WorldWideScience

Sample records for blister rusts albuginaceae

  1. WHITE BLISTER SPECIES (Albuginaceae ON WEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Vrandečić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate fungi inside the family Albuginaceae are widespread world wide and cause white rust or white blister disease. Mycopopulation of weeds has been researched within the project „The role of weeds in epidemiology of row-crop diseases“. The aim of this research was to identify white blister species occurring on weeds in Eastern Croatia. Weed plants with disease symptoms characteristic for white blister species have been collected since 2001 on location Slavonia and Baranja country. Determination of white blister species was based on morphological characters of pathogen and the host. Wilsoniana bliti was determined on Amaranthus retroflexus and Amaranthus hybridus leaves. Capsella bursa pastoris is a host for Albugo candida. Ambrosia artemisiifolia is a host for Pustula sp. and Cirsium arvense was found to be host for Pustula spinulosa. Wilsoniana portulaceae was determined on Portulaca oleracea.

  2. Commandra Blister Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Johnson

    1986-01-01

    Commandra blister rust is a disease of hard pines that is caused by a fungus growing in the inner bark. The fungus (Cronartium commandrae Pk.) has a complex life cycle. It infects hard pines but needs an alternate host, an unrelated plant, to spread from one pine to another.

  3. Frequency of comandra blister rust infection episodes on lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Jacobi; Brian W. Geils; Jane E. Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Comandra blister rust is a damaging canker disease of lodgepole pine in the Central Rocky Mountains. Our knowledge of previous blister rust outbreaks and the effects of weather and climate on rust epidemiology has not been sufficient to explain the frequency and severity of disease outbreaks. Thus, we sought to describe the seasonal and annual frequency and duration of...

  4. White pines, blister rust, and management in the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. A. Conklin; M Fairweather; D Ryerson; B Geils; D Vogler

    2009-01-01

    White pines in New Mexico and Arizona are threatened by the invasive disease white pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola. Blister rust is already causing severe damage to a large population of southwestern white pine in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico. Recent detection in northern and western New Mexico suggests that a major expansion of the...

  5. Antibiotic Treatment of Blister Rust Cankers in Eastern White Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Phelps; Ray Weber

    1970-01-01

    Cycloheximide (Acti-dione) and Phytoactin antibiotics, applied as basal stem treatments, aerial spray treatments, and complete foliar drenches were not effective in controlling blister rust cankers in eastern white pine. Cycloheximide was effective in suppressing canker activity and growth if directly applied to scarified cankers.

  6. Blister rust control in the management of western white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth P. Davis; Virgil D. Moss

    1940-01-01

    The forest industry of the western white pine region depends on the production of white pine as a major species on about 2,670,000 acres of commercial forest land. Continued production of this species and maintenance of the forest industry at anything approaching its present level is impossible unless the white pine blister rust is controlled. Existing merchantable...

  7. Resistance of three interspecific white pine hybrids to blister rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Z. Callaham

    1962-01-01

    Three white pine hybrids exposed to infection by white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer) since 1946 have inherited the relative resistance of their parental species. The hybrids were produced from controlled pollinations in 1940 and 1941 at the Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, Calif. Twelve seedlings of each hybrid were...

  8. Characteristics of Blister Rust Cankers on Eastern White Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Phelps; Ray Weber

    1969-01-01

    The growth, development, and sporulation of white pine blister rust cankers were studied on eastern white pine in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Three district canker types were identified on the basis of physical appearance, growth rate, and sporulation. Canker growth rate and sporulation decreased as tree size or age increased, and many cankers apparently became inactive...

  9. White pine blister rust resistance research in Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew David; Paul Berrang; Carrie Pike

    2012-01-01

    The exotic fungus Cronartium ribicola causes the disease white pine blister rust on five-needled pines throughout North America. Although the effects of this disease are perhaps better known on pines in the western portion of the continent, the disease has also impacted regeneration and growth of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L. ...

  10. White pines, Ribes, and blister rust: integration and action

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Hunt; B. W. Geils; K. E. Hummer

    2010-01-01

    The preceding articles in this series review the history, biology and management of white pine blister rust in North America, Europe and eastern Asia. In this integration, we connect and discuss seven recurring themes important for understanding and managing epidemics of Cronartium ribicola in the white pines (five-needle pines in subgenus Strobus). Information and...

  11. White pines, Ribes, and blister rust: a review and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian W. Geils; Kim E. Hummer; Richard S. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    For over a century, white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) has linked white pines (Strobus) with currants and gooseberries (Ribes) in a complex and serious disease epidemic in Asia, Europe, and North America. Because of ongoing changes in climate, societal demands for forests and their amenities, and scientific advances in genetics and proteomics, our current...

  12. White pine blister rust in the interior Mountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Burns; Jim Blodgett; Dave Conklin; Brian Geils; Jim Hoffman; Marcus Jackson; William Jacobi; Holly Kearns; Anna Schoettle

    2010-01-01

    White pine blister rust is an exotic, invasive disease of white, stone, and foxtail pines (also referred to as white pines or five-needle pines) in the genus Pinus and subgenus Strobus (Price and others 1998). Cronartium ribicola, the fungus that causes WPBR, requires an alternate host - currants and gooseberries in the genus Ribes and species of Pedicularis...

  13. HOW TO Identify White Pine Blister Rust and Remove Cankers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Nicholls; Robert L. Anderson

    1977-01-01

    White pine blister rust (caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch. ex Rabenh.) was introduced into the United States about 1900 and has since spread throughout the range of white pine. The disease intensity varies throughout the range but is normally most severe where late summers (July-September) are cool (below 67? F) and damp, conditions necessary for...

  14. Strategies for managing whitebark pine in the presence of white pine blister rust [Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond J. Hoff; Dennis E. Ferguson; Geral I. McDonald; Robert E. Keane

    2001-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is one of many North American white pine species (Pinus subgenus Strobus) susceptible to the fungal disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Blister rust has caused severe mortality (often reaching nearly 100 percent) in many stands of white bark pine north of 45° latitude in western North America. The rust is slowly...

  15. Current and future molecular approaches to investigate the white pine blister rust pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. A. Richardson; A. K. M. Ekramoddoulah; J.-J. Liu; M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetics is proving to be especially useful for addressing a wide variety of research and management questions on the white pine blister rust pathosystem. White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola, is an ideal model for studying biogeography, genetics, and evolution because: (1) it involves an introduced pathogen; (2) it includes multiple primary...

  16. Low average blister-rust infection rates may mean high control costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Marty

    1965-01-01

    The Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, in cooperation with Federal and State forest-pest-control agencies, undertook a survey of blister-rust infection rates in the white pine region of the East during 1962 and 1963. Those engaged in blister-rust-control activities will not be surprised at the survey's results. We found that infection rates were significantly...

  17. Biology and pathology of Ribes and their implications for management of white pine blister rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. J. Zambino

    2010-01-01

    Ribes (currants and gooseberries) are telial hosts for the introduced and invasive white pine blister rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola. Knowledge of wild and introduced Ribes helps us understand the epidemiology of blister rust on its aecial hosts, white pines, and develop disease control and management strategies. Ribes differ by species in their contribution to...

  18. Blister rust in North America: What we have not learned in the past 100 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene P. Van Arsdel; Brian W. Geils

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of Cronartium ribicola (white pine blister rust) greatly motivated development of tree disease control and research in America. Although foresters and pathologists have learned much in the past 100 years, more remains to learn. The most important lesson is that fear of blister rust has reduced pine regeneration more than the disease itself. Based on six...

  19. White pine blister rust in northern ldaho and western Montana: alternatives for integrated management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan K. Hagle; Geral I. McDonald; Eugene A. Norby

    1989-01-01

    This report comprises a handbook for managing western white pine in northern ldaho and western Montana, under the threat of white pine blister rust. Various sections cover the history of the disease and efforts to combat it, the ecology of the white pine and Ribes, alternate host of the rust, and techniques for evaluating the rust hazard and attenuating it. The authors...

  20. White pine blister rust resistance in limber pine: Evidence for a major gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. W. Schoettle; R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; K. S. Burns

    2014-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is being threatened by the lethal disease white pine blister rust caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola. The types and frequencies of genetic resistance to the rust will likely determine the potential success of restoration or proactive measures. These first extensive inoculation trials using individual tree seed collections...

  1. Resistance to white pine blister rust in Pinus flexilis and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna W. Schoettle; Richard A. Sniezko; Angelia Kegley; Jerry Hill; Kelly S. Burns

    2010-01-01

    The non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, that causes white pine blister rust (WPBR), is impacting or threatening limber pine, Pinus flexilis, and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata. In the Southern Rockies, where the rust invasion is still expanding, we have the opportunity to be proactive and prepare the landscape for invasion. Genetic...

  2. White pine blister rust in Korea, Japan and other Asian regions: comparisons and implications for North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; Y. Ota; S. K. Lee; K.-S. Woo; S. Kaneko

    2010-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the history of white pine blister rust, attributed to Cronartium ribicola, and addresses current research and management issues in South Korea, Japan and other regions of eastern Asia (China, Russia and Himalaya). For each region, the distribution, damage, aecial hosts, telial hosts and management of C. ribicola and other blister rust fungi...

  3. White pine blister rust resistance of 12 western white pine families at three field sites in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Sniezko; Robert Danchok; Jim Hamlin; Angelia Kegley; Sally Long; James Mayo

    2012-01-01

    Western white pine (Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don) is highly susceptible to the non-native, invasive pathogen Cronartium ribicola, the causative agent of white pine blister rust. The susceptibility of western white pine to blister rust has limited its use in restoration and reforestation throughout much of western North...

  4. Monitoring white pine blister rust infection and mortality in whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathie Jean; Erin Shanahan; Rob Daley; Gregg DeNitto; Dan Reinhart; Chuck Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for information on the status and trend of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Concerns over the combined effects of white pine blister rust (WPBR, Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae), and climate change prompted an interagency working group to design and implement...

  5. Conservation of biodiversity in sugar pine: effects of the blister rust epidemic on genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar; Bohun B. Kinloch; Robert D. Westfall

    1992-01-01

    Genetic diversity in sugar plne will be severely reduced by the blister rust pandemic predicted within the next 50 to 75 years. We model effects of the epidemic on genetic diversity at the stand and landscape levels for both natural and artificial regeneration. In natural stands, because natural frequencies of the dominant gene (R) for resistance are low, the most...

  6. Strong partial resistance to white pine blister rust in sugar pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch, Jr.; Deems Burton; Dean A. Davis; Robert D. Westfall; Joan Dunlap; Detlev Vogler

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative resistance to white pine blister rust in 128 controlled- and open-pollinated sugar pine families was evaluated in a “disease garden”, where alternate host Ribes bushes were interplanted among test progenies. Overall infection was severe (88%), but with great variation among and within families: a 30-fold range in numbers of infections...

  7. Selection for resistance to white pine blister rust affects the abiotic stress tolerances of limber pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J. Vogan; Anna W. Schoettle

    2015-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) mortality is increasing across the West as a result of the combined stresses of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola; WPBR), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium cyanocarpum) in a changing climate. With the continued spread of WPBR, extensive mortality will continue with strong selection...

  8. Antibiotics Do Not Control Blister Rust in Eastern White Pine Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Phelps; Ray Weber

    1968-01-01

    To prevent blister rust infections in Eastern white pine seedlings, the antibiotics, cycloheximide (acti-dione) and Phytoactin, were tested in root dips, root slurries, and foliar drenches before planting and after planting the trees. None of the methods and materials tested was effective.

  9. Preempting the pathogen: Blister rust and proactive management of high-elevation pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue Miller; Anna Schoettle; Kelly Burns; Richard Sniezko; Patty Champ

    2017-01-01

    White pine blister rust has been spreading through western forests since 1910, causing widespread mortality in a group that includes some of the oldest and highest-elevation pines in the United States. The disease has recently reached Colorado and is expected to travel through the southern Rockies. Although it cannot be contained, RMRS researchers and collaborators are...

  10. Limber pine forests on the leading edge of white pine blister rust distribution in Northern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Betsy A. Goodrich; Anna W. Schoettle

    2011-01-01

    The combined threats of the current mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) epidemic with the imminent invasion of white pine blister rust (caused by the non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, WPBR) in limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests in northern Colorado threatens the limber pine's regeneration cycle and ecosystem function. Over one million...

  11. Histology of white pine blister rust in needles of resistant and susceptible eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel A. Jurgens; Robert A. Blanchette; Paul J. Zambino; Andrew David

    2003-01-01

    White pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola, has plagued the forests of North America for almost a century. Over past decades, eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) that appear to tolerate the disease have been selected and incorporated into breeding programs. Seeds from P. strobus with putative resistance were...

  12. Whitebark pine mortality related to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreak, and water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Erin; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thoma, David P.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Ray, Andrew; Legg, Kristin; Shovic, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in the western United States have been adversely affected by an exotic pathogen (Cronartium ribicola, causal agent of white pine blister rust), insect outbreaks (Dendroctonus ponderosae, mountain pine beetle), and drought. We monitored individual trees from 2004 to 2013 and characterized stand-level biophysical conditions through a mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Specifically, we investigated associations between tree-level variables (duration and location of white pine blister rust infection, presence of mountain pine beetle, tree size, and potential interactions) with observations of individual whitebark pine tree mortality. Climate summaries indicated that cumulative growing degree days in years 2006–2008 likely contributed to a regionwide outbreak of mountain pine beetle prior to the observed peak in whitebark mortality in 2009. We show that larger whitebark pine trees were preferentially attacked and killed by mountain pine beetle and resulted in a regionwide shift to smaller size class trees. In addition, we found evidence that smaller size class trees with white pine blister rust infection experienced higher mortality than larger trees. This latter finding suggests that in the coming decades white pine blister rust may become the most probable cause of whitebark pine mortality. Our findings offered no evidence of an interactive effect of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust infection on whitebark pine mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Interestingly, the probability of mortality was lower for larger trees attacked by mountain pine beetle in stands with higher evapotranspiration. Because evapotranspiration varies with climate and topoedaphic conditions across the region, we discuss the potential to use this improved understanding of biophysical influences on mortality to identify microrefugia that might contribute to successful whitebark pine conservation

  13. First report of the white pine blister rust pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. L. Fairweather; Brian Geils

    2011-01-01

    White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., was found on southwestern white pine (Pinus flexilis James var. reflexa Engelm., synonym P. strobiformis Engelm.) near Hawley Lake, Arizona (Apache County, White Mountains, 34.024°N, 109.776°W, elevation 2,357 m) in April 2009. Although white pines in the Southwest (Arizona and New Mexico) have been...

  14. Blister rust resistance among 19 families of whitebark pine, Pinus albicaulis, from Oregon and Washington – early results from an artificial inoculation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelia Kegley; Richard A. Sniezko; Robert Danchok; Douglas P. Savin

    2012-01-01

    Whitebark pine is considered one of the most susceptible white pine species to white pine blister rust, the disease caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola. High mortality from blister rust and other factors in much of the range in the United States and Canada have raised serious concerns about the future viability of this high-...

  15. Non-Ribes alternate hosts of white pine blister rust: What this discovery means to whitebark pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul J. Zambino; Bryce A. Richardson; Geral I. McDonald; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook. Kim

    2006-01-01

    From early to present-day outbreaks, white pine blister rust caused by the fungus Cronartium ribicola, in combination with mountain pine beetle outbreaks and fire exclusion has caused ecosystem-wide effects for all five-needled pines (McDonald and Hoff 2001). To be successful, efforts to restore whitebark pine will require sound management decisions that incorporate an...

  16. 4.4.5S: Genetic interactions of white pines and blister rust in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A century since its introduction to North America from Europe, white pine blister rust has come to be recognized as one of the catastrophic plant disease epidemics in history. It has yet to stabilize, continuing to spread and intensify. The nine native white pine hosts comprise major timber producers, important watershed protectors, keystone ecological species, and the...

  17. Status of white pine blister rust and seed collections in california's high-elevation white pine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Dunlap

    2011-01-01

    White pine blister rust (caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola) reached northern California about 80 years ago. Over the years its spread southward had been primarily recorded on sugar pine. However, observations on its occurrence had also been reported in several of the higher elevation five-needled white pine species in California. Since the late...

  18. White blister rusts and downy mildews from bajaur agency fata, with some new records from pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, M.A.; Shahzad, S.

    2015-01-01

    In a species diversity study of Oomycyctes of Bajaur Agency FATA, Pakistan, infection of white blister rusts and downy mildews recorded on three cultivated and four wild plants. Capsella bursa-pastoris showed mixed infection of Albugo candida and Hyaloperonospora parasitica (syn: Peronospora parasitica). Similarly, A. candida and H. brassicae (syn: P. brassicae) parasitized Brassica campestris. Wilsoniana portulacae (syn: Albugo portulacae) and W. occidentalis com. nov. (syn: Albugo occidentalis) recovered from Portulaca oleracea and Spinacia oleracea, respectively. Bremia taraxaci, B. sonchicola and B. saussureae recorded on Taraxicum officinale, Sonchus sp., and Saussurea sp., respectively. All these obligate parasites are new records from Bajaur Agency, while H. parasitica, W. occidentalis, B. taraxaci, and B. saussureae on the mentioned hosts are new records from Pakistan. (author)

  19. First report of the white pine blister rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola, infecting Pinus flexilis on Pine Mountain, Humboldt National Forest, Elko County, northeastern Nevada, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlev R. Vogler; Patricia E. Maloney; Tom Burt; Jacob W. Snelling

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, while surveying for five-needle white pine cone crops in northeastern Nevada, we observed white pine blister rust, caused by the rust pathogen Cronartium ribicola Fisch., infecting branches and stems of limber pines (Pinus flexilis James) on Pine Mountain (41.76975°N, 115.61622°W), Humboldt National Forest,...

  20. White pine blister rust resistance in North American, Asian and european species - results from artificial inoculartion trials in Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Sniezko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dorena Genetic Resource Center (DGRC has used artificial inoculation trials to evaluate progenies of thousands of Pinus monticola and P. lambertiana selections from Oregon and Washington for resistance to white pine blister rust caused by Cronartium ribicola. In addition, early results are now available for P. albicaulis and P. strobiformis. DGRC has also recently evaluated seed orchard progenies of P. strobus, as well as bulked seedlots from P. armandii and P. peuce. The majority of P. monticola, P. lambertiana, P. albicaulis, and P. strobus progenies are very susceptible to blister rust. However, resistance exists in all these species. P. strobiformis showed relatively high levels of resistance for the eight progenies tested. Resistance in P. armandii was mainly reflected in the very low percentage of cankered seedlings; for P. peuce, the high percentage of cankered seedlings alive three years after inoculation was notable. R-genes are present in some of the North American five-needle pine species, but partial resistance traits (e.g. bark reaction will play a major role in breeding activities for P. monticola and P. lambertiana and will likely be the key to developing durable resistance.

  1. Synoptic climatology of the long-distance dispersal of white pine blister rust II. Combination of surface and upper level conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. L. Frank; B. W. Geils; L. S. Kalkstein; H. W. Thistle

    2008-01-01

    An invasive forest pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, white pine blister rust (WPBR), is believed to have arrived in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico about 1970. Epidemiological and genetic evidence supports the hypothesis that introduction was the result of long-distance dispersal (LDD) by atmospheric transport from California. This...

  2. Colonization history, host distribution, anthropogenic influence and landscape features shape populations of white pine blister rust, an invasive alien tree pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simren Brar

    Full Text Available White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales. This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola. We characterized 1,292 samples of C. ribicola from 66 geographic locations in North America using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and evaluated the effect of landscape features, host distribution, and colonization history on the structure of these pathogen populations. We identified eastern and western genetic populations in North America that are strongly differentiated. Genetic diversity is two to five times higher in eastern populations than in western ones, which can be explained by the repeated accidental introductions of the pathogen into northeastern North America compared with a single documented introduction into western North America. These distinct genetic populations are maintained by a barrier to gene flow that corresponds to a region where host connectivity is interrupted. Furthermore, additional cryptic spatial differentiation was identified in western populations. This differentiation corresponds to landscape features, such as mountain ranges, and also to host connectivity. We also detected genetic differentiation between the pathogen populations in natural stands and plantations, an indication that anthropogenic movement of this pathogen still takes place. These results highlight the importance of monitoring this invasive alien tree pathogen to prevent admixture of eastern and western populations where different pathogen races occur.

  3. Fracture Blisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uebbing, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fracture blisters are a relatively uncommon complication of fractures in locations of the body, such as the ankle, wrist elbow and foot, where skin adheres tightly to bone with little subcutaneous fat cushioning. The blister that results resembles that of a second degree burn.These blisters significantly alter treatment, making it difficult to splint or cast and often overlying ideal surgical incision sites. Review of the literature reveals no consensus on management; however, most authors agree on early treatment prior to blister formation or delay until blister resolution before attempting surgical correction or stabilization. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;131-133.

  4. Tracking the footsteps of an invasive plant pathogen: Intercontinental phylogeographic structure of the white-pine-blister-rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce A. Richardson; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Yuko Ota; Kwan Soo Woo; Richard C. Hamelin

    2009-01-01

    Presently, little is known about the worldwide genetic structure, diversity, or evolutionary relationships of the white-pineblister-rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola. A collaborative international effort is underway to determine the phylogeographic relationships among Asian, European, and North American sources of C. ribicola and...

  5. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  6. Radiation blistering: recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.

    1978-01-01

    Different metals have been proposed for radiation blistering of metals. For example, for the formation of blisters on helium bombarded metal surfaces such models are based on the coalescence of gas bubbles and the build-up of excess gas pressure in the implant region, causing large enough stresses for the occurrence of plastic deformation of the surface regions; or the percolation of helium in the lattice; or the build-up of large, lateral stresses in the implant layer causing buckling. These models are critically reviewed in the light of recent experimental results. A discussion of blistering effects at high doses is included

  7. Blistering and hydride embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals have been categorized into several groups. Two of the groups, hydrogen blistering and hydride embrittlement, are reasonably well understood, and problems relating to their occurrence may be avoided if that understanding is used as a basis for selecting alloys for hydrogen service. Blistering and hydride embrittlement are described along with several techniques of materials selection and used to minimize their adverse effects. (U.S.)

  8. Blistering and bubble formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.

    1976-01-01

    Blister formation in metals has been observed during bombardment with inert-gas ions in the energy range between 1 and 2000 keV at doses of about 10 17 to 10 19 cm -2 . The changes in surface topography and the erosion yields were mainly studied in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally the release of the implanted gas during blister formation was observed. Recently measurements on single crystals were performed determining simultaneously the implantation profile, the total amount of trapped ions, the depth distribution of the induced lattice damage and the thickness of the covers of the blisters. In several stages of the formation process of blisters the implanted layer was observed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) showing the formation of gas bubbles. Using the results of all these measurements in this review an attempt is made to develop a model of blister formation combining the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the gas bubbles and lateral stress due to volume swelling. (author)

  9. [Application of blistering cupping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingui; Chen, Zelin; Chen, Bo; Fan, Yihua; Chen, Xianghong

    2016-11-12

    Blistering cupping is special as eliminating wind and dampness as well as removing phlegm and blood stasis, and it achieves effects through suction. In this paper we reviewed relevant literature combined with clinical experience so as to summarize its operation attention through exploring the origin, mechanism and application. We divide the progress into the blistering period, the phlegm-stasis-eliminating period, and the escharosis period according to the changes of bubble and the things pulled out. Blistering cupping creates ways to eliminate concrete unhealthy influences through smoothing meridians and collaterals, such as phlegm and retained fluid, dampness and blood stasis. Thus chronic diseases are relieved. Also,we propose the rules of "blistering acupoints being related to disease location as well as the nature of acupoints and diseases". The therapy has been used to treat diseases of respiratory system, osteoarticular, skin and subcutaneous tissue, mental and behavioral disorders, and tumor, among which the effects of intractable diseases of respiratory and osteoarticular systems are definite. It deserves to be further explored and promoted.

  10. A model for blister exfoliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, S.K.; Sood, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for exfoliation of blisters by taking into account the temperature rise of the blister cover due to the incident beam heating. The rise in temperature is calculated by solving the time dependent heat conduction equation. The exfoliation is initiated either by a local melting or by the reduction of material strength due to the temperature rise leading to rupture of the blister skin by the pressure of the gas in the blister cavity. We propose two types of exfoliation: peripheral and non-peripheral, depending on the blister size. This model agrees well with the various experimental results reported on blister exfoliation. It is argued that this thermally assisted exfoliation of blisters may render the first wall erosion by high energy helium flux more serious than considered hitherto, in an actual fusion reactor system. (author)

  11. Rust scoring guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anonymous,

    1986-01-01

    This brief guide for identifying rust diseases of smaill grain cereals contains color photos depicting the growth stages of small grain cereal crops and provides instructions for recording rust severity and field response for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis), stem rust (P. graminis), and leaf rust

  12. Rust scoring guide

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1986-01-01

    This brief guide for identifying rust diseases of smaill grain cereals contains color photos depicting the growth stages of small grain cereal crops and provides instructions for recording rust severity and field response for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis), stem rust (P. graminis), and leaf rust (P. recondita).

  13. Rust essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Balbaert, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers interested in systems level and application programming, and are looking for a quick entry into using Rust and understanding the core features of the framework. It is assumed that you have a basic understanding of Java, C#, Ruby, Python or JavaScript.

  14. Winnie Rust

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Om te trek is om jou kortstondig in 'n liminale staat te bevind. Nóg by jou vertrekpunt, nóg by jou uiteindelike bestemming, sonder die geborgenheid wat hierdie twee vaste plekke kwansuis bied. In 'n hele aantal opsigte is Trek van Winnie Rust 'n beskrywing van verskil- lende liminale state. Dit is egter nie 'n reisverhaal met ...

  15. Seeing Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The rust color of the Martian landscape is apparent in this low-resolution thumbnail image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. This image is part of a larger image currently stored onboard the rover in its memory.

  16. Rust transformation/rust compatible primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeric, Dario A.; Miller, Christopher E.

    1993-01-01

    Proper surface preparation has been the key to obtain good performance by a surface coating. The major obstacle in preparing a corroded or rusted surface is the complete removal of the contaminants and the corrosion products. Sandblasting has been traditionally used to remove the corrosion products before painting. However, sandblasting can be expensive, may be prohibited by local health regulations and is not applicable in every situation. To get around these obstacles, Industry developed rust converters/rust transformers and rust compatible primers (high solids epoxies). The potential use of these products for military equipment led personnel of the Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center (BRDEC) to evaluate the commercially available rust transformers and rust compatible primers. Prior laboratory experience with commercially available rust converters, as well as field studies in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, revealed poor performance, several inherent limitations, and lack of reliability. It was obvious from our studies that the performance of rust converting products was more dependent on the amount and type of rust present, as well as the degree of permeability of the coating, than on the product's ability to form an organometallic complex with the rust. Based on these results, it was decided that the Military should develop their own rust converter formulation and specification. The compound described in the specification is for use on a rusted surface before the application of an organic coating (bituminous compounds, primer or topcoat). These coatings should end the need for sandblasting or the removing of the adherent corrosion products. They also will prepare the surface for the application of the organic coating. Several commercially available rust compatible primers (RCP) were also tested using corroded surfaces. All of the evaluated RCP failed our laboratory tests for primers.

  17. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  18. Blistering phenomena I: metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    A summary of the major parameters affecting the blistering process is given. Brief discussions of the blistering mechanisms are included. The following topics are described: (1) projectile-target system, (2) projectile energy, (3) critical dose for blister formation, (4) effect of total dose, (5) dose rate, (6) target temperature, (7) crystallographic orientation of the irradiated surface, (8) models for blister formation, and (9) surface erosion of fusion reactor components by blistering

  19. Rust resistance in seedling families of Pinus albicaulis and Pinus strobiformis and implications for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; R. Danchok; J. Hamlin; J. Hill; D. Conklin

    2011-01-01

    Infection and mortality levels from Cronartium ribicola, the fungus causing white pine blister rust, are very high in parts of the geographic range of Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) and P. strobiformis (Southwestern white pine). Genetic resistance to this non-native fungus will be one of the key factors in maintaining or restoring populations of these species in...

  20. Radiation blistering of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Naritsugu; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Imoto, Shosuke

    1980-01-01

    Surface blistering of stainless steels due to 20 keV He + ion bombardment has been investigated by examination of surface topography with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Blisters of 0.1 to 2 μm in diameter are observed in all samples irradiated with fluence of about 1 x 10 18 He + /cm 2 at any temperature between -80 0 C and 500 0 C. With increasing the fluence blister covers are ruptured and exfoliated and finally the surface becomes rough surface without traces of blister formation. The surface effect is severer at 500 0 C than at 100 0 C irradiation. Also in double-phase stainless steel DP-3, similar surface topography to 316 SS is observed. But by the difference of the erosion rate by sputtering of the surface between α-phase and γ-phase, a striped pattern appears in DP-3 with heavy irradiation of about 2 x 10 19 He + /cm 2 . (author)

  1. The Causes of Boat Hull Blisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    blistering. The report is divided into the following sections: Introduction; How Blisters Form; the Hull Material; Manufacturing Processes; Water Diffusion...Term Effects of Water Up-Takeo " The much more detailed and highly technical report of thia-Vsrk is entitled "The Causes of Blistering in Boat Building...Chemical Engineering, ably assisted by several graduate students, and was completed in the fall of 1986. The report itself, d List-ribution/_ Availabilit

  2. Radiation blistering in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation blistering in solids has been identified as a process leading to damage and erosion of irradiated surfaces. Some of the major parameters governing the blistering process in metals and some metallic alloys are the type of projectile and its energy, total dose, dose rate, target temperature, channeling condition of the projectile, orientation of the irradiated surface plane, and target material and its microstructure. Experimental results and models proposed for blister formation and rupture are reviewed. The blistering phenomenon is important as an erosion process in applications such as fusion reactor technology (plasma-wall interactions) and accelerator technology (erosion of components and targets). A description of methods for the reduction of surface erosion caused by blistering is included

  3. Wheat Rust Toolbox Related to New Initiatives on Yellow Rust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Grønbech; Lassen, Poul

    ://www.fao.org/agriculture/crops/rust/stem/rust-report/en/). The Wheat rust toolbox is one of several International research platforms hosted by Aarhus University, and it uses the same ICT framework and databases as EuroWheat (www.eurowheat.org) and EuroBlight (www.EuroBlight.net). The Wheat Rust Toolbox will also serve the Global Rust Reference Centre (GRRC) as well...... – 2009), and as soon as possible this will be expanded to cover all global yellow rust data available via the GRRC. The presentation will focus on experiences from the previous work on global databases and web based information systems, as well as propose ideas how the toolbox can be helpful regarding...

  4. Microbiological Quality of Blister Pack Tablets in Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Blister pack, Community pharmacy, Good Manufacturing Practice, Microbial contamination,. Quality control ... High levels of microbial contamination in blister-packed tablets ... and their drugs approved by the Jordan Food and Drug ...

  5. Antiplectin autoantibodies in subepidermal blistering diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsrogge, J. J. A.; de Jong, M. C. J. M.; Kloosterhuis, G. J.; Vermeer, M. H.; Koster, J.; Sonnenberg, A.; Jonkman, M. F.; Pas, H. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemidesmosomal proteins may become targets of autoimmunity in subepidermal blistering diseases. Well-known recognized autoantigens are the intracellular plaque protein BP230, the transmembrane BP180 and its shed ecto-domain LAD-1. Objectives To establish the prevalence of autoimmunity

  6. Effector proteins of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future.

  7. Crown rust control on oats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.J.; Browning, J.A.; Simons, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    Attempts have been made to test the relative effectiveness of EMS treatment for inducing tolerance to crown rust among oat strains Clintland-60 of different ploidy levels. One strain of diploid and one of tetraploid oats were treated with EMS. These two strains are as susceptible to damage from crown rust as are cultivars of hexaploid oats. Multiline cultivars of oats have been shown to provide adequate protection from economic loss due to crown-rust disease in Iowa. Since 1968, eleven multiline cultivars of oats have been released from the Iowa station for use in commercial production in the midwestern USA. During the past two winter seasons, the effectiveness of multiline oat cultivars against crown-rust disease has been researched in Texas, USA, which has a ''long rust season'' of about four months, not an Iowa ''short rust season''. The protection against crown rust afforded by the multiline cultivars appeared equally good in Texas and Iowa. The seasonal productions of crown-rust spores relative to completely resistant and susceptible checks were nearly identical in both environments. Fifteen new isolines of oats have been developed for use in multiline varieties, with seed supplies sufficiently large for immediate use

  8. Correlation of blister diameter and blister skin thickness in helium-ion-irradiated Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Fenske, G.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic study of the correlation between blister diameter and blister skin thickness has been performed for helium-ion irradiation of monocrystalline and polycrystalline Nb for ion energies ranging from 20 to 500 keV. The results indicate that a relationship Datsub mpatproportionaltatsup 1.50at between the most probable blister diameter, Datsub mpat, and blister skin thickness, t, which has been suggested by other authors, does not exist for the various types of Nb targets studied. For example, for room-temperature irradiation of annealed polycrystalline Nb the experimentally determined relationship is Datsub mpat<10.3tatsup 1.22at. Furthermore, the D-t relationship was found to depend on the irradiation temperature in contrast to theoretical predictions by the lateral stress model of blister formation. These results do not appear to support the lateral stress model which predicts the relationship Dproportionaltatsup 1.5at. However, the experimentally determined relationships can be explained in part by the gas pressure model of blister formation

  9. Protecting steel from rusting by rust. The mechanism of rust formation and its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Weathering steel, when exposed outdoors for a few years, forms a protective layer resulting in reduction of the corrosion rate. The state of rusts is fundamental for understanding its mechanisms, but the structure and its relationship with the mechanism have not been understood. In this study, a new crystallographic approach was applied to reveal nano-structure of rusts with using of X-ray synchrotron radiation. It has been shown that additional elements alter the corrosion process in its early stage, resulting in formation of protective rusts. (author)

  10. A computer model for hydride blister growth in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.J.; Sawatzky, A.; Woo, C.H.

    1985-06-01

    The failure of a Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering unit 2 reactor started at a series of zirconium hydride blisters on the outside of the pressure tube. These blisters resulted from the thermal diffusion of hydrogen to the cooler regions of the pressure tube. In this report the physics of thermal diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium is reviewed and a computer model for blister growth in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry is described. The model is used to show that the blister-growth rate in a two-phase zirconium/zirconium-hydride region does not depend on the initial hydrogen concentration nor on the hydrogen pick-up rate, and that for a fixed far-field temperature there is an optimum pressure-type/calandria-tube contact temperature for growing blisters. The model described here can also be used to study large-scale effects, such as hydrogen-depletion zones around hydride blisters

  11. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  12. Reliable site for suction blister induction and harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmisha Chandrashekar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suction blister grafting is a useful modality of treatment of patients with resistant and stable vitiligo. However, there have been no detailed studies to find out the best donor site for blister formation. Methods: The study was conducted between the period of October 2004 and February 2005 in the dermatology department at a tertiary care center. Nine patients with vitiligo (focal vitiligo, 3; mucosal vitiligo, 2; acrofacial vitiligo, 2; vitiligo vulgaris, 1; and segmental vitiligo, 1 were selected for blister harvesting and grafting. The blisters were raised using the method described by Gupta et al. Results: Suction blisters were attempted to be raised at 52 sites, but only 38 blisters could be raised, 24 complete and 14 incomplete. Blisters were raised in all the three cases on the flexor aspect of the arm (100%, 15 of 17 cases (88.2% on the flexor aspect of the forearm, 4 of 5 cases (80% on the abdomen, 11 of 16 cases (68.7% on the anterolateral thigh, and less frequently over leg or foot. Complete blisters were formed in 13/15 cases (86.6% on the flexor aspect of the forearm, 6/11 cases (54.5% on the anterolateral thigh, and in all cases over leg. Conclusion: The flexor aspect of the forearm is a good site for suction blister harvesting.

  13. Alpha transport and blistering in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Wilson, K.L.; Bisson, C.L.; Haggmark, L.G.; Goldston, R.J.

    1978-12-01

    The particle flux and angular distribution of 3.5 MeV alpha particles impinging on the first wall from uncontained banana orbits in an axisymmetric tokamak reactor have been calculated. The resulting helium concentration profiles in the first wall can give rise to surface exfoliation under specified conditions. The major mitigating factor is the simultaneous surface recession due to sputtering by the D-T charge exchange neutral flux. For the parameters used in these calculations blistering in high sputtering rate materials such as Be is unlikely whereas in low sputtering rate materials such as Nb, He induced surface deformation is quite probable

  14. Suction blister lesions and epithelialization monitored by optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, M G; Gjerdrum, L M R; Larsen, H F

    2018-01-01

    suction blister was raised on each buttock, and the blister roof was excised. Lesions were covered with moisture-retaining dressing. In Study 1, the lesions were OCT-scanned on day 0 (D0), D2 and D4 and excised for histological examination. In Study 2, the progress of epithelialization and skin barrier...

  15. Role of gas pressure and lateral stress on blistering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1980-04-01

    Both gas pressure in bubbles and lateral stress have been suggested as primary causes of blistering. An analysis of both mechanisms is presented, and the conditions for blistering are examined. To realistically predict the gas pressure in bubbles, a recently derived high-density equation of state for helium is utilized

  16. Deuterium ion irradiation induced blister formation and destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jaemin; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Jin, Younggil; Roh, Ki-Baek; Kim, Gon-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@snu.ac.kr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The areal number density of blisters on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation increased with increasing ion fluence. • No more blisters were created above the temperature about 900 K due to high thermal mobility of ions and inactivity of traps. • The destruction of blister at the boundary induced by sputtering is proposed. • The blisters were destructed at the position about the boundary by high sputtering yield of oblique incident ions and thin thickness due to plastic deformation at the boundary. - Abstract: The blisters formation and destruction induced by the deuterium ions on a polycrystalline tungsten were investigated with varying irradiation deuterium ion fluence from 3.04 × 10{sup 23} to 1.84 × 10{sup 25} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and an fixed irradiated ion energy of 100 eV in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, which was similar to the far-scrape off layer region in the nuclear fusion reactors. Target temperature was monitored during the irradiation. Most of blisters formed easily on the grain with (1 1 1) plane orientation which had about 250 nm in diameter. In addition, the areal number density of blisters increased with increasing the ion fluence under the surface temperature reaching to about 900 K. When the fluence exceeded 4.6 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2}, the areal number density of the blister decreased. It could be explained that the destruction of the blister was initiated by erosion at the boundary region where the thickness of blister lid was thin and the sputtering yield was high by oblique incident ions, resulting in remaining the lid open, e.g., un-eroded center dome. It is possible to work as a tungsten dust formation from the plasma facing divertor material at far-SOL region of fusion reactor.

  17. Is cupping blister harmful?-A proteomical analysis of blister fluid induced by cupping therapy and scald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhidan; Chen, Chunlan; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Chuang; Li, Zunyuan; Liang, Wei; Lin, Yufang

    2018-02-01

    Cupping therapy has a long history in traditional medicine especially in Asian countries. It was controversial whether cupping induced blisters are beneficial to healing effects, and the formation and content in the blisters remain unexplored. We aimed to identify and compare the molecular components of the blister fluid from the cupping therapy and the scalds to explore the necessary of inducing cupping induced blisters. Fluid sample of blisters from fifteen patients receiving cupping therapy (Cupping group) and scald burns (Scald group) were collected in this study. Proteins from the blisters were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-gel) and further analyzed by mass spectrometry. In addition, the changes in particular proteins were confirmed by Western blotting. The protein components are significantly different between blister from cupping therapy and scalds. The immune responses, oxidative stress and metabolic related proteins (Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, hemopexin, prdx2, calmodulin, succinyl-CoA ligase and tetranectin) were increased, whereas the hemoglobin subunit beta was decreased in the Cupping group compared with the Scald group. Cupping induced blisters contain several proteins which relate to the activation of certain immune pathways including anti-oxidation, anti-apoptosis, tissue repairing and metabolic regulation. This proteomic analysis may indicate a significant clue to the mechanism study of cupping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rusted Designs: The New Apron

    OpenAIRE

    Swindells, Steve; Burcikova, Mila

    2013-01-01

    Articulated as a practice of design-couture, conceptualized as a project that seeks a sense \\ud of social engagement through research, design and making of everyday ‘common couture’, \\ud Rusted puts craft action in a very close relation with daily (political) or practical life. Rusted \\ud designs collage pre-used fabric and clothing (found, bought or gifted) with new cloth, thus \\ud using items of fabric and clothing from different times, countries and with variety of social \\ud histories. Th...

  19. Fusiform Rust of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. R. Phelps; F. L. Czabator

    1978-01-01

    Fusiform rust, caused by the fungus Cronartium fusiforme Hedg. & Hunt ex Cumm., is distributed in the Southern United States from Maryland to Florida and west to Texas and southern Arkansas. Infections by the fungus, which develops at or near the point of infection, result in tapered, spindle-shaped swells, called galls, on branches and stems of pines. (see photo...

  20. Characterization of mild steel pre rusted and rust converted surfaces through advanced electrochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, F.; Rizvi, Z.H.; Arshad, K.

    2008-01-01

    The present work evaluates the anti corrosive properties of a tannin based rust converter applied on the pre rusted steel coupons as compared with the grit blasted bare metal and pre rusted steel coupons. The mechanism and the corrosion control behaviour of the rust converter are characterized and monitored using EIS technique. The result suggested that when the tannin based rust converter applied on the pre rusted/corroded coupon, the protection properties of the mild steel coupon clearly improved because of the more compact conversion layer being formed on the coupon. It is inferred that the rust converter can be applied on the pre rusted samples as an alternative technique to the surface preparation for protection purpose. (author)

  1. Sources of resistance to yellow rust and stem rust in wheat-alien introgressions

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmatov, Mahbubjon

    2013-01-01

    Wheat is the staple food and the main source of caloric intake in most developing countries, and thereby an important source in order to maintain food security for the growing populations in those countries. Stem rust Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, and yellow rust P. striiformis f. sp. tritici of wheat continues to cause severe damage locally and globally, thereby contributing to food insecurity. In this paper biology and taxonomy of stem rust and yellow rust, breeding for resistance, util...

  2. The ‘Sticky Elastica’: delamination blisters beyond small deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Wagner, Till J. W.; Vella, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    We consider the form of an elastic loop adhered to a rigid substrate: the 'Sticky Elastica'. In contrast to previous studies of the shape of delamination 'blisters', the theory developed accounts for deflections with large slope (i.e. geometrically

  3. Surface roughness effects on blister formation in polycrystalline molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Sone, Kazuho; Yamada, Rayji; Ohtsuka, Hidewo; Murakami, Yoshio

    1977-07-01

    Polycrystalline molybdenum targets with electropolished and roughened surfaces were bombarded with 100 keV He + and 200 keV H 2 + ions at room temperature. It has been demonstrated that the blister formation is largely or completely suppressed by roughening the electropolished surface with emery paper of No. 1200, No. 400 and No. 100. Up to a He + fluence of 1.0 x 10 19 particles/cm 2 , no blisters are observed in the targets with the two roughest surfaces, while on the smooth surface blisters begin to occur at a fluence of 7.5 x 10 17 particles/cm 2 . The surface roughness effect on blister suppression is discussed in relation to the projected range of incident particles. (auth.)

  4. Suction blister grafting - Modifications for easy harvesting and grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suction blister grafting is a simple modality of treatment of patients with resistant and stable vitiligo. But raising the blisters may be time consuming and transferring to the recipient site may be difficult as the graft is ultrathin. By doing some modifications we can make the technique simpler and easier. We can decrease the blister induction time by intradermal injection of saline, exposure to Wood′s lamp, intrablister injection of saline. By these methods we can decrease the blister induction time from 2-3 hrs to 45-90 minutes. After harvesting the graft, it can be transferred to the recipient area by taking the graft on a sterile glass slide, on the gloved finger, rolling the graft over a sterile syringe and then spreading on the recipient area, or taking on the sterile wrapper of paraffin dressing and then placing over the recipient area.

  5. Helium-induced blistering and volume swelling in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of helium-induced blistering are presented. The goal of the research was to examine the mechanisms involved in blistering by observing the microstructure of the implanted region using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In particular, the volume swelling was measured as a function of the implant depth, and compared to experimental skin thicknesses in order to determine if the skin separated at the maximum volume swelling, or at the end of the swelling profile

  6. Flaking and blistering on He and Ne bombardments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, K.; Naramoto, H.

    1979-01-01

    Large scale exfoliation formed by 300 keV He + bombardment of niobium without any preceding blistering is investigated, in comparison with the blistering due to 450 and 850 keV Ne + bombardments. In-situ observations of the erosion processes were performed in a scanning electron microscope connected to the Van de Graaff. Critical doses of 7.2 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 , 2.4 x 10 17 Ne + /cm 2 and 4.0 x 10 17 Ne + /cm 2 were obtained for the 300 keV He flaking, 450 keV Ne blistering and 850 keV Ne blistering, respectively. The He flaking was presumed to be due to brittle fashion peeling-off of the surface layer by the bending moment driven by the internal gas pressure. The blistering, on the other hand, was presumed to be the result of the ductile fashion spreading of the lenticular bubble in the sub-surface layer. The necessary pressure for the peeling-off of the cover was calculated, and was speculated to be able to work as the driving force for the flaking from its unexpectedly low values. Fractographies under the exfoliations were discussed for both flaking and blistering. (author)

  7. The significance of a correlation of blister diameter with skin thickness for Ni and Be for blistering models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Fenske, G.

    1978-01-01

    It has been suggested that large lateral stresses introduced in an ion implanted surface layer may cause elastic instability and buckling of the implant layer (blister formation), and result in a relationship Dsub(mp) proportional to tsup(3/2) between the most probable blister diameter Dsub(mp) and the blister skin thickness, t, for metals such as Be, V, stainless steel, Nb and Mo. To test this relationship a systematic study of the correlation between blister diameter and skin thickness for helium blistering of annealed polycrystalline Ni and Be has been conducted for helium ion energies in the range of 15-300 keV. For beryllium the relationship between Dsup(mp) (μm) and t(μm) can be fitted by the expression Dsub(mp)=24.6tsup(1.25) whereas for nickel a best fit is obtained for the expression Dsub(mp)=1.24tsup(1.5). These results, together with earlier results for Nb and V show that the relationship between Dsub(mp) and t is stronly dependent on the type of metal studied and do not support the lateral stress model for blister formation. (Auth.)

  8. Strategies for improving rust resistance in oats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.E.; McKenzie, R.I.H.; Martens, J.W.; Brown, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    During the history of breeding oats for rust resistance in Canada the known sources of resistance proved inadequate to counter the virulence potential of both stem rust (Puccinia graminis avenae) and crown rust (P. coronata avenae). A major programme to overcome the rust problem was undertaken at Winnipeg, involving four alternate approaches: (1) A search for new resistance in wild oat species, particularly Avena sterilis, has provided a wealth of good resistance to crown rust, but less to stem rust. Much of the A. sterilis-derived crown rust resistance is now being used world-wide; (2) Efforts at synthesizing new resistance by mutation breeding methods have not been successful. Of about seven million plants examined, only one showed significant new resistance, but this was associated with poor plant type; (3) Resistance with low levels of expression but which appears broadly effective has been observed against both stem and crown rusts. It appears that numbers of these low-level genes exist, and that they can be accumulated to provide increasingly effective resistance. Problems in using this type of resistance in a practical way are discussed; (4) Excellent rust resistance has been found in lower ploidy species such as A. barbata, but it was not previously possible to stabilize this resistance in hexaploid species. By using mutagenic treatments attempts have been made to translocate smaller portions of the A. barbata chromosome carrying the resistance to the hexaploid cultivar Rodney. In conclusion, mutation breeding methods at present appear to have limited application in synthesizing new rust-resistant genotypes in oats. The search for already existing genetic resistance and its synthesis into multi-genic resistant lines appears to be the most effective way at present of resolving the rust problem in oats. (author)

  9. Historic Rust College: Fulfilling a Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Carl

    1989-01-01

    Describes Rust College, a Mississippi college dedicated to educating Blacks from economically and educationally impoverished backgrounds. Discusses the college's financial management, recent fund-raising efforts, building program, and academic programs. Examines the role of the predominantly Black college and Rust's mission to help students…

