT electrodes were applied to the determination of targeted molecules such as dopamine (DA) and epinephrine (EP), which are neurotransmitters/hormones, and acetaminophen (AC), an endocrine disruptor. Using simple and low-cost techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, analytical curves in the concentration range from 10 to 100 μmol L(-1) were obtained and excellent analytical parameters achieved, including high analytical sensitivity, good response stability, and low limits of detection of 2.9, 4.5, and 2.3 μmol L(-1) for DA, EP, and AC, respectively.

  10. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  11. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Injection of Caenorhabditis elegans polyA RNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the expression of neurotransmitter receptors that generated some unique responses, including ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors as well as receptors that coupled to G proteins, such as those to octopamine, norepinephrine, and angiotensin, which activated the oocyte’s own phosphatidylinositol system and calcium-gated chloride channels. The oocytes also expressed chloride-conducting glutamate receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and voltage-operated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, GABA, and kainate did not generate ionic currents, suggesting that the corresponding receptors were not expressed or were not functional in the oocytes. The use of X. laevis oocytes for expressing worm RNA demonstrates that there are many molecular components whose role remains to be clarified in the nematode. Among them are the nature of the endogenous agonists for the octopamine and angiotensin receptors and the subunits that compose the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors and the norepinephrine receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide cascade. PMID:16549772

  12. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  13. LeuT: a prokaryotic stepping stone on the way to a eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K

    2008-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by a broad range of integral membrane proteins to catalyze the energetically unfavorable movement of solute molecules across a lipid bilayer. Members of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, are sodium-coupled symporters that play crucial roles in processes as diverse as nutrient uptake and neurotransmitter clearance. The crystal structure of LeuT, a bacterial member of this family, provided the first atomic-level glimpse into overall architecture, pinpointed the substrate and sodium binding sites and implicated candidate helices and residues in the "gating" conformational changes that accompany ion binding and release. The structure is consistent with a wealth of elegant biochemical data on the eukaryotic counterparts and has for the first time permitted the construction of accurate homology models that can be directly tested experimentally. Sequence identity is especially high near the substrate and sodium binding sites and, thus, molecular insights within these regions have been substantial. However, there are several topics relevant to transport mechanism, inhibition and regulation that structure/function studies of LeuT cannot adequately address, suggesting the need for a eukaryotic transporter crystal structure.

  14. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  15. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  16. Loss of Ahi1 impairs neurotransmitter release and causes depressive behaviors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Ren

    Full Text Available Major depression is becoming one of the most prevalent forms of psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms of major depression are still not well-understood. Most antidepressants are only effective in some patients and produce some serious side effects. Animal models of depression are therefore essential to unravel the mechanisms of depression and to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Our previous studies showed that Abelson helper integration site-1 (Ahi1 deficiency causes depression-like behaviors in mice. In this study, we characterized the biochemical and behavioral changes in Ahi1 knockout (KO mice. In Ahi1 KO mice, neurotransmitters including serotonin and dopamine were significantly decreased in different brain regions. However, glutamate and GABA levels were not affected by Ahi1 deficiency. The antidepressant imipramine attenuated depressive behaviors and partially restored brain serotonin level in Ahi1 KO mice. Our findings suggest that Ahi1 KO mice can be used for studying the mechanisms of depression and screening therapeutic targets.

  17. Effects of Moxa Smoke on Monoamine Neurotransmitters in SAMP8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanfang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the anti-aging effects of moxa smoke on SAMP8 mice. Methods. Using 2×3 factorial design, exposure length (15 or 30 minutes daily, and concentration (low, 5–15 mg/m3; middle, 25–35 mg/m3; high, 85–95 mg/m3, 70 SAMP8 mice were randomly assigned, n=10/group, to a model group or one of six moxa smoke groups: L1, L2, M1, M2, H1, or H2. Ten SAMR1 mice were used as normal control. Mice in moxa smoke groups were exposed to moxa smoke at respective concentrations and exposure lengths; the model and normal control mice were not exposed. Cerebral 5-HT, DA, and NE levels were determined using ELISA. Results. Compared to normal control, the model group showed a significant decrease in 5-HT, DA, and NE. Compared to model group, 5-HT and NE were significantly higher in groups L2, M1, and M2 and DA was significantly so in L2 and M1. 5-HT, DA, and NE levels were the highest in group M1 among moxa smoke groups. A marked exposure length × concentration interaction was observed for 5-HT, DA, and NE. Conclusion. Moxa smoke increases monoamine neurotransmitter levels, which varies according to concentration and exposure length. Our finding suggests that the middle concentration of moxa smoke for 15 minutes seems the most beneficial.

  18. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdc (JK910) mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdc (JK910) photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdc (JK910) photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdc (JK910) R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdc (JK910) mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  19. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eBarth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo.

  20. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-06-24

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro.