WorldWideScience

Sample records for blizzard deposit

  1. A Blizzard of a Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    "Who has been to Dairy Queen® and purchased a Blizzard?®" Ms. Bosetti asked her students. During the summer, Bosetti had seen many of her former and future students at the local Dairy Queen enjoying Blizzard desserts and wondered, "Which Blizzard size is the best value?" She used this context for a ratios and proportions task…

  2. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabeel Almashraki; Mukarram Zainuddin Abdulnabee; Maja Sukalo; Abdullah Alrajoudi; Iman Sharafadeen; Martin Zenker

    2011-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed.

  3. CONTRIBUTION TO DEFINE THE BLIZZARD PHENOMENA TROUGHT CLIMATE STUDY IN SOUTHEASTERN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORUŢA CIURLĂU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The definition of the phenomenon of blizzard implies two distinct aspects: the transport of snow on ground and the transport of snow at heights or also known as the actual blizzard. In order for a phenomenon to be defined as blizzard, it has to meet two mandatory conditions: strong wind (>15 m/s and snow cover (previously deposited or associated with snowing phenomenon. The delineation between the two phenomena, respectively snow transport at heights as compared to the one on the ground is often subjective or difficult to assess (being determined visually by the observatories at the meteorological stations. The topography of the place, the moment of day when the phenomenon is produced, the luminosity, the visibility landmarks, etc. can often times lead to the incorrect assessment of the phenomenon. The only parameter measured exactly (among the meteorological parameters that define the phenomenon is the wind (parameter that is determined automatically by the sensors in the meteorological stations where they exist, aspect that might be a delineating factor when the occurrence of the phenomenon is estimated. The climatological analysis of the data derived from 19 meteorological stations located in the South-East of Romania, throughout a period of over 50 years (1961-2012 revealed the existence of the phenomenon of blizzard (transported on ground or at height, associated/not-associated to the phenomenon of snow, with a snow layer/without and at different intensities of the wind. Being a natural phenomenon with climatic hazard and negative impact on the environment and the human society, the correct delineation of the two phenomena might highlight the territories with increased vulnerability to its occurrence. Starting from those presented above, the hereby paper aims to make a detailed climatological analysis regarding the snow transport on ground and at height and their delineation based on the data given by the 19 meteorological stations placed

  4. The Effects of a Blizzard on Urban Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Armando; Bein, Frederick L.

    1981-01-01

    The chronology and effects of a 1978 blizzard on Indianapolis' air pollution levels (ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide) are used as a case study for geography classes. Photographs, graphs, and maps are provided as examples of meteorological data collection and interpretation. (AM)

  5. Media Coverage of a Blizzard: Is the Message Helplessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Lee

    To determine the media's role in hazard awareness, a study analyzed the content of media coverage of the 1982 Denver, Colorado blizzard, the worst storm in that region in 70 years. Data were collected from the two major daily newspapers and from four television stations. The study period began on December 21, about 48 hours before the first real…

  6. Blizzard Sign as a specific endobronchial ultrasound image for ground glass opacity: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sasada, M.D. Ph.D.

    2014-01-01

    On hindsight, it was the aforementioned ultrasound pattern that helped us decide the sampling site for EBUS-GS guided TBB when fluoroscopy was equivocal. We hypothesize that this pattern is specific for GGO and we name it the Blizzard Sign.

  7. THE BLIZZARD FROM 25-26 OCTOBER 2014 AND ITS IMPACT ON AIR FLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŞCHIOPU C.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available On a calendar basis, October is considered the middle month of the fall, and for this reason, some meteorological phenomena such as blizzards, specific of the cold season, may occur extremely rare. Throughout the latest years there haven’t been any blizzards on this specific month, the earliest snow occurring on 15 October 1970 and the first snow cover on 26 October 1988. Climatologically the first month in which blizzard occurs is November with 0-1 days, when the multi-annual average is 0.4 days, therefore, the occurrence of this phenomenon on this month may be considered as an abnormal event which exceeds by far the multi-annual climatologic normalized standards. In order to highlight the synoptic context which determined the blizzard, the authors have revised the synoptic maps of air-pressure topography at the 500 hPa and ground levels and the meteorological data which were extracted from www.wetter3.de, www.ogimet.com, www.sat24.com, www.zamg.ac.at, www.weather.uwyo.edu. On 25-26 October 2014, the air flight activity was disturbed by the unexpected blizzard conditions and the Air Operators were taken by surprise and the Emergency and Rescue Air Unit (SMURD could not intervene. Also, the military helicopters were not able to fly in transport missions to Carei (Satu Mare county where there is the commemoration of the Romanian Army Day and the high officials of the Romanian state which were taking part have arrived with military aircrafts (C-27J Spartan, C-130B Hercules, An-30. After this event, at the landing on Otopeni Military Aerodrome they encountered severe meteorological hazard, but the aircrafts landed in safety conditions.

  8. Storm tide monitoring during the blizzard of January 26-28, 2015, in eastern Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Andrew J.; Verdi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of six storm surge sensors and four barometric pressure sensors along the Atlantic coast in eastern Massachusetts, from Plymouth to Newburyport, before the blizzard of January 26–28, 2015 (Blizzard of January 2015), to record the timing and magnitude of storm tide at select locations where forecasters had predicted the potential for coastal flooding. Additionally, water-level data were recorded and transmitted in near real-time from four permanent USGS tidal stations—three on Cape Cod and one near the mouth of the Merrimack River in Newburyport. The storm surge sensors were deployed at previously established fixed sites outfitted with presurveyed mounting brackets. The mounting brackets were installed in 2014 as part of the USGS Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamic (SWaTH) Network (https://water.usgs.gov/floods/STN/), which was funded through congressional supplemental appropriations for the U.S. Department of the Interior after the devastating landfall of Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 (Simmons and others, 2014). The USGS received this funding to enable better understanding of coastal flooding hazards in the region, to improve preparedness for future coastal storms, and to increase the resilience of coastal cities, infrastructure, and natural systems in the region (Buxton and others, 2013). The USGS established 163 monitoring locations along the New England coast for the SWaTH Network, including 70 sites in Massachusetts.

  9. 巴黎风情画——Blizzard WWI 2008赛场日记

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WE.Pepsi.Suky

    2008-01-01

    很荣幸参加2008 Blizzard Enter- tainment Worldwide Invitational,作为WE魔兽世界竞技场战队的成员。第一次参加《魔兽世界:燃烧的远征》(World of WarCraft:The Burning Crusade)的竞技场大赛,虽然最后没能取得理想的成绩,但从魔兽世界目前极少的线下赛来看,WWI确实是一次难得的锻炼机会,这次失败也促使我更加努力的练习,对胜利的渴望,遗憾绝对不会留到下次!

  10. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome with mild phenotypic features confirmed by UBR1 gene testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naim Alkhouri; Barbara Kaplan; Marsha Kay; Amy Shealy; Carol Crowe; Susanne Bauhuber; Nartin Zenker

    2008-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and is characterized by hypoplastic nasal alae, mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, short stature, scalp defects, dental abnormalities and abnormal hair patterns. Growth hormone deficiency, hypopituitarism, and impaired glucagon secretion response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia have been reported. Congenital heart defects have also been described in this condition. Mental retardation is typically moderate to severe in patients with JBS; however, normal intelligence can occur. In the pancreas, there is a selective defect of acinar tissue, whereas the islets of Langerhans and ducts are preserved. Diabetes has been reported in older children, suggesting the progressive nature of pancreatic disease. The molecular basis of JBS has recently been mapped to chromosome 15q15-q21 with identified mutations in the UBR1 gene. We report the case of a 7-year-old female with pancreatic insufficiency and mild phenotypic features, in whom the diagnosis of JBS was established using recently described molecular testing for the UBR1 gene.

  11. A comparison of regional isentropic-sigma and sigma model simulations of the January 1979 Chicago blizzard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotocny, Tom H.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.

    1993-01-01

    In an initial effort in regional numerical weather prediction, results from the University of Wisconsin isentropic-sigma (UW theta-sigma) hybrid model and an 'identical' sigma model are compared. The two main objectives are to demonstrate the capability of the UW theta-sigma model for regional numerical weather prediction and to identify advantages of the hybrid model in simulating atmospheric water vapor transport and precipitation relative to the sigma model. The 72-h simulations produced by the two models extend over a region covering the western Pacific Ocean, North America, and the western Atlantic Ocean. The simulations begin at 0000 UTC 13 January 1979, a period during which an intense Chicago blizzard develops over the central United States. This period also includes the rapid development of a cyclone in the western Pacific Ocean. Results using the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) ECMWF level IIIB data as initial and verification data indicate that both models produce reasonable and similar 72-h simulations, with the UW theta-sigma model mass and momentum distributions being slightly more accurate than the sigma model. Of particular importance for the Chicago blizzard is that the UW theta-sigma model more accurately simulates water vapor transport northward from the Gulf of Mexico and westward from the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, the hybrid model more accurately simulates observed precipitation, especially over the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada.

  12. Short and long-term effects of an historic blizzard in Asturias (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Cristina; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Gallinar, David

    2016-04-01

    This research has combined the consult of several historical sources (historic newspapers, church records, meteorological records) with fieldwork (geographical checking and interviews) and the application of statistical techniques for data processing in order to define, locate and analyze the causes and physical, social, economic and demographic effects (both short- and long-term) of an historic natural disaster that concerned the territory of Asturias (Northern Spain). The storm that hit the Spanish northwest in the winter of 1888 consisted of a four snowstorms concatenation occurred between 14th February 1888 and 8th April 1888. It was a phenomenon that, by its magnitude and rarity, was especially harmful because of the triggering of avalanches of snow and landslides; the generation of large snow deposits (up to 9 meters depth), and the floods related with the effects of the snow thawing. The first results of this research point to 36 people dead and 23 injured, more than 1,000 buildings ruined and more than 19,000 head of cattle lost as a result of all these events. However, the personal and material losses increase if we investigate the long-term consequences and, in this aspect, we have identified several singularities in the 1888 mortality patterns (ie an increase in neonatal mortality rate), and a clear increase in overall mortality in the two years following this episode, affecting to women more than to men.

  13. A case study for natural cascading hazard: the Great Blizzard of 1888 in the Asturian Massif (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Cristina; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Gallinar, David

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study the events triggered by the Great Blizzard of 1888 in the Asturian Massif as a case study that shows how one hazard can be the main cause of another hazard occurring. The reconstruction of the chain of hazards triggered by the episode has been done on the basis of nivo-meteorogical conditions, event geographical location, and socio-economic impact. The episode has been studied through the analysis of the issues published in six different newspapers between the 20th of January and 30th of May 1888. We have collected the data of the ancient meteorological station of the University of Oviedo, and those contained in parish documents. Field work consisted in visual inspection and interviews to the contemporary residents. The information has been stored and crossed for statistical analysis using a logical database structure that has been designed with this purpose. The snowfall episode consisted in four consecutive snowstorms that occurred between the 14th of February 1888 and the 8th of April 1888, creating snow covers with an average depth ranging between 5 and 7 m. The snow accumulations were the main cause of material damage, affecting 27 high- and mid-elevation mountain municipalities. However, we have to consider that the newspapers only reflected those events affecting densely populated areas along with those which affected vital economic spaces (railway lines, roads in mountain passes, etc.). There were more than 200 interruptions with the traffic flow and communication outages, hampering economic activities. Snow built up on the roofs added extra weight to the structure of the buildings so more than 900 constructions collapsed, killing three persons and causing the loss of more than 19.000 head of cattle. Moreover, these snow accumulations were the basis of an episode of sixty-four snow avalanches that, undoubtedly, meant the main personal damage with a number of dead and wounded that reached 29 and 23 respectively. During the snowfall

  14. Ubiquitin ligases of the N-end rule pathway: assessment of mutations in UBR1 that cause the Johanson-Blizzard syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-Sang Hwang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS; OMIM 243800 is an autosomal recessive disorder that includes congenital exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, facial dysmorphism with the characteristic nasal wing hypoplasia, multiple malformations, and frequent mental retardation. Our previous work has shown that JBS is caused by mutations in human UBR1, which encodes one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the N-end rule pathway. The N-end rule relates the regulation of the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. One class of degradation signals (degrons recognized by UBR1 are destabilizing N-terminal residues of protein substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Most JBS-causing alterations of UBR1 are nonsense, frameshift or splice-site mutations that abolish UBR1 activity. We report here missense mutations of human UBR1 in patients with milder variants of JBS. These single-residue changes, including a previously reported missense mutation, involve positions in the RING-H2 and UBR domains of UBR1 that are conserved among eukaryotes. Taking advantage of this conservation, we constructed alleles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBR1 that were counterparts of missense JBS-UBR1 alleles. Among these yeast Ubr1 mutants, one of them (H160R was inactive in yeast-based activity assays, the other one (Q1224E had a detectable but weak activity, and the third one (V146L exhibited a decreased but significant activity, in agreement with manifestations of JBS in the corresponding JBS patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results, made possible by modeling defects of a human ubiquitin ligase in its yeast counterpart, verified and confirmed the relevance of specific missense UBR1 alleles to JBS, and suggested that a residual activity of a missense allele is causally associated with milder variants of JBS.

  15. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070291 Gong Ping (Northern Fujian Geological Party, Shaozou 354000) Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Control Factors of the Shimen Au-polymetallic Deposit in Zhenghe County, Fujian Province (Geology of Fujian, ISSN1001-3970, CN38-1080/P, 25(1), 2006, p.18-24, 2 illus., 2 tables, 1 ref.) Key words: gold deposits, polymetallic deposits, Fujian Province

  16. Autonomous Aerial Payload Delivery System Blizzard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    awareness SUV = sport utility vehicle UAV = unmanned aerial vehicle YPG = U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground I. Introduction MROVED accuracy of...15 miles) allows non-line-of-sign operations inside canyons , around the hills and tall buildings (urban operations). Therefore, there are almost no...ship. To date, two drops have been performed with a standard sport utility vehicle (SUV) being a moving target and broadcasting its GPS position to a

  17. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102406 Chen Gang(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China);Li Fengming Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Genesis of Yuquanshan Graphite Deposit of Xinjiang(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,27(4),2009,p.325-329,4 illus.,4 tables,5 refs.)Key words:graphite deposit,XinjiangYuquanshan graphite deposit of Xinjiang occurs in mica-quartz schist of Xingeer Information which belongs to Xinditate Group of Lower Pt in Kuluketage Block of Tarim paleo-continent,and experiences two mineralizing periods of

  18. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140876 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550025,China);Yang Ruidong Study on the Strontium Isotopic Composition of Large Devonian Barite Deposits from Zhenning,Guizhou Province(Geochimica,

  19. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122457 Cai Jianshe ( Fujian Institute of Geological Survey and Drawing,Fuzhou 350011,China ) On the Geologic Characteristics and Genesis of the Longtangsi Fluorite Deposit in Pucheng County,Fujian Province ( Geology of Fujian,ISSN1001-3970,CN35-1080 / P,30 ( 4 ), 2011,p.301-306,3illus.,1table,6 refs.,with English abstract ) Key words:fluorspar deposit,Fujian Province

  20. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110947 Chen Xinglong(Guizhou Bureau of Nonferrous Metal and Nuclear Geology,Guiyang 550005,China);Gong Heqiang Endowment Factors and Development & Utilization Strategy of Bauxite Resource in North Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(2),2010,p.106-110,6 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province20110948 Dang Yanxia(Mineral Resource & Reservoir Evaluation Center,Urumiq 830000,China);Fan Wenjun Geological Features and a Primary Study of Metallogenesis of the Wucaiwang Zeolite Deposit,Fuyun County(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,28(2),2010,p.167-170,2 illus.,1 table,5 refs.)Key words:zeolite deposit,Xinjiang Nearly all zeolite deposits in the world result from low-temperature-alteration of glass-bearing volcanic rocks.The southern slope of the Kalamali Mountain is one of the regions where medium to acid volcanics are major lithological type,thus it is a preferred area to look for zeolite deposit.The Wucaiwang zeolite ore district consists of mainly acid volcanic-clastic rocks.

  1. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091594 Bao Yafan(The Third Geologic Survey of Jilin Province,Siping 136000,China);Liu Yanjun Relations between Bashenerxi Granite,West Dongkunlun and Baiganhu Tungsten-Tin Deposit(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,27(3),2008,p.56-59,67,5 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:tungsten ores,tin ores,monzogranite,Kunlun Mountains20091595 Chen Fuwen(Yichang Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Yichang 443003,China);Dai Pingyun Metallogenetic and Isotopic Chronological Study on the Shenjiaya Gold Deposit in Xuefeng Mountains,Hunan Province(Acta Geologica Sinica,ISSN0001-5717,CN11-1951/P,82(7),2008,p.906-911,3 illus.,2 tables,30 refs.)Key words:gold ores,HunanThe Shenjiaya gold deposit is a representative one

  2. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111705 An Junbo(Team 603,Bureau of Nonferrous Metals Geological Exploration of Jilin Province,Hunchun 133300,China);Xu Renjie Geological Features and Ore Genesis of Baishilazi Scheelite Deposit in Yanbian Area(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,29(3),2010,p.39-43,2 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.)Key words:tungsten ores,Jilin ProvinceThe Baishilazi scheelite deposit is located in contacting zone between the marble of the Late Palaeozoic Qinglongcun Group and the Hercynian biotite granite.The vein and lenticular major ore body is obviously controlled by NE-extending faults and con

  3. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090243 Chen Zhibin (Hebei Institute of Geological Survey, Shijiazhuang 050081, China) Ore-Controlling Factors of the Beichagoumen Ag-Polymetallic Deposits in Northern Hebei Province (Geological Survey and Research, ISSN1672-4135, CN12-1353/P, 31(1), 2008, p.1-5, 3 illus., 10 refs.)

  4. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131565 Cai Lianyou(No.332 Geological Team,Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources Exploration of Anhui Province,Huangshan 245000,China);Weng Wangfei Geological Characteristics and Genesis Analysis of Guocun Navajoite Deposit in South Anhui Province(Mineral Resources and Geology,

  5. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102341 Bao Peisheng(Institute of Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Science,Beijing 100037,China)Further Discussion on the Genesis of the Podiform Chromite Deposits in the Ophiolites-Questioning about the Rock:Melt Interaction Metallogeny(Geological Bulletin of China,ISSN1671-2552,CN11-4648/P,28(12),2009,p.1741-1761

  6. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131601 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550003,China);Yang Ruidong Hydrothermal Venting-Flowing Sedimentation Characteristics of Devonian Barite Deposits from Leji,Zhenning County,Guizhou Province(Acta Sedimentologica Sinica,ISSN1000-0550,CN62-1038/P,30(3),

  7. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110165 Chen Jiawei(The 3rd Geological Team,Henan Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources,Xinyang 464000,China)Ore Control Conditions and Genetic Model for the Bodaoling Ag-Au Deposit in Guangshan,Henan Province(Acta Geologica Sichuan,ISSN1006-0995,CN51-1273/P,30(1),2010,p.28-30,5 illus.,1 ref.,with English abstract)Key words:gold ores,Henan Province20110166 Chen Mingquan(Geological Team 306,Yunnan Bureau of Nonferrous Geology,Kunming 650216,Ch

  8. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122389 Cai Lianyou ( No.332 Geological Team,Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources Exploration of Anhui Province,Huangshan 245000,China );Weng Wangfei Geologic Characteristic and Ore-Control Factors of the Nanshan W-Mo Polymetallic Ore Deposit in South Anhui Province ( Geological Survey and Research,ISSN1672-4135,CN12-1353 / P,34 ( 4 ), 2011,p.290-298,3 illus.,1table,14refs. ) Key words:tungsten ores,molybdenum ores,ore guide of prospecting,Anhui Province

  9. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111761 Chen Hua(115 Geological Party,Guizhou Bureau of Geology and Mineral Exploration & Development,Guiyang 551400,China);Deng Chao Analysis on the Metallogenic Environment of Maochang Bauxite in Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(3),2010,p.198-201,2 illus.,1 table,8 refs.)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province By long time physical and chemical process,the carbonate rock after Central Guizhou uplidft,becomes red clay,after further weathering,the red clay decomposed into the oxide,hydroxide of Al and Fe,in the dissolution hole and depression,it concentrates primary fragmentary tight and earthy karst bauxite ore.Because the variation of landform,it decomposes and cracks again,affords the material source

  10. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  11. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  12. A blizzard of stem cells in Santa Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Khalil Kass; Blanpain, Cédric

    2011-06-01

    The Keystone Symposium 'Stem Cells in Development, Tissue Homeostasis and Disease' was held between 30th January and 4th February 2011 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. The organizers gathered together an impressive panel of speakers to discuss various aspects of stem-cell biology from early development to adult homeostasis, as well as the implications of stem cells for human diseases.

  13. Externalities of Testing: Lessons from the Blizzard of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents lessons learned from a story of a snowy and dangerous intersection where there was no way for pedestrians to cross. The basic theme of this paper is that if political economy is preoccupied largely with the measurement of externalities, then a goal for the testing and assessment policy community should be to devise strategies…

  14. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  15. Bauxite Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨化洲

    1989-01-01

    Bauxite deposits in China,rangin in age from Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic ,are distributed mainly in Shanxi,Shandong Henan,Guizhou,Guangxi and Yunnan.Based on stratigraphic relations they can be clas-sified as 6 types:inter-system marine,inter-system continental,intra-system marine,intra-system continent-tal,weathering lateritic and weathering accumulation types.But in terms of depositional environments,only four types are distinguished,I.e.the marine deposits,continental deposits,lateritic deposits and weath-ering-accumulation deposits.These deposits have been formed in two steps:firstly,the depression of paraplatform or front basin margins in paleocontinents and secondly,the development of littoral-lagoons on the eroded surface of karstified carbonate bedrocks.The aluminum may have been derived from the carbonate rocks with which the ores are associated,or from adjacent aluminosilicate rocks.

  16. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome...... ash deposits which contain significant concentrations of alkali, and earth-alkali metals. The specific composition of biomass deposits give different characteristics as compared to coal ash deposits, i.e. different physical significance of the deposition mechanisms, lower melting temperatures, etc....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  17. ElectroSpark Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-25

    ElectroSpark Deposition Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Cadmium Alternatives Team Canadian Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Group on Pollution...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Processes, Inc. ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) Results of Materials Testing and Technology Insertion January 25, 2007 Advanced Surfaces And Processes, Inc. 3

  18. MAPLE deposition of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P., E-mail: annapaola.caricato@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, V.; Catalano, M. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesaria, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Scarfiello, R. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Zacheo, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently exploited for depositing films of nanomaterials by combining the advantages of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles and laser-based techniques. MAPLE-deposition of nanomaterials meeting applicative purposes demands their peculiar properties to be taken into account while planning depositions to guarantee a congruent transfer (in terms of crystal structure and geometric features) and explain the deposition outcome. In particular, since nanofluids can enhance thermal conductivity with respect to conventional fluids, laser-induced heating can induce different ablation thermal regimes as compared to the MAPLE-treatment of soft materials. Moreover, nanoparticles exhibit lower melting temperatures and can experience pre-melting phenomena as compared to their bulk counterparts, which could easily induce shape and or crystal phase modification of the material to be deposited even at very low fluences. In this complex scenario, this review paper focuses on examples of MAPLE-depositions of size and shape controlled nanoparticles for different applications highlights advantages and challenges of the MAPLE-technique. The influence of the deposition parameters on the physical mechanisms which govern the deposition process is discussed.

  19. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  20. Solid on liquid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmet, J., E-mail: jerome.charmet@he-arc.c [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquees ARC, HES-SO Arc, Eplatures-Grise 17, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Banakh, O.; Laux, E.; Graf, B.; Dias, F.; Dunand, A.; Keppner, H. [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquees ARC, HES-SO Arc, Eplatures-Grise 17, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Gorodyska, G.; Textor, M. [BioInterface group, ETHZ, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, ETH Hoenggerberg HCI H 525 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Noell, W.; Rooij, N.F. de [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institute of Microengineering, Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems laboratory, Rue Jaquet Droz 1, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Neels, A.; Dadras, M.; Dommann, A.; Knapp, H. [Centre Suisse d' Electronique et de Microtechnique SA, Rue Jacquet-Droz 1, 2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Borter, Ch.; Benkhaira, M. [COMELEC SA, Rue de la Paix 129, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    A process for the deposition of a solid layer onto a liquid is presented. The polymer poly-di-chloro-para-xylylene, also known as Parylene C, was grown on low vapour pressure liquids using the conventional low pressure chemical vapour deposition process. A reactor was built and a process developed to enable the deposition of Parylene C at atmospheric pressure over high vapour pressure liquids. It was used to deposit Parylene C over water among others. In all cases Parylene C encapsulated the liquid without influencing its initial shape. The results presented here show also that the Parylene C properties are not affected by its growth on liquid templates and the roughness of the Parylene C surface in contact with the liquid during the deposition is extremely low.

  1. Speleothem (Cave Deposit) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, and other aspects of climate derived from mineral deposits found in caves. Parameter keywords describe what was measured...

  2. Podiform chromite deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Location and characteristics of 1,124 individual mineral deposits of this type, with grade and tonnage models for chromium as well as several related elements.

  3. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  4. Alluvial Deposits in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This coverage maps alluvial deposits throughout Iowa. This generally would include areas of alluvial soils associated with modern streams that are identified on...

  5. Chemically deposited tin sulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkari, A., E-mail: anis.akkari@ies.univ-montp2.f [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Guasch, C. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Kamoun-Turki, N. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia)

    2010-02-04

    SnS thin films were deposited on glass substrates after multi-deposition runs by chemical bath deposition from aqueous solution containing 30 ml triethanolamine (TEA) (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}NO{sub 3}) (50%), 10 ml thioacetamide (CH{sub 3}CSNH{sub 2}), 8 ml ammonia (NH{sub 3}) solution and 10 ml of Sn{sup 2+}(0.1 M). These films were characterised with X-ray diffraction (XRD), with scanning electron microscopy, and with spectrophotometric measurements. The obtained thin films exhibit the zinc blend structure, the crystallinity seems to be improved as the film thickness increases and the band gap energy is found to be about 1.76 eV for film prepared after six depositions runs.

  6. Electrospark deposition coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, W. F.

    1986-11-01

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life.

  7. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Zoran; Simić, Vladimir; Jelenković, Rade; Ilić, Miloje

    2016-06-01

    Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc.), jasper (picture, landscape, red etc.), common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc.), silica masses (undivided), and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.). Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine), garnet (almandine and pyrope), tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  8. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc., jasper (picture, landscape, red etc., common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc., silica masses (undivided, and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.. Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine, garnet (almandine and pyrope, tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  10. Granitoid intrusions and related deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟良义; 李绪俊

    1996-01-01

    Taking the Bainaimiao copper and gold deposits, Inner Mongolia and the Wushan copper deposits, Jiangxi Province as examples, a discussion is devoted to the relationship between the granitoid intrusions and related deposits from different lines of evidence: the spatial distribution, country rocks and alteration of the deposits, trace element contents and vertical zoning of elements in deposits, the metallogenic preference of granitoid intrusions, the metallogenic models and stable isotopic geology. It is concluded that the ore-bearing fluids mainly come from granitoid magmas and granitoid intrusions are closely associated with the related deposits in space.

  11. 78 FR 56583 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... depositor has ever lost a penny of an insured deposit. The Federal Deposit Insurance Act (``FDI Act'') \\1... could affect deposits in a particular location. \\1\\ 12 U.S.C. 1811, et seq. \\2\\ See FDI Act section 11(f...(l) of the FDI Act.\\3\\ Since the establishment of the FDIC in 1933, Congress has made...

  12. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  13. FDIC Summary of Deposits (SOD) Download File

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation — The FDIC's Summary of Deposits (SOD) download file contains deposit data for branches and offices of all FDIC-insured institutions. The Federal Deposit Insurance...

  14. Acid deposition in Asia: Emissions, deposition, and ecosystem effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lei; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Pan, Yuepeng; Larssen, Thorjørn; Tang, Jie; Mulder, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We review and synthesize the current state of knowledge regarding acid deposition and its environmental effects across Asia. The extent and magnitude of acid deposition in Asia became apparent only about one decade after this issue was well described in Europe and North America. In addition to the temperate zone, much of eastern and southern Asia is situated in the tropics and subtropics, climate zones hitherto little studied with respect to the effects of high loads of acid deposition. Surface waters across Asia are generally not sensitive to the effects of acid deposition, whereas soils in some regions are sensitive to acidification due to low mineral weathering. However, soil acidification was largely neutralized by such processes as base cation deposition, nitrate (NO3-) denitrification, and sulfate (SO42-) adsorption. Accompanying the decrease in S deposition in recent years, N deposition is of increasing concern in Asia. The acidifying effect of N deposition may be more important than S deposition in well drained tropical/subtropical soils due to high SO42- adsorption. The risk of regional soil acidification is a major threat in Eastern Asia, indicated by critical load exceedance in large areas.

  15. Some characteristics of electrospark deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesnjak, A. [Q-Techna, Krsko (Sierra Leone); Tusek, J. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ljubljana (Sierra Leone)

    2003-11-01

    The paper deals with some characteristics of electrospark deposition. A relevant device and the process are described, the material transfer is shown schematically, and the average droplet mass, the thickness of deposited layer, and the layer roughness are determined. Two types of substrate (tool steel, austenitic stainless steel), two types of shielding gas, (Ar, He), and three types of filler material, (WC, TiC, Stellite 6) were used. With some deposit, chemical analyses of deposit surfaces were performed and with some others through-thickness chemical analyses. Among the final conclusions the most important one is that the addition of a shielding gas results in a considerable increase in deposit quality. The device manufacturer, however, recommends deposition without the addition of a shielding gas. (orig.)

  16. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  17. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lowrie, Robert Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rockefeller, Gabriel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, Kelly Glen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  18. Multiphase flow wax deposition modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzain, A. [Petronas Research and Scientific Services, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhang, H.-Q.; Volk, M.; Redus, C.L.; Brill, J.P. [University of Tulsa (United States); Apte, M.S. [Shell Technology EP (United States); Creek, J.L. [Chevron Petroleum Technology (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Results are presented from two-phase flow wax deposition tests using a state-of-the-art, high pressure, multiphase flow test facility. Wax deposition was found to be flow pattern dependent and occurs only along the pipe wall in contact with the waxy crude oil. The deposition buildup trend at low mixture velocities is similar to that observed in laminar single-phase flow tests. The buildup trend at high mixture velocities is similar to that observed in turbulent single-phase flow tests. Thinner and harder deposits at the bottom than at the top of the pipe were observed in horizontal intermittent flow tests. Thicker and harder deposits were observed at low liquid superficial velocity than at high liquid superficial velocity annular flow tests. No wax deposition was observed along the upper portion of the pipe in stratified flow tests. A semi-empirical kinetic model tailored for the wax deposition tests predicted wax thickness with an acceptable accuracy, especially at high oil superficial velocity. Deposition rate reduction due to shear stripping and rate enhancement due to entrapment of oil and other mechanisms not accounted for by the classical Fick's mass diffusion theory were incorporated through the use of dimensionless variables and empirical constants derived from the wax deposition data. The kinetic model, although semi-empirical, provides an insight for future model development. (author)

  19. 78 FR 11604 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... (``FDI Act'') depositor preference regime, and would therefore be on an equal footing with domestic... insured deposit. The FDI Act, 12 U.S.C. 1811, et seq., mandates the payment of deposit insurance ``as soon... the financial markets of the United States. See FDI Act section 11(f), 12 U.S.C. 1821(f). The...

  20. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Vitousek, Peter [Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Erisman, Jan Willem [VU University Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goulding, Keith [The Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Fangmeier, Andreas [Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4+) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3-), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  1. Liquefier Dynamics in Fused Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Guceri, Selcuk; Bertoldi, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    Layered manufacturing (LM) is an evolution of rapid prototyping (RP) technology whereby a part is built in layers. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a particular LM technique in which each section is fabricated through vector style deposition of building blocks, called roads, which...

  2. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  3. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two

  4. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  5. Geological classification of coal deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretsnaidr, P.

    1985-02-01

    A new classification of coal deposits developed by the author is evaluated. The classification considers only selected factors which characterize a coal deposit. Each factor is described by a number of points ranging from 0 to 10. Geologic structure (deposits with one or more seams or with seam groups) is described using from 1 to 10 points. Secondary deformation of a coal deposit (e.g. tectonics) and hydrogeology (aquifers, filtration properties, etc.) are described using a 10 point scale. Coal seam structure (with or without partings) is characterized using 1 to 5 points. Coal seam thickness and its stability (4 thickness classes from 0.4 to 1.0 m, 1 to 3 m, 3 to 10 m and above 10 m) is described using 0 to 5 points. Coal seam quality (ash content, calorific value and coking properties) is described using 0 to 5 points. Other factors are characterized using a 10 point scale. Use of this deposit classification is explained using four examples: the Merkur surface mine (uncomplicated conditions), the Nosek surface mine (relatively complicated conditions), the Slany deposit (with complicated conditions) and the Jan Sverma deposit (with extremely complicated conditions).

  6. 12 CFR 337.6 - Brokered deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY UNSAFE... of a deposit broker. (3) Capital categories. (i) For purposes of section 29 of the Federal Deposit...)). (5) Deposit broker. (i) The term deposit broker means: (A) Any person engaged in the business...

  7. 76 FR 21265 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... in the subject line of the message. Mail: Robert E. Feldman, Executive Secretary, Attention: Comments... Deposit Insurance Corporation. Robert E. Feldman, Executive Secretary. BILLING CODE 6714-01-P...

  8. TSUNAMI_DEPOSITS - Tsunami Deposits at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami deposits within the Seaside, Oregon region obtained by Brooke Fiedorowicz and Curt Peterson in 1997 and Bruce...

  9. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  10. A remote coal deposit revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen-Kofoed, Jørgen A.; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Petersen, Henrik I.

    2012-01-01

    In 1908, members of the “Danmark Expedition” discovered a coal deposit in a very remote area in western Germania Land, close to the margin of the inland ice in northeast Greenland. The deposit was, however, neither sampled nor described, and was revisited in 2009 for the first time since its...... environment related to meandering river channels. Spores and pollen in the lower fluvial deposits reflect abundant vegetation of ferns along the river banks. In contrast, a sparse spore and pollen flora in the coals show a mixed vegetation of ferns and gymnosperms. Based on proximate and petrographic analyses...

  11. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  12. DIMENSION STONE DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Crnković

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The geology, petrographycal composition and properties of dimension stone deposits in Croatia are described. Dimension stone deposits in the conception of mobilistic view of the genesis and structure of Dinarides, as well as after stratigraphic units, are considered. Valuation of the dimension stones of the active quarries is exposed. The marketable categories of dimension stone in Croatia are different varietes of limestones and calcareous clastites, primarly of Cretaceous age, and to lesser degree of Jurassic and Paleogene. The greatest part of deposits is concentrated in the Adriatic carbonate platform or Adriaticum.

  13. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (1)METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20082280 An Fang(School of Earth and Space Sciences,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Zhu Yongfeng Studies on Geology and Geochemistry of Alteration- Type Ore in Hatu Gold Deposit(Western Junggar),Xinjiang,NW China(Mineral Deposits,ISSN0258—7106,CN11—1965/ P,26(6),2007,p.621—633,7 illus.,2 tables,48 refs.,with English abstract) Key words:gold deposits,Junggar Basin 20082281 An Guobao(No.212 Geological Party,Gansu Bureau of Nuclear Geology,

  14. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  15. Electrospark deposition for die repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrospark deposition is a process for surfacing of hard metal alloys, e.g. carbides and stellites, on the surfaces of new or old machine elements. In this process, a high current is conducted through an oscillating electrode and a substrate for a very short period of time. In the paper, the process is described and the thickness of deposited layer, chemical composition, dilution rate and the layer roughness are determined.

  16. Electrospark deposition for die repair

    OpenAIRE

    J. Tušek; Kosec, L.; Lešnjak, A.; T. Muhič

    2012-01-01

    The electrospark deposition is a process for surfacing of hard metal alloys, e.g. carbides and stellites, on the surfaces of new or old machine elements. In this process, a high current is conducted through an oscillating electrode and a substrate for a very short period of time. In the paper, the process is described and the thickness of deposited layer, chemical composition, dilution rate and the layer roughness are determined.

  17. Thin Film Deposition Techniques (PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, E.

    The most interesting materials for spin electronic devices are thin films of magnetic transition metals and magnetic perovskites, mainly the doped La-manganites [1] as well as several oxides and metals for passivating and contacting the magnetic films. The most suitable methods for the preparation of such films are the physical vapor deposition methods (PVD). Therefore this report will be restricted to these deposition methods.

  18. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  19. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    CERN Document Server

    Guiseppe, V E; Hime, A; Rielage, K; Westerdale, S

    2011-01-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to depos...

  20. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  1. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  2. Nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强斌; 高芒来; 张嗣伟

    2000-01-01

    The nanofriction properties of Au substrate and monolayer molecular deposition film and multilayer molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the molecular deposition films modified with alkyl-terminal molecule have been investigated by using an atomic force microscope. It is concluded that ( i ) the deposition of molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the modification of alkyl-terminal molecule to the molecular deposition films can reduce the frictional force; (ii) the molecular deposition films with the same terminal exhibit similar nanofriction properties, which has nothing to do with the molecular chain-length and the layer number; (iii) the unstable nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films are contributed to the active terminal of the molecular deposition film, which can be eliminated by decorating the active molecular deposition film with alkyl-terminal molecule, moreover, the decoration of alkyl-terminal molecule can lower the frictional force conspicuously; (iv) the relat

  3. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    It is well known that sediment deposition in the North Sea and on the Norwegian Shelf varied significantly during the Cenozoic as a consequence of varying erosion rate mainly in Western Scandinavia, in Scotland and in the Alps. Recent results have demonstrated that a causal relationship exists...... of variations in erosion rates. Here we present the rationale behind the project, the data available and some preliminary results. The dense seismic and well coverage in the area makes it possible to estimate the rate of deposition of matrix mass. Assuming that sediment storage is not important, this provides...

  4. Systems for Guaranteeing Bank Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Untaru

    2013-01-01

    The advent of the financial crisis and the latest event that occurred in Cyprus bring new light to how states intervene when commercial banks are facing the risk of bankruptcy. While until now institutions had a clear traditional role to protect depositors, currently there is a trend to transfer damage to companies and individuals that hold deposits.

  5. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (2)NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20082329 Chen Wang(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China) Control Factors on Distribution of Carboniferous Bauxite Deposits in Western Henan Province (Geotectonica et Metallogenia,ISSN1001—1552,CN44—1595/P,31(4),2007,p.452—456,1 illus.,10 refs.) Key words:bauxite,mineralization con- trols,Henan Province

  6. Titania Deposition on PMR-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mary B.; Sutter, James K.; Pizem, Hillel; Gershevitz, Olga; Goffer, Yossi; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Milhet, Xavier; McIlwain, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The formation, degree of crystallinity and adherence of dense titania (TiO2) thin film coatings on a high-temperature polyimide resin (PMR-15) can be influenced by the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Furthermore, solution deposition conditions can be adjusted to provide additional control over the morphology and crystallinity of the titania films. Recipes for solution-based titania deposition that used a slowly-hydrolyzing titanium fluoride salt in the presence of boric acid as a fluoride scavenger allowed growth of films up to 750 nm thick in 22 h. By adjusting solution pH and temperature, either amorphous titania or oriented crystalline anatase films could be formed. Surface sulfonate groups enhance the adhesion of solution-deposited oxide thin film coatings. While most sulfonation procedures severely damaged the PMR-15 surface, the use of chlorosulfonic acid followed by hydrolysis of the installed chlorosulfonyl groups provided effective surface sulfonation without significant surface damage. In some cases, the oxide deposition solution caused partial hydrolysis of the polymer surface, which itself was sufficient to allow adhesion of the titania film through chelation of titanium ions by exposed benzoic acid groups on the polymer surface.

  7. Electro-spark deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  8. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  9. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  10. Constructing deposition chronologies for peat deposits using radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Piotrowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating is one of the main methods used to establish peat chronologies. This article reviews the basis of the method and its application to dating of peat deposits. Important steps in the radiocarbon dating procedure are described, including selection and extraction of material (and fractions for dating, chemical and physical preparation of media suitable for measurements, measurements of 14C activity or concentration, calculations, calibration of results and age-depth modelling.

  11. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  12. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within a deposit...

  13. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  14. Electro-spark deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated as one of the enabling technologies for advanced energy systems. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that promises an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Since this regime borders on and exceeds the normal operating limits of existing ESD electronic equipment, development is in progress to produce equipment that can consistently and reliably achieve these conditions for a broad range of materials. Progress so far has resulted in a consistent 500% increase in deposition rates, and greater rates still are anticipated. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, the incorporation of the process into the operations of a major gas turbine manufacturer, major new applications in gas turbine blade and steam turbine blade protection and repair, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  15. Complexing and hydrothermal ore deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Helgeson, Harold C

    1964-01-01

    Complexing and Hydrothermal Ore Deposition provides a synthesis of fact, theory, and interpretative speculation on hydrothermal ore-forming solutions. This book summarizes information and theory of the internal chemistry of aqueous electrolyte solutions accumulated in previous years. The scope of the discussion is limited to those aspects of particular interest to the geologist working on the problem of hydrothermal ore genesis. Wherever feasible, fundamental principles are reviewed. Portions of this text are devoted to calculations of specific hydrothermal equilibriums in multicompone

  16. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...... can be successfully treated, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis. Serum ferritin values, transferrin saturation and genetic analysis are used when diagnosing haemochromatosis. The diagnostics of Wilson's disease depends on the use of urinary copper values, serum ceruloplasmin and liver...

  17. CTD_DATABASE - Cascadia tsunami deposit database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have...

  18. Isotropic metal deposition technique for metamaterials fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will present the first steps taken towards isotropic deposition of thin metallic layers on dielectric substrates. The deposition takes place in aqueous environment thus making it both cheap and easy to be implemented....

  19. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Insured Banks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Summary of Deposits (SOD) is the annual survey of branch office deposits for all FDIC-insured institutions including insured U.S. branches of foreign banks. Data...

  20. Mergers and acquisitions : the case of Microsoft Corporation and Activision Blizzard Inc.

    OpenAIRE

    Stenmark, Robert Vicent Leon

    2012-01-01

    Globalization, geographic diversification and deregulation of markets have led to an increasingly competitive environment for most companies. Increasing competition often leads to higher efforts to persuade consumers to by the given company’s product, and consequently margins are affected. Moreover, this development of the business environment also faces as a threat to most companies’ organic growth. For this reason, companies often envision mergers and acquisitions as a sol...

  1. Mineral deposits in western Saudi Arabia; a preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Greenwood, William R.; Worl, Ronald G.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kiilsgaard, Thor H.

    1975-01-01

    Mineral deposits in Saudi Arabia include a variety of deposits which were formed in many geologic environments. These include magmatic and late magmatic deposits in igneous masses, contact metamorphic deposits along the margins of igneous bodies, and stratiform sulfide deposits and veins. Notable deposits of sedimentary origin include deposits of iron oxides and phosphate.

  2. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  3. DEPOSITION OF PARTICLES IN TURBULENT PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Luo; Suyuan Yu

    2006-01-01

    The deposition of particles in turbulent pipe flow was investigated in terms of two mechanisms, turbulent and thermophoretic. A general equation incorporating these two mechanisms was formulated to calculate the deposition efficiency of aerosol particles in turbulent pipe flow together with thermophoretic deposition. The validity of the equation was confirmed by good agreement between calculated and measured results.

  4. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...... contributions to the theory of cluster stopping in matter as well as for practical applications requiring ultra-shallow implantation and modification of surfaces on the nanoscale. Metal clusters from the magnetron cluster source are of interest for the production of optical sensors to detect specific biological...

  5. Metal deposition using seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  6. Deposit Reserve Rate No Panacea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark; A.DeWeaver

    2006-01-01

    To rein in runaway investment, China's central bank, the People's Bank of China (PBOC), took several measures in mid-June, including the most dramatic step of raising the deposit reserve rate by 0.5 percentage point According to Mark A. DeWeaver, who manages Quantrarian Asia Hedge, a fund that invests in Asian equities, the PBOC's measures may lower money supply growth in the short term; that is, the effect of these measures "may be only temporary." He believes that "attempts to slow money supply growth ...

  7. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  8. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  9. Arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposit model: Chapter D in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model for arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposits. Presented within are geological, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics that differentiate this deposit type from porphyry copper and alkali-feldspar rhyolite-granite porphyry molybdenum deposits. The U.S. Geological Survey's effort to update existing mineral deposit models spurred this research, which is intended to supplement previously published models for this deposit type that help guide mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments.

  10. Legal Deposit of Digital Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Oltmans

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital publishing is causing a real paradigm shift for research institutions and publishers, as well as for libraries. As a consequence these institutions have to develop new policies, new business models and new infrastructures and techniques. A major problem is that, at the same rate at which our world is becoming digital, the digital information is threatened. New types of hardware, computer applications and file formats supersede each other, making our recorded digital information inaccessible in the long-term. In the past years libraries and archives have undertaken several actions and studies on digital preservation issues. For instance the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB has jointly with IBM developed a standard-based deposit system: Digital Information Archiving System ( DIAS. Using DIAS the KB realised in 2002 an electronic deposit (the e-Depot and signed archiving agreements with major science publishers for permanent keeping of their digital materials. In this paper I will discuss the fully operational e-Depot at the KB. I will focus on the data flow of processing the digital publications, and I will address the issue of digital preservation in detail.

  11. Physiopathology of intratendinous calcific deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In calcific tendinopathy (CT, calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical manifestations of tendinopathy with an increase in rupture rate, slower recovery times and a higher frequency of post-operative complications. The aetiopathogenesis of CT is still controversial, but seems to be the result of an active cell-mediated process and a localized attempt of the tendon to compensate the original decreased stiffness. Tendon healing includes many sequential processes, and disturbances at different stages of healing may lead to different combinations of histopathological changes, diverting the normal healing processes to an abnormal pathway. In this review, we discuss the theories of pathogenesis behind CT. Better understanding of the pathogenesis is essential for development of effective treatment modalities and for improvement of clinical outcomes.

  12. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  13. Engineering vapor-deposited polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Yu

    The vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) of PMDA-ODA polyimide was studied parametrically to produce microcapsules and thin films with desirable properties and quality for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The mechanical properties and gas permeability were determined at temperatures from 10 to 573 K. The VDP polyimide possessed distinct properties including lower gas permeability and stronger tensile properties from those of solution-cast Kapton, which were attributed to the presence of cross-linking. Processing parameters determining the properties of the VDP polyimide were identified: (1) utilizing air instead of nitrogen as the atmosphere of imidization increased the permeability by 140%, lowered the activation energy for permeation, and reduced the tensile strength by 30% without affecting the Young's modulus; (2) imidizing at faster heating rates increased the permeability by up to 50% and reduced the activation energy for permeation with 50% lowered tensile strength and impervious Young's modulus; (3) bi-axial stretching increased the permeability by up to three orders of magnitude. Analyses via IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density measurement revealed that the effects of the processing parameters were results of the modifications in the crystallinity and molecular weight. The VDP polyimide underwent minor degradation in the tensile strength and elongation at break with unaffected Young's modulus and permeability upon absorbing 120 MGy of beta-radiation. Substituting a fluorinated dianhydride monomer, 6FDA, for PMDA in the optimized VDP process yielded 6FDA-ODA polyimide microcapsules and films with 50-fold increased permeability and comparable mechanical properties. The results of this study enable the production of polyimide microcapsules that will greatly facilitate the ICF experiments, and will broaden the applications of vapor-deposited polyimides in other technology fields.

  14. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits.

  15. Uranium in cassiterites of tin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagruzina, I.A.; Pinskij, Eh.M.; Savinova, I.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidation of physico-chemical features of uranium and tin behaviour in ore deposition zones uranium determinations (1000 determ) in cassiterite grains from 55 tin-ore deposits of different formation types of several separate regions are carried out by means of fission radiography. It is shown that uranium content in cassiterites is a genetic sign. Peculiarities of uranium concentration and migration in tin deposits permit to use them as prognostic radiogeochemical criteria. Radiogeochemical prognostic-search signs confirm the antagonism between uranium and tin deposits of cassiterite-silicate and cassiterite-sulfide formations and paragenetic of certain types of uranium hydrothermal deposits with tin deposits of cassiterite-quartz formation.

  16. Preliminary Model of Porphyry Copper Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program develops mineral-deposit models for application in USGS mineral-resource assessments and other mineral resource-related activities within the USGS as well as for nongovernmental applications. Periodic updates of models are published in order to incorporate new concepts and findings on the occurrence, nature, and origin of specific mineral deposit types. This update is a preliminary model of porphyry copper deposits that begins an update process of porphyry copper models published in USGS Bulletin 1693 in 1986. This update includes a greater variety of deposit attributes than were included in the 1986 model as well as more information about each attribute. It also includes an expanded discussion of geophysical and remote sensing attributes and tools useful in resource evaluations, a summary of current theoretical concepts of porphyry copper deposit genesis, and a summary of the environmental attributes of unmined and mined deposits.

  17. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  18. Electrochemical Deposition of Ni-W Gradient Deposit and Its Structural Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏智; 姚素薇; 张卫国

    2003-01-01

    The Ni-W gradient deposit with nano-structure was prepared by an electrochemical deposition method.X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) indicate that the crystallite size of the deposit decreases from 10.3nm to 1.5nm and the crystal grating aberrance increases with the increase of W content in the growing direction of the deposit. The structure of deposit changes from crystalline to amorphous stepwise with associated increase of crystal grating aberrance, and presents gradient distribution. These show that the deposit isgradient with nano-structure.

  19. CPI Overruns Deposit Reserve Rate Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The People's Bank of China has announced its intention to raise the deposit reserve rate again,less than one month after the last rate increase, this means that the deposit reserve rate has increased a total of ten times this year. However, this time the central bank increased the deposit reserve rate by a full 1 percent, a bigger increase than the last nine adjustments of 0.5 percent.

  20. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  1. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez; Sergio Bonafonte Royo

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL) implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for i...

  2. FTIR analysis of aviation fuel deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, L. S.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    Five modes of operation of the Nicolet 7199 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer have been evaluated for application in analysis of the chemical structure of accelerated storage/thermal deposits produced by jet fuels. Using primarily the absorption and emission modes, the effects of fuel type, stress temperature, stress time, type of spiking agent, spiking agent concentration, fuel flow, and post-depositional treatment on the chemical nature of fuel deposits have been determined.

  3. Mass deposition from inspired polydisperse aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf, G.; Gebhart, J.; Heyder, J.; Scheuch, G.; Stahlhofen, W. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Frankfurt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung)

    1988-01-01

    Mass deposition of polydisperse hydrophobic aerosol particles in various regions of the human respiratory tract has been calculated using a semi-empirical deposition model and assuming lognormal particle size distributions. The effects of polydispersity, breathing mode (nose versus mouth breathing), breathing pattern, particle size and density upon mass deposition are discussed. Significant differences are found from the model predictions of the ICRP TASK GROUP ON LUNG DYNAMICS (1966) and later ICRP recommendations. The influence of the geometric standard deviation of the size distribution upon mass deposition depends on particle size, and a simple explanation of this effect is introduced. (author).

  4. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  5. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Califano, Valeria, E-mail: v.califano@im.cnr.it [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Lipase from Candida Rugosa was deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on KBr pellets, mica and glass substrate. • The deposited film was characterized morphologically and structurally by optical microscopy, SEM and FTIR analysis. • Results of characterization underlined a phenomenon of aggregation taking place. • The aggregation phenomenon was reversible since lipase showed activity in the transesterification reaction between soybean oil and isopropyl alcohol once detached from the substrate. - Abstract: Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  7. Solubility of deposited airborne heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Sibel C.; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-09-01

    Toxic effects of heavy metals in water and soil environments are important. Quantifying the heavy metal concentrations and their solubilities in dry and wet deposition samples is part of atmospheric research. Soluble fractions of the deposited air pollutants are important in food chain mechanisms as heavy metals may cause ecotoxic impacts. In this study, the solubilities of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni were investigated in deposition samples for total, dissolved, and suspended fractions after collection in a surrogate, water-surface sampler in Izmir, Turkey, during October 2003 to June 2004. To find overall solubility of each metal in dry and wet deposition samples, concentrations in soluble and suspended phases of aqueous solutions were analyzed separately. Ratios between total and dissolved forms and the metals in the same forms were analyzed and evaluated statistically. It was found that the deposited metal fluxes were significantly correlated in wet deposition with the highest correlation between Cd and Pb in the soluble and total forms. Comparatively smaller correlations were found between these metal fluxes in dry deposition samples. Results of this study showed the importance of metal pollution, especially ecotoxic properties of heavy metals in wet deposition far more than dry deposition.

  8. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  9. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Guiqiao

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  10. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    peptide nanotubes, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nano assembly 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...Using physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...for the deposition of thin films (Figure 1b). A. B. Figure 1. (a) Illustration of physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) process of diphenylalanine

  11. The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-14

    AD-A278 022 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT N00014-84-k-0656/PP0002 R & T Code 4133034 Technical Report #36 The Underpotential Deposition of Copper...Include Security Clauffication) The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects 𔃼 OERSONAL AUTHOR(S...Alacant, Spain ABSTRACT The underpotential deposition of copper on Pt(31 1)=Pt[2(111 )x(100)] stepped surfaces has been studied and the results are compared

  12. Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media: Fundamental Insights Through Investigation of Deposit Fractal Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eric J; Gilbert, Benjamin; Mays, David C

    2015-10-20

    Experiments reveal a wide discrepancy between the permeability of porous media containing colloid deposits and the available predictive equations. Evidence suggests that this discrepancy results, in part, from the predictive equations failing to account for colloid deposit morphology. This article reports a series of experiments using static light scattering (SLS) to characterize colloid deposit morphology within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media during flow through a column. Real time measurements of permeability, specific deposit, deposit fractal dimension, and deposit radius of gyration, at different vertical positions, were conducted with initially clean porous media at various ionic strengths and fluid velocities. Decreased permeability (i.e., increased clogging) corresponded with higher specific deposit, lower fractal dimension, and smaller radius of gyration. During deposition, fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability decreased with increasing specific deposit. During flushing with colloid-free fluid, these trends reversed, with increased fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability. These observations suggest a deposition scenario in which large and uniform aggregates become deposits, which reduce porosity, lead to higher fluid shear forces, which then decompose the deposits, filling the pore space with small and dendritic fragments of aggregate.

  13. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  14. The mechanical properties of thin alumina film deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Gellings, P.J.; Vendel, van de D.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Amorphous alumina films were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The MOCVD experiments were performed in nitrogen at low and atmospheric pressures. The effects of deposition temperature, growth rate and film thickness on the mechanical pro

  15. Deposition and Investigation of Hydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluoropolymer coatings of different morphologies are deposited by the HWCVD (Hot Wire CVD method. The effect of activator filament temperature on the structure of fluoropolymer coating is shown. The results of studying the hydrophobic fluoropolymer coatings with different structures, deposited by the HWCVD method, are presented.

  16. Large Nonferrous Metals Deposits Found in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>According to the Department of Land and Resources of Yunnan, Yunnan has made great achievements since implementation of the geological prospecting action plan. 5 ultra-large deposits and several large deposits have been found, and a group of key areas with favorable ore-forming prospect have been pinpointed.

  17. A Simplified Diffusion-Deposition Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1980-01-01

    The use of a simple top hat plume model facilitates an analytical treatment of the deposition problem. A necessary constraint, however, is that the diffusion velocity (e.g., in terms of the plume growth-rate) is large compared to the deposition velocity. With these limitations, explicit formulae...

  18. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Review of Gaussian diffusion-deposition models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    The assumptions and predictions of several Gaussian diffusion-deposition models are compared. A simple correction to the Chamberlain source depletion model is shown to predict ground-level airborne concentrations and dry deposition fluxes in close agreement with the exact solution of Horst.

  20. Plant responses to insect egg deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, M.; Fatouros, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    Plants can respond to insect egg deposition and thus resist attack by herbivorous insects from the beginning of the attack, egg deposition. We review ecological effects of plant responses to insect eggs and differentiate between egg-induced plant defenses that directly harm the eggs and indirect def

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  2. Ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quane, Steven L.; Russell, James K.

    2005-02-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits involves flattening of glassy pyroclasts under a compactional load at temperatures above the glass transition temperature. Progressive welding is recorded by changes in the petrographic (e.g., fabric) and physical (e.g., density) properties of the deposits. Mapping the intensity of welding can be integral to studies of pyroclastic deposits, but making systematic comparisons between deposits can be problematical. Here we develop a scheme for ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits on the basis of petrographic textural observations (e.g., oblateness of pumice lapilli and micro-fabric orientation) and measurements of physical properties, including density, porosity, point load strength and uniaxial compressive strength. Our dataset comprises measurements on 100 samples collected from a single cooling unit of the Bandelier Tuff and parallel measurements on 8 samples of more densely welded deposits. The proposed classification comprises six ranks of welding intensity ranging from unconsolidated (Rank I) to obsidian-like vitrophyre (Rank VI) and should allow for reproducible mapping of subtle variations in welding intensity between different deposits. The application of the ranking scheme is demonstrated by using published physical property data on welded pyroclastic deposits to map the total accumulated strain and to reconstruct their pre-welding thicknesses.

  3. Goudafzettingen in Suriname (Gold deposits in Surinam)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinck, J.W.

    1956-01-01

    THE GOLD DEPOSITS IN SURINAM AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONCESSIONS THROUGH THE COUNTRY The fieldwork on the occurrence of primary and secondary gold deposits in Surinam on which this thesis is based was carried out by order of the Welfare Fund Surinam (Welvaarts Fonds Suriname) during the periods Dece

  4. Fuzzy Comprehensive Appraisal of Concealed Ore Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the transformation from the fuzzy to the accurate process is exemplified by the Jiaodong gold ore deposits concentrated region where the mathematical analysis is used to appraise and forecast regional concealed gold ore deposits. In this sense, this paper presents a new way to the appraisal of the non-traditional mineral resources.

  5. 12 CFR 19.170 - Discovery depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hearing. (b) Notice. A party desiring to take a deposition shall give reasonable notice in writing to the... proceeding instituted under or subject to the provisions of subpart A of this part, a party may take the... take depositions at any time after the commencement of the proceeding, but no later than ten...

  6. The geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiluo Hao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and “bacteriopyrites” that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium plagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecology of such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies.

  7. The geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiluo Hao; Kwunlun Leung; Rucheng Wang; Weidong Sun; Yiliang Li

    2010-01-01

    Bauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and "bacteriopyrites" that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium ptagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecologyof such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub) surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies.

  8. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (2)NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20071073 Huang Tiedong(No.1 Geological Team of Xinjiang Bureau of Exploration and Mining,Changji,Xinjiang 831100,China) Formation of the Salt Lake and KNO3 Ore in the Kumishi Block-Falling Basin in Xin- jiang(Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology, ISSN1000-3665,CN11-2202/P,32(6), 2005,p.20-24,4 illus.,3 tables,8 refs.) Key words:niter,salt deposits,Xinjiang The Kumishi Basin,a Cenozoic block- falling basin,has been controlled by a dry continental climate and continuously under- went a concentration process due to evapora- tion.The rock salt began to form in the late Pliocene to Pleistocene(35 ka B.P.).The thick rock salt bodies assembled in the late Holocene(4.5 ka B.P.)because of the stable crust and the continuous dry climate.With the evolution into the dry salt lake stage,the brines occurring in the crystals further con- centrated and the liquid-phase KNO3 formed,which is overlain by K-rich rock salt.

  9. Innovations in marketing of deposit services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Vasylieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is recent studies of global trends in marketing of innovative deposit services. The results of the analysis. Summing up the general, it should be noted that, according to our goal, we systematized the theoretical basis of innovation in marketing services and deposit rated their performance justified the specific marketing innovation support domestic banks in the deposit market. Conclusions and directions of further researches. Deposit market is an important resource base for the banking sector of any country. Increased competition there between financial institutions in the post-crisis period is an incentive to find and implement various marketing innovation in deposit services that would help attract additional financial resources. Today, many analysts have focused on the fact that any further activities on the deposit market, including marketing, must take account of three important factors: 1. «Online competition». In this case it means the access to the financial market in order to attract temporarily free funds of non-banking institutions (insurance brokerage companies, world leaders providing IT services. These institutions are deploying a fierce fight for every customer, using global information space – the Internet. Given all modern premise, it planned to expand the presence of such companies in the online space with lucrative offers favorable interest rates on deposits with new loyalty programs relative to individual customer needs. 2. Shortage of alternatives to ensure liquidity. Since banks are limited in their ability to write off loans from their balance through exercise securitization and financing transactions in the wholesale financial markets, as they continue to feel the need to attract customer funds. This, in turn, will contribute to increased competition in the struggle for each new customer and promote the development of innovation in marketing deposit services. 3. Presence of non-national sources

  10. A lithium deposition system for tokamak devices*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziul, Christopher; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Hoffman, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Card, David

    2002-11-01

    The production of a lithium deposition system using commercially available components is discussed. This system is intended to provide a fresh lithium wall coating between discharges in a tokamak. For this purpose, a film 100-200 Å thick is sufficient to ensure that the plasma interacts solely with the lithium. A test system consisting of a lithium evaporator and a deposition monitor has been designed and constructed to investigate deposition rates and coverage. A Thermionics 3kW e-gun is used to rapidly evaporate small amounts of solid lithium. An Inficon XTM/2 quartz deposition monitor then measures deposition rate at varying distances, positions and angles relative to the e-gun crucible. Initial results from the test system will be presented. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  11. Tax evasion and Swiss bank deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Bank deposits in offshore financial centers may be used to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform limits the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a withholding tax on interest income earned by EU households in Switzerland and several other offshore centers. This paper...... quarters immediately before and after the tax was introduced. We also present evidence suggesting that the drop in Swiss bank deposits was driven by behavioral responses aiming to escape the tax - such as the transfer of funds to bank accounts in other offshore centers and the transfer of formal ownership...... estimates the impact of the withholding tax on Swiss bank deposits held by EU residents while using non-EU residents who were not subject to the tax as a comparison group. We present evidence that Swiss bank deposits owned by EU residents declined by 30–40% relative to other Swiss bank deposits in two...

  12. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  14. Effects of deposition time in chemically deposited ZnS films in acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Chelouche, A., E-mail: azeddinechelouche@gmail.com; Talantikite, D.; Merzouk, H.; Boudjouan, F.; Djouadi, D.

    2015-08-31

    We report an experimental study on the synthesis and characterization of zinc sulfide (ZnS) single layer thin films deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in acidic solution. The effect of deposition time on the microstructure, surface morphology, optical absorption, transmittance, and photoluminescence (PL) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis–NIR spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples exhibit wurtzite structure and their crystal quality is improved by increasing deposition time. The latter, was found to affect the morphology of the thin films as showed by SEM micrographs. The optical measurements revealed a high transparency in the visible range and a dependence of absorption edge and band gap on deposition time. The room temperature PL spectra indicated that all ZnS grown thin films emit a UV and blue light, while the band intensities are found to be dependent on deposition times. - Highlights: • Single layer ZnS thin films were deposited by CBD in acidic solution at 95 °C. • The effect of deposition time was investigated. • Coexistence of ZnS and ZnO hexagonal structures for time deposition below 2 h • Thicker ZnS films were achieved after monolayer deposition for 5 h. • The highest UV-blue emission observed in thin film deposited at 5 h.

  15. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Tao; Zhang Chunhui; Su Guiqiao; Yan Ping

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 pm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  16. Particle deposition in industrial duct bends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas M; Leith, David

    2004-07-01

    A study of particle deposition in industrial duct bends is presented. Particle deposition by size was measured by comparing particle size distributions upstream and downstream of bends that had geometries and flow conditions similar to those used in industrial ventilation. As the interior surface of the duct bend was greased to prevent particle bounce, the results are applicable to liquid drops and solid particles where duct walls are sticky. Factors investigated were: (i) flow Reynolds number (Re = 203 000, 36 000); (ii) particle Reynolds number (10 vertical); and (vii) construction technique (smooth, gored, segmented). Measured deposition was compared with models developed for bends in small diameter sampling lines (Re 20 microm, deposition was slightly greater in the horizontal-to-horizontal orientation than in the horizontal-to-vertical orientation due to gravitational settling. Penetration was not a multiplicative function of bend angle as theory predicts, due to the developing nature of turbulent flow in bends. Deposition in a smooth bend was similar to that in a gored bend; however, a tight radius segmented bend (R0 = 1.7) exhibited much lower deposition. For more gradual bends (3 < R0 < 12), curvature ratio had negligible effect on deposition.

  17. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Tammie L., E-mail: Tammie.Gerke@miamioh.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States); Little, Brenda J., E-mail: brenda.little@nrlssc.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 (United States); Barry Maynard, J., E-mail: maynarjb@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+}) and hollandite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. - Highlights: • Oxidation and deposition of Mn deposits in drinking water distribution pipes • In-situ synchrotron-based μ-XANES and μ-XRF mapping • Toxic metal sorption in Mn deposits.

  18. 24 CFR 886.315 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 886... utility deposits. (a) Amount of deposits. If at the time of the initial execution of the Lease the Owner... security deposits and utility deposits from its resources and/or other public or private sources. (b)...

  19. Wet deposition in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J; Mohnen, V; Kadlecek, J

    1980-12-01

    Attempts are made to examine concentration and wet deposition of pollutant material at selected stations within the northeastern United States and to characterize as many events as possible with respect to air mass origin. Further attempts are made to develop a regional pattern for the deposition of dominant ion species. MAP3S (US Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study) data for 1977 to 1979 are used to determine concentration and deposition on an event basis from which monthly, seasonal, annual, and cumulative averages are developed. The ARL-ATAD trajectory model is used to characterize individual events as to air mass origin. Case studies are examined to illustrate variability in the chemical composition of precipitation originating from distinctly different air mass trajectories. A difference in concentration of pollution-related ions in precipitation is noted between Midwest/Ohio Valley and Great Lakes/Canadian air mass origins for carefully selected cases. Total deposition of the major ions is examined in an effort to develop a regional pattern for deposition over a period of at least one year. For that purpose, total deposition is normalized to remove the variability in precipitation amounts for inter-station comparison. No marked gradient is noted in the normalized deposition totals within the northeast of the United States. The Adirondack region exhibited the lowest normalized ion deposition value, while the Illinois station showed the highest of the MAP3S network. The data analysis suggest that the acid rain phenomena covers the entire northeast. The concept of large scale mixing emerges to account for the lack of a significant gradient in the normalized deposition.

  20. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for it could be the only sign of secondary glaucoma.

  1. Characteristics that distinguish types of epithermal deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayba, D.O.; Foley, N.K.; Heald-Wetlaufer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three distinctive groupings of epithermal deposits were recognized from a literature study of fifteen well-described precious- and base-metal epithermal districts, supplemented by L. J. Buchanan's 1981 compilation of data from 47 less completely documented deposits. The three groups are distinguished primarily by the type of alteration and the sulfur fugacity indicated by the vein mineral assemblage. Additional discriminating criteria include composition of the host rock, timing of ore deposition relative to emplacement of the host, and relative abundances of gold, silver, and base metals.

  2. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  3. Nitrogen deposition in California forests: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytnerowicz, A; Fenn, M E

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of the major nitrogenous (N) compounds and their biological effects in California forests are reviewed. Climatic characteristics of California are summarized in light of their effects on pollutant accumulation and transport. Over large areas of the state dry deposition is of greater magnitude than wet deposition due to the arid climate. However, fog deposition can also be significant in areas where seasonal fogs and N pollution sources coincide. The dominance of dry deposition is magnified in airsheds with frequent temperature inversions such as occur in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Most of the deposition in such areas occurs in summer as a result of surface deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO3) as well as particulate nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Internal uptake of gaseous N pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), and others provides additional N to forests. However, summer drought and subsequent lower stomatal conductance of plants tend to limit plant utilization of gaseous N. Nitrogen deposition is much greater than S deposition in California. In locations close to photochemical smog source areas, concentrations of oxidized forms of N (NO2, HNO3, PAN) dominate, while in areas near agricultural activities the importance of reduced N forms (NH3, NH4+) significantly increases. Little data from California forests are available for most of the gaseous N pollutants. Total inorganic N deposition in the most highly-exposed forests in the Los Angeles Air Basin may be as high as 25-45 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Nitrogen deposition in these highly-exposed areas has led to N saturation of chaparral and mixed conifer stands. In N saturated forests high concentrations of NO3- are found in streamwater, soil solution, and in foliage. Nitric oxide emissions from soil and foliar N:P ratios are also high in N saturated sites. Further research is needed to determine the

  4. Effect of layer thickness setting on deposition characteristics in direct energy deposition (DED) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Do-Sik; Baek, Gyeong-Yun; Seo, Jin-Seon; Shin, Gwang-Yong; Kim, Kee-Poong; Lee, Ki-Yong

    2016-12-01

    Direct energy deposition is an additive manufacturing technique that involves the melting of metal powder with a high-powered laser beam and is used to build a variety of components. In laser-assisted metal deposition, the mechanical and metallurgical properties achieved are influenced by many factors. This paper addresses methods for selecting an appropriate layer thickness setting, which is an important parameter in layer-by-layer deposition manufacturing. A new procedure is proposed for determining the layer thickness setting for use in slicing of a part based on the single-layer height for a given depositing condition. This procedure was compared with a conventional method that uses an empirically determined layer thickness and with a feedback control method. The micro-hardness distribution, location of the melting pool, and microstructures of the deposited layers after deposition of a simple target shape were investigated for each procedure. The experimental results show that even though the feedback control method is the most effective method for obtaining the desired geometry, the deposited region was characterized by inhomogeneity of micro-hardness due to the time-variable depositing conditions involved. The largest dimensional error was associated with the conventional deposition procedure, which produced a rise in the melting zone due to over-deposition with respect to the slicing thickness, especially at the high laser power level considered. In contrast, the proposed procedure produced a stable melting zone position during deposition, which resulted in the deposited part having reasonable dimensional accuracy and uniform micro-hardness throughout the deposited region.

  5. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  6. Rare earth element mines, deposits, and occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains location, geologic and mineral economic data for world rare earth mines, deposits, and occurrences. The data in this compilation were derived...

  7. Tax Evasion and Swiss Bank Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    Bank deposits in jurisdictions with banking secrecy constitute an effective tool to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform reduces the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a source tax on interest income earned by EU residents in Switzerland and several other jurisdictions...... with banking secrecy. In this paper, we estimate the impact of the source tax on Swiss bank deposits held by EU residents while using that non-EU residents were not subject to the tax to apply a natural experiment methodology. We find that the 15% source tax caused Swiss bank deposits of EU residents to drop...... by more than 40% with most of the response occurring in two quarters immediately before and after the source tax was introduced. The estimates imply an elasticity of Swiss deposits with respect to the net-of-source-tax-rate in the range 2.5-3....

  8. Major mineral deposits of the world

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Regional locations and general geologic setting of known deposits of major nonfuel mineral commodities. Originally compiled in five parts by diverse authors,...

  9. Deposition of contaminant aerosol on human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Roed, Jørn; Byrne, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years, it has been established that deposition of various types of pollutant aerosols (e.g., radioactive) on human skin can have serious deleterious effects on health. However. only few investigations in the past have been devoted to measurement of deposition velocities on skin...... of particles of the potentially problematic sizes. An experimental programme has shown the deposition velocities on skin of particles in the ca. 0.5-5 mu m AMAD range to be high and generally associated with great variations. A series of investigations have been made to identify some of the factors that lead...... to this variation. Part of the variation was found to be caused by differences between individuals, whereas another part was found to be related to environmental factors, The identification of major influences on skin contaminant deposition is important in estimating health effects as well as in identifying means...

  10. On Biochemical Formation of Salt Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A water/salt system in an evaporative environment is both a physicochemical region and a biological one. All the parameters of the system, such as the salinity, temperature and CO2 partial pressure, are affected by halophilic bacteria. The system controls salt deposition but is modified by an accompanying ecological system; therefore it should be called a water/salt/biological system. Salt minerals result from accumulation of the remains of bacteria/algae, namely, bacteria/algae formation; whereas biological, biophysical and biochemical processes provide full evidence for organic involvement. Consequently, salt deposits should not be called purely chemical but biological/chemical ones. This new argument supplements and develops the traditional idea and helps perfect the mineralization theory of salts and even general deposits, thus giving guidance to prospecting for salt deposits.

  11. Porphyry copper deposits of the world

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Information on porphyry copper deposits from around the world with grade and tonnage models, a general classification based on geologic setting, mineralogy, with...

  12. NOAA/WDC Global Tsunami Deposits Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Discover where, when and how severely tsunamis affected Earth in geologic history. Information regarding Tsunami Deposits and Proxies for Tsunami Events complements...

  13. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  14. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  15. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  16. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  17. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  18. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  19. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  20. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  1. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  2. Fabrication of Micro Components by Electrochemical Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    The main issue of this thesis is the combination of electrochemical deposition of metals and micro machining. Processes for electroplating and electroless plating of nickel and nickel alloys have been developed and optimised for compatibility with microelectronics and silicon based micromechanics...... of electrochemical machining and traditional machining is compared to micro machining techniques as performed in the field of microelectronics. Various practical solutions and equipment for electrochemical deposition of micro components are demonstrated, as well as the use and experience obtained utilising...

  3. Major Brazilian gold deposits - 1982 to 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorman, Charles H.; DeWitt, Ed; Maron, Marcos A.; Ladeira, Eduardo A.

    2001-07-01

    Brazil has been a major but intermittent producer of gold since its discovery in 1500. Brazil led the world in gold production during the 18th and early 19th centuries. From the late 19th century to the late 20th century, total mining company and garimpeiro production was small and relatively constant at about 5 to 8 t/year. The discovery of alluvial deposits in the Amazon by garimpeiros in the 1970s and the opening of eight mines by mining companies from 1983 to 1990 fueled a major boom in Brazil's gold production, exceeding 100 t/year in 1988 and 1989. However, garimpeiro alluvial production decreased rapidly in the 1990s, to about 10 t/year by 1999. Company production increased about tenfold from about 4 t/year in 1982 to 40 t in 1992. Production from 1992 to the present remained relatively stable, even though several mines were closed or were in the process of closing and no new major mines were put into production during that period. Based on their production history from 1982-1999, 17 gold mines are ranked as major (>20 t) and minor (3-8 t) mines. From 1982-1999, deposits hosted in Archean rocks produced 66% of the gold in Brazil, whereas deposits in Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks accounted for 19% and 15%, respectively. Deposits in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks, especially carbonate-rich rocks and carbonate iron-formation, yielded the great bulk of the gold. Deposits in igneous rocks were of much less importance. The Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes of Brazil largely lack base-metal-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, porphyry deposits, and polymetallic veins and sedimentary exhalative deposits. An exception to this is in the Carajás Mineral Province.

  4. Factors that Affect the Lung Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhala, Shweta; Singh, H. S.; Singh, S. K.; Lalwani, Gautam

    The lung is an external organ forming the site of unwanted material or particles. In order to protect it, the airways have to be highly effective filters and if the particle deposit they need to be cleared. Inhaled particles can cause a variety of diseases. There are various factors on which the prediction of depositing particles depends, such as age, particle size, flow rate gender, the physics of the particles, the anatomy of the respiratory tract etc.

  5. A Game Theory Approach of Deposit Insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-xun; QIU Wan-hua; MING Ming

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic game theory approach for deposit insurance. We formulate a deposit insurance problem as an incomplete information game theory model, which deduces the expression of Capital Charge Ratio for national central bank. The main contribution of the paper however is that we then extrapolate the declared value of the bank in best its policy. Finally a numerical example is used to illustrate the approach proposed in this paper.

  6. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  7. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  8. IMMUNOGLOBULIN DEPOSITIONS IN PERIPHERAL NERVES IN POLYMYOSITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李越星; 陈清棠; 吴丽娟; 贾钟; 张秋荣; 左越焕

    1995-01-01

    An immunocytochemical study was performed in 6 peripheral nerve specimens from 6 cases of polymyositis.The results revealed that depositions of IgG,IgM,IgA and C3 were found in the epineurium,perineurium and the walls of capillaries.These findings demonstrated that depositions of immonoglobulins and the complement-mediated immunoreaction may play an important role in pathogenesis of polymyositis with peripheral nerfve involvements.

  9. Ultramafic-Hosted Talc-Magnesite Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Foley, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation on the geology of ultramafic-hosted talc-magnesite deposits was given at the 42nd Forum on the Geology of Industrial Minerals, May 7-13, 2006, in Asheville, North Carolina (USA). Talc is a soft inert industrial mineral commodity commonly used as a component or filler in ceramic, paint, paper, plastic, roofing, and electrical applications. Ultramafic-hosted talc-magnesite deposits are important sources of talc.

  10. Removal of External Deposits on Boiler Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. De

    1970-07-01

    Full Text Available The superheater tubes in Port and Starboard boilers were found to have completely clogged by heavy deposits, which on analysis mainly vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulphmatter. The cleaning of the deposits was accomplished by alternate spraying with 15-20 per cent hydrogen peroxide and washing with hot water jets. Over the past two years, since the date of cleaning, the IN ship is operating without any trouble in the boilers.

  11. An Introduction to Copper Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    There are 11 genetic types of copper deposit in China, three of which (porphyry,contact metasomatic and VMS types) are the most important. The copper deposits distribute widely both temporally and spatially in China. The features of copper ores in China are mostly poor in copper tenor and complex in metal associated. The copper metallogeny in China predominantly occurs in three metallogenic megadomains, namely the circum-Pacific, the paleo-Asian and the Tethys-Himalayan.

  12. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  13. Selective Electroless Silver Deposition on Graphene Edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, D.; Larsen, M. V.; Andryieuski, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method of electroless selective silver deposition on graphene edges or between graphene islands without covering the surface of graphene. Modifications of the deposition recipe allow for decoration of graphene edges with silver nanoparticles or filling holes in damaged graphene...... on silica substrate and thus potentially restoring electric connectivity with minimal influence on the overall graphene electrical and optical properties. The presented technique could find applications in graphene based transparent conductors as well as selective edge functionalization and can be extended...

  14. Focused helium-ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Miro, H. [Delft University of Technology, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    The recent introduction of the helium ion microscope (HIM) offers new possibilities for materials modification and fabrication with spatial resolution below 10 nm. In particular, the specific interaction of He{sup +} ions in the tens of keV energy range with materials - i.e., minimal deflection and mainly energy loss via electronic excitations - renders the HIM a special tool for ion-beam-induced deposition. In this work, an overview is given of all studies of helium-ion-beam-induced deposition (He-IBID) that appeared in the literature before summer 2014. Continuum models that describe the deposition processes are presented in detail, with emphasis on precursor depletion and replenishment. In addition, a Monte Carlo model is discussed. Basic experimental He-IBID studies are critically examined. They show deposition rates of up to 0.1 nm{sup 3}/ion. Analysis by means of a continuum model yields the precursor diffusion constant and the cross sections for beam-induced precursor decomposition and beam-induced desorption. Moreover, it is shown that deposition takes place only in a small zone around the beam impact point. Furthermore, the characterization of deposited materials is discussed in terms of microstructure and resistivity. It is shown that He-IBID material resembles more electron-beam-induced-deposition (EBID) material than Ga-ion-beam-induced-deposition (Ga-IBID) material. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution for He-IBID is in general better than for EBID and Ga-IBID; in particular, proximity effects are minimal. (orig.)

  15. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  16. Making Lightweight Structures By Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1990-01-01

    Technique developed for fabrication of stiff, strong, lightweight structures of silicon carbide or other materials by any of several deposition processes. Structures made by method can have complicated shapes. Ability to manufacture complex shape from pure deposited SiC useful and leads to new products in several fields. These lightweight structures used as backup structures for optical components, as structural components in automotive, aerospace, and outer space applications, and as lightweight parts of furniture for outer space.

  17. Chicxulub Ejecta Blanket Deposits From Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Chicxulub impact into a thick sequence of carbonates and sulfates released over a trillion tons of volatiles. The importance of the explosive release of such a large mass of volatiles has been greatly underestimated in studies of ejecta depositional processes. Proximal Chicxulub ejecta blanket deposits recent discovered on Albion Island in Belize provide a key to understanding the role of volatile-rich target material during large impact events.

  18. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  19. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  20. Deposition uniformity inspection in IC wafer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Jeng, J. J.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the task of automatic visual inspection of color uniformity on the surface of integrated circuits (IC) wafers arising from the layering process. The oxide thickness uniformity within a given wafer with a desired target thickness is of great importance for modern semiconductor circuits with small oxide thickness. The non-uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a wafer surface will proceed to fail testing in Wafer Acceptance Test (WAT). Early detection of non-uniform deposition in a wafer surface can reduce material waste and improve production yields. The fastest and most low-priced inspection method is a machine vision-based inspection system. In this paper, the proposed visual inspection system is based on the color representations which were reflected from wafer surface. The regions of non-uniform deposition present different colors from the uniform background in a wafer surface. The proposed inspection technique first learns the color data via color space transformation from uniform deposition of normal wafer surfaces. The individual small region statistical comparison scheme then proceeds to the testing wafers. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect the non-uniform deposition regions on the wafer surface. The inspection time of the deposited wafers is quite compatible with the atmospheric pressure CVD time.

  1. MICRO ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE MACHINING DEPOSITION IN AIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Baidong; ZHAO Wansheng; WANG Zhenlong; CAO Guohui

    2006-01-01

    A new deposition method is described using micro electrical discharge machining (EDM)to deposit tool electrode material on workpiece in air. The basic principles of micro electrical discharge deposition (EDD) are analyzed and the realized conditions are predicted. With an ordinary EDM shaping machine, brass as the electrode, high-speed steel as the workpiece, a lot of experiments are carried out on micro EDD systematically and thoroughly. The effects of major processing parameters, such as the discharge current, discharge duration, pulse interval and working medium, are obtained. As a result, a micro cylinder with 0.19 mm in diameter and 7.35 mm in height is deposited.By exchanging the polarities of the electrode and workpiece the micro cylinder can be removed selectively. So the reversible machining of deposition and removal is achieved, which breaks through the constraint of traditional EDM. Measurements show that the deposited material is compact and close to workpiece base, whose components depend on the tool electrode material.

  2. Mercury's Pyroclastic Deposits and their spectral variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Sebastien; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have shown that volcanism is a very important process that has shaped the surface of the planet, in particular in its early history.In this study, we use the full range of the MASCS spectrometer (300-1400nm) to characterize the spectral properties of the pyroclastic deposits. Analysis of deposits within the Caloris Basin, and on other location of Mercury's surface (e.g., Hesiod, Rachmaninoff, etc.) show two main results: 1) Spectral variability is significant in the UV and VIS range between the deposits themselves, and also with respect to the rest of the planet and other features like hollows, 2) Deposits exhibit a radial variability similar to those found with the lunar pyroclastic deposits of floor fractured craters.These results are put in context with the latest analysis of other instruments of the MESSENGER spacecraft, in particular the visible observations from the imager MDIS, and the elemental composition given by the X-Ray spectrometer. Although all together, the results do not allow pointing to compositional variability of the deposits for certain, information on the formation mechanisms, the weathering and the age formation can be extrapolated from the radial variability and the elemental composition.

  3. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  4. Stratiform chromite deposit model: Chapter E in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    A new descriptive stratiform chromite deposit model was prepared which will provide a framework for understanding the characteristics of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. Previous stratiform chromite deposit models developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been referred to as Bushveld chromium, because the Bushveld Complex in South Africa is the only stratified, mafic-ultramafic intrusion presently mined for chromite and is the most intensely researched. As part of the on-going effort by the USGS Mineral Resources Program to update existing deposit models for the upcoming national mineral resource assessment, this revised stratiform chromite deposit model includes new data on the geological, mineralogical, geophysical, and geochemical attributes of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. This model will be a valuable tool in future chromite resource and environmental assessments and supplement previously published models used for mineral resource evaluation.

  5. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  6. Competitive growth model involving random deposition and random deposition with surface relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Claudio M.; Monetti, Roberto A.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-06-01

    A deposition model that considers a mixture of random deposition with surface relaxation and a pure random deposition is proposed and studied. As the system evolves, random deposition with surface relaxation (pure random deposition) take place with probability p and (1{minus}p), respectively. The discrete (microscopic) approach to the model is studied by means of extensive numerical simulations, while continuous equations are used in order to investigate the mesoscopic properties of the model. A dynamic scaling ansatz for the interface width W(L,t,p) as a function of the lattice side L, the time t and p is formulated and tested. Three exponents, which can be linked to the standard growth exponent of random deposition with surface relaxation by means of a scaling relation, are identified. In the continuous limit, the model can be well described by means of a phenomenological stochastic growth equation with a p-dependent effective surface tension.

  7. Phanerozoic Rifting Phases And Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassaan, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    In North Africa occur Mediterranean and Red Sea metallogenic provinces. In each province distribute 47 iron- manganese- barite and lead-zinc deposits with tectonic-structural control. The author presents in this paper aspects of position of these deposits in the two provinces with Phanerozoic rifting . The Mediterranean Province belongs to two epochs, Hercynian and Alpine. The Hercynian Epoch manganese deposits in only Moroccoa- Algeria belong to Paleozoic tectonic zones and Proterozoic volcanics. The Alpine Epoch iron-manganese deposits are of post-orogenic exhalative-sedimentary origin. Manganese deposits in southern Morocco occur in Kabil-Rief quartz-chalcedony veins controlled by faults in andesitic sheets and in bedded pelitic tuffs, strata-form lenses and ore veins, in Precambrian schist and in Triassic and Cretaceous dolomites. Disseminated manganese with quartz and barite and effusive hydrothermal veins are hosted in Paleocene volcanics. Manganese deposits in Algeria are limited and unrecorded in Tunisia. Strata-form iron deposits in Atlas Heights are widespread in sub-rift zone among Jurassic sediments inter-bedding volcanic rocks. In Algeria, Group Beni-Saf iron deposits are localized along the Mediterranean coast in terrigenous and carbonate rocks of Jurassic, Cretaceous and Eocene age within faults and bedding planes. In Morocco strata-form hydrothermal lead-zinc deposits occur in contact zone of Tertiary andesite inter-bedding Cambrian shale, Lias dolomites and Eocene andesite. In both Algeria and Tunisia metasomatic Pb-Zn veins occur in Campanian - Maastrichtian carbonates, Triassic breccia, Jurassic limestone, Paleocene sandstones and limestone and Neogene conglomerates and sandstones. The Red Sea metallogenic province belongs to the Late Tertiary-Miocene times. In Wadi Araba hydrothermal iron-manganese deposits occur in Cretaceous sediments within 320°and 310 NW faults related to Tertiary basalt. Um-Bogma iron-manganese deposits are closely

  8. [Monitoring nitrogen deposition on temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhao, Bin; Huang, Yong-mei; Ye, Zhi-xiang; Duan, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen deposition on temperate steppe was monitored from November 2011 to October 2012 in Taipusi County, Inner Mongolia. The dry deposition of gaseous nitrogen compounds was calculated based on online-monitored atmospheric concentrations of NH3 and NO2 and dry deposition velocity simulated by CMAQ model. The wet deposition, dry deposition of particle, and throughfall deposition were also estimated by collecting rainfall, dust fall, and throughfall samples and the chemical analysis of NH4+ and NO3-concentrations. Results showed that the total deposition of nitrogen was up to 3.43 g x (m2 x a)(-1), which might be harmful to the ecosystem. The wet deposition accounted for about 44% of the total deposition, while dry deposition of gases and particle accounted for 38% and 18%, respectively. Since the deposition contributed more than wet deposition, a great attention should be paid on dry deposition monitoring. However, the very simple method for total deposition monitoring based on throughfall seemed not suitable for grassland because the monitored throughfall deposition was much lower than the total deposition. In addition, reduced nitrogen (NH4+ and NH3) contributed to 71% of the total deposition, while oxidation nitrogen (NO3- and NO2) was only 29%. Therefore, NH3 emission reduction should be considered as important as nitrogen oxides (NO3x) for controlling nitrogen deposition.

  9. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Su Guiqiao; You Tao; Zhang Chunhui

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a...

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of titania nanoparticles: Wet density of deposits during EPD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Morteza Farrokhi-Rad; Taghi Shahrabi; Shirin Khanmohammadi

    2014-08-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of titania nanoparticles was performed at different voltages and times. The wet density of deposits was calculated according to the Archimedes’ principle. The wet density as well as the electric field over the deposits increased with time and attained the plateau at longer times. The velocity at which particles attach to the deposit, strongly influences its wet density at initial times. However, the effect of electro-osmotic flow is dominant at longer times. The coating with higher wet density had the higher corrosion resistance in Ringer’s solution at 37.5 °C due to its closely packed and crack free microstructure.

  11. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  12. Aerosol Deposition and Solar Panel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, W. P.; Rollings, A.; Taylor, S. J.; Parks, J.; Barnard, J.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active solar collector farms are often located in relatively dry desert regions where cloudiness impacts are minimized. These farms may be susceptible to reduced performance due to routine or episodic aerosol deposition on collector surfaces. Intense episodes of wind blown dust deposition may negatively impact farm performance, and trigger need to clean collector surfaces. Aerosol deposition rate depends on size, morphology, and local meteorological conditions. We have developed a system for solar panel performance testing under real world conditions. Two identical 0.74 square meter solar panels are deployed, with one kept clean while the other receives various doses of aerosol deposition or other treatments. A variable load is used with automation to record solar panel maximum output power every 10 minutes. A collocated sonic anemometer measures wind at 10 Hz, allowing for both steady and turbulent characterization to establish a link between wind patterns and particle distribution on the cells. Multispectral photoacoustic instruments measure aerosol light scattering and absorption. An MFRSR quantifies incoming solar radiation. Solar panel albedo is measured along with the transmission spectra of particles collected on the panel surface. Key questions are: At what concentration does aerosol deposition become a problem for solar panel performance? What are the meteorological conditions that most strongly favor aerosol deposition, and are these predictable from current models? Is it feasible to use the outflow from an unmanned aerial vehicle hovering over solar panels to adequately clean their surface? Does aerosol deposition from episodes of nearby forest fires impact performance? The outlook of this research is to build a model that describes environmental effects on solar panel performance. Measurements from summer and fall 2015 will be presented along with insights gleaned from them.

  13. Information system of mineral deposits in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribernik, K.; Rokavec, D.; Šinigioj, J.; Šolar, S.

    2010-03-01

    At the Geologic Survey of Slovenia the need for complex overview and control of the deposits of available non-metallic mineral raw materials and of their exploitations became urgent. In the framework of the Geologic Information System we established the Database of non-metallic mineral deposits comprising all important data of deposits and concessionars. Relational database is built with program package MS Access, but in year 2008 we plan to transfer it on SQL server. In the evidence there is 272 deposits and 200 concessionars. The mineral resources information system of Slovenia, which was started back in 2002, consists of two integrated parts, mentioned relational database of mineral deposits, which relates information in tabular way so that rules of relational algebra can be applied, and geographic information system (GIS), which relates spatial information of deposits. . The complex relationships between objects and the concepts of normalized data structures, lead to the practical informative and useful data model, transparent to the user and to better decision-making by allowing future scenarios to be developed and inspected. Computerized storage, and display system is as already said, developed and managed under the support of Geological Survey of Slovenia, which conducts research on the occurrence, quality, quantity, and availability of mineral resources in order to help the Nation make informed decisions using earth-science information. Information about deposit is stored in records in approximately hundred data fields. A numeric record number uniquely identifies each site. The data fields are grouped under principal categories. Each record comprise elementary data of deposit (name, type, location, prospect, rock), administrative data (concessionar, number of decree in official paper, object of decree, number of contract and its duration) and data of mineral resource produced amount and size of exploration area). The data can also be searched, sorted and

  14. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  15. Polydisperse suspensions: Erosion, deposition, and flow capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Hogg, A. J.; Pritchard, D.

    2013-09-01

    Deposition from particle-laden flows is often described in terms of the capacity and competence of the flow, but robust definitions of these terms have proved elusive. In this paper we provide a mathematical modeling framework within which erosion and deposition of polydisperse sediment, and thus flow capacity and competence, can be rigorously defined. This framework explicitly captures the coupling between the suspension and an active layer of sediment at the top of the bed, and is capable of describing both depositional and erosional flows over both erodible and nonerodible beds. Crucially, the capacity of a flow is shown to depend on the erosional and depositional history because these processes determine the composition of the active layer. This dependence is explored within models of bidisperse and polydisperse suspensions. It is further demonstrated that monodisperse representations of suspended sediment transport may severely underpredict actual flow capacity. The polydisperse model is validated against recent experimental studies of the evolution of suspended material in waning turbulent flows, and is used to demonstrate that loss of capacity is the principal driver of sediment deposition.

  16. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  17. Intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercin, Ersin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2012-01-16

    High levels of uric acid cause accumulation of monosodium urate crystals. This formation of masses is called tophus. Intraosseous tophus deposits are rare, even for patients with gout. We report an unusual case of intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. The patient presented with ankle pain with no previous history of gout. On examination, tenderness on the posterior aspect of his ankle and limitation of plantarflexion was noted. Laboratory values were normal, except for an elevated serum uric acid value. Radiographs of the right ankle showed the presence of a large os trigonum with osteosclerotic changes, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. Conservative therapy failed, and the patient was admitted for an endoscopic resection of the os trigonum.Intraosseous chalky crystals were detected during endoscopic resection of the os trigonum. The histological diagnosis was tophaceous gout. The underlying pathological mechanism of intraosseous tophi is uncertain. Penetration of urate crystals from the joint due to hyperuricemia may be the mechanism of deposition in this patient.When a patient with hyperuricemia presents with posterior ankle impingement symptoms, intraosseous tophus deposits should be included in the differential diagnosis. Posterior endoscopic excision may be an option for treating intraosseous lesions of the os trigonum because of good visualization, satisfactory excision, and rapid recovery time.

  18. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  19. Deposition of carbonyl sulphide to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczewski, S. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bel, J. N. B.

    Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a trace constituent of the atmosphere and is also the main form in which 35S is released from CO 2-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of its deposition velocity ( Vg) are therefore important for validating radiological dose models and for interpreting the role of COS in the global S cycle. The Vg of [ 35S]COS to thin layers of several contrasting soils was measured in a through-flow fumigation system. Deposition velocity was not significantly affected by soil type, although deposition to moist soil was significantly greater ( P dried soils, mean values being 5.71 × 10 -6 ms -1 and 3.06 × 10 -6 ms -1, respectively. The results obtained are about three orders of magnitude smaller than published Vg values for SO 2 to similar soils, which suggests that uptake by soils is not a major sink for atmospheric COS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that deposition to soil of [ 35S]COS from nuclear reactors is unlikely to contribute significantly to radiation dose from the food chain pathway. The reduction in Vg observed in heat-treated soils indicates a microbial involvement in uptake. However, it seems unlikely that microbial metabolism is the rate-controlling step, since stimulation of the microflora by the addition of nutrients did not increase COS deposition.

  20. Applications of graphene electrophoretic deposition. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Valdez, A; Shaffer, M S P; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-14

    This Review summarizes research progress employing electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to fabricate graphene and graphene-based nanostructures for a wide range of applications, including energy storage materials, field emission devices, supports for fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors and sensors, among others. These carbonaceous nanomaterials can be dispersed in organic solvents, or more commonly in water, using a variety of techniques compatible with EPD. Most deposits are produced under constant voltage conditions with deposition time also playing an important role in determining the morphology of the resulting graphene structures. In addition to simple planar substrates, it has been shown that uniform graphene-based layers can be deposited on three-dimensional, porous, and even flexible substrates. In general, electrophoretically deposited graphene layers show excellent properties, e.g., high electrical conductivity, large surface area, good thermal stability, high optical transparency, and robust mechanical strength. EPD also enables the fabrication of functional composite materials, e.g., graphene combined with metallic nanoparticles, with other carbonaceous materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes) or polymers, leading to novel nanomaterials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. In summary, the analysis of the available literature reveals that EPD is a simple and convenient processing method for graphene and graphene-based materials, which is easy to apply and versatile. EPD has, therefore, a promising future for applications in the field of advanced nanomaterials, which depend on the reliable manipulation of graphene and graphene-containing systems.

  1. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  2. The Effect of Deposition Time on Textured Magnesium Diboride Thick Films Fabricated by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Mutia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available MgB2 powders suspended in ethanol were electrophoretically deposited on high-purity molybdenum substrates having dimensions of 1 x 0.3 x 0.01 cm. The said substrate was set as the cathode and was placed 0.5 cm away from a graphite rod anode. A current density of ~0.02 mA/cm2 and a voltage of 600 V were applied. The effect of deposition time was studied by varying it as follows: 15 s, 30 s, 1 min, and 2 min. Heat treatment at 950 oC for 3 h was done after deposition. MgB2 thick films were successfully fabricated for the deposition carried out for 2 min. Deposition times less than 2 min resulted in insufficient deposited powder; hence formation of MgB2 was not facilitated. Films deposited at 15 and 30 s have good surface characteristics, wherein no microcracks were present. X-ray diffraction and surface image analysis reveal that the deposited films have a preferred orientation along the (10l direction.

  3. Spatial atomic layer deposition: a route towards further industrialization of atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Cameron, D.C.; Dickey, E.; George, S.M.; Kuznetsov, V.; Parsons, G.N.; Roozeboom, F.; Sundaram, G.; Vermeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique capable of producing ultrathin conformal films with atomic level control over thickness. A major drawback of ALD is its low deposition rate, making ALD less attractive for applications that require high throughput processing. An approach to overcome this

  4. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique ar

  5. A special issue devoted to gold deposits in northern Nevada: Part 2. Carlin-type Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; John, David A.; Theodore, Ted G.

    2003-01-01

    This is the second of two special issues of Economic Geology devoted to gold deposits in northern Nevada. Readers interested in a general overview of these deposits, their economic significance, their context within the tectonic evolution of the region, and synoptic references on each gold deposit type are directed to the preface of the first special issue (John et al., 2003). Volume 98, issue 2, contains five papers that address regional aspects important to the genesis of gold deposits in northern Nevada and five papers that present detailed studies of epithermal deposits and districts. All of the regional papers are pertinent to Carlin-type gold deposits, because they address the age of mineralization (Arehart et al., 2003), origin and evolutionary history of the northwest-striking mineral belts that localize many deposits (Grauch et al., 2003), nature of the middle and lower crust below these mineral belts (Howard, 2003), district- to deposit-scale stream sediment and lithogeochemical anomalies (Theodore et al., 2003), and stratigraphy and structure of a district located along a northeast-striking lineament (Peters et al., 2003).

  6. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  7. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, Lianne M.; Moor, de Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  8. 37 CFR 1.807 - Viability of deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Viability of deposit. 1.807... Biological Material § 1.807 Viability of deposit. (a) A deposit of biological material that is capable of... term of deposit. Viability may be tested by the depository. The test must conclude only that...

  9. 24 CFR 882.414 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 882... Moderate Rehabilitation-Basic Policies § 882.414 Security and utility deposits. (a) If at the time of the... security deposits and utility deposits from its resources and/or other public or private sources. (b) If...

  10. 24 CFR 884.115 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 884... Security and utility deposits. (a) An Owner may require Families to pay a security deposit in an amount... security and utility deposits, if required, from their own resources and/or other private or public sources....

  11. 24 CFR 886.116 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 886... utility deposits. (a) An Owner may require Families to pay a security deposit in an amount up to, but not... utility deposits, if required, from their own resources and/or other private or public sources....

  12. Ash Deposition Trials at Three Power Stations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, Ole Hede

    1998-01-01

    the probe temperature did influence the composition of deposits for coals with medium ash deposition propensities. These results may indicate that coals with medium to high ash deposition propensities in existing boilers may cause increasing ash deposit formation in future boilers with higher steam...

  13. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  14. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  15. Influence of deposition time on the properties of chemical bath deposited manganese sulfide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Kassim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Manganese sulfide thin films were chemically deposited from an aqueous solution containing manganese sulfate, sodium thiosulfate and sodium tartrate. The influence of deposition time (2, 3, 6 and 8 days on the properties of thin films was investigated. The structure and surface morphology of the thin films were studied by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, in order to investigate the optical properties of the thin films, the UV-visible spectrophotometry was used. The XRD results indicated that the deposited MnS2 thin films exhibited a polycrystalline cubic structure. The number of MnS2 peaks on the XRD patterns initially increased from three to six peaks and then decreased to five peaks, as the deposition time was increased from 2 to 8 days. From the AFM measurements, the film thickness and surface roughness were found to be dependent on the deposition time.

  16. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  17. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  18. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  19. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wagner, William R; Antaki, James F

    2016-01-01

    Based on the transport model of Sorensen et al. (1999), an improved mathematical model describing the process of thrombus deposition and growth was developed. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are modeled using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations. These represent three main processes: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: mural thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and thrombus deposition in a small (125 x 95 micros) crevice observed in vitro. For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. These promising results encourage further simulations to investigate clinical conditions and design factors that affect the risk of t...

  20. Sol-gel deposited electrochromic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, N.; Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochromic devices have increasing application in display devices, switchable mirrors and smart windows. A variety of vacuum deposition technologies have been used to make electrochromic devices. The sol- gel process offers an alternative approach to the synthesis of optical quality and low cost electrochromic device layers. This study summarizes the developments in sol-gel deposited electrochromic films. The sol-gel process involves the formation of oxide networks upon hydrolysis-condensation of alkoxide precursors. In this study we cover the sol-gel deposited oxides of WO[sub 3], V[sub 2]O[sub 5], TiO[sub 2], Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], and NiO[sub x].

  1. Oleophobic optical coating deposited by magnetron PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernt, D.; Ponomarenko, V.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Thin oxinitride films of Zn-Sn-O-N and Si-Al-O-N were deposited on glass by reactive magnetron sputtering at various nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. Nitrogen added to oxygen led to decrease of the surface roughness and increase of oleophobic properties studied by the oil-drop test. The best oleophobity was obtained for Zn-Sn-O-N oxinitride at Zn:Sn=1:1 and N:O=1:2. Improved oleophobic properties were also demonstrated if the oxinitride film was deposited on top of the multilayer coating as the final step in the industrial cycle of production of energy efficient glass.

  2. Stability of nanocrystalline electrochemically deposited layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The technological demand for manufacturing components with complex geometries of micrometer or sub-micrometer dimensions and ambitions for ongoing miniaturization have attracted particular attention to electrochemical deposition methods. Thin layers of electrochemically deposited metals and alloys......-layers. The kinetics of grain growth and changes of the preferred crystallographic orientation of grains has been investigated by means of in-situ X-ray diffraction both at room temperature and during isothermal annealing at elevated temperatures. So-called self-annealing, which is well-known for Cu-layers, has been...

  3. Underpotential deposition: From planar surfaces to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, O. A.; Vélez, P.; Macagno, V. A.; Leiva, E. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is given of selected theoretical, experimental and computer simulation research on thermodynamic modeling applied to the metal underpotential deposition. Focus is made mainly on the last 20 years. The upd-theory on planar surfaces is revisited and the thermodynamic framework is extended to consider underpotential deposition on nanoparticles and to include anion coadsorption, solvation and double layer charging. Results from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations are shown for systems of experimental interest. At the end some perspectives for further advanced modeling of the present problem are given.

  4. Response of agricultural soils to acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.F.; Wagner, C.K.

    1982-07-01

    Proceedings of the workshop, Response of Agricultural Soils to Acid Deposition, which was held May 12-13 1981, in Columbus, Ohio, and which evaluated the potential beneficial and harmful impacts of atmospheric acid deposition on agricultural soils are presented. Those issues requiring further research are also identified. Five working papers and a literature review prepared by soils specialists are included as is a summary of conclusions reached by the participants. Each of the five working papers has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

  5. Wax deposition in crude oil pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, Pablo Morelato; Rodrigues, Lorennzo Marrochi Nolding [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Engenharia de Petroleo; Romero, Mao Ilich [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute], e-mail: mromerov@uwyo.edu

    2010-07-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons which consists of aromatics, paraffins, naphthenics, resins asphaltenes, etc. When the temperature of crude oil is reduced, the heavy components, like paraffin, will precipitate and deposit on the pipe internal wall in the form of a wax-oil gel. The gel deposit consists of wax crystals that trap some amount of oil. As the temperature gets cooler, more wax will precipitate and the thickness of the wax gel will increase, causing gradual solidification of the crude and eventually the oil stop moving inside the offshore pipeline. Crude oil may not be able to be re-mobilized during re-startup. The effective diameter will be reduced with wax deposition, resulting in several problems, for example, higher pressure drop which means additional pumping energy costs, poor oil quality, use of chemical components like precipitation inhibitors or flowing facilitators, equipment failure, risk of leakage, clogging of the ducts and process equipment. Wax deposition problems can become so sever that the whole pipeline can be completely blocked. It would cost millions of dollars to remediate an offshore pipeline that is blocked by wax. Wax solubility decreases drastically with decreasing temperature. At low temperatures, as encountered in deep water production, is easy to wax precipitate. The highest temperature below which the paraffins begins to precipitate as wax crystals is defined as wax appearance temperature (WAT). Deposition process is a complex free surface problem involving thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, mass and heat transfer. In this work, a numerical analysis of wax deposition by molecular diffusion and shear dispersion mechanisms in crude oil pipeline is studied. Diffusion flux of wax toward the wall is estimated by Fick's law of diffusion, in similar way the shear dispersion; wax concentration gradient at the solid-liquid interface is obtained by the volume fraction conservation equation; and since the wax deposition

  6. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  7. Uranium deposit in Kumsan area (1979)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jong Yun; Kim, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dai Oap [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposits of Kumsan area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 5 maps.

  8. Uranium deposit in Yongyuri Miwon area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Taek; Han, Jong Yun; Kim, Dai Oap; Im Hyun Chul [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Yongyuri Miwon area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 maps.

  9. Uranium deposit in Yiheonri area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dai Oap [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Yiheonri area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 4 tabs., 3 maps.

  10. Uranium deposit in Geosan B area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gil Seung; Kim, Dai Oap; Kim, Jong Hwan [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Goesan Deokpyeongri B area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 8 maps.

  11. Deposit Money Creation in Search Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Keiichiro Kobayashi

    2002-01-01

    The endogenous creation of bank credit and of deposit money is modeled. If banks have a limited ability to commit to making interbank loans, then, in order for bank deposits to be accepted as liquid assets, an upper bound is placed upon the size of each bank's asset portfolio, where the bound is determined as a certain multiple of the bank's capital. In our search model, the Central Limit Theorem implies that the multiplier is a non-linear function of the aggregate level of bank assets. Thus ...

  12. Electrochemical Deposition Of Thiolate Monolayers On Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marc D.; Weissharr, Duane E.

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical method devised for coating metal (usually, gold) surfaces with adherent thiolate monolayers. Affords greater control over location and amount of material deposited and makes it easier to control chemical composition of deposits. One important potential use for this method lies in fabrication of chemically selective thin-film resonators for microwave oscillators used to detect pollutants: monolayer formulated to bind selectively pollutant chemical species of interest, causing increase in mass of monolayer and corresponding decrease in frequency of resonance. Another important potential use lies in selective chemical derivatization for purposes of improving adhesion, lubrication, protection against corrosion, electrocatalysis, and electroanalysis.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  14. Bank core deposits and the mitigation of monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont K. Black; Diana Hancock; Wayne Passmore

    2007-01-01

    We consider the business strategy of some banks that provide relationship loans (where they have loan origination and monitoring advantages relative to capital markets) with core deposit funding (where they can pass along the benefit of a sticky price on deposits). These "traditional banks" tend to lend out less than the deposits they take in, so they have a "buffer stock" of core deposits. This buffer stock of core deposits can be used to mitigate the full effect of tighter monetary policy o...

  15. 12 CFR 347.203 - Deposit insurance required for all branches of foreign banks engaged in domestic retail deposit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign banks engaged in domestic retail deposit activity in the same State. 347.203 Section 347.203 Banks... engaged in domestic retail deposit activity in the same State. The FDIC will not insure deposits in any... foreign bank in the same state that engages in domestic retail deposit activity will be an insured branch....

  16. State-of-the-art Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, F., E-mail: Francisco.gontad@le.infn.it; Perrone, A.

    2014-05-21

    In this article we present and discuss the current status of thin film Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different laser parameters, such as laser fluence, wavelength or pulse duration. The PLD technique appears very efficient for the fabrication of pure Pb photocathodes, providing good adherence and respectable quantum efficiency. The films deposited on the picosecond and subpicosecond regimes are practically free of big droplets and fragments, whereas in the nanosecond regime their presence cannot be neglected. All the films present a granular structure and polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111) crystalline planes, irrespective of the laser pulse duration or wavelength. The main results obtained from the photoemission performance of Pb thin films deposited by PLD demonstrate their chemical stability under vacuum conditions and respectable quantum efficiency with a maximum of 7.3×10{sup −5} for films deposited on the subpicosecond regime. The photoemission properties confirm that Pb thin films deposited by PLD are a notable alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. - Highlights: • Lead samples were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition at different laser parameters • All films present a granular morphology • Lead films grow preferentially along the 111 crystalline planes of the cubic net • A maximum quantum efficiency of 7.3 × 10-5 has been found.

  17. Panel 1 - comparative evaluation of deposition technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Benson, D.K.; Pitts, R.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bhat, D.G. [GTE Valenite Corp., Troy, MI (United States); Yulin Chen [Allison Gas Turbine Division, GM, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gat, R.; Sunkara, M.K. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kelly, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lawler, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Nagle, D.C. [Martin Marietta Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Outka, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Revankar, G.S. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Subramaniam, V.V. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Wilbur, P.J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States); Mingshow Wong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Woolam, W.E. [Southwest Research Inst., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This working group attempted to evaluate/compare the different types of deposition techniques currently under investigation for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. A table lists the broad types of techniques that were considered for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. After some discussion, it was agreed that any evaluation of the various techniques would be dependent on the end application. Thus the next action was to list the different areas where diamond and DLC films could find applications in transportation. These application areas are listed in a table. The table intentionally does not go into great detail on applications because that subject is dealt with specifically by Panel No. 4 - Applications To Transportation. The next action concentrated on identifying critical issues or limitations that need to be considered in evaluating the different processes. An attempt was then made to rank different broad categories of deposition techniques currently available or under development based on the four application areas and the limitations. These rankings/evaluations are given for diamond and DLC techniques. Finally, the working group tried to identify critical development and research issues that need to be incorporated into developing a long-term program that focuses on diamond/DLC coatings for transportation needs. 5 tabs.

  18. Nanostructured Antibacterial Silver Deposited on Polypropylene Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Bo, Wang; Jin-Yan, Wang; Qu-Fu, Wei; Jian-Han, Hong; Xiao-Yan, Zhao

    Nanostructured silver films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) nonwovens by RF magnetron sputter coating to obtain the antibacterial properties. Shake flask test was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the materials. Atomic force microscope (AFM) was utilized to observe the surface morphology. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) was also employed to analyze the surface elemental compositions. The antibacterial results indicated that the prolonged deposition time led to a significant improvement in antibacterial effect, and sputtering power and argon pressure did not show obvious effect on antibacterial performance. It is believed that the total amount of silver ions released from the silver coating was increased as the deposition time increased. AFM images and quantitative analysis of EDX, respectively revealed that increase in deposition time led to the increased coverage of silver film and the increased silver weight percentage per unit surface, which provided evidences for the increased release rate of silver ions from the coating. Moreover, it was found that the optimum silver coating thickness was about 3 nm, taking antibacterial effect and cost of production into account.

  19. Depositing Materials on the Micro- and Nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mar, Mikkel Dysseholm; Herstrøm, Berit; Shkondin, Evgeniy

    2014-01-01

    on sequential introduction of precursor pulses with intermediate purging steps. The process proceeds by specific surface ligand-exchange reactions and this leads to layer-by-layer growth control. No other thin film deposition technique can approach the conformity achieved by ALD on high aspect ratio structures...

  20. Hydrogen release from deposited beryllium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L. [NIIETF of Al Farabi Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    The analysis of hydrogen retained in deposited beryllium layers deposited by magnetron sputtering was carried out by means of thermodesorption (TDS) technique. Two hydrogen release peaks were clearly seen on the thermodesorption curves at the temperatures 760-800 K and 920-970 K. Hydrogen concentrations in the deposited beryllium layers were calculated from the gas release curves corresponding to the number of Be atoms in the beryllium layer of 100% theoretical density. Average hydrogen concentration in the beryllium samples loaded in the process of magnetron sputtering was equal to 3800{+-}200 appm. The experiments with beryllium layers, enriched with carbon, revealed the increase of retained hydrogen concentration up to 9600{+-}200 appm. Assuming that gas release can be described within the framework of model of diffusion from layer system BeO-Be-BeO, hydrogen diffusion coefficient in BeO and the trapping and detrapping constants for the traps appearing in beryllium in the process of deposition were evaluated. (orig.)

  1. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  2. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis.

  3. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  4. 20 CFR 901.46 - Depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depositions. 901.46 Section 901.46 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension or Termination of...

  5. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  6. Tax Evasion and Swiss Bank Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    Bank deposits in jurisdictions with banking secrecy constitute an effective tool to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform reduces the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a source tax on interest income earned by EU residents in Switzerland and several other jurisdictions...

  7. Deposition of grids on plastic detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Birabeau, J P; Mendola, Onofrio

    1972-01-01

    In order to facilitate the locating of tracks of charged particles in cellulose-nitrate and polycarbonate (Makrofol, Lexan) foils, a method has been developed for the photo-deposition of translucent coordinate grids on these materials. The grids are resistant to the strongly caustic solutions used in developing tracks in plastic foils. (9 refs) .

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  9. New Mexico Known Mineral Deposit Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains all Known Mineral Deposit Areas in the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital structure digitized from a 1:500,000 scale map of the...

  10. Theory of Cast Formation in Electrophoretic Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P. Maarten; Verweij, Henk

    1999-01-01

    The rate of cast formation in electrophoretic deposition is described by a combination of the equation of continuity for the suspension phase with expressions for the particle velocity and the movement of the cast-suspension boundary. The assumptions necessary to arrive at the well-known equations o

  11. 31 CFR 223.4 - Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deposits. 223.4 Section 223.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE SURETY COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS WITH THE UNITED...

  12. 37 CFR 2.208 - Deposit accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... upon receipt of the statement to cover the value of items or services charged to the account and thus... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Fees and Payment of Money in Trademark Cases § 2.208 Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in...

  13. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... receipt of the statement to cover the value of items or services charged to the account and thus restore... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES General Provisions Fees and Payment of Money § 1.25 Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due,...

  14. Local plasma deposition on polymer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, P.J.; Theelen, M.J.; Habets, D.; Winands, G.J.J.; Staemmler, L.

    2011-01-01

    For the modification of the surface energy of polymers, organosilicon coatings provide good optical and mechanical properties and are excellent candidates for the modification of the surface energy of polymers. These coatings can be deposited by plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)

  15. Lifetime obtained by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakaroun, M. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France); Antony, R. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)], E-mail: remi.antony@unilim.fr; Taillepierre, P.; Moliton, A. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2007-09-15

    We have fabricated green organic light-emitting diodes based on tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) thin films. In order to favor the charge carriers transport from the anode, we have deposited a N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) layer (hole transport layer) on a ITO anode. Cathode is obtained with a calcium layer covered with a silver layer. This silver layer is used to protect the other layers against oxygen during the OLED use. All the depositions are performed under vacuum and the devices are not exposed to air during their realisation. In order to improve the silver layer characteristics, we have realized this layer with the ion beam assisted deposition process. The aim of this process is to densify the layer and then reduce the permeation of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. We have used argon ions to assist the silver deposition. All the OLEDs optoelectronic characterizations (I = f(V), L = f(V)) are performed in the ambient air. We compare the results obtained with the assisted layer with those obtained with a classical cathode realized by thermal unassisted evaporation. We have realized lifetime measurements in the ambient air and we discuss about the assisted layer influence on the OLEDs performances.

  16. Deposition of biopolymer films on micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, Marie P.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various parameters on the spray-coating of thin films of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was investigated. The optimized processing conditions were used for deposition of the biodegradable polymer on arrays of SU-8 microcantilevers. The resonance frequency of the cantilevers before and af...

  17. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  18. Solid Organic Deposition During Gas Injection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit Y.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    Recently a series of first contact miscibility (swelling) experiments have been performed on undersaturated light and heavy oils using LPG rich and methane rich injection gases, in which solid organic deposition was observed. A compositional gradient in the oils during the gas injection process w...

  19. Micromorphology of modern tills in southwestern Spitsbergen – insights into depositional and post-depositional processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skolasińska Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Textural properties and microstructures are commonly used properties in the analysis of Pleistocene and older glacial deposits. However, contemporary glacial deposits are seldom studied, particularly in the context of post-depositional changes. This paper presents the results of a micromorphological study of recently deposited tills in the marginal zones of Hansbreen and Torellbreen, glaciers in southwestern Spitsbergen. The main objectives of this study were to compare modern tills deposited in subglacial and supraglacial conditions, as well as tills that were freshly released from ice with those laid down several decades ago. The investigated tills are primarily composed of large clasts of metamorphic rocks and represent coarse-grained, matrix-supported diamictons. The tills reveal several characteristic features for ductile (e.g. turbate structures and brittle (e.g. lineations, microshears deformations, which have been considered to be indicative of subglacial conditions. In supraglacial tills, the same structures are common as in the subglacial deposits, which points to the preservation of the primary features, though the sediment was transferred up to the glacier surface due to basal ice layer deformation and redeposited as slumps, or to formation of similar structures due to short-distance sediment re-deposition by mass flows. This study revealed that it might not be possible to distinguish subglacial and supraglacial tills on the basis of micromorphology if the latter are derived from a subglacial position. The only noted difference was the presence of iron oxide cementation zones and carbonate dissolution features in supraglacial tills. These features were found in tills that were deposited at least a few years ago and are interpreted to be induced by early post-depositional processes involving porewater/sediment interactions.

  20. Atmospheric deposition of organic carbon via precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; DeWalle, David R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the major pathway for removal of organic carbon (OC) from the atmosphere, affecting both atmospheric and landscape processes. Transfers of OC from the atmosphere to land occur as wet deposition (via precipitation) and as dry deposition (via surface settling of particles and gases). Despite current understanding of the significance of organic carbon inputs with precipitation to carbon budgets, transfers of organic matter between the atmosphere and land are not explicitly included in most carbon cycle models due to limited data, highlighting the need for further information. Studies regarding the abundance of OC in precipitation are relatively sparse, in part due to the fact that concentrations of organics in precipitation and their associated rates of atmospheric deposition are not routinely measured as a part of major deposition monitoring networks. Here, we provide a new data synthesis from 83 contemporary studies published in the peer reviewed literature where organic matter in precipitation was measured around the world. We compiled data regarding the concentrations of organic carbon in precipitation and associated rates of atmospheric deposition of organic carbon. We calculated summary statistics in a common set of units, providing insights into the magnitude and regional variability of OC in precipitation. A land to ocean gradient is evident in OC concentrations, with marine sites generally showing lower values than continental sites. Our synthesis highlights gaps in the data and challenges for data intercomparison. There is a need to concentrate sampling efforts in areas where anthropogenic OC emissions are on the rise (Asia, South America), as well as in remote sites suggesting background conditions, especially in Southern Hemisphere. It is also important to acquire more data for marine rainwater at various distances from the coast in order to assess a magnitude of carbon transfer between the land and the ocean. Our integration of

  1. Uranium deposits of the world. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlkamp, Franz J.

    2016-07-01

    Uranium Deposits of the World, in three volumes, comprises an unprecedented compilation of data and descriptions of the uranium regions in Asia, USA, Latin America and Europe structured by countries. With this third, the Europe volume, Uranium Deposits of the World presents the most extensive data collection of the set. It covers about 140 uranium regions in more than 20 European countries with nearly 1000 mentioned uranium deposits. Each country and region receives an analytical overview followed by the geologically- and economically-relevant synopsis of the individual regions and fields. The presentations are structured in three major sections: (a) location and magnitude of uranium regions, districts, and deposits, (b) principal features of regions and districts, and (c) detailed characteristics of selected ore fields and deposits. This includes sections on geology, alteration, mineralization, shape and dimensions of deposits, isotopes data, ore control and recognition criteria, and metallogenesis. Beside the main European uranium regions, for example in the Czech Republic, Eastern Germany, France, the Iberian Peninsula or Ukraine, also small regions an districts to the point of singular occurrences of interest are considered. This by far the most comprehensive presentation of European uranium geology and mining would not be possible without the author's access to extensive information covering the countries of the former Eastern Bloc states, which was partly not previously available. Abundantly illustrated with information-laden maps and charts throughout, this reference work is an indispensable tool for geologists, mining companies, government agencies, and others with an interest in European key natural resources. A great help for the reader's orientation are the substantial bibliography of uranium-related publications and the indices, latter containing about 3900 entries in the geographical part alone. The three volumes of Uranium Deposits of the

  2. Atmospheric Deposition of Phosphorus to the Everglades: Concepts, Constraints, and Published Deposition Rates for Ecosystem Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth W. Redfield

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes concepts underlying the atmospheric input of phosphorus (P to ecosystems, published rates of P deposition, measurement methods, and approaches to future monitoring and research. P conveyed through the atmosphere can be a significant nutrient source for some freshwater and marine ecosystems. Particle sources and sinks at the land-air interface produce variation in P deposition from the atmosphere across temporal and spatial scales. Natural plant canopies can affect deposition rates by changing the physical environment and surface area for particle deposition. Land-use patterns can alter P deposition rates by changing particle concentrations in the atmosphere. The vast majority of P in dry atmospheric deposition is conveyed by coarse (2.5 to 10 μm and giant (10 to 100 μm particles, and yet these size fractions represent a challenge for long-term atmospheric monitoring in the absence of accepted methods for routine sampling. Most information on P deposition is from bulk precipitation collectors and wet/dry bucket sampling, both with questionable precision and accuracy. Most published annual rates of P deposition are gross estimates derived from bulk precipitation sampling in locations around the globe and range from about 5 to well over 100 mg P m–2 year–1, although most inland ecosystems receive between 20 and 80 mg P m–2 year–1. Rates below 30 mg P m–2 year–1 are found in remote areas and near coastlines. Intermediate rates of 30 to 50 mg P m–2 year–1 are associated with forests or mixed land use, and rates of 50 to 100 mg P m–2 year–1 or more are often recorded from urban or agricultural settings. Comparison with other methods suggests that these bulk precipitation estimates provide crude boundaries around actual P deposition rates for various land uses. However, data screening cannot remove all positive bias caused by contamination of bucket or bulk collectors. As a consequence, continued sampling

  3. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  4. Properties of CdTe layers deposited by a novel method -Pulsed Plasma Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ancora, C.; Nozar, P.; Mittica, G.; Prescimone, F.; A. Neri; Contaldi, S.; Milita, S.; Albonetti, C.; Corticelli, F.; Brillante, A.; Bilotti, I.; Tedeschi, G.; Taliani, C.

    2011-01-01

    CdTe and CdS are emerging as the most promising materials for thin film photovoltaics in the quest of the achievement of grid parity. The major challenge for the advancement of grid parity is the achievement of high quality at the same time as low fabrication cost. The present paper reports the results of the new deposition technique, Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD), for the growth of the CdTe layers on CdS/ZnO/quartz and quartz substrates. The PPD method allows to deposit at low temperature. ...

  5. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  6. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  7. VUV-light-induced deposited silica films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher K.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; Benson, Roberto S.; Park, Jae-Won

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique to deposit dielectric films at room temperature is described. The deposition of the silica takes place inside a cylindrical glass chamber where a silent discharge is generated between two electrodes connected to a high voltage, high frequency AC source. The chamber contains two parallel glass tubes where the electrodes are located and is filled with argon or xenon at a pressure of 100 mbar. Under these conditions, it has been shown that high intensity VUV light is generated peaking at 126 nm for argon and at 172 nm for xenon. This VUV radiation seems to produce photoablation of the glass tubes that surround the electrodes. Upon operation of the lamp, polyimide, polypropylene and silicon wafer substrates lying at the bottom of the vessel became coated with silica. The films, identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealed that the silica is oxygen-deficient with a composition of SiO x where x is between 1.7 and 1.8. The deposition rate on silicon wafers was measured by ellipsometry. When Xe gas is used the deposition rate is much lower than when Ar is used. This result is consistent with a photoablation process since the energy of the photons generated in Ar peaks at 10 eV while those generated in Xe peaks at 7 eV. These energy values should be compared with the O-Si bond strength energy that is 8.3 eV. The morphology and structure of the films were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Deposition of carbonaceous films occurred when the glass tubes containing the electrodes were coated with carbon.

  8. The Nopal 1 Uranium Deposit: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Galoisy, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal 1 natural analogue is located in the Pena Blanca uranium district, about 50 kms north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit is hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs, dated at 44 Ma (Nopal and Colorados formations), and overlying the Pozos conglomerate formation and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The deposit is exposed at the ground surface and consists of a near vertical zone extending over about 100 m with a diameter of 40 m. An interesting characteristic is that the primary mineralization has been exposed above the water table, as a result of the uplift of the Sierra Pena Blanca, and subsequently oxidized with a remobilization of hexavalent uranium. The primary mineralization has been explained by various genetic models. It is associated to an extensive hydrothermal alteration of the volcanic tuffs, locally associated to pyrite and preserved by an intense silicification. Several kaolinite parageneses occur in fissure fillings and feldspar pseudomorphs, within the mineralized breccia pipe and the barren surrounding rhyolitic tuffs. Smectites are mainly developed in the underlying weakly welded tuffs. Several radiation-induced defect centers have been found in these kaolinites providing a unique picture of the dynamics of uranium mobilization (see Allard et al., this session). Another evidence of this mobilization is given by the spectroscopy of uranium-bearing opals, which show characteristic fluorescence spectra of uranyl groups sorbed at the surface of silica. By comparison with the other uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca and the nearby Sierra de Gomez, the Nopal 1 deposit is original, as it is one of the few deposits hving retained a reduced uranium mineralization.

  9. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts were made to develop mathematical models for the deposition of aerosols in the human respiratory system. Expressions were obtained for the mean deposition efficiency for nasal inspiration, nasal expiration, and mouth inspiration. A determination was made of statistical properties associated with each deposition efficiency due to intersubject and intrasubject variabilities. Expressions were then derived for head deposition with combined nose and mouth breathing. In the lung, deposition is a result primarily of impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. While there was no adequate model for impaction, several deposition formulae for sedimentation were derived as well as ones for diffusion. Studies were also made of the particle charge effect, as the electrostatic image force on a particle contributes to its deposition. There is, however, a threshold charge per particle below which the particle charge has no effect on deposition. Deposition data on ultrafine particles is scarce due to the difficulties in conducting proper experiments.

  10. Properties of electrodeposited amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng-jiao; WANG Miao; LU Xin

    2006-01-01

    A new technique of electroplating amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits was proposed. The structure and morphology of Fe-Ni-W alloy deposit were detected by XRD and SEM. The friction and wear behavior of Fe-Ni-W alloy deposit were studied and compared with that of chromium deposit. The corrosion properties against 5% sodium chloride, 5% sulfuric acid and 5% sodium hydroxide were also discussed. The experimental results indicate that Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits have superior properties against wear than hard chromium deposits under dry sliding condition. Under oil sliding condition, except their better wear resistance, the deposits can protect their counterparts against wear. The deposits plated on brass and AISI 1045 steel show good behavior against corrosion of 5% sodium chloride, 5% sulfuric acid and 5% sodium hydroxide. The bath of electroplating amorphous Fe-Ni-W alloy deposits is environmentally friendly and would find widely use in industry.

  11. Mississippi Valley-Type Lead-Zinc Deposit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David L.; Taylor, Ryan D.

    2009-01-01

    Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc (Pb+Zn) deposits are found throughout the world, and these deposits are characteristically distributed over hundreds of square kilometers that define individual ore districts. The median size of individual MVT deposits is 7.0 million tonnes with grades of about 7.9 percent Pb+Zn metal. However, MVT deposits usually occur in extensive districts consisting of several to as many as 400 deposits. Nearly one-quarter of the world's sedimentary and volcanic rock-hosted Pb+Zn resources are found in these deposits, with by-product commodities including silver (Ag), copper (Cu), and indium (In) for some deposits. Environmentally, MVT deposits are less of a concern than other types of mineral deposits since the carbonate-host rocks mitigate many environmental concerns.

  12. Scaling in film growth by pulsed laser deposition and modulated beam deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2011-04-01

    The scalings in film growth by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and modulated beam deposition (MBD) were investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. In PLD, an atomic pulse beam with a period t(0) were deposited instantaneously on a substrate, whereas in MBD, adatoms were deposited during a short time interval t(1) (0≤t(1)≤t(0)) within each period. If t(1)=0, MBD will be identical to PLD and, if t(1)=t(0), MBD will become usual molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Specifically, logarithmic scaling was investigated for the nucleation density reported for PLD, and the scaling of island density was studied regarding the growth for 0MBE growth was observed as t(1) increased. The phase diagram was also presented.

  13. Electrochemical deposition and characterization of zinc–nickel alloys deposited by direct and reverse current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA B. BAJAT

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn–Ni alloys electrochemically deposited on steel under various deposition conditions were investigated. The alloys were deposited on a rotating disc electrode and on a steel panel from chloride solutions by direct and reverse current. The influence of reverse plating variables (cathodic and anodic current densities and their time duration on the composition, phase structure and corrosion properties were investigated. The chemical content and phase composition affect the anticorrosive properties of Zn–Ni alloys during exposure to a corrosive agent (3 % NaCl solution. It was shown that the Zn–Ni alloy electrodeposited by reverse current with a full period T = 1 s and r = 0.2 exhibits the best corrosion properties of all the investigated alloys deposited by reverse current.

  14. Appropriate deposition parameters for formation of fcc Co-Ni alloy nanowires during electrochemical deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Aiman; Shahzad Khan, Babar; Mehmood, Tahir

    2016-12-01

    The effect of deposition potential on the crystal structure and composition of Co-Ni alloy nanowires is studied by XRD, FE-SEM and EDX. The alloy nanowires deposited at -3.2 V are metastable fcc phase Co-Ni. The alloy nanowires deposited at -1.8 V are hcp phase Co-Ni. The formation of the metastable fcc alloy nanowires can be attributed to smaller critical clusters formed at the high potential as the smaller critical clusters favor fcc structure because of the significant surface energy effect. The content of Co inside nanowires increases with increasing potential. This can be understood by the polarization curves of depositing Co and Ni nanowires, which show that the current density ratio of Ni to Co at low potential has larger value than that at high potential.

  15. Gigantic landslides versus glacial deposits: on origin of large hummock deposits in Alai Valley, Northern Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Natalya

    2015-04-01

    As glaciers are sensitive to local climate, their moraines position and ages are used to infer past climates and glacier dynamics. These chronologies are only valid if all dated moraines are formed as the result of climatically driven advance and subsequent retreat. Hence, any accurate palaeoenvironmental reconstruction requires thorough identification of the landform genesis by complex approach including geomorphological, sedimentological and structural landform investigation. Here are presented the implication of such approach for the reconstruction of the mega-hummocky deposits formation both of glacial and landslide origin in the glaciated Alai Valley of the Northern Pamir with further discussion on these and similar deposits validity for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. The Tibetan Plateau valleys are the largest glaciated regions beyond the ice sheets with high potential to provide the best geological record of glacial chronologies and, however, with higher probabilities of the numerous rock avalanche deposits including those that were initially considered of glacial origin (Hewitt, 1999). The Alai Valley is the largest intermountain depression in the upper reaches of the Amudarja River basin that has captured numerous unidentified extensive hummocky deposits descending from the Zaalai Range of Northern Pamir, covering area in more than 800 km2. Such vast hummocky deposits are usually could be formed either: 1) glacially by rapid glacial retreat due to the climate signal or triggered a-climatically glacial changes, such as glacial surge or landslide impact, or 2) during the landslide emplacement. Combination of sediment tests on agglomerates forming only in rock avalanche material (Reznichenko et al., 2012) and detailed geomorphological and sedimentological descriptions of these deposits allowed reconstructing the glacial deposition in the Koman and Lenin glacial catchments with identification of two gigantic rock avalanches and their relation to this glacial

  16. Factors influencing chloride deposition in a coastal hilly area and application to chloride deposition mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride is commonly used as an environmental tracer for studying water flow and solute transport in the environment. It is especially useful for estimating groundwater recharge based on the commonly used chloride mass balance (CMB method. Strong spatial variability in chloride deposition in coastal areas is one difficulty encountered in appropriately applying the CMB approach. Furthermore, intensive vegetation clearance for agriculture, for example during the European settlement in many coastal areas of Australia, may have perturbed catchment chloride balance conditions for appropriate use in CMB applications. In order to deal with these issues, a high resolution chloride deposition map in the coastal region is needed. In this study, we examined geographic, orographic, and atmospheric factors influencing chloride deposition in the Mount Lofty Ranges (MLR, a coastal hilly area of approximately 9000 km2 spatial extent in South Australia, using partial correlation and regression analyses. The results indicate that coastal distance, and terrain aspect and slope are two most significant factors controlling chloride deposition. Coastal distance accounts for 65% spatial variability in chloride deposition, with terrain aspect and slope for 8%. The deposition gradient is about 0.08 gm-2 year-1 km-1 as one progresses inland. The results are incorporated into a published de-trended residual kriging approach (ASOADeK to produce a 1 km×1 km resolution annual chloride deposition map and a bulk precipitation chloride concentration map. The average uncertainty of the deposition map is about 30% in the western MLR, and over 50% in the eastern MLR. The maps will form a very useful basis for examining catchment chloride balances for use in the CMB application in the study area.

  17. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition for future applications as transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, M. E-mail: galeazzi@physics.miami.edu; Chen, C.; Cohn, J.L.; Gundersen, J.O

    2004-03-11

    The University of Miami has recently started developing and studying high-resolution microcalorimeters operating near 100 mK for X-ray and particle physics and astrophysics. These detectors will be based on Transition Edge Sensors technology fabricated using iridium thin films deposited via the Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. We report here the preliminary result of the room temperature characterization of the Ir thin films, and an overview of future plans to use the films as transition edge sensors.

  18. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...... formation and selective corrosion are discussed based on the results of the practical measurements....... for metal temperatures above 520 C. Deposition measurements carried out at a position equal to the secondary superheater showed deposits rich in potassium and chlorine and to a lesser extent in silicon, calcium, and sulfur. Potassium and chlorine make up 40-80 wt% of the deposits. Mechanisms of deposit...

  19. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  20. A Pyroclastic Flow Deposit on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghail, R.; Wilson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanism on Venus is severely inhibited by its high atmospheric pressure and lack of water. This paper shows that a deposit located near 16°S, 144°E, here referred to as Scathach Fluctus, displays a number of morphological characteristics consistent with a pyroclastic flow deposit. These characteristics, particularly its lack of channelisation and evidence for momentum rather than cooling limited flow length, contrast with fissure-fed lava flow deposits. The total erupted volume is estimated to have been between 225 km3 and 875 km3 but this may have been emplaced in more than one event. Interaction between Scathach Fluctus and a small volcanic cone constrain the flow velocity to 48 m s-1 and plausible volatile concentrations to at least 1.8 wt% H2O, 4.3 wt% CO2 or 6.1 wt% SO2, the latter two implying magma sourced directly from the mantle. The deposit has radar characteristics, particularly an exponential backscatter function, that are similar to those of nearly half the planetary surface, implying that pyroclastic deposits may be much more common on Venus than has been recognised to date, and suggesting both a relatively volatile-rich mantle and a volcanic source for atmospheric SO2. Unfortunately, because the plains usually lack clear flow boundaries and structures, the features diagnostic of a high momentum flow - linear undulating deposits that lack channel morphology, cross narrow graben without deviation, climb obstacles and show evidence for parabolic flow out from steep drops - may not be identifiable. Thus, while pyroclastic flows may be common on Venus, Scathach Fluctus may, indeed, become the only proven example from Magellan data. False colour image of Scathach Fluctus using data from Cycle 1 (left-looking), Cycle 2 (right-looking) and passive emissivity combined to enhance the impression of relief in the grey scale image, overlain with colour-coded derived asperity height, defined as surface roughness at the scale-length of the Magellan

  1. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  2. Metallogenic evolution of uranium deposits in the Middle East and North Africa deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howari, Fares; Goodell, Philip; Salman, Abdulaty

    2016-02-01

    This paper is briefly involved in classification and distributions of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) uranium deposits. The study of these mineral systems can significantly contribute to our further understanding of the metallogeny of known and poorly explored deposits. This provides contribution to, and further enhancement of, current classifications and metallogenic models of uranium systems, allowing researchers to emphasize on unknown or poorly studied mineral systems found in MENA. The present study identified eight metallogenic types of uranium associated with: 1) the Archean rocks and intra-cratonic basins, 2) the Pan-African granites and rhyolites which are characterized by igneous activity, 3) Phanerozoic (Paleozoic) clastics, these deposits are the sedimentological response to Pan African magmatism, 4) Mesozoic (basal) clastics type e.g. Nubia sandstones which are characterized by uranium minerals, 5) regional sedimentary phosphate deposits which are categorized as geosynclinal, or continental margin deposits, on the shelf of the Tethys Ocean, 6) Cenozoic Intracratonic Felsic Magmatism of the Tibesti and Hoggar, and the sandstone U deposits of adjoining Niger. These are similar to the Pan-African magmatism metallogenic, 7) Calcretes, and 8) Resistate minerals which are often enriched in rare earth elements, sometimes including uranium. They are thus sometimes considered as U resources but poorly explored in the MENA region. These metallogenic types are described and discussed in the current paper.

  3. Vacuum deposition of stoichiometric crystalline PbS films: The effect of sulfurizing environment during deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Tyagi, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Thin film of lead sulfide (PbS) was deposited onto highly cleaned glass and quartz substrates using a vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The effect of the sulfurizing environment on the growth and properties of vacuum-deposited PbS thin film was studied. The ambient sulfurizing environment was created by thermal decomposition of thiourea inside the vacuum chamber during deposition to maintain the stoichiometry and quality of the PbS film. The sulfurizing gas H2S, produced in the thermal decomposition of the solid sulfur containing thiourea readily combines with the cations (Pb2+) without leaving any anions (S2-) at the substrates and also has not produced any excess of sulfur at the substrates. The deposited film was characterized by optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and atomic force micrographs. The physical characterization of the deposited PbS film revealed that the surface of film grown in the sulfurizing environment improved and contained more stoichiometric sulfur in comparison to film deposited without the sulfurizing environment.

  4. Deposition of Cu seed layer film by supercritical fluid deposition for advanced interconnects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bin; Zhao Ming-Tao; Zhang Yan-Fei; Yang Jun-He

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of a Cu seed layer film is investigated by supercritical fluid deposition (SCFD) using H2 as a reducing agent for Bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) copper in supercritical CO2 (scCO2).The effects of deposition temperature,precursor,and H2 concentration are investigated to optimize Cu deposition.Continuous metallic Cu films are deposited on Ru substrates at 190 ℃ when a 0.002 mol/L Cu precursor is introduced with 0.75 mol/L H2.A Cu precursor concentration higher than 0.002 mol/L is found to have negative effects on the surface qualities of Cu films.For a H2concentration above 0.56 mol/L,the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of a Cu film decreases as the H2 concentration increases.Finally,a 20-nm thick Cu film with a smooth surface,which is required as a seed layer in advanced interconnects,is successfully deposited at a high H2 concentration (0.75 mol/L).

  5. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source....... This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  6. The compositional and physical properties of localized lunar pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, David; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Lemelin, Myriam; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Hawke, B. Ray; Giguere, Thomas A.

    2017-02-01

    Lunar localized pyroclastic deposits are low albedo deposits with areas thermal-infrared-derived measures of surficial rock abundance and regolith density, and mineral abundances. Our goals are to (1) quantitatively characterize the physical and mineralogical properties of each localized pyroclastic deposit, (2) investigate the physical and mineralogical variations among localized pyroclastic deposits, (3) compare these properties of localized ( 2500 km2), and (4) provide useful parameters for future volcanological modeling. From this study, we find that: (1) localized pyroclastic deposits exhibit low relief structures, (2) the surface rock abundance and circular polarization ratio of localized pyroclastic deposits display a wide range of values (0.2-0.5% and 0.3-0.6, respectively), (3) the glass abundance of localized pyroclastic deposits vary between ∼0 and ∼80 wt.%, (4) there are four types of localized pyroclastic deposits based upon the surface rock abundance and glass abundance parameters, (5) pyroclastic deposits within the same floor-fractured crater tend to have similar properties, and (6) localized pyroclastic deposits are diverse with respect to regional pyroclastic deposits, but a subset of localized pyroclastic deposits have similar physical and mineralogical properties to regional pyroclastic deposits.

  7. Interspecies modeling of inhaled particle deposition patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. Herein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. It is derived to improve animal testing protocols. The computer code describes the behavior and fate of particles in the lungs of human subjects and a selected surrogate, the laboratory rat. In the simulations CO2 is integrated with exposure chamber atmospheres, and its concentrations regulated to produce rat breathing profiles corresponding to selected levels of human physical activity. The dosimetric model is used to calculate total, compartmental (i.e., tracheobronchial and pulmonary), and localized distribution patterns of inhaled particles in rats and humans for comparable ventilatory conditions. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to predetermine the exposure conditions necessary to produce deposition patterns in rats that are equivalent to those in humans at prescribed physical activities.

  8. Monitoring particle growth in deposition plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebrowski, T.; Bahre, H.; Böke, M.; Winter, J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods are frequently used to deposit barrier layers, e.g. on polymers for food packaging. These plasmas may suffer from particle (dust) formation. We report on a flexible monitoring system for dust. It is based on scanning a 3D plasma volume for particles by laser light scattering. The lower size limit of particles detected in the presented system is 20 nm. We report on existence diagrams for obtaining dust free or dust loaded capacitively or inductively coupled rf-plasmas in C2H2 depending on pressure, flow and rf-power. We further present growth rates for dust in these plasmas and show that monodisperse particles are only obtained during the first growth cycle.

  9. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErjia; ZENGA; LIULX

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion hombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the flirt1 surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering powerdensity, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfufic acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  10. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget

    structure. Optimization of a process for graphene growth on commercially available copper foil is limited by the number of aluminium oxide particles on the surface of the catalyst. By replacing the copper foil with a thin deposited copper film on a SiO2/Si or c-plane sapphire wafer the particles can......Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform......, single layer, and high carrier mobility large area graphene. The main goals of this work are; (1) explore the graphene growth mechanics in a low pressure cold-wall CVD system on a copper substrate, and (2) optimize the process of growing high quality graphene in terms of carrier mobility, and crystal...

  11. Strategic metal deposits of the Arctic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Lobanov, K. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Tarasov, N. N.; Distler, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Chizhova, I. A.; Chefranov, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mineral commodities rank high in the economies of Arctic countries, and the status of mineral resources and the dynamics of their development are of great importance. The growing tendency to develop strategic metal resources in the Circumarctic Zone is outlined in a global perspective. The Russian Arctic Zone is the leading purveyor of these metals to domestic and foreign markets. The comparative analysis of tendencies in development of strategic metal resources of the Arctic Zone in Russia and other countries is crucial for the elaboration of trends of geological exploration and research engineering. This paper provides insight into the development of Arctic strategic metal resources in global perspective. It is shown that the mineral resource potential of the Arctic circumpolar metallogenic belt is primarily controlled by large and unique deposits of nonferrous, noble, and rare metals. The prospective types of economic strategic metal deposits in the Russian Arctic Zone are shown.

  12. Deposited low temperature silicon GHz modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Yoon Ho Daniel; Lipson, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The majority of silicon photonics is built on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers while the majority of electronics, including CPUs and memory, are built on bulk silicon wafers, limiting broader acceptance of silicon photonics. This discrepancy is a result of silicon photonics's requirement for a single-crystalline silicon (c-Si) layer and a thick undercladding for optical guiding that bulk silicon wafers to not provide. While the undercladding problem can be partially addressed by substrate removal techniques, the complexity of co-integrating photonics with state-of-the-art transistors and real estate competition between electronics and photonics remain problematic. We show here a platform for deposited GHz silicon photonics based on polycrystalline silicon with high optical quality suitable for high performance electro-optic devices. We demonstrate 3 Gbps polysilicon electro-optic modulator fabricated on a deposited polysilicon layer fully compatible with CMOS backend integration. These results open up an arr...

  13. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  14. Financial products as alternatives to traditional deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lidia MANEA

    2016-05-01

    In this context, increasing the safety of depositors appears as an undisputed necessity, which translates to our approach in the development of a constructive type applied research that takes into account the following stages: short description of risks and uncertainties characterizing the economic environment with emphasis on the importance of the financial instruments; analysis of empirical data on deposits in lei and euro at national level, identifying possible causes which led to one preference or another and finding the causes underlying the different options manifested in the capital, as compared to other counties; identifying the products that offer a dangerous alternative to traditional deposits from the Romanian banking market and describing these products and their related risks; the proposal of a new product, demonstrating its effectiveness by testing and confirmation of two hypotheses.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  16. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker....... Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use...

  17. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Ladam, Cecile; Dahl, Oeystein [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) lasers were used to ablate a polycrystalline Si target in a background pressure of <10{sup -4} Pa. Si films were deposited on Si and GaAs substrates at room temperature. The surface morphology of the films was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Round droplets from 20 nm to 5 {mu}m were detected on the deposited films. Raman Spectroscopy indicated that the micron-sized droplets were crystalline and the films were amorphous. The dependence of the properties of the films on laser wavelengths and fluence is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  19. Deposition of nitrogen into the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeuw, G. de; Skjøth, C.A.; Hertel, O.;

    2003-01-01

    The flux of nitrogen species from the atmosphere into the ocean, with emphasis on coastal waters, was addressed during the ANICE project (Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs into the Coastal Ecosystem). ANICE focused on quantifying the deposition of atmospheric inputs of inorganic nitrogen compounds (HNO3......, NO3-, NH3 and NH4+) into the North Sea and the processes governing this deposition. The Southern North Sea was studied as a prototype. Because the physical and chemical processes are described, as opposed to empirical relations, the results can potentially be transferred to other regional seas like...... the Mediterranean, the North Atlantic continental shelf area and the Baltic. Two intensive field experiments were undertaken, centred around the offshore tower Meetpost Noordwijk and the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory in East Anglia (UK). Long-term measurements were made on a ferry sailing between Hamburg...

  20. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Erjia; ZENG A,LIU L X

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion bombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the film surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering power density, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfuric acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  1. Ion sputtered deposit analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, T.R.; Kraus, B.; Swann, P.R. (GATAN, Inc., Warrendale, PA (USA))

    1983-12-15

    The collected deposit formed by sputtering a specimen provides a permanent record of the elemental surface composition. For analysis by X-rays or energy loss in a transmission electron microscope, all the sputtered particles (both ions and neutrals) are collected on a carbon or SiO thin film. Surface analysis can be obtained by exposing different areas of the specimen to the ion beam. Information available in the angular distributions of sputtered particles is retained on the thin film substrate. Depth profiling can be performed by the sequential exposure of different areas of the thin film substrate to the sputtered specimen particles. Examples from stainless steels and silicon compounds are given. The advantage of this ion sputtered deposit analysis (ISDA) technique, apart from its collection efficiency, is its ability to store permanently all the elemental information obtained from a particular experiment. This information can then be processed in a parallel or serial fashion at any time after the sputtering experiment.

  2. Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David R.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Trudell, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

  3. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  4. Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaogan [Berkeley, CA

    2011-11-15

    An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

  5. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  6. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  7. Complex Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Adam M; Olynick, Deirdre

    2015-10-14

    Complex materials are defined as nanostructured materials with combinations of structure and/or composition that lead to performance surpassing the sum of their individual components. There are many methods that can create complex materials; however, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is uniquely suited to control composition and structural parameters at the atomic level. The use of ALD for creating complex insulators, semiconductors, and conductors is discussed, along with its use in novel structural applications.

  8. Sinks for inorganic nitrogen deposition in forest ecosystems with low and high nitrogen deposition in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wenping; Yu, Guirui; Fang, Huajun; Jiang, Chunming; Yan, Junhua; Zhou, Mei

    2014-01-01

    We added the stable isotope (15)N in the form of ((15)NH4)2SO4 and K(15)NO3 to forest ecosystems in eastern China under two different N deposition levels to study the fate of the different forms of deposited N. Prior to the addition of the (15)N tracers, the natural (15)N abundance ranging from -3.4‰ to +10.9‰ in the forest under heavy N deposition at Dinghushan (DHS), and from -3.92‰ to +7.25‰ in the forest under light N deposition at Daxinganling (DXAL). Four months after the tracer application, the total (15)N recovery from the major ecosystem compartments ranged from 55.3% to 90.5%. The total (15)N recoveries were similar under the ((15)NH4)2SO4 tracer treatment in both two forest ecosystems, whereas the total (15)N recovery was significantly lower in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than in the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL under the K(15)NO3 tracer treatment. The (15)N assimilated into the tree biomass represented only 8.8% to 33.7% of the (15)N added to the forest ecosystems. In both of the tracer application treatments, more (15)N was recovered from the tree biomass in the subtropical forest ecosystem at DHS than the boreal forest ecosystem at DXAL. The amount of (15)N assimilated into tree biomass was greater under the K(15)NO3 tracer treatment than that of the ((15)NH4)2SO4 treatment in both forest ecosystems. This study suggests that, although less N was immobilized in the forest ecosystems under more intensive N deposition conditions, forest ecosystems in China strongly retain N deposition, even in areas under heavy N deposition intensity or in ecosystems undergoing spring freezing and thawing melts. Compared to ammonium deposition, deposited nitrate is released from the forest ecosystem more easily. However, nitrate deposition could be retained mostly in the plant N pool, which might lead to more C sequestration in these ecosystems.

  9. Deposition of amorphous carbon-silver composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zarco, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Rodil, S.E., E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2009-12-31

    Composites of amorphous carbon films and silver were deposited by co-sputtering, where the target (10 cm diameter) was of pure graphite with small inclusion of pure silver (less than 1 cm{sup 2}). The films were deposited under different powers, from 40 to 250 W, and different target-substrate distances. The substrate was earthed and rotated in order to obtain a uniform distribution of the silver content. The addition of the Ag piece into the target increased the deposition rate of the carbon films, which could be related to the higher sputter yield of the silver, but there seems to be also a contribution from a larger emission of secondary electrons from the Ag that enhances the plasma and therefore the sputtering process becomes more efficient. Scanning electron micrographs acquired using backscattered electrons showed that the silver was segregated from the carbon matrix, forming nanoparticles or larger clusters as the power was increased. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the silver was crystalline and the carbon matrix remained amorphous, although for certain conditions a peak attributed to fullerene-like structures was obtained. Finally, we used Raman spectroscopy to understand the bonding characteristics of the carbon-silver composites, finding that there are variations in the D/G ratio, which can be correlated to the observed structure and X-ray diffraction results.

  10. Research on laser direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Shi, Likai

    2003-03-01

    Laser direct deposition of metallic parts is a new manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design, laser cladding and rapid prototyping. Fully dense metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting the coaxially fed powders with a high-power laser in a layer-by-layer manner. The process characteristics, system composition as well as some research and advancement on laser direct deposition are presented here. The microstructure and properties observation of laser direct formed 663 copper alloy, 316L stainless steel and Rene'95 nickel super alloy samples indicate that, the as-deposited microstructure is similar to rapidly solidified materials, with homogenous composition and free of defects. Under certain conditions, directionally solidified microstructure can be obtained. The as-formed mechanical properties are equal to or exceed those for casting and wrought annealed materials. At the same time, some sample parts with complicate shape are presented for technology demonstration. The formed parts show good surface quality and dimensional accuracy.

  11. Deposited sediment settlement and consolidation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai-jie Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study deposited sediment settlement and consolidation mechanisms, sediment settlement experiments were conducted using a settlement column. Based on the experimental results, sediment settlement stage definition, excessive pore pressure (EPP dissipation, and consolidation constitutive equations are discussed. Three stages, including the free settlement, hindered settlement, and self-weight consolidation settlement stages, are defined. The results of this study show that sediment settlement is mainly affected by the initial sediment concentration and initial settlement height, and the interface settlement rate is attenuated linearly with time on bilogarithmic scales during the hindered settlement and self-weight consolidation settlement stages. Moreover, the deposited sediment layer in the self-weight consolidation settlement stage experiences large strains, and the settlement amount in this stage is about 32% to 59% of the initial height of deposited sediment. EPP is nonlinearly distributed in the settlement direction, and consolidation settlement is faster than EPP dissipation in the self-weight consolidation settlement stage. Consolidation constitutive equations for the hydraulic conductivity and effective stress, applicable to large-strain consolidation calculation, were also determined and fitted in the power function form.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of rare earth compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, L A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetostrictive thin films have been deposited using various techniques such as sputtering and evaporation but the use of laser deposition has been limited. This research presents the results from pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of TbFe sub 2 , DyFe sub 2 and Terfenol-D thin films using an infra red Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO sub 2 laser at lambda approx 10.6 mu m and an ultra violet Argon-Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser at lambda approx 193 nm. Results have showed that the TEA CO sub 2 laser under the range of conditions studied is not suitable for the production of magnetostrictive films. The problems experienced are a mixture of mostly fracture debris at low fluences (F approx 20 Jcm sup - sup 2) and melt droplets at high fluences (F approx 60 Jcm sup - sup 2). In all cases the destruction of the target is a major problem, with the Terfenol-D targets being the worst affected. Thin films produced were all iron rich. The use of an excimer laser has proved more successful in providing stoichiometri...

  13. Na Deposition on MnO(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Cox, David F.

    2016-03-01

    Na deposition on the MnO(100) surface was investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Na TPD and XPS results indicate that adsorbed Na interacts strongly with the MnO substrate to form an irreversibly-adsorbed, oxidic Na compound on the surface for coverages up to 1 monolayer (ML). This strongly-bound Na diffuses into the MnO subsurface and bulk at elevated temperatures above 500 K. For Na coverages above 1 ML, metallic Na is present and desorbs from the surface below 500 K. The deposition of Na on MnO(100) follows a Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth mode, with the formation of metallic Na islands following completion of the first Na monolayer. After Na deposition, the surface exhibits a diffuse (1 × 1) LEED pattern, suggesting the formation of disordered Na overlayers. After heating to 1000 K, the surface presents a (2 × 2) LEED pattern indicating that a surface reconstruction is induced by the diffusion of Na into the near surface region. CO2 can be used as a probe molecule in TPD to distinguish between metallic Na islands and oxidic Na in the first ML, and to indicate when Na that is still observable by XPS goes subsurface.

  14. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  15. GYPSUM DEPOSITS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Gabrić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurences and deposits of gypsum can be found in big karst poljes (Sinjsko, Vrličko, Petrovo, Kosovo and Kninsko as well as in tectonnically predestined river valleys of Zrmanja, Butišnica and Una. There also appear spatially localized occurences on the island of Vis and in the vicinity of Samobor. Evaporites (gypsum and anhydrite with adjoining overlying clastic rocks (red sandstones, siltites and pelites, carbonate rocks (dolomites and limestones and porous carbonate breccias (Rauhwackes were deposited during the period of Upper Permian. The recent position of the Upper Permian beds is a result of complex tectonic, particularly neotectonic, movements and diapiric displacements. Evaporites were deposited in marginal areas of the epicontinental marine basin, in a period of favourable conditions for the sabkha and playa sedimentation due to the continuous shoreline progradation. The Upper Permian age of these sediments in Dalmatio is proved by the characteristic mineral paragenesis and palinological determinations in elastics rocks, as well as by isotope analyses of sulphure in gypsum. Gypsum is a significant ore mineral resource in building, cement production, as well as in a number of tehnological processes used in chemical industry and elsewhere. According to the recent investigations gypsum is predestined to serve as an ore mineral resource of significant perspectives (the paper is published in Croatian.

  16. Localized Pyroclastic Deposits in the Grimaldi Region of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, B. R.; Giguere, T. A.; Gaddis, L. R.; Gustafson, O.; Lawrence, S. J.; Stopar, J. D.; Peterson, C. A.; Bell, J. F.; Robinson, M. S.; LROC Science Team

    2012-03-01

    LRO Camera WAC and NAC images were used to identify and characterize previously unknown localized pyroclastic deposits in the Grimaldi region. Some are among the smallest pyroclastic deposits yet identified on the lunar surface.

  17. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  18. Point locations and characteristics of evaporite-related potash deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial database of evaporite-related potash deposits and occurrences provides location and descriptive information for 981 deposits and occurrences that are...

  19. Evidence for change in depositional environment in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.; Rao, Ch.M.

    cm interval were analyzed for calcium carbonate, organic carbon and reduced sulfur contents. Sedimentological analysis indicates that the core contains hemipelagic Globigerina ooze of Holocene age at the top, underlain by sediments depositEd...

  20. Developing Depositional Models for Mercury Contaminated Floodplain Deposits Using Geomorphic Mapping and GIS in South River, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, A.; Pizzuto, J.; O'Neal, M. A.; Rhoades, E.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury was introduced into the South River from the 1930s to the 1950s from an industrial plant in Waynesboro, Virginia. Mercury contamination in fish tissue continues to exceed acceptable levels. The contaminated sediments in the river's floodplains are probably the present source of mercury to the South River ecosystem. Locating and determining the extent and depositional history of these deposits are important for understanding the mercury cycle in the river as well as for remediation plans. The South River is a sinuous, single thread alluvial river with frequent bedrock exposures along its bed and banks. Overbank deposits are discontinuous and thin. Rates of lateral migration by the South River are extremely low, averaging 0.02 m/yr, and the river has been influenced by mill dams along a 19 km study reach. This 19 km section of the 37 km river reach was selected for the study because of its high concentration of Hg. Six different categories of floodplain deposits dating from 1937-2005 have been identified throughout the river using studies of historical aerial photographs in a GIS framework, field mapping, dendro- and radionuclide dating, grain size and Hg analysis. Not surprisingly, traditional depositional models of meandering rivers do not apply. Floodplain depositional units include mill dam deposits, point bar/bench deposits, concave bank bench deposits, islands, cattle deposits, and tributary confluences deposits. The most important deposits for sequestering historic mercury are those that also store the most silt and clay. These include mill dam deposits, point bar/bench deposits, concave bank deposits, and tributary confluence deposits. Many of these deposits represent reservoirs of mercury-contaminated sediments that could supply significant amounts of mercury into the river presently and in the future.

  1. Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation compared to layered deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowe, M.; Bishop, J. L.; Gross, C.; Walter, S.

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation are morphologically similar to the mounds of Juventae Chasma at the equatorial region on Mars (Fig. 1). By analyzing these deposits, we hope to gain information about the environmental conditions that prevailed during sediment deposition and erosion, hence conditions that might be applicable to the Martian layered and hydrated deposits. Mariner 9 data of the Martian mid-latitudes have already shown evidence of the wind-sculptured landforms that display the powerful prevailing eolian regime [1]. In addition, [2] reported on similarities between Martian erosional landforms and those of the rainless coastal desert of central Peru from the Paracas peninsula to the Rio Ica. As indicated by similar erosional patterns, hyper-arid conditions and unidirectional winds must have dominated at least after deposition of the sediments, which are intermixed volcaniclastic materials and evaporate minerals at both locations. Likewise, variations in composition are displayed by alternating layers of different competence. The Pisco formation bears yardangs on siltstones, sandstones and clays with volcaniclastic admixtures [3] whereas the presence of sulphate minerals and the omnipresent mafic mineralogy has been reported for the layered mounds of Juventae Chasma equally [4]. Likewise, a volcanic airfall deposition and lacustrine formation have been proposed for the sulphate-rich deposits of Juventae Chasma [5,6]. In order to find out about potential spectral similarities, we performed a detailed spectral analysis of the surface by using LANDSAT and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR/ SWIR data (visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared region).

  2. Influence of deposit architecture on intrastratal deformation, slope deposits of the Tres Pasos Formation, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchter, Neal C.; Romans, Brian W.; Hubbard, Stephen M.

    2016-07-01

    Slope sediments on passive and active margins deform and fail across a broad range of scales ranging from loading and sediment remobilization near the sediment-water interface to submarine landslides and mass movements that incorporate significant volumes of slope deposits. Deformational styles are characterized by updip extension and downdip compressional features that occur above a detachment surface. Conditions for failure and deformation include the presence of weak layer(s) that serve as a detachment surface, competency contrasts that allow for detachment and downslope movement, deformation above a detachment surface, and a triggering mechanism(s) that initiates failure. Slope failure processes and products are well documented at scales resolvable by seismic-reflection surveys and in instances of extensive downslope failure, but the processes and products associated with intermediate-scale slope deformation are poorly understood. Intrastratal deformation is defined as stratigraphically isolated zones of deformation bounded above and below by concordant and undeformed strata. In this study, outcrop examples of intrastratal deformation from the Upper Cretaceous Tres Pasos Formation are used to elucidate the influence of depositional architecture on slope deformation. The facies distribution associated with compensational stacking of lobe deposits is shown to have a first-order control on the location and style of deformation. Detachment planes that form in mudstone deposits associated with lobe fringe and interlobe deposits are spatially limited and deformation is restricted to interbedded sandstone and mudstone associated with off-axial lobe positions. Downslope translation was arrested by stratigraphic buttresses associated with more sandstone-prone axial deposits. Emplacement of a regionally extensive mass transport deposit is interpreted as the triggering mechanism for contemporaneous intrastratal deformation of > 60 m of underlying stratigraphy. A vertical

  3. Nano-scale gap filling and mechanism of deposit-etch-deposit process for phase-change material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Wan-Chun; Liu Bo; Song Zhi-Tang; Xiang Yang-Hui; Wang Zong-Tao; Zhang Bei-Chao; Feng Song-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 gap filling is one of the key processes for phase-change random access memory manufacture.Physical vapor deposition is the mainstream method of Ge2Sb2Te5 film deposition due to its advantages of film quality,purity,and accurate composition control.However,the conventional physical vapor deposition process cannot meet the gapfilling requirement with the critical device dimension scaling down to 90 nm or below.In this study,we find that the deposit-etch-deposit process shows better gap-filling capability and scalability than the single-step deposition process,especially at the nano-scale critical dimension.The gap-filling mechanism of the deposit-etch-deposit process was briefly discussed.We also find that re-deposition of phase-change material from via the sidewall to via the bottom by argon ion bombardment during the etch step was a key ingredient for the final good gap filling.We achieve void-free gap filling of phase-change material on the 45-nm via the two-cycle deposit-etch-deposit process.We gain a rather comprehensive insight into the mechanism of deposit-etch-deposit process and propose a potential gap-filling solution for over 45-nm technology nodes for phase-change random access memory.

  4. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-06-01

    NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation-deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  5. Deposition of Aluminium Oxide Films by Pulsed Reactive Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhui MAO; Bingchu CAI; Maosong WU; Guoping CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed reactive sputtering is a novel process used to deposit some compound films, which are not deposited by traditional D.C. reactive sputtering easily. In this paper some experimental results about the deposition of Al oxide films by pulsed reactive sputtering are presented. The hysteresis phenomenon of the sputtering voltage and deposition rate with the change of oxygen flow during sputtering process are discussed.

  6. Self-ordering and complexity in epizonal mineral deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard W.; Berger, Byron R.

    2000-01-01

    Epizonal base and precious metal deposits makeup a range of familiar deposit styles including porphyry copper-gold, epithermal veins and stockworks, carbonate-replacement deposits, and polymetallic volcanic rock-hosted (VHMS) deposits. They occur along convergent plate margins and are invariably associated directly with active faults and volcanism. They are complex in form, variable in their characteristics at all scales, and highly localized in the earth’s crust.

  7. PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON SUPERHYDROPHOBIC SURFACES BY SESSILE DROPLET EVAPORATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dicuangco, Mercy G.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation is essential in ink-jet printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. In recent years, sessile droplet evaporation on bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive method for depositing materials on a site-specific, localized region, but is less explored compared to evaporative deposition on hyd...

  8. Management of polluted deposit in lake and river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Eun Jung [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    In this study, the perception and problem of polluted deposit in Korea, which does not have a clear concept of it, were analyzed and the need of a comprehensive polluted deposit management, including the present condition of pollution, assessment, pollution prevention, and disposal of polluted deposit, was presented. Based on the analysis on foreign management system, the framework of polluted deposit management in Korea was provided. 84 refs., 11 figs., 40 tabs.

  9. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  10. 19 CFR 10.40 - Refund of cash deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refund of cash deposits. 10.40 Section 10.40... TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.40 Refund of cash deposits. (a) When a cash deposit is made in lieu of surety,...

  11. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and mo

  12. Stress in and texture of PVD deposited metal nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machunze, R.

    2010-01-01

    Thin metal nitride films deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) are used amongst many other applications as wear protective coatings in tool industry or as diffusion barriers in integrated circuit technology. Typically these films exhibit a residual in-plane stress when deposited onto rigid su

  13. High speed titanium coating by Supersonic Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    LUPOI, ROCCO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The importance of metal coating technologies drives the continuous improvement of metal deposition techniques for application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This work presents the foundations of a new process technology f or the deposition of t itanium coatings on steel tube substrates using supersonic powder streams and impact site laser heating , known as Supersonic Laser Deposition (SLD). M et...

  14. Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. January...4 Figure 2. Particle deposition in the lung of the guinea pig via endotracheal breathing...Particle deposition in the lungs of guinea pigs via nasal breathing. ......................................... 12 v PREFACE The research work

  15. Human respiratory deposition of particles during oronasal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, David L.; Proctor, Donald F.

    Deposition of particles in the tracheobronchial and pulmonary airways is computed as a function of particle size, correcting for deposition in the parallel nasal and oral airways with oronasal breathing. Thoracic deposition is lower at all sizes for oronasal breathing than for mouth breathing via tube, and is negligible for aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 10 μm or larger.

  16. Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Films Prepared by Magnetic Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menon, Mohan; Larsen, Casper; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm

    2009-01-01

    Deposition of La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 (LSM) films from suspensions using a magnetic field was found to be a cheap and quick technique. Ninety weight percent of the particles present in the suspensions were deposited within the first minute of the deposition, and the thickness of the film varied linearly...

  17. Potentiostatic Deposition and Characterization of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was employed to deposit cuprous oxide Cu2O thin films. In this work, Cu2O thin films have been grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) transparent conducting glass as a substrate by potentiostatic deposition of cupric acetate. The effect of deposition time on the morphologies, crystalline, and optical quality of Cu2O thin films was investigated.

  18. 14 CFR 399.39 - Equipment purchase deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment purchase deposits. 399.39 Section... Equipment purchase deposits. Equipment purchase deposits are advance payments made by air carriers to manufacturers for the purchase of equipment to be delivered in the future, or funds segregated by air...

  19. Acid deposition and its implications for nature conservation in Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, G.L.A.; Cooke, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general consideration of acid deposition is given, in terms of the origins and fate of acid deposition and its effects on terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Acid deposition in wetland sites in Britain is discussed, and conclusions are drawn for nature conservation in Britain. (177 refs.)

  20. Simulated dry deposition of nitric acid near forest edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Jong, J.J.M. de

    1997-01-01

    Dry deposition is simulated to understand and generalize observations of enhanced deposition of air pollution near forest edges. Nitric acid is taken as an example as its deposition velocity is often assumed to be determined by turbulent transport only. The simulations are based on the micro-meteoro

  1. 12 CFR 303.243 - Brokered deposit waivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brokered deposit waivers. 303.243 Section 303.243 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING... brokered deposits in the institution's overall funding and liquidity management program; (3) The...

  2. Imposed layer by layer growth by pulsed laser interval deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus J.H.M.; Blank, Dave H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has become an important technique to fabricate novel materials. Although there is the general impression that, due to the pulsed deposition, the growth mechanism differs partially from continuous physical and chemical deposition techniques, it has hardly been used. Here, we w

  3. Nickel-cobalt laterites: a deposit model: Chapter H in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Erin; Anderson, Eric J.; Gray, Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are supergene enrichments of Ni±Co that form from intense chemical and mechanical weathering of ultramafic parent rocks. These regolith deposits typically form within 26 degrees of the equator, although there are a few exceptions. They form in active continental margins and stable cratonic settings. It takes as little as one million years for a laterite profile to develop. Three subtypes of Ni-Co laterite deposits are classified according to the dominant Ni-bearing mineralogy, which include hydrous magnesium (Mg)-silicate, smectite, and oxide. These minerals form in weathering horizons that begin with the unweathered protolith at the base, saprolite next, a smectite transition zone only in profiles where drainage is very poor, followed by limonite, and then capped with ferricrete at the top. The saprolite contains Ni-rich hydrous Mg-silicates, the Ni-rich clays occur in the transition horizon, and Ni-rich goethite occurs in the limonite. Although these subtypes of deposits are the more widely used terms for classification of Ni-Co laterite deposits, most deposits have economic concentrations of Ni in more than one horizon. Because of their complex mineralogy and heterogeneous concentrations, mining of these metallurgically complex deposits can be challenging. Deposits range in size from 2.5 to about 400 million tonnes, with Ni and Co grades of 0.66–2.4 percent (median 1.3) and 0.01–0.15 percent (median 0.08), respectively. Modern techniques of ore delineation and mineralogical identification are being developed to aid in streamlining the Ni-Co laterite mining process, and low-temperature and low-pressure ore processing techniques are being tested that will treat the entire weathered profile. There is evidence that the production of Ni and Co from laterites is more energy intensive than that of sulfide ores, reflecting the environmental impact of producing a Ni-Co laterite deposit. Tailings may include high levels of

  4. Prediction of wall deposition behaviour in a pilot-scale spray dryer using deposition correlations for pipe flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOTA K.; LANGRISH T.A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The particle deposition behaviour of skim milk, water and maltodextrin in the conical section of a pilot-scale spray dryer was predicted using simple correlations for particle depositions in pipes. The predicted particle deposition fluxes of these materials were then compared with the measured deposition fluxes. The predicted particle deposition regimes of the spray dryer were expected to be in the diffusional and mixed (diffusional and inertial) regimes, but the experimental results suggested that the particle deposition was mainly in the inertial regime. Therefore, using the pipe correlations for predicting deposition in a pilot-scale spray dryer suggests that they do not sufficiently represent the actual deposition behaviour. This outcome indicates that a further study of particle flow patterns needs to be carried out using numerical simulations (computational fluid dynamics,CFD) in view of the additional geometrical complexity of the spray dryer.

  5. Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films Deposited onto MWCNT/Polysulfone Substrates by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide (CdS thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD onto polymeric composites with electric field-aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. MWCNT/polysulfone composites were prepared by dispersing low concentrations of MWCNTs within dissolved polysulfone (PSF. An alternating current electric field was “in situ” applied to align the MWCNTs within the dissolved polymer along the field direction until the solvent was evaporated. 80 μm thick solid MWCNT/PSF composites with an electrical conductivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than the conductivity of the neat PSF were obtained. The MWCNT/PSF composites were subsequently used as flexible substrates for the deposition of CdS thin films by CBD. Transparent and adherent CdS thin films with an average thickness of 475 nm were obtained. The values of the energy band gap, average grain size, rms roughness, crystalline structure, and preferential orientation of the CdS films deposited onto the polymeric substrate were very similar to the corresponding values of the CdS deposited onto glass (conventional substrate. These results show that the MWCNT/PSF composites with electric field-tailored MWCNTs represent a suitable option to be used as flexible conducting substrate for CdS thin films, which represents an important step towards the developing of flexible systems for photovoltaic applications.

  6. Technology basis and perspectives on focused electron beam induced deposition and focused ion beam induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rius, Gemma, E-mail: rius.gemma@nitech.ac.jp

    2014-12-15

    The main characteristics of focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) and focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID) are presented. FEBID and FIBID are two nanopatterning techniques that allow the fabrication of submicron patterns with nanometer resolution on selected locations of any kind of substrate, even on highly structured supports. The process consists of mask less serial deposition and can be applied to a wide variety of materials, depending strictly on the precursor material source used. The basic mechanism of FEBID and FIBID is the adsorption of volatile precursor molecules onto the sample surface and decomposition of the molecules induced by the energetic electron and ion focused beams. The essential similarities of the two techniques are presented and especial emphasis is dedicated to highlighting their main differences, such as aspects related to resolution, deposition rate, deposits purity, substrate integrity, etc. In both cases, the factors interplay and complex mechanisms are still understood in a qualitative basis, so much work can still be done in terms of modeling and simulating the processes involved in FEBID and FIBID. Current work on FEBID and FIBID is presented through examples of achievements, interesting results and novel approaches.

  7. Investigations on the Nature of Ceramic Deposits in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Mauer, G.; Gindrat, M.; Wäger, R.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-01-01

    In Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) process, major fractions of the feedstock powder can be evaporated so that coatings are deposited mainly from the vapor phase. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results indicate that such evaporation occurs significantly in the plasma torch nozzle and even nucleation and condensation of zirconia is highly possible there. Experimental work has been performed to investigate the nature of the deposits in the PS-PVD process, in particular coatings from condensate vapor and nano-sized clusters produced at two spraying distances of 1000 mm and 400 mm. At long spraying distance, columns in the coatings have pyramidal tops and very sharp faceted microstructures. When the spraying distance is reduced to 400 mm, the tops of columns become relatively flat and a faceted structure is not recognizable. XRD patterns show obvious preferred orientations of (110) and (002) in the coatings sprayed at 400 mm but only limited texture in the coatings sprayed at 1000 mm. Meanwhile, a non-line of sight coating was also investigated, which gives an example for pure vapor deposition. Based on these analyses, a vapor and cluster depositions are suggested to further explain the formation mechanisms of high-quality columnar-structured PS-PVD thermal barrier coatings which have already shown excellent performance in cyclic lifetime test.

  8. Defect control in room temperature deposited cadmium sulfide thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Como, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Martinez-Landeros, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Mejia, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States); Aguirre-Tostado, F.S. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 66600, México (Mexico); Nascimento, C.D.; Azevedo, G. de M; Krug, C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 91509-900 (Brazil); Quevedo-Lopez, M.A., E-mail: mquevedo@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The control of defects in cadmium sulfide thin films and its impact on the resulting CdS optical and electrical characteristics are studied. Sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial concentrations in the CdS films are controlled using the ambient pressure during pulsed laser deposition. CdS film resistivities ranging from 10{sup −1} to 10{sup 4} Ω-cm are achieved. Hall Effect measurements show that the carrier concentration ranges from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and is responsible for the observed resistivity variation. Hall mobility varies from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V-s for the same pressure regime. Although the energy bandgap remains unaffected (∼ 2.42 eV), the optical transmittance is reduced due to the increase of defects in the CdS films. Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy shows the dependence of the CdS films stoichiometry with deposition pressure. The presence of CdS defects is attributed to more energetic species reaching the substrate, inducing surface damage in the CdS films during pulsed laser deposition. - Highlights: • CdS thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. • The optical, electrical and structural properties were evaluated. • Carrier concentration ranged from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. • The chemical composition was studied by Rutherford back scattering. • The density of sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitial was varied.

  9. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  10. Matrix shaped pulsed laser deposition: New approach to large area and homogeneous deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkan, C.K.; May, A. [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hammadeh, M. [Department for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, IVF Laboratory, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Abdul-Khaliq, H. [Clinic for Pediatric Cardiology, Saarland University Medical Center and Faculty of Medicine, Building 9, 66421 Homburg, Saar (Germany); Aktas, O.C., E-mail: cenk.aktas@inm-gmbh.de [INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Group, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is one of the well-established physical vapor deposition methods used for synthesis of ultra-thin layers. Especially PLD is suitable for the preparation of thin films of complex alloys and ceramics where the conservation of the stoichiometry is critical. Beside several advantages of PLD, inhomogeneity in thickness limits use of PLD in some applications. There are several approaches such as rotation of the substrate or scanning of the laser beam over the target to achieve homogenous layers. On the other hand movement and transition create further complexity in process parameters. Here we present a new approach which we call Matrix Shaped PLD to control the thickness and homogeneity of deposited layers precisely. This new approach is based on shaping of the incoming laser beam by a microlens array and a Fourier lens. The beam is split into much smaller multi-beam array over the target and this leads to a homogenous plasma formation. The uniform intensity distribution over the target yields a very uniform deposit on the substrate. This approach is used to deposit carbide and oxide thin films for biomedical applications. As a case study coating of a stent which has a complex geometry is presented briefly.

  11. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  12. In-situ CdS/CdTe Heterojuntions Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Avila-Avendano, Jesus

    2016-04-09

    In this paper pulsed laser deposition (PLD) methods are used to study p-n CdTe/CdS heterojunctions fabricated in-situ. In-situ film deposition allows higher quality p-n interfaces by minimizing spurious contamination from the atmosphere. Morphologic and structural analyses were carried for CdTe films deposited on various substrates and different deposition conditions. The electrical characteristics and performance of the resulting p-n heterojunctions were studied as function of substrate and post-deposition anneal temperature. In-situ growth results on diodes with a rectification factor of ~ 105, an ideality factor < 2, and a reverse saturation current ~ 10-8 A. The carrier concentration in the CdTe film was in the range of ~ 1015 cm-3, as measured by C-V methods. The possible impact of sulfur diffusion from the CdS into the CdTe film is also investigated using High Resolution Rutherford Back-Scattering.

  13. Study of indium tin oxide thin films deposited on acrylics substrates by Ion beam assisted deposition technique

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Lijian; Liang Erjun; Gao Jinsong; Teixeira, Vasco M. P.; Santos, M. P. dos

    2009-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been deposited onto acrylics (PMMA) substrates by ion beam assisted deposition technique at different oxygen flows. The structural, optical and electrical properties of the deposited films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmittance, FTIR, ellipometry and Hall effect measurements. The optical constants of the deposited films have been calculated by fitting the ellipsometric spectra. The effects of the oxygen flow on the properties of the ...

  14. Atmospheric Sulfur Deposition on Farmland in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ti-Jian; YANG Hao-Ming; GAO Li-Jie; ZHANG Yan; HU Zheng-Yi; XU Cheng-Kai

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition onto typical farmland in East China was investigated using both field measurements and numerical modeling. The field measurements were conducted at the Experiment Station of Red Soil Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 10 km from Yingtan, Jiangxi Province, East China, between November 1998 and October 1999, and at the Changshu Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in a rapidly developing region of Jiangsu Province, East China, between April 2001 and March 2002. The regional acid deposition model system (RegADMS), in which the dry deposition velocities of SO2 and sulfate aerosols (SO42-) were estimated using a big-leaf resistance analogy model, was applied to simulate air sulfur deposition over East China and sulfur deposition onto lands of different use types in East China. The wet scavenging coefficients were parameterized in terms of precipitation rate, and the effect of sub-grid processes due to inhomogeneous land use on dry deposition velocity was also included. Results of the field measurements showed that over 83% of the total sulfur deposition at the Yingtan site was dry deposition, while at the Changshu site42% was dry deposition. The total sulfur deposition was much larger at the Yingtan site than at the Changshu site, which suggested contrasting air pollution and meteorological situations. The modeling results revealed that the total annual sulfur deposition over East China was 1.88 Mt, of which 72.8% was deposited onto farmland, and dry deposition accounted for 43% of the total sulfur deposited. The modeling results were generally in agreement with those from the observations.Overall, this study suggested that atmospheric sulfur deposition played an important role in the soil sulfur balance, which could have a significant effect on agricultural ecosystems in the study region.

  15. ZnS thin film deposited with chemical bath deposition process directed by different stirring speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Dang, X. Y.; Jin, J.; Yu, T.; Li, B. Z.; He, Q.; Li, F. Y.; Sun, Y.

    2010-09-01

    In this combined film thickness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and optical properties study, we explore the effects of different stirring speeds on the growth and optical properties of ZnS film deposited by CBD method. From the disclosed changes of thickness of ZnS film, we conclude that film thickness is independent of the stirring speeds in the heterogeneous process (deposition time less than 40 min), but increases with the stirring speeds and/or deposition time increasing in the homogeneous process. Grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the study of optical properties disclosed that the ZnS films grown with different stirring speeds show partially crystallized film and exhibit good transmittance (70-88% in the visible region), but the stirring speeds cannot give much effects on the structure and optical properties in the homogeneous process.

  16. Characterization of nanocarbon deposited on insulator substrate by alcohol chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Marina; Murata, Hidenobu; Tachibana, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer-graphene-like nanocarbon materials were directly deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition with ethanol as a carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the deposited materials have sheetlike grains of around 100 nm diameter. Most of them have “hills” with 32 nm diameter on the grains. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, the height of the sheetlike grains is below 1 nm, which is comparable to that of single-layer graphene, while the hills have a height of several nm. Raman spectra show that the material is similar to graphitic nanocarbon, which has a strong D band. This result implies that there are a number of defects in the nanocarbon materials.

  17. Electrophoretic deposition of siderite thin layers: Influence of electrode potential and deposition time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ithurbide, A., E-mail: aurelie.ithurbide@cea.f [CEA Saclay/DEN/DPC/SECR, Laboratoire de Mesures et Modelisation de la Migration des Radionucleides, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Peulon, S., E-mail: sophie.peulon@univ-evry.f [CNRS-Universite d' Evry-CEA, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, Boulevard Francois Mitterrand, 91025 Evry (France); Miserque, F. [CEA Saclay/DEN/DPC/SCP, Laboratoire de Reactivite des Surfaces et des Interfaces, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Beaucaire, C. [CEA Saclay/DEN/DPC/SECR, Laboratoire de Mesures et Modelisation de la Migration des Radionucleides, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chausse, A. [CNRS-Universite d' Evry-CEA, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, Boulevard Francois Mitterrand, 91025 Evry (France); Poinssot, Ch. [CNRS-Universite d' Evry-CEA, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, Boulevard Francois Mitterrand, 91025 Evry (France); CEA Marcoule Saclay/DEN, Departement RadioChimie et Procedes, BP 17171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2010-03-01

    Siderite thin layers have been obtained by electrophoretic deposition on an inert substrate (gold). Scanning electron microscopy image exhibits a compact and homogeneous film composed of round grains which diameter is about 1-2 {mu}m. The influence of two parameters, namely the electrode potential and the deposition time, on its thickness and its microstructure was investigated. The thickness was shown to be slightly dependent of the electrode potential (1.2 {mu}m for - 0.70 V and 1.7 {mu}m for - 0.95 V after 17 h). The crystallite size, estimated by X-ray diffraction patterns, was about 5 nm, depending on both electrode potential and deposition time. Despite its high sensitivity to oxygen, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra prove that the siderite surface has been kept out from oxidation. These siderite thin layers could be used as modified electrodes for further interaction studies.

  18. Influence of deposited CNTs on the surface of carbon fiber by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. J.; Liu, F.; Deng, C.; Fang, L. C.; Li, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    The surface property of carbon fiber directly affects the interface performance between carbon fiber and matrix. To improve the surface property of carbon fiber, we proposed a simple method to prepare carbon nanotubes /carbon fiber hybrid fiber via ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Surface morphologies and surface functional group of carbon fibers were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The results show that the deposition of carbon nanotubes changed the surface morphologies of carbon fibers and introduced polar groups (C=O and C-O) to carbon fiber surface. Comparing the results with EPD-only, ultrasonically assisted EPD increased the uniformity of carbon nanotubes coatings whereas only sparse and not uniformly deposition formed without ultrasonic.

  19. Deposition and characterization of CuInS2 thin films deposited over copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Titu; Kumar, K. Rajeev; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Simple, cost effective and versatile spray pyrolysis method is effectively combined with vacuum evaporation for the deposition of CuIns2 thin films for photovoltaic applications. In the present study In2s3 was spray deposited over vacuum evaporated Cu thin films and Cu was allowed to diffuse in to the In2S3 layer to form CuInS2. To analyse the dependence of precursor volume on the formation of CuInS2 films structural, electrical and morphological analzes are carried out. Successful deposition of CuInS2thin films with good crystallinity and morphology with considerably low resistivity is reported in this paper.

  20. Effect of thermal annealing on the properties of cadmium sulfide deposited via chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faisal R., E-mail: ahmad@ge.com; Yakimov, Aharon; Davis, Robert J.; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Cournoyer, James R.; Ayensu, Nana Menya

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates how post-deposition annealing in air of CdS thin films deposited via chemical bath deposition, influences the defects and impurities in the films, which in turn affect the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the films. The electrical properties of the annealed CdS films were characterized using a van der Pauw Hall effect measurement method. Using low-temperature photoluminescence measurements, a variety of sub-bandgap energy levels were observed and identified that are believed to play a critical role in impacting the concentration of carriers in the films. In addition, we studied the optical transmission and crystalline quality of the films as a function of the different annealing conditions. - Highlights: ► Annealing CdS affects its bandgap, structure and electrical conductivity. ► Low temperature photoluminescence spectra show how annealing affects CdS. ► Carrier concentration affected sulfur vacancies and cadmium interstitials.

  1. Hardness and stress of amorphous carbon film deposited by glow discharge and ion beam assisting deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, F C

    2000-01-01

    The hardness and stress of amorphous carbon films prepared by glow discharge and by ion beam assisting deposition are investigated. Relatively hard and almost stress free amorphous carbon films were deposited by the glow discharge technique. On the other hand, by using the ion beam assisting deposition, hard films were also obtained with a stress of the same order of those found in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films. A structural analysis indicates that all films are composed of a sp sup 2 -rich network. These results contradict the currently accepted concept that both stress and hardness are only related to the concentration of sp sup 3 sites. Furthermore, the same results also indicate that the sp sup 2 sites may also contribute to the hardness of the films.

  2. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Lukas, E-mail: lhoffmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Theirich, Detlef; Hasselmann, Tim; Räupke, André; Schlamm, Daniel; Riedl, Thomas, E-mail: t.riedl@uni-wuppertal.de [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-Str. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2}d{sup −1}.

  3. Vitroceramic interface deposited on titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Georgeta; Miu, Dana; Dogaru, Ionut; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Busuioc, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain biovitroceramic thin film coatings on titanium substrates. The composition of the targets was selected from SiO2-CaO-P2O5-(CaF2) systems and the corresponding masses were prepared using the sol-gel method. The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere (100mTorr), while the substrates were heated at 400°C. The PLD deposited films were analysed through different experimental techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning (SEM, EDX) and transmission (HRTEM, SAED) electron microscopy and infra-red spectroscopy coupled with optical microscopy. They were also biologically tested by in vitro cell culture and the contact angle was determined. The bioevaluation results indicate a high biocompatibilty of the obtained materials, demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  4. Ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-yan; Lv Yan-na; LIU Xue-yan Liu; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    The continuing increase in human activities is causing global changes such as increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.There is considerable interest in understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,specifically in terms of global nitrogen cycling and its potential future contribution to global climate change.This paper summarizes the ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,including size-effects,stage-effects,site-effects,and the effects of different levels and forms of atmospheric nitrogen deposition.We discuss needs for further research on the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil enzymes.

  5. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  6. Room-Temperature Deposition of NbN Superconducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Films with high superconducting transition temperatures deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Since deposition process does not involve significantly high substrate temperatures, employed to deposit counter electrode in superconductor/insulator/superconductor junction without causing any thermal or mechanical degradation of underlying delicate tunneling barrier. Substrates for room-temperature deposition of NbN polymeric or coated with photoresist, making films accessible to conventional lithographic patterning techniques. Further refinements in deposition technique yield films with smaller transition widths, Tc of which might approach predicted value of 18 K.

  7. Refining oil production in the latter stage of developing deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhakiyev, K.T.; Balgimbayev, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Certain characteristics of the Emba high viscosity oil deposits are examined. Experience in the development of the deposits which are in the latter stage show that despite the high relationships of the viscosities of the oil and water in the examined deposits, quite high values have been achieved. An orderly approach to refining the balanced reserves based on factual data from exploitation of the deposits is approached. The relationship between the accumulated withdrawals of oil and fluid, acquired as applied to Emba deposits, and the displacement factor, determined from factual data on the basis of a theory of full scale modeling, are used for this purpose.

  8. Particle deposition in low-speed, high-turbulence flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Mads; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Ullum, U.

    2002-01-01

    field measurements. Particle deposition is shown to be associated with near-wall coherent structures. Flow reversal, simulated by impulsive start, is shown to give higher deposition rates than steady mean flows. Key word index: Spoilage fungi; spores; food processing plant; deposition flux; large eddy......, active and passive samplers provide typical values of airborne concentrations and specific deposition fluxes. Velocity and turbulence data from field studies are used as input in LES simulations of the process, and estimates of deposition fluxes are of the same order of magnitude as those deduced from...... simulation....

  9. Deposit Insurance and Bank Liquidity: Does Ownership Structure Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Trinugroho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine how the level deposit insurance coverage affects bank liquidity. We also test the role of ownership in the relationship between deposit insurance coverage and bank liquidity. This study uses quarterly data of Indonesian banks from Q1:2002 - Q2:2008. We argue that the presence of explicit deposit insurance changes a bank‘s behavior in liquidity management in the form of decreasing asset liquidity. We find some evidence on the negative impact of deposit insurance coverage on bank liquidity. However, little is found on the role of ownership structure. The credibility of deposit insurance system and implicit guarantee are the main policy implications.

  10. Diagnostics in ? helicon plasmas for ? deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, A.; Nicolazo, F.; Vallée, C.; Goullet, A.; Turban, G.; Grolleau, B.

    1997-05-01

    0963-0252/6/2/008/img3 and 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 helicon plasmas used for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of 0963-0252/6/2/008/img5 films are investigated in the 1 - 10 mTorr pressure and 0 - 800 W rf power ranges. The positive oxygen ions are analysed by energy selective mass spectrometry and Langmuir probes. The oxygen atom concentration is monitored by actinometry and ionization threshold mass spectrometry. In oxygen plasmas it is shown that 0963-0252/6/2/008/img6 is the major positive ion, and that the oxygen molecules are far from being completely dissociated, due to a very high oxygen atom recombination frequency on the reactor walls. The dissociation degree increases with the rf power reaching 10% at 500 W. In 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasmas, the plasma density and electron temperature decrease as the TEOS fraction increases. In contrast, the degree of oxygen dissociation increases sharply with the addition of a few per cent TEOS, is maximum for about 5% TEOS and decreases as TEOS fraction is further increased. In a 95:5 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasma (5 mTorr, 300 W) the fluxes of oxygen positive ions and atoms impinging onto a floating substrate are estimated to be 0963-0252/6/2/008/img9 and 0963-0252/6/2/008/img10 respectively. Under these plasma conditions, near-stoichiometric 0963-0252/6/2/008/img11 films, with low OH content, are deposited at ambient temperature. The corresponding atom to ion flux ratio is about 250, which suggests the dominant role of oxygen atoms in the deposition kinetics. The comparison of the compositions of layers grown in a 5 mTorr 95:5 0963-0252/6/2/008/img4 plasma at two rf powers confirms the major role of oxygen atoms.

  11. Impediments to recovery from acid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Shaun A.; Eimers, Catherine; Baker, Scott

    2016-12-01

    In response to large reductions in sulphur (S) emissions over the past 30 years, sulphate (SO42-) concentrations in precipitation at Plastic Lake in south-central Ontario, Canada, have declined by more than 70%. More recent decreases in NOx emissions have similarly led to a reduction in nitrate deposition (NO3-) and consequently the pH of bulk precipitation has increased by approximately 0.8 pH units since 1980. Despite the large decrease in acidic deposition, chemical recovery of the streams, as measured by an increase in pH and decrease in aluminum (Al), has been much less than expected, primarily due to losses of base cations from the shallow, base-poor soils. While nitrogen (N) is almost totally retained within the terrestrial catchment, S export continues to exceed inputs measured in bulk deposition and during the early part of the record approximately 70% of the anions in streams were buffered by calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) compared with only 60% in 2011/12. In the wetland-draining stream (PC1), peak depressions in stream pH and peaks in SO42- and Al concentration in the fall are significantly positively correlated with annual drought days defined as the number of days when stream flow ceases. Even though reductions in SO2 and NOx emissions in Canada have resulted in large improvements in precipitation chemistry, the combined influence of soil acidification and climate-mediated biogeochemical processes occurring in wetlands cause acidification-related issues to persist. Forecasting the longer-term response of soils and surface waters in light of these observations is required to fully assess the need for further emission reductions.

  12. Quality study of a fedspar deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taboada, J.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a pegmatite mineral deposit composed by some veins of a length between 50 and 800 meters and a width of almost 15 meters. With the purpose to evaluate the potential exploitation, we have characterized the quality of the selling product, through a sampling procedure, granulometric classification, magnetic separation, flotation process and mineralogical analysis. In order to establish the more able flotation process, we have tested different methods, that we also include here. Later on, and with the finality to establish the selling feldspar percentage in the deposit, we realized a geostatic study in order to identify, not only the different qualities but also its distribution in the deposit.

    Este trabajo describe un yacimiento de pegmatita compuesto por varios filones, que varían entre 50 y 800 metros de longitud y casi 15 metros de ancho. Con el fin de evaluar el potencial de explotación, se caracteriza la calidad del producto vendible. Esto se lleva a cabo mediante un procedimiento de muestreo, clasificación granulométrica, separación magnética, proceso de flotación y análisis mineralógico. Para establecer el proceso de flotación más eficaz, se ha experimentado con varios procedimientos, cuya breve descripción se incluye. Posteriormente, y con el fin de establecer el porcentaje de feldespato vendible en el yacimiento, se realizó un estudio geoestadístico para identificar tanto las categorías de calidad como su distribución en el yacimiento.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  14. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Traberg, Rikke

    1996-01-01

    Contaminant transport in an aquifer at an incinerator waste residue deposit in Denmark is simulated. A two-dimensional, geochemical transport code is developed for this purpose and tested by comparison to results from another code, The code is applied to a column experiment and to the field site......, The ongoing geochemical processes and any unknown geochemical parameters are obtained through simulation of the column experiment that used soil and leachate from the field site. The application of the code to the field site, which has been monitored for more than 15 years, use this geochemical information...

  15. LASER DEPOSITION. THE AREA THERMAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin CIOFU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By laser direct deposition, the parts are manufactured by injecting powder in a melt metal bath with the help of the laser. During the manufacture it is deployed a complex “ thermic history” in the different built regions. This includes re-melting and many thermic cycles at low temperatures (of hundreds of degrees. The phenomena of thermic transmission are variable in time, being by excellence reversible phenomena, too, as the temperature difference which intervenes cannot be ever small infinite. In the most general case, the temperature is a function of space coordinates, and of the time ح

  16. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  17. Mixture for removing tar and paraffin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kamenshchikov, F.A.; Frolov, M.A.; Golovin, I.N.; Khusainov, Z.M.; Smirnov, Ya.L.; Suchkov, B.M.

    1981-05-23

    Mixture is claimed for removing tar and paraffin deposits (TPD) on the basis of the butyl-benzene fraction (BBF), which is intended to more efficiently remove TPD from the surface of refinery equipment, additionally has piperylene, isoprene and isoamine with the following ratio of the components: piperylene, 19-31%; isoprene, 8-12%; isoamines, 8-12%, while BBF, the rest. The efficiency of the given compositions was assessed by the rate at which the plates were cleaned of TPD and pure commercial paraffin. It has been shown that BBF dissolves 4-6 times faster in the given mixture than in BBF and pyperylene.

  18. Determination of electroless deposition by chemical nickeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Badida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of technical level and reliability of machine products in compliance with the economical and ecological terms belongs to the main trends of the industrial development. During the utilisation of these products there arise their each other contacts and the interaction with the environment. That is the reason for their surface degradation by wear effect, corrosion and other influences. The chemical nickel-plating allows autocatalytic deposition of nickel from water solutions in the form of coherent, technically very profitable coating without usage of external source of electric current. The research was aimed at evaluating the surface changes after chemical nickel-plating at various changes of technological parameters.

  19. Orientation specific deposition of mesoporous particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kjellman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a protocol for a facile orientation specific deposition of plate-like mesoporous SBA-15 silica particles onto a surface (mesopores oriented normal to surface. A drop of an aqueous dispersion of particles is placed on the surface and water vaporizes under controlled relative humidity. Three requirements are essential for uniform coverage: particle dispersion should not contain aggregates, a weak attraction between particles and surface is needed, and evaporation rate should be low. Aggregates are removed by stirring/sonication. Weak attraction is realized by introducing cationic groups to the surface. Insight into the mechanisms of the so-called coffee stain effect is also provided.

  20. DEPOSITION CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY SURFATRON GENERATED DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Davydova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were deposited by surface wave discharge using various Ar/CH4/ CO2 gas mixture ratios. The morphology was controlled by adjusting of gas concentration and was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Also, the influence of the low temperature plasma treatment and process time on the wettability of the diamond films has been studied. The results indicate that for hydrogen termination of diamond surface indicate that the temperature as low as 400°C and treatment time of 15 min is sufficient to attain the p-type surface conductivity of diamond.

  1. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  2. Electron beam niobium oxide powder deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, D.S. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Nono, M.C.A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.R.M. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Zirconium oxide applied by Electron Beam –Physical Vapor Deposition can produce high quality coatings for high temperature blades. In this work niobium, yttrium and zirconium oxides were applied on metallic substrates, using EB-PVD, aiming thermal conductivity reduction. Coating characterization has been performed by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffractometry shows only tetragonal phase for the composition range evaluated, with tetragonality increase for higher niobium oxide amounts. Higher amounts of niobium promote reduction of ceramic coating theoretical density and thermal conductivity. (author)

  3. Liquid phase deposition of electrochromic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Rubin, Michael D.

    2000-08-18

    Thin films of titanium, zirconium and nickel oxides were deposited on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by immersion in aqueous solutions. The films are transparent, conformal, of uniform thickness and appearance, and adhere strongly to the substrates. On electrochemical cycling, TiO2, mixed TiO2-ZrO2, and NiOx films exhibited stable electrochromism with high coloration efficiencies. These nickel oxide films were particularly stable compared with films prepared by other non-vacuum techniques. The method is simple, inexpensive, energy efficient, and readily scalable to larger substrates.

  4. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Paul B.

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700°C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S 2 and O 2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  5. Deposition of Cadmium Sulphide Thin Films by Photochemical Deposition and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Pushpalatha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of cadmium sulphide (CdS thin films on glass substrates in acidic medium by photochemical deposition (PCD and studies by several characterizations are presented. The structural characterization of the thin films was carried out by XRD. The elemental composition of the thin films was carried out by EDAX. The optical properties have been studied in the wavelength range 200-900 nm and the optical transition has been found to be direct and allowed. The morphological properties are studied by AFM and electrical properties are studied by four probe technique.

  6. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkarnain Zainal; Mohd Norizam Md Daud; Azmi Zakaria; Mohd Sabri Mohd Ghazali; Atefeh Jafari; Wan Rafizah Wan Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the ...

  7. Simulating ozone dry deposition at a boreal forest with a multi-layer canopy deposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Gierens, Rosa; Taipale, Ditte; Mammarella, Ivan; Boy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A multi-layer ozone (O3) dry deposition model has been implemented into SOSAA (a model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to improve the representation of O3 concentration and flux within and above the forest canopy in the planetary boundary layer. We aim to predict the O3 uptake by a boreal forest canopy under varying environmental conditions and analyse the influence of different factors on total O3 uptake by the canopy as well as the vertical distribution of deposition sinks inside the canopy. The newly implemented dry deposition model was validated by an extensive comparison of simulated and observed O3 turbulent fluxes and concentration profiles within and above the boreal forest canopy at SMEAR II (Station to Measure Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) in Hyytiälä, Finland, in August 2010. In this model, the fraction of wet surface on vegetation leaves was parametrised according to the ambient relative humidity (RH). Model results showed that when RH was larger than 70 % the O3 uptake onto wet skin contributed ˜ 51 % to the total deposition during nighttime and ˜ 19 % during daytime. The overall contribution of soil uptake was estimated about 36 %. The contribution of sub-canopy deposition below 4.2 m was modelled to be ˜ 38 % of the total O3 deposition during daytime, which was similar to the contribution reported in previous studies. The chemical contribution to O3 removal was evaluated directly in the model simulations. According to the simulated averaged diurnal cycle the net chemical production of O3 compensated up to ˜ 4 % of dry deposition loss from about 06:00 to 15:00 LT. During nighttime, the net chemical loss of O3 further enhanced removal by dry deposition by a maximum ˜ 9 %. Thus the results indicated an overall relatively small contribution of airborne chemical processes to O3 removal at this site.

  8. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  9. Properties of Ultra-Thin Hafnium Oxide and Interfacial Layer Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taeho Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Kyung-Il Hong; Duck-Kyun Choi; Jinho Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-thin hafnium-oxide gate dielectric films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique using HfCl4 and H2O precursor on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the interface layer is Hf-silicate rather than phase separated Hf-silicide and silicon oxide structure. The Hf-silicate interfacial layer partially changes into SiOx after high temperature annealing, resulting in a complex HfO2-silicate-SiOx dielectric structure. Electrical measurements confirms that HfO2 on Si is stable up to 700 ℃ for 30 s under N2 ambient.

  10. Pb Isotope Study of Some Nonferrous Metallic Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Pb-Pb isochron data of more than 40 Precambrian polymetallic deposits, the authors consider that there are four mineralization periods for the Precambrian copper deposits in China, and the major copper deposits were formed at about 1800 Ma; there are three mineralization periods for gold deposits formed from Archaean to Proterozoic. By studying hundreds of lead isotope data from some Mesozoic continental subvolcanic Cu and Ag polymetallic deposits and fine-disseminated gold deposits, the authors found that the calculation based on the lead single-stage evolution model or two-stage evolution model cannot give the true ore-forming ages but can provide more information about mineralization and material sources of the deposits.

  11. Nitrogen deposition threatens species richness of grasslands across Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.J. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Gowing, D.J.G. [Department of Life Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dupre, C.; Diekmann, M. [Institute of Ecology, FB 2, University of Bremen, Leobener Str., DE-28359 Bremen (Germany); Dorland, E. [Section of Landscape Ecology, Department of Geobiology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht (Netherlands); Gaudnik, C.; Alard, D.; Corcket, E. [University of Bordeaux 1. UMR INRA 1202 Biodiversity, Genes and Communities, Equipe Ecologie des Communautes, Batiment B8 - Avenue des Facultes, F-33405 Talence (France); Bleeker, A. [Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bobbink, R. [B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Fowler, D. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Mountford, J.O. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, MacLean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Vandvik, V. [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Box 7800, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Aarrestad, P.A. [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, NO-7485 Trondheim (Norway); Muller, S. [Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite et Ecosystemes LIEBE, UMR CNRS 7146, U.F.R. Sci. F.A., Campus Bridoux, Universite Paul Verlaine, Avenue du General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Dise, N.B. [Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Evidence from an international survey in the Atlantic biogeographic region of Europe indicates that chronic nitrogen deposition is reducing plant species richness in acid grasslands. Across the deposition gradient in this region (2-44 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) species richness showed a curvilinear response, with greatest reductions in species richness when deposition increased from low levels. This has important implications for conservation policies, suggesting that to protect the most sensitive grasslands resources should be focussed where deposition is currently low. Soil pH is also an important driver of species richness indicating that the acidifying effect of nitrogen deposition may be contributing to species richness reductions. The results of this survey suggest that the impacts of nitrogen deposition can be observed over a large geographical range. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is reducing biodiversity in grasslands across Europe.

  12. Mercury Wet Scavenging and Deposition Differences by Precipitation Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulfus, Aaron S; Nair, Udaysankar; Holmes, Christopher D; Landing, William M

    2017-03-07

    We analyze the effect of precipitation type on mercury wet deposition using a new database of individual rain events spanning the contiguous United States. Measurements from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) containing single rainfall events were identified and classified into six precipitation types. Mercury concentrations in surface precipitation follow a power law of precipitation depth that is modulated by precipitation system morphology. After controlling for precipitation depth, the highest mercury deposition occurs in supercell thunderstorms, with decreasing deposition in disorganized thunderstorms, quasi-linear convective systems (QLCS), extratropical cyclones, light rain, and land-falling tropical cyclones. Convective morphologies (supercells, disorganized, and QLCS) enhance wet deposition by a factor of at least 1.6 relative to nonconvective morphologies. Mercury wet deposition also varies by geographic region and season. After controlling for other factors, we find that mercury wet deposition is greater over high-elevation sites, seasonally during summer, and in convective precipitation.

  13. Searching for Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposits in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.; Alam, S.; Atwater, B.; Charoentitirat, T.; Charusiri, P.; Choowong, M.; Fernando, S.; Jankaew, K.; Jittanoon, V.; Kongko, W.; Maxcia, C.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Rajendran, K.; Rhodes, B.; Srichan, N.; Tejakusuma, I.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    We found only one candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit during a ten-day search in July 2006 of four coastal sites in Phangnga Province. Although our initial field effort was limited, the paucity of pre-2004 tsunami deposits suggests that either there have been few Late Holocene tsunamis like the 2004 event or that the identification of paleotsunami deposits will be challenging in this region. Our investigations at Ban Bang Neang, Ban Lang Ong, Ban Nauk Nai, and Khlong Phru Sai involved examining soils and sediments 30 to 250 cm below the surface in cutbank exposures, gouge-core samples, and excavations. We targeted swales between beach ridges in areas undisturbed by tin mining and where tsunami deposits might have accumulated and been preserved. As shown in previous studies, the deposits of the 2004 tsunami extend as much as 1.5 km inland, thin over high ground, and thicken in swales. The deposits are composed of 1 to 4 beds, ranging from coarse to very fine sand, that commonly fine upward and locally contain parallel laminations. Where estuaries are relatively unprotected by mangroves, the 2004 tsunami deposits extend farther inland. Where mangroves fringe estuaries for 100s of meters, the deposits are concentrated in areas of mangrove damage. Crabs have already destroyed much of the tsunami deposits by mixing it with underlying peaty soil. At Ban Nauk Nai, we found a candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit about 1.1 km inland at the back edge of the coastal plain adjacent to a steep hillslope. The deposit, identified over a distance of 60 meters, consists of a 10-cm-thick, silty, fining-upward coarse to fine sand about 25 cm below the bottom of a shallow pond and the adjoining area. In the same area, the overlying 6 to 13- cm-thick 2004 tsunami deposit consists of a normally graded fine to very fine sand. At the other sites, we found coarse, medium, and fine sand beds typical of coastal plain beach deposits. Although tsunami deposits may occur within the

  14. A 20-year simulated climatology of global dust aerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhao, Tianliang; Che, Huizheng; Liu, Yu; Han, Yongxiang; Liu, Chong; Xiong, Jie; Liu, Jianhui; Zhou, Yike

    2016-07-01

    Based on a 20-year (1991-2010) simulation of dust aerosol deposition with the global climate model CAM5.1 (Community Atmosphere Model, version 5.1), the spatial and temporal variations of dust aerosol deposition were analyzed using climate statistical methods. The results indicated that the annual amount of global dust aerosol deposition was approximately 1161±31Mt, with a decreasing trend, and its interannual variation range of 2.70% over 1991-2010. The 20-year average ratio of global dust dry to wet depositions was 1.12, with interannual variation of 2.24%, showing the quantity of dry deposition of dust aerosol was greater than dust wet deposition. High dry deposition was centered over continental deserts and surrounding regions, while wet deposition was a dominant deposition process over the North Atlantic, North Pacific and northern Indian Ocean. Furthermore, both dry and wet deposition presented a zonal distribution. To examine the regional changes of dust aerosol deposition on land and sea areas, we chose the North Atlantic, Eurasia, northern Indian Ocean, North Pacific and Australia to analyze the interannual and seasonal variations of dust deposition and dry-to-wet deposition ratio. The deposition amounts of each region showed interannual fluctuations with the largest variation range at around 26.96% in the northern Indian Ocean area, followed by the North Pacific (16.47%), Australia (9.76%), North Atlantic (9.43%) and Eurasia (6.03%). The northern Indian Ocean also had the greatest amplitude of interannual variation in dry-to-wet deposition ratio, at 22.41%, followed by the North Atlantic (9.69%), Australia (6.82%), North Pacific (6.31%) and Eurasia (4.36%). Dust aerosol presented a seasonal cycle, with typically strong deposition in spring and summer and weak deposition in autumn and winter. The dust deposition over the northern Indian Ocean exhibited the greatest seasonal change range at about 118.00%, while the North Atlantic showed the lowest seasonal

  15. Study of nozzle deposit formation mechanism for direct injection gasoline engines; Chokufun gasoline engine yo nozzle no deposit seisei kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, M.; Saito, A. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Matsushita, S. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan); Shibata, H. [Nippon Soken, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Niwa, Y. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Nozzles in fuel injectors for direct injection gasoline engines are exposed to high temperature combustion gases and soot. In such a rigorous environment, it is a fear that fuel flow rate changes in injectors by deposit formation on nozzles. Fundamental factors of nozzle deposit formation were investigated through injector bench tests and engine dynamometer tests. Deposit formation processes were observed by SEM through engine dynamometer tests. The investigation results reveal nozzle deposit formation mechanism and how to suppress the deposit. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Genetic Analogy Between Sediment—Hosted Gold Deposits and Sediment—Hosted Copper Deposits in Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖荣阁; 陈卉泉; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sediment-hosted copper deposits according to the authors' study were formed from connate formation water during the post-sedimentary or diagenetic stage while the sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits are unanimously considered to be of post-sedimentary hydrothermal origin.Therefore,apart from their own individulities.These two types of deposits must share some characters in common.Comparisons are attempted,in this paper,between the sediment-hosted copper deposits in southwest China and the Triassic sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits in the Yunnan-Guizhou-Guangxi Triangle in terms of geological and geochemical features.

  17. Aerosol deposition in bends with turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, A.R.; Gong, H.; Wente, W.B. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The losses of aerosol particles in bends were determined numerically for a broad range of design and operational conditions. Experimental data were used to check the validity of the numerical model, where the latter employs a commercially available computational fluid dynamics code for characterizing the fluid flow field and Lagrangian particle tracking technique for characterizing aerosol losses. Physical experiments have been conducted to examine the effect of curvature ratio and distortion of the cross section of bends. If it curvature ratio ({delta} = R/a) is greater than about 4, it has little effect on deposition, which is in contrast with the recommendation given in ANSI N13.1-1969 for a minimum curvature ratio of 10. Also, experimental results show that if the tube cross section is flattened by 25% or less, the flattening also has little effect on deposition. Results of numerical tests have been used to develop a correlation of aerosol penetration through a bend as a function of Stokes number (Stk), curvature ratio ({delta}) and the bend angle ({theta}). 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Vacuum deposition onto webs, films and foils

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition is the technology that applies an even coating to a flexible material that can be held on a roll and provides a much faster and cheaper method of bulk coating than deposition onto single pieces or non-flexible surfaces, such as glass. This technology has been used in industrial-scale applications for some time, including a wide range of metalized packaging (e.g. snack packets). Its potential as a high-speed, scalable process has seen an increasing range of new products emerging that employ this cost-effective technology: solar energy products are moving from rigid panels onto flexible substrates, which are cheaper and more versatile; in a similar way, electronic circuit 'boards' can be produced on a flexible polymer, creating a new range of 'flexible electronics' products; and, flexible displays are another area of new technology in vacuum coating, with flexible display panels and light sources emerging. Charles Bishop has written this book to meet the need he identified, as a t...

  19. Colloidal Drop Deposition on Porous Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Pack, Min; Hu, Han; Kim, Dong-Ook; Yang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Printable electronics and in particular paper and textile-based electronics have fueled research in inkjet printing on porous substrates. On nonporous substrates, the particle motion of the particles and evaporation of the solvent are the two main mechanisms that drive the final deposition morphology. For porous substrates another factor, mainly infiltration, adds a layer of complexity to the deposition patterns that has not yet been elucidated in literature. In this study, a high-speed camera was used to capture the imbibition of picoliter-sized polystyrene nanoparticles in water droplets into nano-porous anodic aluminum oxide substrates of various porosities and wettabilities. For water, the infiltration rate is much faster than both evaporation and particle motion and thus when the substrate fully imbibes the droplet, the well-known ``coffee ring'' is suppressed. However, when a residual droplet forms upon the termination of the infiltration regime, the competing particle motion and evaporation regimes, tP and tEI respectively, define the critical time scales for which the coffee ring will be formed (tP /tEI 1). National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1401438.

  20. Atmospheric mass deposition by captured planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaroslavitz, Eyal; Podolak, Morris

    2007-04-01

    We examine the deposition of heavy elements in the envelope of a protoplanet growing according to the core accretion scenario of Pollack et al. [Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y., 1996. Icarus 124, 62-85]. We use their atmospheric models and the deposition rates that they computed, and we calculate the amount of heavy elements that can be dissolved in the envelope. For planetesimals composed of a mixture of water, CHON, and rock, we find that almost all of the water is dissolved in the atmosphere. A substantial amount of CHON is also dissolved but it remains sequestered at high temperatures near the core. Some fraction of the rock is also dissolved in the very high temperature region near the core envelope boundary. If this dissolved material can be mixed upward later in the planet's evolution, the resulting structure would be much closer to that determined by matching the moments of Jupiter's gravitational field.

  1. Controlled Deposition of HAp Mimicking Tooth Enamel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chemical compositions and microsturcture of mature human tooth enamel were investigated by XRD , FTIR and SEM to further understand the characteristics of tooth enamel. In order to obtain apatite crystals chemically and structurally similar to those in tooth enamel, biomimetic way was employed. Selfassembled monolyers terminated with-SO3 H groups were used as deposition substrates and 1.5 SBF ( the concentrations of Ca2+ and PO43- ions 1.5 times than those in simulated body fluid ) with and without 5 ppm F- were used as soaking medium. The XRD and FTIR results showed that both the deposited fluoride-substituted hydroxyapatite( F-HAp ) crystals in 1.5 SBF with F- and hydroxyapatite ( HAp ) crystals in 1.5 SBF were carbonate-containing, mimicking human tooth enamel in chemical compositions. The SEM photos showed that needle-like F-HAp crystals bad large aspect ratios and grew in bundles, which were similar to the crystals in human tooth enamel.The results provide available information on dental restoration.

  2. Clean diffusion coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, B.M.; Punola, D.C. [Howmet Thermatech Coatings, Whitehall, MI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify diffusion coating impurities introduced by standard aluminizing processes and to evaluate the impact of those impurities on oxidation resistance of the resultant Pt aluminide coating. IN-738 tabs and foils were platinum-electroplated, and then aluminized using three different processes: high-activity pack cementation, high-activity CVD and low-activity CVD. The results suggest that aluminizing processes which involve aluminum bearing alloys in the coating retort with H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/HCl gas at high temperature can contaminate the diffusion coating during deposition. CVD low-activity aluminizing (coating gas generated at low temperature outside the coating chamber from 99.999% Al) did not introduce any coating impurities. In addition, the data indicates that harmful impurities from the IN-738 substrate (sulfur, boron and tungsten) and the electroplating process (phosphorus) were removed from the coating during deposition. The CVD low-activity Pt aluminide coating was the `cleanest` in the study, and it exhibited the best high-temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings considered. It can be concluded that trace elements in diffusion coatings from the superalloy substrate and/or the aluminizing process can adversely effect the oxidation resistance of those coatings, and that CVD low-activity aluminizing yields cleaner coatings than other commercially available aluminizing techniques. (orig.) 10 refs.

  3. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A.; Wagner, William R.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices. PMID:28218279

  4. Acid deposition study in the Asian countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Ting-Kueh [Tunku Abdul Rahman College, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lau, Wai-Yoo [Malaysian Scientific Association, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1996-12-31

    The Association of South East Asian Nations or ASEAN is a regional association of seven countries, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei and Vietnam, located at the south eastern part of the Asian continent. Together with the East Asian States of Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan, this part of the world is experiencing rapid economic growth, especially in the last decade. Rapid industrialization has resulted in an increased demand for energy in the manufacturing and transport sectors, and also for infrastructure development. This has led to a significant increase in gaseous emissions and a corresponding increase in atmospheric acidity. Acid deposition study in the ASEAN countries began in the mid-70s when Malaysia first started her acid rain monitoring network in 1976. This was followed closely by Singapore and the other ASEAN countries in the 80s. By now all ASEAN countries have their own acid rain monitoring networks with a number of these countries extending the monitoring to dry deposition as well.

  5. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  6. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  7. Atomic mobility in energetic cluster deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zheng-Ying; WANG Yue-Xia; WEI Qi; LI Zhi-Jie; ZHOU Liang; ZHANG Liang-Kun

    2004-01-01

    This paper tries to outline the influence of atomic mobility on the initial fabrication of thin films formed by LECBD. Based on our recent studies on low-energy cluster beam deposition (LECBD) by molecular dynamics simulation, two examples, the deposition of small carbon clusters on Si and diamond surfaces and Al clusters on Ni substrate, were mainly discussed. The impact energy of the cluster ranges from 0.1 eV to 100 eV. In the former case,the mobility and the lateral migration of surface atoms, especially the recoil atoms, are enhanced with increasing the impact energy, which promote the film to be smoother and denser. For the latter case, the transverse kinetic energy of cluster atoms, caused mainly by the collision between moving cluster atoms, dominates the lateral spread of cluster atoms on the surface, which is contributive to layer-by-layer growth of thin films. Our result is consistent with the experimental observations that the film structure is strongly dependent on the impact energy. In addition, it elucidates that the atomic mobility takes a leading role in the structure characteristic of films formed by LECBD.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  9. Designing polymer surfaces via vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Asatekin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD methods significantly augment the capabilities of traditional surface modification techniques for designing polymeric surfaces. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. Since de-wetting and surface tension effects are absent, CVD coatings conform to the geometry of the underlying substrate. Hence, CVD polymers can be readily applied to virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. CVD methods integrate readily with other vacuum processes used to fabricate patterned surfaces and devices. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, thickness control, and the synthesis of films with graded composition. This article focuses on two CVD polymerization methods that closely translate solution chemistry to vapor deposition; initiated CVD and oxidative CVD. The basic concepts underlying these methods and the resultant advantages over other thin film coating techniques are described, along with selected applications where CVD polymers are an enabling technology.

  10. Meteoritic Microfossils In Eltanin Impact Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, F. T.; Wollenburg, J.; Gersonde, R.; Kuhn, G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km- sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain mm-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored 80,000 square km of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 5 to 50 kg per square meter. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth. Results: Two cores were taken in a basin near the top of the Freeden Seamounts at a water depth of 2.7 km. Sediments in this shallow basin are compositionally different than those at all other sites as they contain abundant calcareous microfossils. In deeper water sites (4 to 5 km depth), higher pressures and CO2 concentrations cause dissolution of calcite and sediments contain siliceous (opal) microfossils or are barren. An exception to this is a few sites in the immediate vicinity of the seamounts that contain calcareous sediments that flowed off the seamounts after being disturbed by the impact. At the top of the seamounts, sediments with meteoritic ejecta

  11. Monazite deposits of the southeastern Atlantic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertie, John Beaver

    1953-01-01

    Monazite, a phosphate of the rare earths, is the principal mineral from which the cerium earths and thorium are obtained. Fluviatile monazite placers were mined in the Piedmont province of North and South Carolina from 1887 to 1911, and again intermittently from 1915 to 1917; but the principal sources In recent years have been the beach placers of India and Brazil. In 1946, an embargo was placed on the exportation of Indian monazite, and the Brazilian production has not increased materially to replace this loss. Accordingly monazite in recent years has become a scarce commodity. The principal domestic sources from which monazite may be recovered commercially are in Idaho and in the Piedmont province of the southeastern States. Some monazite is now being produced in Idaho, and a small output is being recovered as a byproduct of heavy mineral mining in Florida. The southeastern placers were not exhausted by the earlier mining and new deposits have been discovered; but production from this region awaits adequate exploration. The country rock of the southeastern Piedmont province is a complex assemblage of metamorphic and igneous rocks. The monazite occurs in two belts. A western belt has been traced from east-central Virginia for 600 miles southwestward into Alabama; and an eastern belt has been traced from the vicinity of Fredericksburg, Va., south-southwestward for 200 miles into North Carolina. Monazite-bearing rocks near. Rion, S. C., appear to indicate a southwestward continuation of the eastern belt. The western, or principal belt, includes the placers that were formerly mined in North and South Carolina. These placers were sampled, and the monazite was separated from the best of the samples, for mineralogical and chemical analysis. The tabulated results show a mean tenor, in the headwater placers of highest grade, of 8.4 pounds of monazite to the cubic yard. Farther downstream where mining must be done to obtain larger yardages, the tenor will be much lower

  12. Reaction kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokcen, Dincer; Bae, Sang-Eun [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Brankovic, Stanko R., E-mail: Stanko.Brankovic@mail.uh.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States)

    2011-06-30

    The study of the kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers is presented. The model system was Pt submonolayer deposition on Au(1 1 1) via red-ox replacement of Pb and Cu UPD monolayers on Au(1 1 1). The kinetics of a single replacement reaction was studied using the formalism of the comprehensive analytical model developed to fit the open circuit potential transients from deposition experiments. The practical reaction kinetics parameters like reaction half life, reaction order and reaction rate constant are determined and discussed with their relevance to design and control of deposition experiments. The effects of transport limitation and the role of the anions/electrolyte on deposition kinetics are investigated and their significance to design of effective deposition process is discussed.

  13. 76 FR 7740 - Amendments to Deposit Insurance Regulations: Deposit Insurance Coverage Training; SMDIA Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... personnel to complete FDIC-provided training on the fundamentals of FDIC deposit insurance coverage. These... Internet or other technology. Third, the rule would require IDIs to provide a link to the FDIC's Electronic... Internet or by means of other technology, these inquiries can be included in the paper or...

  14. Aspects of thin film deposition on granulates by physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Andreas; Schmid, Gerwin H. S.; Mahr, Harald; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Thin film and coating technology has entered fields which may show significant deviations from classical coating applications where films are deposited on plane, sometimes large substrates. Often surfaces of small and irregularly shaped bodies have to be improved in respect to electrical, thermal or mechanical properties. Film deposition and characterization on such small substrates is not a trivial task. This specially holds for methods based on Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes such as sputter deposition and its ion- and plasma assisted varieties. Due to their line of sight nature a key issue for homogenous films is efficient intermixing. If this problem is mastered, another task is the prediction and determination of the film thickness on single particles as well as on large scale ensembles thereof. In this work a mechanism capable of uniformly coating up to 1000 cm3 of granulate with particle sizes ranging from approx. 10 μm to 150 μm by magnetron sputtering is thoroughly described. A method for predicting the average film thickness on the particles is presented and tested for several differently shaped objects like microspheres, irregular grains of sinter powder or micro diamonds. For assessing the film thickness on single particles as well as on particle ensembles several complementary methods based on optics, X-ray analysis and gravimetry are employed. Their respective merits and limitations are discussed. Finally an outlook on adapting the described technology for surface modification by plasma based reactive and non-reactive processes is given.

  15. Phase change properties of Ti-Sb-Te thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sannian; Shen, Lanlan; Song, Zhitang; Yao, Dongning; Guo, Tianqi; Li, Le; Liu, Bo; Wu, Liangcai; Cheng, Yan; Ding, Yuqiang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh density PCM depends heavily on the thin film growth technique for the phase changing chalcogenide material. In this study, TiSb2Te4 (TST) thin films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using TiCl4, SbCl3, (Et3Si)2Te as precursors. The threshold voltage for the cell based on thermal ALD-deposited TST is about 2.0 V, which is much lower than that (3.5 V) of the device based on PVD-deposited Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) with the identical cell architecture. Tests of TST-based PCM cells have demonstrated a fast switching rate of 100 ns. Furthermore, because of the lower melting point and thermal conductivities of TST materials, TST-based PCM cells exhibit 19% reduction of pulse voltages for Reset operation compared with GST-based PCM cells. These results show that thermal ALD is an attractive method for the preparation of phase change materials.

  16. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, John, E-mail: john.j.hennessy@jpl.nasa.gov; Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  17. Antireflection coatings on plastics deposited by plasma polymerization process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M K Srivatsa; M Bera; A Basu; T K Bhattacharya

    2008-08-01

    Antireflection coatings (ARCs) are deposited on the surfaces of optical elements like spectacle lenses to increase light transmission and improve their performance. In the ophthalmic industry, plastic lenses are rapidly displacing glass lenses due to several advantageous features. However, the deposition of ARCs on plastic lenses is a challenging task, because the plastic surface needs treatment for adhesion improvement and surface hardening before depositing the ARC. This surface treatment is usually done in a multi-stage process—exposure to energetic radiations, followed by deposition of a carbonyl hard coating by spin or dip coating processes, UV curing, etc. However, this treatment can also be done by plasma processes. Moreover, the plasma polymerization process allows deposition of optical films at room temperature, essential for plastics. The energetic ions in plasma processes provide similar effects as in ion assisted physical deposition processes to produce hard coatings, without requiring sophisticated ion sources. The plasma polymerization process is more economical than ion-assisted physical vapour deposition processes as regards equipment and source materials and is more cost-effective, enabling the surface treatment and deposition of the ARC in the same deposition system in a single run by varying the system parameters at each step. Since published results of the plasma polymerization processes developed abroad are rather sketchy and the techniques are mostly veiled in commercial secrecy, innovative and indigenous plasma-based techniques have been developed in this work for depositing the complete ARCs on plastic substrates.

  18. Variation in chemical wet deposition with meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Gilbert S.; Hayes, Janet V.

    Analysis of hourly sequential precipitation samples collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory over a 4-y period shows systematic relationships between amounts of chemicals deposited in precipitation and meteorological conditions. Samples were taken by an automatic, sequential sampler and measured for pH, conductivity and the concentrations of major ions. Concurrent measurements and observations were made of the synoptic situation, precipitation type and rate, wind speed and direction, and temperature. Deposition per unit area was computed for subsets of the data classified by meteorological and time parameters. Results demonstrate that precipitation amount alone is not an adequate predictor of chemical wet deposition because of the variability of concentration in precipitation which is a complex function of emission rates and atmospheric processes. Results, however, document those conditions under which most material is deposited and those circumstances in which deposition occurs at the greatest rate. When classified by season, hydrogen and sulfate ion deposition are greatest in the summer when precipitation is lowest and least in the winter when precipitation is greatest. Nitrogen in both nitrate and ammonium has a similar but less extreme pattern. By synoptic type, all chemicals are deposited most heavily in warm front precipitation but the fraction of hydrogen and sulfate deposited in cold front and squall line hours is greater than the fraction of precipitation. All chemicals are deposited most heavily in steady rain when examined by precipitation type but thundershowers deposit chemicals of anthropogenic origin in amounts disproportionate to precipitation amounts. Results are also presented from data classified by other parameters.

  19. Cobalt Deposits of China:Classification, Distribution and Major Advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Chengyou; ZHANG Dequan

    2004-01-01

    The important strategic metal cobalt has diverse uses and the majority of world cobalt deposits have been found in China. The deposits can be classified into four types, i.e., magmatic Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposits, hydrothermal and volcanogenic cobalt polymetallic deposits, strata-bound Cu-Co deposits hosted by sedimentary rocks and lateritic Ni-Co deposits, of which the former two types are the most important. There are six principal metallogenic epochs and seven important metallogenic belts according to their distribution and tectonic position. Although cobalt generally occurs in nickel-copper, copper and iron deposits as an associated metal, great developments in exploration for independent cobalt deposits have happened in China, and, in recent years, many independent deposits with different elementary assemblages and different genetic types have been discovered in the eastem part of the northern margin of the North China platform, the Central Orogenic Belt of China, western Jiangxi and northeastern Hunan. In addition, it is inferred that the Kunlun-Qinling Orogenic Belt has great potential for further exploration of new types of independent cobalt deposits.

  20. Dry deposition of sulfur to forests in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akira; Sato, Kazuo; Fujita, Shin-ichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Dry deposition is an important input process of acidifying compounds to forest ecosystem. However, dry deposition to forest was largely unstudied in Japan, despite the fact that about 70% of the land is covered with forest. To assess the contribution of dry deposition to the total (wet + dry) input of sulfur to forest, we estimated dry deposition velocities and fluxes of sulfur to three different forest stands (cedar [Cryptomeria japonica], pine [Pinus densiflora], and oak [Quercus serrata]) located at Mt. Akagi in Gumma Prefecture, Japan. Micro meteorology above canopies, atmospheric concentrations, and throughfall fluxes were measured from October 1994 to September 1995. Deposition velocities of sulfur dioxide and particulate sulfate were determined by using the inferential method, based on the result of meteorological measurements. Dry deposition fluxes were calculated from the estimated deposition velocities and the result of concentration measurements. Dry deposition fluxes of sulfate for cedar, pine, and oak were estimated at 164 eq/ha/y, 143 eq/ha/y, and 131 eq/ha/y, respectively. The relative contribution of dry deposition ranged from 20% to 22% of the total sulfur deposition. However, these results might be underestimated because estimated fluxes were about 30% lower than observed net throughfall fluxes ([throughfall + stemflow] - precipitation) in cedar and pine forest stands.

  1. Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J B; Clarkson, C; Mant, C; Drinkwater, A; May, E

    2012-12-01

    Fat, oil and grease deposits (FOG) in sewers are a major problem and can cause sewer overflows, resulting in environmental damage and health risks. Often simplistically portrayed as cooling of fats, recent research has suggested that saponification may be involved in FOG formation. However there are still questions about the mechanisms effecting transformations in sewers and the role and source of metal cations involved in saponification. This study characterises FOG deposits from pumping stations, sewers and sewage works from different water hardness zones across the UK. The sites all had previous problems with FOG and most catchments contained catering and food preparation establishments. The FOG deposits were highly variable with moisture content ranging from 15 to 95% and oil content from 0 to 548 mg/g. Generally the pumping stations had lower moisture content and higher fat content, followed by the sewers then the sewage works. The water in contact with the FOG had high levels of oil (mean of about 800 mg/L) and this may indicate poor kitchen FOG management practices. FOG fatty acid profiles showed a transformation from unsaturated to saturated forms compared to typical cooking oils. This seems to relate to ageing in the sewer network or the mechanism of formation, as samples from pumping stations had higher proportions of C18:1 compared to C16. This may be due to microbial transformations by bacteria such as Clostridium sp. in a similar process to adipocere formation. There was an association between water hardness and increased Ca levels in FOG along with harder deposits and higher melting points. A link between FOG properties and water hardness has not been previously reported for field samples. This may also be due to microbial processes, such as biocalcification. By developing the understanding of these mechanisms it may be possible to more effectively control FOG deposits, especially when combined with promotion of behavioural change.

  2. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  3. 12 CFR 347.206 - Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Domestic retail deposit activity requiring... Banks § 347.206 Domestic retail deposit activity requiring deposit insurance by U.S. branch of a foreign bank. (a) Domestic retail deposit activity. To initiate or conduct domestic retail deposit...

  4. OSTEOPOROSIS IN CALCIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CRYSTAL DEPOSITION DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Vladimirov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of osteoporosis (OP in patients with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPCDD. Subjects and methods. Eighty patients with CPCDD were examined. Bone mineral density (BMD of the forearm, lumbar spine, and femoral neck was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Laboratory diagnosis involved determination of the blood levels of C-reactive protein, parathyroid hormone, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus and the daily urinary excretion of calcium and phosphates. Results. The patients with OP were significantly older than those with normal BMD and osteopenia. Forearm bones were the most common isolated location of OP and osteopenia. Injuries in the history, traumatic fractures, and the intake of diuretics were somewhat more common in the patients diagnosed with OP. The incidence of hyperparathyroidism did not differ significantly in the groups.

  5. Model for erosion-deposition patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Maionchi, D O; Filho, R N Costa; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2007-01-01

    We investigate through computational simulations with a pore network model the formation of patterns caused by erosion-deposition mechanisms. In this model, the geometry of the pore space changes dynamically as a consequence of the coupling between the fluid flow and the movement of particles due to local drag forces. Our results for this irreversible process show that the model is capable to reproduce typical natural patterns caused by well known erosion processes. Moreover, we observe that, within a certain range of porosity values, the grains form clusters that are tilted with respect to the horizontal with a characteristic angle. We compare our results to recent experiments for granular material in flowing water and show that they present a satisfactory agreement.

  6. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Dornfeld, David

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08-0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12-0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21-0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology.

  7. Accreted terranes and mineral deposits of Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Pow-foong; Ko, Ko

    There are three terranes in Myanmar: (1) Shan-West Malaysia-Sumatra, (2) Central Burma Basin, and (3) Arakan Yoma. The Shan-West Malaysia-Sumatra terrane can be divided into three subterranes: (a) West Kachin, (b) East Kachin-Shan, and (c) Karen-Tenasserim. The Shan-West Malaysia-Sumatra terrane consists of jadeite of gem quality in the West Kachin subterrane ruby and other gems, Paleozoic strata-bound lead-zinc and iron deposits in the East Kachin-Shan subterrane; and a tin and tungsten mineralized belt in the Karen-Tenasserim subterrane. The volcanic arc divides the Central Myanmar Basin terrane into forearc and back-arc basins; the oil-bearing fields are located in the forearc basin. In the Arakan Yoma terrane, chromium and nickel of late Cretaceous-early Tertiary age occur within ultramafic belts.

  8. 存款单%The Deposit Slip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨盼盼(译)

    2012-01-01

    At six-foot-seven, Terry Kirk was hard to miss. Jean noticed him several times when he stopped by the bank to make deposits from his freelance^1 photography business. Somehow, he always ended up at her window.%身高6.7英尺的特里·科克很难让人不注意。特里是名自由摄影师,时常来银行存些他的1=作所得。珍注意过他几次。说来也巧,特里每次都是在珍的窗口办理业务。

  9. Method and apparatus for electrospark deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Roger N.; Park, Walter R.; Munley, John T.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus for controlling electrospark deposition (ESD) comprises using electrical variable waveforms from the ESD process as a feedback parameter. The method comprises measuring a plurality of peak amplitudes from a series of electrical energy pulses delivered to an electrode tip. The maximum peak value from among the plurality of peak amplitudes correlates to the contact force between the electrode tip and a workpiece. The method further comprises comparing the maximum peak value to a set point to determine an offset and optimizing the contact force according to the value of the offset. The apparatus comprises an electrode tip connected to an electrical energy wave generator and an electrical signal sensor, which connects to a high-speed data acquisition card. An actuator provides relative motion between the electrode tip and a workpiece by receiving a feedback drive signal from a processor that is operably connected to the actuator and the high-speed data acquisition card.

  10. Deposit Insurance: A Strategy for Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    banks 461 233.4 4.6 Other savings banks and thriftsa 2,878 1,251.7 24.8 Credit unions 13,102 195.3 3.9 Total 28,943 $5,040.4 100.0 aData are as of... aData for thrifts are as of December 31, 1989. Source: GAO analysis of call report data. Federal agencies estimate that as of June 30, 1990, the U.S...depositors and non-deposit liabilities has led to a widespread perception in the market that some banks are "too big to fail."’ 0 This policy has been

  11. Iron deposition in modern and archaeological teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.-M.M., E-mail: AnneMarie.Williams@utas.edu.au [School of Medicine, Private Bag 34, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); Siegele, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Iron surface concentrations and profile maps were measured on the enamel of archaeological and modern teeth to determine how iron is deposited in tooth enamel and if it was affected by the post-mortem environment. Teeth from Australian children who died in the second half of the 19th century were compared with contemporary teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Surface analysis of the teeth was performed using the 3 MV Van Der Graff Accelerator at The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Australia. A small sample of teeth were then cut in the mid sagittal plane and analysed using ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe. Maps and linear profiles were produced showing the distribution of iron across the enamel. Results show that both the levels and distribution of iron in archaeological teeth is quite different to contemporary teeth, raising the suggestion that iron has been significantly altered by the post-mortem environment.

  12. Iron deposition in modern and archaeological teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.-M. M.; Siegele, R.

    2014-09-01

    Iron surface concentrations and profile maps were measured on the enamel of archaeological and modern teeth to determine how iron is deposited in tooth enamel and if it was affected by the post-mortem environment. Teeth from Australian children who died in the second half of the 19th century were compared with contemporary teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Surface analysis of the teeth was performed using the 3 MV Van Der Graff Accelerator at The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Australia. A small sample of teeth were then cut in the mid sagittal plane and analysed using ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe. Maps and linear profiles were produced showing the distribution of iron across the enamel. Results show that both the levels and distribution of iron in archaeological teeth is quite different to contemporary teeth, raising the suggestion that iron has been significantly altered by the post-mortem environment.

  13. Thin film deposition using rarefied gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The rarefied gas jet of aluminium is studied at Mach number Ma =(U_j /√{ kbTj / m }) in the range .01 mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. An important finding is that the capture width (cross-section of the gas jet deposited on the substrate) is symmetric around the centerline of the substrate, and decreases with increased Mach number due to an increase in the momentum of the gas molecules. DSMC simulation results reveals that at low Knudsen number ((Kn =0.01); shorter mean free paths), the atoms experience more collisions, which direct them toward the substrate. However, the atoms also move with lower momentum at low Mach number ,which allows scattering collisions to rapidly direct the atoms to the substrate.

  14. Occurrence model for volcanogenic beryllium deposits: Chapter F in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Lindsey, David A.; Seal, Robert R., II; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.

    2012-01-01

    Current global and domestic mineral resources of beryllium (Be) for industrial uses are dominated by ores produced from deposits of the volcanogenic Be type. Beryllium deposits of this type can form where hydrothermal fluids interact with fluorine and lithophile-element (uranium, thorium, rubidium, lithium, beryllium, cesium, tantalum, rare earth elements, and tin) enriched volcanic rocks that contain a highly reactive lithic component, such as carbonate clasts. Volcanic and hypabyssal high-silica biotite-bearing topaz rhyolite constitutes the most well-recognized igneous suite associated with such Be deposits. The exemplar setting is an extensional tectonic environment, such as that characterized by the Basin and Range Province, where younger topaz-bearing igneous rock sequences overlie older dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone sequences. Mined deposits and related mineralized rocks at Spor Mountain, Utah, make up a unique economic deposit of volcanogenic Be having extensive production and proven and probable reserves. Proven reserves in Utah, as reported by the U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Information Center, total about 15,900 tons of Be that are present in the mineral bertrandite (Be4Si2O7(OH)2). At the type locality for volcanogenic Be, Spor Mountain, the tuffaceous breccias and stratified tuffs that host the Be ore formed as a result of explosive volcanism that brought carbonate and other lithic fragments to the surface through vent structures that cut the underlying dolomitic Paleozoic sedimentary rock sequences. The tuffaceous sediments and lithic clasts are thought to make up phreatomagmatic base surge deposits. Hydrothermal fluids leached Be from volcanic glass in the tuff and redeposited the Be as bertrandite upon reaction of the hydrothermal fluid with carbonate clasts in lithic-rich sections of tuff. The localization of the deposits in tuff above fluorite-mineralized faults in carbonate rocks, together with isotopic evidence for the

  15. Effects of acid deposition on tree roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1995-12-31

    Large forest regions in SW Sweden have been exposed to high levels of acid deposition for many decades, causing soil acidification in forest soils. Historically, SO{sub 2} has been the major acidification agent, but lately nitrogen compounds increasingly have become important. The amount and chemical form of nitrogen strongly affects the pH in the rhizosphere and rhizoplane. Many forest stands show a positive growth response to increased nitrogen input, even in heavily N-loaded areas. Nitrogen fertilization experiments suggest that part of the increased forest production is caused by a translocation of biomass production from below-ground to above-ground parts. At the same time fine-root growth dynamics are strongly affected by the high N supply. Deficiencies of various nutrients (Mg,Ca,K,Mn and Zn) obtained from needle analyses have been reported from different Picea abies stands. In areas with more extensive acidification and nutrient leaching, a decline in tree vitality has been observed. Although deficiency symptoms in forest trees may be reflected in nitrogen/cation ratios in fine roots, few attempts have been made to explain forest damage symptoms from fine-root chemistry. Root damage is often described as a decline in the amount of living fine roots, an increase in the amount of dead versus live fine roots (a lower live/dead ratio) and an increasing amount of dead medium and coarse roots. The primary objectives of the present presentation were to analyse available data on the effects of high nitrogen and sulphur deposition on mineral nutrient balance in tree fine roots and to evaluate the risk of Al interference with cation uptake by roots

  16. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  17. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD disease is an arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP crystal deposits in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. According to EULAR, four different clinical presentations can be observed: 1 asymptomatic CPPD; 2 osteoarthritis (OA with CPPD; 3 acute CPP crystal arthritis; 4 chronic CPP inflammatory crystal arthritis. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is characterized by sudden onset of pain, swelling and tenderness with overlying erythema, usually in a large joint, most often the knee, wrist, shoulder, and hip. Occasionally, ligaments, tendons, bursae, bone and the spine can be involved. CPPD of the atlanto-occipital joint (crowned dens syndrome can cause periodic acute cervico-occipital pain with fever, neck stiffness and laboratory inflammatory syndrome. Chronic inflammatory arthritis is characterized by joint swelling, morning stiffness, pain, and high ESR and CRP. The relationship between OA and CPPD is still unclear. The main problem is whether such crystals are directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA or if they are the result of joint degeneration. Diagnosis is based on evaluation of history and clinical features, conventional radiology, and synovial fluid examination. Non-polarized light microscopy should be used initially to screen for CPPD crystals based upon their characteristic morphology, and compensated polarized light microscopy, showing the crystals to be weakly positive birefringent, is recommended for definitive identification, although this last pattern only occurs in about 20% of samples. The main goals of CPPD therapy are control of the acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and prevention of further episodes.

  18. Nitrogen deposition threatens species richness of grasslands across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carly J; Duprè, Cecilia; Dorland, Edu; Gaudnik, Cassandre; Gowing, David J G; Bleeker, Albert; Diekmann, Martin; Alard, Didier; Bobbink, Roland; Fowler, David; Corcket, Emmanuel; Mountford, J Owen; Vandvik, Vigdis; Aarrestad, Per Arild; Muller, Serge; Dise, Nancy B

    2010-09-01

    Evidence from an international survey in the Atlantic biogeographic region of Europe indicates that chronic nitrogen deposition is reducing plant species richness in acid grasslands. Across the deposition gradient in this region (2-44 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) species richness showed a curvilinear response, with greatest reductions in species richness when deposition increased from low levels. This has important implications for conservation policies, suggesting that to protect the most sensitive grasslands resources should be focussed where deposition is currently low. Soil pH is also an important driver of species richness indicating that the acidifying effect of nitrogen deposition may be contributing to species richness reductions. The results of this survey suggest that the impacts of nitrogen deposition can be observed over a large geographical range.

  19. Self-terminating growth of platinum films by electrochemical deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Gokcen, Dincer; Bertocci, Ugo; Moffat, Thomas P

    2012-12-07

    A self-terminating rapid electrodeposition process for controlled growth of platinum (Pt) monolayer films from a K(2)PtCl(4)-NaCl electrolyte has been developed that is tantamount to wet atomic layer deposition. Despite the deposition overpotential being in excess of 1 volt, Pt deposition was quenched at potentials just negative of proton reduction by an alteration of the double-layer structure induced by a saturated surface coverage of underpotential deposited H (H(upd)). The surface was reactivated for further Pt deposition by stepping the potential to more positive values, where H(upd) is oxidized and fresh sites for the adsorption of PtCl(4)(2-) become available. Periodic pulsing of the potential enables sequential deposition of two-dimensional Pt layers to fabricate films of desired thickness, relevant to a range of advanced technologies.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, UOS Tito Scalo, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito, PZ (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • We have deposited in vacuum niobium carbide films by fs and ns PLD. • We have compared PLD performed by ultra-short and short laser pulses. • The films deposited by fs PLD of NbC are formed by nanoparticles. • The structure of the films produced by fs PLD at 500 °C corresponds to NbC. - Abstract: NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation–deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  1. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  2. Clay alteration and gold deposition in the genesis and blue star deposits, Eureka County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews-Armitage, S. P.; Romberger, S.B.; Whitney, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Genesis and Blue Star sedimentary rock-hosted gold deposits occur within the 40-mile-long Carlin trend and are located in Eureka County, Nevada. The deposits are hosted within the Devonian calcareous Popovich Formation, the siliciclastic Rodeo Creek unit and the siliciclastic Vinini Formation. The host rocks have undergone contact metamorphism, decalcification, silicification, argillization, and supergene oxidation. Detailed characterization of the alteration patterns, mineralogy, modes of occurrence, and associated geochemistry of clay minerals resulted in the following classifications: least altered rocks, found distal to the orebody, consisting of both metamorphosed and unmetamorphosed host rock that has not been completely decalcified; and altered rocks, found proximal to the orebody that have been decalcified. Altered rocks are classified further into the following groups based on clay mineral content: silicic, 1 to 10 percent clay; silicicargillic, 10 to 35 percent clay; and argillic, 35 to 80 percent clay. Clay species identified are 1M illite, 2M1 illite, kaolinite, halloysite, and dioctahedral smectite. An early hydrothermal event resulted in the precipitation of euhedral kaolinite and at least one generation of silica. This event occurred contemporaneously with decalcification which increased rock permeability and porosity. A second clay alteration event resulted in the precipitation of hydrothermal 1M illite which replaced hydrothermal kaolinite and is associated with gold deposition. Silver and silica deposition is also associated with this phase of hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal alteration was followed by supergene alteration which resulted in the formation of supergene kaolinite, halloysite, and smectite as well as the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals. Supergene clays are concentrated along faults, dike margins, and within rocks containing carbonate. Gold mineralization is not associated with supergene clay minerals within the Genesis and

  3. Deposition of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yunxiang; Afzaal, Mohammad; Malik, Mohammad A.; O'Brien, Paul

    2006-12-01

    A new method is reported for the growth of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles using copper acetylacetonate and trioctylphosphine selenide. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition experiments lead to successful deposition of tetragonal Cu 2Se films. In contrast, hexadecylamine capped nanoparticles are composed of cubic Cu 2-xSe. The deposited materials are optically and structurally characterized. The results of this comprehensive study are described and discussed.

  4. Characteristics of 137Cs deposition in steppe area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Soil wind erosion in the semiarid steppe area was studied using the 137Cs tracing technique. Comparisons of 137Cs deposition characteristics between different soil profiles indicated that slight aeolian activities occurred on sandy grasslands and semi-fixed dunes with erosion/deposition rates of less than 0.108 cm/a, whereas they were intense on semi-shifting dunes with erosion/deposition rates of higher than 1.35 cm/a.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Particle Deposition in the Human Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Gengenbach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We model, simulate and calculate breathing and particle depositions in the human lungs. We review the theory and discretization of fluid mechanics, the anatomy, physiology and measuring methods of lungs. A new model is introduced and investigated with a sensitivity analysis using the singular value decomposition. Particle depositions are simulated in patient-specific and schematized human lungs and compared to the particle deposition in a multiplicative model of subsequent bifurcations.

  6. Electro-Spark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Wear and Corrosion: the Electrospark Deposition Process", published in Proceedings, American Electroplaters and Surface Finishers Society, Jan. 2002. 6...Johnson, R.N., " ElectroSpark Deposition : Principals and Applications", Society of Vacuum Coaters 45th Annual Technical Conference Proceedings, Apr...AD AD-E403 050 Contractor Report ARAET-CR-05002 ELECTRO-SPARK DEPOSITED COATINGS FOR REPLACEMENT OF CHROME PLATING R. N. Johnson J. A. Bailey Pacific

  7. Exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to describe exploring laser-guided metal deposition through a microbe metabolite.Design/methodology/approach: A maskless micro-fabrication of laser-guided deposition process through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T.f.) is explored.Findings: The authors have conducted an analysis of the metal deposition process using the point thermal-source of the Nd:YAG laser through the metabolite of Acidophilic bacteria Thiobacillus. A...

  8. Deposition of copper coatings in a magnetron with liquid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumarkin, A. V., E-mail: sanyahrustal@mail.ru; Kaziev, A. V.; Kolodko, D. V.; Pisarev, A. A.; Kharkov, M. M.; Khodachenko, G. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Copper coatings were deposited on monocrystalline Si substrates using a magnetron discharge with a liquid cathode in the metal vapour plasma. During the deposition, the bias voltage in the range from 0 V to–400 V was applied to the substrate. The prepared films were investigated by a scanning electron microscope, and their adhesive properties were studied using a scratch tester. It was demonstrated that the adhesion of the deposited films strongly depends on the bias voltage and varies in a wide range.

  9. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  10. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  11. Comparison of different experimental techniques used for wax deposition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, Stephen; Johnston, Angela [Nalco Energy Services, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines and pipelines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on five separate crude oils by using a varying protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments were carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  12. Optical characterization of directly deposited graphene on a dielectric substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplas, Tommi; Karvonen, Lasse; Ahmadi, Sepehr

    2016-01-01

    By using scanning multiphoton microscopy we compare the nonlinear optical properties of the directly deposited and transferred to the dielectric substrate graphene. The direct deposition of graphene on oxidized silicon wafer was done by utilizing sacrificial copper catalyst film. We demonstrate...... that the directly deposited graphene and bi-layered transferred graphene produce comparable third harmonic signals and have almost the same damage thresholds. Therefore, we believe directly deposited graphene is suitable for the use of e.g. nanofabricated optical setups. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  13. A Review of Variable Slicing in Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiyapara, Hitesh Hirjibhai; Pande, Sarang

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a literature survey in the field of fused deposition of plastic wires especially in the field of slicing and deposition using extrusion of thermoplastic wires. Various researchers working in the field of computation of deposition path have used their algorithms for variable slicing. In the study, a flowchart has also been proposed for the slicing and deposition process. The algorithm already been developed by previous researcher will be used to be implemented on the fused deposition modelling machine. To demonstrate the capabilities of the fused deposition modeling machine a case study has been taken. It uses a manipulated G-code to be fed to the fused deposition modeling machine. Two types of slicing strategies, namely uniform slicing and variable slicing have been evaluated. In the uniform slicing, the slice thickness has been used for deposition is varying from 0.1 to 0.4 mm. In the variable slicing, thickness has been varied from 0.1 in the polar region to 0.4 in the equatorial region Time required and the number of slices required to deposit a hemisphere of 20 mm diameter have been compared with that using the variable slicing.

  14. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  15. Method of depositing a high-emissivity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Foster, Ellis L.

    1983-01-01

    A method of depositing a high-emissivity layer on a substrate comprising RF sputter deposition of a carbide-containing target in an atmosphere of a hydrocarbon gas and a noble gas. As the carbide is deposited on the substrate the hydrocarbon gas decomposes to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon deposits on the target and substrate causing a carbide/carbon composition gradient to form on the substrate. At a sufficiently high partial pressure of hydrocarbon gas, a film of high-emissivity pure carbon will eventually form over the substrate.

  16. Review:Resuspension of wall deposits in spray dryers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Wall deposition occurs in spray dryers when dried or partially dried particles contact and adhere to the walls during operation, thus reducing the yield of product collected. Wall deposits also present a product contamination risk and a fire or explosion risk when spray drying products that oxidize exothermically, such as milk powder. Re-entrainment is the resuspension of spray dryer wall deposits into the main gas stream for collection as product. Literature suggests that the process for re-entrainment of particles from spray dryer wall deposits is strongly dependent on particle size and gas velocity.

  17. Mo SILICIDE SYNTHISIS BY DUAL ION BEAM DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.H. Zhang; Z.Z. Yi; X.Y. Wu; S.J. Zhang; Y.G. Wu; X. Zhang; H.X. Zhang; A.D. Liu; X.J. Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Mo silicides MosSi3 with high quality were prepared using ion beam deposition equip-ment with two Filter Metal Vacuum Arc Deposition (FMEVAD). When the numberof alternant deposition times was 198, total thickness of the coating is 40nm. Thecoatings with droplet free can be readily obtained, so the surface is smooth. TEMobservation shows that Mo and Si alternant deposition coating is conpact structure.The fine Mo silicide grains densely distributed in the coating. The coating adherenceon silicon is excellent.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of Alnico5 magnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, M.Z., E-mail: mzbutt49@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, Dilawar [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Magnetophotonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Alnico5 films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate at room temperature under a vacuum ∼10{sup −3} Torr in the absence and in the presence of 500 Oe external transverse magnetic field applied on the plasma plume during film deposition. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser was employed to ablate the Alnico5 target. The ablated material was deposited on glass substrate placed at a distance of 2 cm from the target. The structural and magnetic properties of the film were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the Alnico5 films were amorphous in nature. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the Alnico5 film deposited in absence of external magnetic field has larger root-mean-square roughness value (60.2 nm) than the magnetically deposited film (42.9 nm). Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements showed that the in-plane saturation magnetization of Alnico5 film deposited in the presence of external magnetic field increases by 32% as compared to that for the film deposited in the absence of external magnetic field. However, the out-of-plane saturation magnetization was almost independent of the external magnetic field. In magnetically deposited film, there is in-plane anisotropy parallel to the applied external magnetic field.

  19. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Kendall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pena, Maria I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  20. Particle dry deposition to water surfaces: Processes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, S.C.; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    by meteorological conditions, atmospheric concentrations, surface type/ condition and the specific chemical and physical properties of the particle. Dry deposition can be conceptualized as a three-step process: (1) the gas or particle is moved toward the surface by thermally or mechanically driven eddies; (2...... the importance of current uncertainties in our understanding of dry deposition processes and to highlight the role of some of the key parameters in determining the transfer rate (the deposition velocity) a simple model of particle dry deposition is presented. The model describes the calculation of the rate...

  1. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  2. Divalent Mn in calcium hydroxyapatite by pulse laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, I; Peto, G; Karacs, A; Molnár, G; Popov, I

    2010-10-01

    Pulse laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit Mn containing calcium hydroxyapatite (HAMn). The PLD process ensures that the composition of the target and the deposited layer is the same. In some cases additional effort should be made to preserve some volatile components, namely OH. This was ensured by water steam supply. Calcium hydroxyapatite deposited by this method has the same properties as the target in respect to lattice parameters and valence state of Mn, which ensures the fixation between hard tissue and metal implants. This fact makes PLD grown HAMn layer covering implants to be improved for practical use.

  3. A comparative study of aerosol deposition in different lung models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C P; Diu, C K

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are made on total and regional deposition of inhaled particles in the human respiratory system based upon various current lung models. It is found that although total deposition does not vary appreciably from model to model, considerably large differences are present in regional deposition. Deposition profiles along the airways from different models also show very different patterns. These differences can be explained in terms of airway dimensions and the number of structures in different models. Extension to explain intersubject variability is also made.

  4. Respiratory tract deposition of polydisperse aerosols in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, C K; Yu, C P

    1983-01-01

    Total and regional deposition of polydisperse aerosols in the human respiratory tract are studied theoretically. The size distribution of the aerosol is assumed to be lognormal. For a given mass median particle diameter, mass deposition fraction is found to vary with the geometric standard deviation of the aerosol. The departure of the deposition pattern in various regions of the respiratory system from that of a monodisperse aerosol is interpreted in terms of the average mobility effect and deposition limitation effect of the polydisperse aerosol together with the sequential filtering effect of the respiratory tract.

  5. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    During the award period, a number of studies have been carried out related to the overall objective of the project which is to elucidate important factors which influence the upper airway deposition and dose of particles in the size range 0.5 nm - 10 {mu}m, such as particle size, breathing conditions, age, airway geometry, and mode of breathing. These studies are listed below. (1) A high voltage electrospray system was constructed to generate polydispersed 1-10 {mu}m diameter di-ethylhexyl sebacate aerosol for particle deposition studies in nasal casts and in human subjects. (2) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage geometry, and nasal resistance on particle deposition efficiency in forty healthy, nonsmoking adults at a constant flowrate were studied. (3) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage dimensions and nasal resistance on the percentage of particle deposition in the anterior 3 cm of the nasal passage of spontaneously breathing humans were studied. (4) The region of deposition of monodispersed aerosols were studied using replicate casts. (5) Ultrafine aerosol deposition using simulated breath holding path and natural path was compared. (6) An experimental technique was proposed and tested to measure the oral deposition of inhaled ultrafine particles. (7) We have calculated the total deposition fraction of ultrafine aerosols from 5 to 200 n in the extrathoracic airways and in the lung. (8) The deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways was studied using several head airway models.

  6. Effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on evaporative deposition patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-05-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation are vital in printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. This Letter presents surface wettability-based localization of evaporation-driven particulate deposition and the effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on the distribution of deposits. Sessile water droplets containing suspended latex particles are evaporated on non-wetting textured surfaces with varying microstructure geometry at ambient conditions. The droplets are visualized throughout the evaporation process to track the temporal evolution of contact radius and apparent contact angle. The resulting particle deposits on the substrates are quantitatively characterized. The experimental results show that superhydrophobic surfaces suppress contact-line deposition during droplet evaporation, thereby providing an effective means of localizing the deposition of suspended particles. A correlation between deposit size and surface morphology, explained in terms of the interface pressure balance at the transition between wetting states, reveals an optimum surface morphology for minimizing the deposit coverage area.

  7. Cobalt Deposits in the Central China Orogenic Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cobalt mostly occurs as an associated metal in Cu-Ni sulphide deposits, skarn Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn deposits and volcanic-hosted massive sulphide (VHMS) or sedex deposits. There are different types of cobalt deposits in the Central China orogenic belt. In the Tamu-Kalangu Mississippi-valley type Pb-Zn deposits, many cobalt-nickel sulphide minerals were found. The cobalt content of the ore is 0.064%- 0.46% in sedex-type Kendekeke Fe-Pb-Zn-Au deposits, and cobalt sulphide veins with Co contents of 4%- 9% have also been found. About 28000 tons of cobalt reserves were delineated in the Durgoi Cu-Co-Zn deposit of VHMS type in the A'nyemaqên Mountains. It is considered that the exploration potential for cobalt is attractive in this district, especially in sedex-type deposits and Co-rich sulphide veins in sedex-type Fe, Cu and Pb-Zn deposits and their surroundings.

  8. Duobaoshan Porphyry Copper Deposit and Its Associated Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Duobaoshan porphyry copper deposit, situated in Nenjiang County of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China, lies tectonically in the Mongolian-Okhotsk geosyncline.Duobaoshan porphyry copper ore field consisting of Duobaoshan copper deposit and Tongshan copper deposit contains rich copper associated with molybdenum, gold, silver and osmium (OsX87). In this sense, this porphyry copper ore field will turn into a large industrial base of copper, gold, silver and osmium. At present, in Duobaoshan porphyry copper deposit occurs a usable B+C+-D grade reserve of 3 276 630ton Cu, 122 920 ton Mo, 87 ton gold and 1 417 ton Ag.

  9. Fog deposition to a Tillandsia carpet in the Atacama Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Osses

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth, fog deposition plays an important role for the water balance and for the survival of vulnerable ecosystems. The eddy covariance method, previously applied for the quantification of fog deposition to forests in various parts of the world, was used for the first time to measure deposition of fog water to a desert. In this exploratory study we estimate the amount of water available for the ecosystem by deposition and determine the relevant processes driving fog deposition. This is especially important for the species Tillandsia landbecki living in coastal Atacama at the limit of plant existence with fog and dew being the only sources of water. Between 31 July and 19 August 2008 approximately 2.5 L m−2 of water were made available through deposition. Whole-year deposition was estimated as 25 L m−2. Turbulent upward fluxes occurred several times during the evenings and are explained by the formation of radiation fog. In connection with that, underestimates of the deposition are assumed. More detailed studies covering various seasons and all parameters and fluxes contributing to the local energy balance are suggested. This will help to further develop understanding about the processes of (i deposition of water to the desert, and (ii intensification of advection fog through additional formation of radiation fog.

  10. Microreactor-Assisted Solution Deposition for Compound Semiconductor Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Ho Choi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art techniques for the fabrication of compound semiconductors are mostly vacuum-based physical vapor or chemical vapor deposition processes. These vacuum-based techniques typically operate at high temperatures and normally require higher capital costs. Solution-based techniques offer opportunities to fabricate compound semiconductors at lower temperatures and lower capital costs. Among many solution-based deposition processes, chemical bath deposition is an attractive technique for depositing semiconductor films, owing to its low temperature, low cost and large area deposition capability. Chemical bath deposition processes are mainly performed using batch reactors, where all reactants are fed into the reactor simultaneously and products are removed after the processing is finished. Consequently, reaction selectivity is difficult, which can lead to unwanted secondary reactions. Microreactor-assisted solution deposition processes can overcome this limitation by producing short-life molecular intermediates used for heterogeneous thin film synthesis and quenching the reaction prior to homogeneous reactions. In this paper, we present progress in the synthesis and deposition of semiconductor thin films with a focus on CdS using microreactor-assisted solution deposition and provide an overview of its prospect for scale-up.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  12. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  13. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  14. Characterization of Thin Films Deposited with Precursor Ferrocene by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Kailun; ZHENG Jianwan; LIU Zuli; JIA Lihui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the characterization of thin films,deposited with the precursor ferrocene(FcH)by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition(PECVD)technique,was investigated.The films were measured by Scanning Electronic Microscopy(SEM),Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM),Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis(ESCA),and superconducting Quantum Interference Device(SQUID).It was observed that the film's layer is homogeneous in thickness and has a dense morphology without cracks.The surface roughness is about 36 nm.From the results of ESCA,it can be inferred that the film mainly contains the compound FeOOH,and carbon is combined with oxygen in different forms under different supply-powers.The hysteresis loops indicate that the film is of soft magnetism.

  15. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkarnain Zainal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111 orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  16. Characterization of CdTe films deposited at various bath temperatures and concentrations using electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  17. Silicon Nitride Film Deposition by Photochemical Vapor Deposition Using an Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezono, Yoshinari; Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Kurosawa, Kou; Amari, Kouichi; Ishimura, Sou; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the deposition of silicon nitride (SiNx) films for the production of semiconductor devices and flat panel displays, by chemical vapor deposition with vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamps (VUV-CVD) using SiH4 and NH3 as raw materials. An Ar2* excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) with a high photon energy was used to directly excite and dissociate SiH4 through a photochemical reaction. SiNx films were successfully formed at a low temperature of 100 °C with the Ar2* excimer lamp. Although the Si-rich films were obtained using an Ar2* lamp, they showed a quality almost similar to that of films obtained by conventional plasma-CVD at 400 °C.

  18. Low resistance polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahtab Ullah; Ejaz Ahmed; Abdelbary Elhissi; Waqar Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films with outgrowing diamond (OGD) grains were deposited onto silicon wafers using a hydrocarbon gas (CH4) highly diluted with H2 at low pressure in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a range of gas flow rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM showed polycrystalline diamond structure with a random orientation. Polycrystalline diamond films with various textures were grown and (111) facets were dominant with sharp grain boundaries. Outgrowth was observed in flowerish character at high gas flow rates. Isolated single crystals with little openings appeared at various stages at low gas flow rates. Thus, changing gas flow rates had a beneficial influence on the grain size, growth rate and electrical resistivity. CVD diamond films gave an excellent performance for medium film thickness with relatively low electrical resistivity and making them potentially useful in many industrial applications.

  19. Electrochemical deposition and characterization of zinc-nickel alloys deposited by direct and pulse current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN R. RADOVIC

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and phase structure of Zn-Ni alloys obtained by electrochemical deposition under various conditions were investigated. The alloys were deposited on a rotating disc electrode and steel panel from chloride solutions by direct and pulse current. The influence of the pulse plating variables (on-time, off-time, relation of off- and on-time on the composition, phase structure and corrosion properties were investigated. The phase composition affects the anticorrosive properties of Zn-Ni alloys during exposure to a corrosive agent (3 % NaCl solution. It was shown that a Zn-Ni alloy electrodeposited by pulse current with a pulse time of 1 ms and an off- and on-time ratio of 1 exhibits the best corrosion properties.

  20. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of