  10. Screening oat populations for rust resistant mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, R.I.H.; Martens, J.W.; Harder, D.E.; Brown, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 a two million M 2 plants were grown at Morden, Manitoba. Thirteen plants which were thought to have possible resistance to race CI0 of oat stem rust were harvested. After extensive seedling and adult plant rust tests the best of the selected plant progenies was crossed and backcrossed to Rodney 0, a stem rust susceptible oat. The resistance in this line M-72-6 was found to be controlled by a single gene. In 1973 another two million M 2 plants were examined for rust resistance at Morden and 38 were harvested. None of the M 2 plants selected in 1973 appeared to have any seedling or adult resistance when examined more thoroughly in the greenhouse and again in the field in 1974. In 1974 one million M 2 plants were examined for resistance and 73 selected. None appeared to have any resistance when tested further. The strain CI3034 which was good adult plant stem rust resistance associated with weak straw and a light green plant colour was treated with gamma radiation and EMS in 1973 and the M 2 grown in the C10 rust nursery at Morden in 1974. A considerable number of dark green plants were present in all treatments but unfortunately all were found to be stem rust susceptible. Thus it would appear to be difficult if not impossible to separate the rust resistance in CI3034 from the undesirable characters, weak straw and light green plant colour. (author)

  11. Determination of Radiographic Healing: An Assessment of Consistency Using RUST and Modified RUST in Metadiaphyseal Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litrenta, Jody; Tornetta, Paul; Mehta, Samir; Jones, Clifford; OʼToole, Robert V; Bhandari, Mohit; Kottmeier, Stephen; Ostrum, Robert; Egol, Kenneth; Ricci, William; Schemitsch, Emil; Horwitz, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    To determine the reliability of the Radiographic Union Scale for Tibia (RUST) score and a new modified RUST score in quantifying healing and to define a value for radiographic union in a large series of metadiaphyseal fractures treated with plates or intramedullary nails. Healing was evaluated using 2 methods: (1) evaluation of interrater agreement in a series of radiographs and (2) analysis of prospectively gathered data from 2 previous large multicenter trials to define thresholds for radiographic union. Part 1: 12 orthopedic trauma surgeons evaluated a series of radiographs of 27 distal femur fractures treated with either plate or retrograde nail fixation at various stages of healing in random order using a modified RUST score. For each radiographic set, the reviewer indicated if the fracture was radiographically healed. Part 2: The radiographic results of 2 multicenter randomized trials comparing plate versus nail fixation of 81 distal femur and 46 proximal tibia fractures were reviewed. Orthopaedic surgeons at 24 trauma centers scored radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively using the modified RUST score above. Additionally, investigators indicated if the fracture was healed or not healed. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals was determined for each cortex, the standard and modified RUST score, and the assignment of union for part 1 data. The RUST and modified RUST that defined "union" were determined for both parts of the study. ICC: The modified RUST score demonstrated slightly higher ICCs than the standard RUST (0.68 vs. 0.63). Nails had substantial agreement, whereas plates had moderate agreement using both modified and standard RUST (0.74 and 0.67 vs. 0.59 and 0.53). The average standard and modified RUST at union among all fractures was 8.5 and 11.4. Nails had higher standard and modified RUST scores than plates at union. The ICC for union was 0.53 (nails: 0.58; plates: 0.51), which indicates moderate

  12. Inheritance and bulked segregant analysis of leaf rust and stem rust resistance genes in eight durum wheat genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina (Pt) and stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) are important diseases of durum wheat. This study determined the inheritance and genomic locations of leaf rust resistance (Lr) genes to Pt-race BBBQJ and stem rust resistance (Sr) genes to Pg...

  13. The ‘Sticky Elastica’: delamination blisters beyond small deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Wagner, Till J. W.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the form of an elastic loop adhered to a rigid substrate: the \\'Sticky Elastica\\'. In contrast to previous studies of the shape of delamination \\'blisters\\', the theory developed accounts for deflections with large slope (i.e. geometrically nonlinear). Starting from the classical Euler Elastica we provide numerical results for the dimensions of such blisters for a variety of end-end confinements and develop asymptotic expressions that reproduce these results well, even up to the point of self-contact. Interestingly, we find that the width of such blisters does not grow monotonically with increased confinement. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by simple desktop experiments and suggest a new method for the measurement of the elastocapillary length for deformations that cannot be considered small. We discuss the implications of our results for applications such as flexible electronics. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Characterization of Blistering and Delamination in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biobaum, K. J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Blistering and delamination are the primary failure mechanisms during the processing of depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums. These hohlraums consist of a sputter-deposited DU layer sandwiched between two sputter-deposited layers of gold; a final thick gold layer is electrodeposited on the exterior. The hohlraum is deposited on a copper-coated aluminum mandrel; the Al and Cu are removed with chemical etching after the gold and DU layers are deposited. After the mandrel is removed, blistering and delamination are observed on the interiors of some hohlraums, particularly at the radius region. It is hypothesized that blisters are caused by pinholes in the copper and gold layers; etchant leaking through these holes reaches the DU layer and causes it to oxidize, resulting in a blister. Depending on the residual stress in the deposited layers, blistering can initiate larger-scale delamination at layer interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that inhomogeneities in the machined aluminum mandrel are replicated in the sputter-deposited copper layer. Furthermore, the Cu layer exhibits columnar growth with pinholes that likely allow etchant to come in contact with the gold layer. Any inhomogeneities or pinholes in this initial gold layer then become nucleation sites for blistering. Using a focused ion beam system to etch through the gold layer and extract a cross-sectional sample for transmission electron microscopy, amorphous, intermixed layers at the gold/DU interfaces are observed. Nanometer-sized bubbles in the sputtered and electrodeposited gold layers are also present. Characterization of the morphology and composition of the deposited layers is the first step in determining modifications to processing parameters, with the goal of attaining a significant improvement in hohlraum yield.

  15. Psychosocial impact of inherited and autoimmune blistering diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaranjali V. Jain, B Med Sci (Hons MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited and autoimmune blistering diseases are rare, chronic, and often severe disorders that have the potential to significantly affect patients’ quality of life. The effective management of these conditions requires consideration of the physical, emotional, and social aspects of the disease. Self-esteem is integral to patients’ ability to cope with their illness, participate in treatment, and function in society. This article discusses quality-of-life studies of patients with blistering diseases with a particular focus on self-esteem issues that patients may face.

  16. Exposure to a First World War blistering agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, H Q; Knudsen, S J

    2006-04-01

    Sulfur mustards act as vesicants and alkylating agents. They have been used as chemical warfare since 1917 during the first world war. This brief report illustrates the progression of injury on a primary exposed patient to a first world war blistering agent. This case documents the rapid timeline and progression of symptoms. It emphasises the importance of appropriate personal protective equipment and immediate medical response plan with rapid decontamination and proper action from military and civilian medical treatment facilities. This case reports the first US active duty military exposure to a blistering agent in the age of global terrorism.

  17. Induced resistance to rust disease in lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Amitava; Singh, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable yield reduction in lentil is due to rust caused by Uromyces fabae. So far the sources of resistance to rust are available in the small seeded background. There is a need to develop rust resistant/tolerant bold seeded cultivars. Mutations were induced by gamma rays (10 and 15 kR) for incorporating resistance to rust in K-75(Mallika), a high yielding bold seeded, but rust susceptible cultivar at Pantnagar which is the hot spot for this disease. Dry seeds (300) were irradiated for each treatment. In M 1 generation, individual plants from each treatment were selfed and harvested separately which constituted the M 2 generation. In M 2 individual plant progenies were scored following a rating scale of 1 (Free) to 9(highly susceptible). At 15 kR dose, 8 plants were resistant (score 3.0) and 14 plants were tolerant (score 5.0) to rust, while in control and 10 kR populations, all plants were susceptible or highly susceptible having score of 7 or 9, respectively. The M 2 plants segregated in ratio of 1 resistant: 3 susceptible. The progenies of resistant/tolerant M 2 plants were bred true in the M 3 generation suggesting that the resistance to rust is controlled by one recessive gene. (author)

  18. Structure of titanium-doped goethite rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Takenori; Ishikawa, Tatsuo; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the influence of titanium addition on the formation and structure of goethite (α-FeOOH) rust which is one of main corrosion products of weathering steel, the artificially synthesized α-FeOOH rusts were prepared by hydrolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe(III) containing Ti(IV) at different atomic ratios (Ti/Fe) in the range 0-0.1. The obtained rusts particles were observed by TEM. Characterization by XRD, N 2 absorption, Moessbauer spectroscopy was also done. TEM observation revealed that the α-FeOOH rust particle size increased with the increase of Ti/Fe, and that Ti-enriched poorly crystalline particles were formed around the rust particles. XRD confirmed that the crystallite size increased with the increase of Ti/Fe, while the XRD peaks decreased in intensity. Specific surface area obtained by N 2 absorption increased with the increase of Ti/Fe. It is deduced from the obtained results that the addition of Ti(IV) increases the crystallite size of α-FeOOH, and produces double domain particles consisting of the particle core and a porous poorly crystalline shell. It is thought that such unique rust structure produced by titanium addition contributes to the protective properties of rust layer of the weathering steel

  19. A case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    We experienced a case showing a blistering disorder in radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy for thymic cancer. Application of steroid to the lesion improved blisters. The literature on bullous eruption including radiation-induced bullous pemhigoid was critically reviewed. (author)

  20. Microbiological Quality of Blister Pack Tablets in Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A total of 66 items of 22 registered blister-packed tablet brands were purchased from community pharmacies in Amman. All the items were investigated for total bacterial count and the presence of specified microorganisms using compendial procedures. Results: Out of 66 items purchased, forty eight (72.7 ...

  1. Hydride blister formation simulation in Candu type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, D.; Bollini, C.; Sangregorio, D.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a computer code for the probability study of hydride blister formation in pressure tubes named BLIFO. The basic hypothesis of the model are: the pressure tube is divided into five areas according to the existence of four garter springs. For each area the probability of blister formation is the probability of the hydrogen content exceeding a critical threshold when contact tube is present; the probability of a blister in a tube is the OR combination of the probabilities of a blister in each area; the tube contact is a function of the garter springs location, and the time; the critical hydrogen threshold is sorted over the areas within the pressure tube; hydrogen pick-up rate was sorted with a Gaussian distribution; the initial hydrogen content values for each tube were measured before the ensamble and they are used in the code. For Embalse evaluation, we build up a subroutine that simulate Gaussian distribution using the parameters of a typical nuclear power Candu reactor garter spring distribution. (author)

  2. Helium-induced blistering and volume swelling in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of He-induced blistering are presented. The mechanisms involved in blistering were examined by observing the microstructure of the implanted region using TEM. The volume swelling was measured as a function of the implant depth. The investigation revealed factors important in understanding the mechanisms involved in blister formation. First, a direct comparison of measured skin-thicknesses with the location of the maximum volume swelling demonstrated that the skin separates at the peak swelling depth, not at the end of the swelling profile. Second, an examination of the assumptions that have been used to predict skin-thicknesses revealed that the differences between predicted and measured skin thicknesses at low energies can be attributed to: failure to account for volume swelling in the skin, using a Gaussian approximation to the range profile, or one generated with a Monte-Carlo code, and uncertainties in the electronic stopping powers. Beyond a certain dose, the density of cavities in the peak-swelling region decreased with increasing dose; indicating that cavity coalescence does occur. A calculation of the He concentration required to fracture the load-bearing cross section between the cavities revealed that a sufficient quantity of He was available to generate the required gas pressures. These observations indicate that models based on coalescence followed by gas-driven deformation provide an accurate description of the mechanisms involved in blistering; and they can accurately predict skin thicknesses at low energies

  3. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicholas Le Maitre

    Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of ... Key words: Prevalence, microsatellite, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), phylogeny, Puccinia. INTRODUCTION. Puccinia triticina Eriks ..... Genetic distances and reconstruction phylogenetic trees from microsatellite DNA.

  4. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  5. Inheritance and Bulked Segregant Analysis of Leaf Rust and Stem Rust Resistance in Durum Wheat Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Meriem; Kolmer, James A; Rouse, Matthew N; Chao, Shiaoman; Bulbula, Worku Denbel; Elias, Elias M; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2017-12-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina, and stem rust, caused by P. graminis f. sp. tritici, are important diseases of durum wheat. This study determined the inheritance and genomic locations of leaf rust resistance (Lr) genes to P. triticina race BBBQJ and stem rust resistance (Sr) genes to P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK in durum accessions. Eight leaf-rust-resistant genotypes were used to develop biparental populations. Accessions PI 192051 and PI 534304 were also resistant to P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. The resulting progenies were phenotyped for leaf rust and stem rust response at seedling stage. The Lr and Sr genes were mapped in five populations using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and bulked segregant analysis. Five leaf-rust-resistant genotypes carried single dominant Lr genes whereas, in the remaining accessions, there was deviation from the expected segregation ratio of a single dominant Lr gene. Seven genotypes carried Lr genes different from those previously characterized in durum. The single dominant Lr genes in PI 209274, PI 244061, PI387263, and PI 313096 were mapped to chromosome arms 6BS, 2BS, 6BL, and 6BS, respectively. The Sr gene in PI 534304 mapped to 6AL and is most likely Sr13, while the Sr gene in PI 192051 could be uncharacterized in durum.

  6. Radiation blistering in Inconel-625 due to 100 KeV helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitton, J.L.; Rao, A.S.; Kaminsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the change of angle of incidence of an ion beam impinging on surface blisters during their growth phase (before exfoliation) could influence the blister skin thickness and the blister crater depth. Polished, polycrystalline Inconel-625 samples were irradiated at room temperature and at normal incidence to the major sample surface with 100 keV helium ions to a total dose of 6.24x10 18 ions/cm 2 . The results revealed that many exfoliated blisters leave craters which have two or three concentric pits. The blister skin thickness near the center of the blister was found to agree well with the calculated projected range of 100 keV He ions in nickel. However, the blister skin thickness of some exfoliated blisters along the edge of the fracture surface showed different thicknesses. A model is proposed to explain the observed blister crater/blister fracture features in terms of a change of angle of incidence of the incident ions to the surface during the growth phase of surface blisters. (orig.)

  7. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated .... infector rows and experimental material with the mixture of uredinospores of Pst ...

  8. Return of the giants: Restoring white pine ecosystems by breeding and aggressive planting of blister rust-resistant white pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren Fins; James Byler; Dennis Ferguson; Al Harvey; Mary Francis Mahalovich; Geral I. McDonald; Dan Miller; John Schwandt; Art Zack

    2001-01-01

    In 1883, when the Northern Pacific Railroad made its way through northern Idaho, western white pines dominated the moist, mid-elevation, mixed-species forests of the Inland Northwest between 2,000 and 6,000 feet. These majestic trees often lived to 350 years but could reach the ripe old ages of 400 and even 500 years. They were an integral part of the most productive...

  9. Demographic projection of high-elevation white pines infected with white pine blister rust: a nonlinear disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. G. Field; A. W. Schoettle; J. G. Klutsch; S. J. Tavener; M. F. Antolin

    2012-01-01

    Matrix population models have long been used to examine and predict the fate of threatened populations. However, the majority of these efforts concentrate on long-term equilibrium dynamics of linear systems and their underlying assumptions and, therefore, omit the analysis of transience. Since management decisions are typically concerned with the short term (

  10. First report of the white pine blister rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola, infecting Ribes inerme in north-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Vogler; B. W. Geils; K. Coats

    2017-01-01

    Cronartium ribicola Fisch. has not been found infecting any of the five-needle white pines (Pinus subgenus Strobus) in Utah, despite being established on both white pine and Ribes hosts in the other 10 western states, defined as those west of the 102° meridian.

  11. Influence of external action and structural factors on radiation blistering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Chernov, I.I.; Fomina, E.P.; Korshunov, S.H.; Polsky, V.I.; Skorov, D.M.; Yakushin, V.L.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of experimental results is presented, pertaining to radiation blistering of a considerable number of materials (stainless steels, alloys with high nickel content, alloys of refractory metals) under helium ion irradiation with energies of 20-100 keV under conditions corresponding to the plasma-wall interaction: bombardment at various angles of incidence and cyclic irradiation in a wide spectrum of ion incidence angles; influence of external action, including thermocyclic; influence of preceding neutron and proton irradiation. It has been shown that external factors have a complex influence on blister parameters and erosion coefficients of materials. A study has been carried out on the influence of aluminium coatings, alloying additions, phase state of material and microstructure on the nature and degree of surface erosion. Complex influence of element and phase composition, as well as microstructural changes during heat treatment and welding on radiation erosion have been established. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic pitfalls in newborns and babies with blisters and erosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nischler, Elke; Klausegger, Alfred; Hüttner, Clemens; Pohla-Gubo, Gabriele; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W; Hintner, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Establishing the correct diagnosis in newborns presenting with blisters and erosions is not always a straightforward process. Many different disease entities including acquired (i.e., infectious, immunobullous, traumatic) and inherited disorders have to be taken into consideration. Similarities in clinical appearance, colonization and/or superinfections of preexisting skin lesions, as well as the absence of late changes in the neonate often pose significant diagnostic challenges. In this paper we discuss by giving examples the process of making an accurate diagnosis of blistering skin diseases in the neonatal period on the basis of a diagnostic algorithm. In addition, we provide an overview of the rational use and the limitations of laboratory procedures such as microbial testing, routine light microscopy, immunofluorescence antigen mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and molecular genetic analysis.

  13. Diagnostic Pitfalls in Newborns and Babies with Blisters and Erosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Nischler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the correct diagnosis in newborns presenting with blisters and erosions is not always a straightforward process. Many different disease entities including acquired (i.e., infectious, immunobullous, traumatic and inherited disorders have to be taken into consideration. Similarities in clinical appearance, colonization and/or superinfections of preexisting skin lesions, as well as the absence of late changes in the neonate often pose significant diagnostic challenges. In this paper we discuss by giving examples the process of making an accurate diagnosis of blistering skin diseases in the neonatal period on the basis of a diagnostic algorithm. In addition, we provide an overview of the rational use and the limitations of laboratory procedures such as microbial testing, routine light microscopy, immunofluorescence antigen mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and molecular genetic analysis.

  14. Coulomb explosion sputtering, crater and blister formation by HCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parilis, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    A simple theoretical model based on gradual Auger neutralization of a highly charged ion as it approaches the surface, with consequent positive charge deposition in surface layers and their expansion due to Coulomb repulsion provides the means to make some estimates that could explain the creation of very shallow blisters and craters on surface, as well as sputtering of up to 10 3 atoms in a single ion impact. Calculation of the dependence of blister size on projectile charge, based on charge evolution, gives some results fitting the experimental data. The model deals not just with the conducting properties of the solid, but with its structure as well, for instance the layered structure of mica. While the general source of energy remains the same, the particular mechanism of its realization depends largely on the composition, structure and electronic properties of the solid. The composition of the ejecta is discussed within the framework of the shock wave approach. (orig.)

  15. Simulation of hydrogen migration and blisters formation in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, R.O.

    1991-06-01

    The phenomenon of hydrogen migration and hydride blister growth after pressure tube/calandria tube contact in CANDU reactors is addressed. This phenomenon is by now regarded as an important factor limiting reactors lifetime, since it originated Pickering incident in 1983. Numerical results of thermally-assisted diffusion in excellent agreement with quasi-analytical solutions of the mathematical model were obtained. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of these results. Some two-dimensional calculations are also included to demonstrate the capabilities of the numerical methods. The main outcomes of the work are the following: a through understanding of the mathematics and physics involved in hydrogen migration under thermal gradients. The validation of a numerical procedure based on a regularization of the constitutive equations. Blister growth rates in slab geometries for initial concentrations that span the full range of technological interest. Some preliminary two-dimensional results allow the design of future developments. (Author) [es

  16. Inheritance of resistance to orange rust in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange rust, caused by Puccinia kuehnii, is an economically important disease in the Florida sugarcane industry. In this study, orange rust reactions of seedlings in progenies originating from 12 crosses between female and male parents with differing resistance to orange rust (three of each categor...

  17. development of wheat germplasm for stem rust resistance in eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) rust outbreak is the primary production constraint in Eastern Africa. Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda are hot spots for the epidemic of rusts, due to higher rates of evolution of new pathogen races, especially of the virulent stem rust (Puccinia graminis) race, Ug99. The objective of this study was to ...

  18. Development of wheat germplasm for stem rust resistance in eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) rust outbreak is the primary production constraint in Eastern Africa. Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda are hot spots for the epidemic of rusts, due to higher rates of evolution of new pathogen races, especially of the virulent stem rust (Puccinia graminis) race, Ug99. The objective of this study was to ...

  19. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts | Le Maitre | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellite markers were used to differentiate P. triticina and P. striiformis pathotypes. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to differentiate stem rust P. graminis pathotypes. Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of leaf, stem and yellow rust were collected ...

  20. Yellow Rust Resistance in Advanced Lines and Commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to characterize seedling yellow rust resistance in 21 advanced bread wheat lines and 20 cultivars from Ethiopia. Yellow rust infection types (ITs) produced on test wheat lines and cultivars from nine yellow rust races were compared with ITs produced on standard differential lines that differed ...

  1. LEAF WHORL INOCULATION METHOD FOR SCREENING SUGARCANE RUST RESISTANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: Sugarcane rust diseases, brown rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala, and orange rust caused by P. kuehnii, are agronomically important diseases in Florida. Cultivar resistance is the best means of controlling these diseases. Natural infection has been the primary means of asses...

  2. Development of RAPD based markers for wheat rust resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rust diseases are the major cause of low yield of wheat in Pakistan. Wheat breeders all over the world as well as in Pakistan are deriving rust resistance genes from alien species like Triticum ventricosum and introducing them in common wheat (Triticum aestivum). One such example is the introgression of rust resistance ...

  3. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts | Le Maitre | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Puccinia triticina, Puccinia graminis and Puccinia striiformis cause leaf, stem and yellow rust, respectively. Wheat rusts can cause losses as high as 70%. The rusts ability to evolve fungicide resistance has resulted in the use of resistant cultivars as the primary method of control. Breeding resistant cultivars is a long process ...

  4. Contact Burn with Blister Formation in Children Treated with Sennosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogley, Kimberly; Echevarria, Andrea; Correa, Catalina; De la Torre-Mondragón, Luis

    2017-03-01

    Eight children treated for severe constipation with sennosides unexpectedly developed contact burns with blisters secondary to the use of these laxatives. All patients wore diapers, and the injuries occurred overnight. To avoid this side effect, we recommend that patients treated with sennosides, especially those in diapers, receive the medication at a time that allows for bowel movements to occur during the day and not overnight. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Diagnostic Pitfalls in Newborns and Babies with Blisters and Erosions

    OpenAIRE

    Elke Nischler; Alfred Klausegger; Clemens Hüttner; Gabriele Pohla-Gubo; Anja Diem; Johann W. Bauer; Helmut Hintner

    2009-01-01

    Establishing the correct diagnosis in newborns presenting with blisters and erosions is not always a straightforward process. Many different disease entities including acquired (i.e., infectious, immunobullous, traumatic) and inherited disorders have to be taken into consideration. Similarities in clinical appearance, colonization and/or superinfections of preexisting skin lesions, as well as the absence of late changes in the neonate often pose significant diagnostic challenges. In this pape...

  6. The effect of autoimmune blistering diseases on work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E Q; Radjenovic, M; Castrillón, M A; Feng, G H Y; Murrell, D F

    2018-05-06

    Autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) are known to negatively impact upon quality of life (QoL); however, there is a paucity of research on the effect of AIBD on work productivity. AIBD can be quite disfiguring in terms of a patient's appearance due to their blistering nature. To determine the impact of AIBD on work productivity and to determine whether patients are stigmatized at work due to their appearance. Sixty-one patients with AIBD completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-Specific Health Problem (WPAIQ-SHP), the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and the Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaires (TABQOL). Non-responders to treatment had more work and activity impairment compared to responders. Worse WPAIQ-SHP scores were correlated with higher ABQOL, TABQOL and DLQI scores. Approximately 14.8% of subjects experienced stigmatization at work due to their appearance. The most common body areas stigmatized were easily visible sites, particularly the hands, arms and feet, with the majority of occurrences related to co-workers; for some patients, this stigmatization occurred on a daily basis. Loss of productivity at work was statistically much higher in those with higher disease severity, ABQOL & TABQOL scores and in non-responders to treatment. Autoimmune blistering diseases negatively impacts upon work productivity and activity. Stigmatization was common in the workplace which leads to increased stress, itself a stimulator of pemphigus. © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Studies of radiation blistering effects on voltage holding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    The surfaces of niobium and tungsten wires were blistered by 300-keV helium-ion irradiation and then tested for voltage holding. A cylindrical projection-tube technique was employed so that regions of strong electron emission could be observed and later examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Blistering was found to cause significant increases in pre-breakdown currents. However, these currents tend to saturate over a region corresponding to around 200-400 kV/cm surface field such that the ultimate voltage breakdown limit is not seriously reduced. Emission image observations and SEM photographs suggest that, in many cases, parts of the blistered surface are gradually erected by the strong surface fields, but this may not occur until after several arc breakdowns. SEM photographs also indicate that vapor from the anode may play an important part in the breakdown mechanism. Implications of these results to the design of devices important to fusion development, such as direct collectors and ion sources, are briefly discussed. The importance of future in situ irradiation-voltage experiments is also stressed. (U.S.)

  8. The Big Rust and the Red Queen: Long-Term Perspectives on Coffee Rust Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCook, Stuart; Vandermeer, John

    2015-09-01

    Since 2008, there has been a cluster of outbreaks of the coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix) across the coffee-growing regions of the Americas, which have been collectively described as the Big Rust. These outbreaks have caused significant hardship to coffee producers and laborers. This essay situates the Big Rust in a broader historical context. Over the past two centuries, coffee farmers have had to deal with the "curse of the Red Queen"-the need to constantly innovate in the face of an increasing range of threats, which includes the rust. Over the 20th century, particularly after World War II, national governments and international organizations developed a network of national, regional, and international coffee research institutions. These public institutions played a vital role in helping coffee farmers manage the rust. Coffee farmers have pursued four major strategies for managing the rust: bioprospecting for resistant coffee plants, breeding resistant coffee plants, chemical control, and agroecological control. Currently, the main challenge for researchers is to develop rust control strategies that are both ecologically and economically viable for coffee farmers, in the context of a volatile, deregulated coffee industry and the emergent challenges of climate change.

  9. Stripe rust and leaf rust resistance QTL mapping, epistatic interactions, and co-localization with stem rust resistance loci in spring wheat evaluated over three continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A; Knox, R E; DePauw, R M; Singh, A K; Cuthbert, R D; Campbell, H L; Shorter, S; Bhavani, S

    2014-11-01

    In wheat, advantageous gene-rich or pleiotropic regions for stripe, leaf, and stem rust and epistatic interactions between rust resistance loci should be accounted for in plant breeding strategies. Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.) and stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks) contribute to major production losses in many regions worldwide. The objectives of this research were to identify and study epistatic interactions of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stripe and leaf rust resistance in a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from the cross of Canadian wheat cultivars, AC Cadillac and Carberry. The relationship of leaf and stripe rust resistance QTL that co-located with stem rust resistance QTL previously mapped in this population was also investigated. The Carberry/AC Cadillac population was genotyped with DArT(®) and simple sequence repeat markers. The parents and population were phenotyped for stripe rust severity and infection response in field rust nurseries in Kenya (Njoro), Canada (Swift Current), and New Zealand (Lincoln); and for leaf rust severity and infection response in field nurseries in Canada (Swift Current) and New Zealand (Lincoln). AC Cadillac was a source of stripe rust resistance QTL on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 5B, and 7B; and Carberry was a source of resistance on chromosomes 2B, 4B, and 7A. AC Cadillac contributed QTL for resistance to leaf rust on chromosome 2A and Carberry contributed QTL on chromosomes 2B and 4B. Stripe rust resistance QTL co-localized with previously reported stem rust resistance QTL on 2B, 3B, and 7B, while leaf rust resistance QTL co-localized with 4B stem rust resistance QTL. Several epistatic interactions were identified both for stripe and leaf rust resistance QTL. We have identified useful combinations of genetic loci with main and epistatic effects. Multiple disease resistance regions identified on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, and 7B are prime candidates for further investigation and

  10. An investigation of two-level fracture in the blistering of D+ irradiated Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.B.; Jones, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The blisters produced by 200 keV D + irradiation of Cu at 120 K and subsequent heating to room temperature are found to be of two distinct types: small semi-spherical blisters and large blister flakes. A simple method has been developed to remove blister flakes enabling direct observation of the exposed underside of the flakes by scanning electron microscopy. The small semi-spherical blisters, which form before the more extensive blister flakes, have a consistently deeper plane of fracture than the flakes. To explain the different depths of fracture two alternative models are proposed. Compressional stress may inhibit bubble nucleation and early growth near the depth region around the maxima in the damage and gas deposition profiles. It is proposed that in the later stages of the irradiation shear introduced by differential expansion, caused by a combination of radiation induced swelling and localised heating plays a central role in fracture. (orig./RK)

  11. Identification of Green Rust in Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bo C.; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Dideriksen, Knud

    2009-01-01

    to air. In this paper, we present a sampling method for capturing green rust so it is not oxidized. We then we used the method to identify the compound in a groundwater sample taken below the water table from fractures in granite. X-ray diffraction patterns were weak, but clearly identical to those......Green rust, a family of Fe(II),Fe(III) layered double hydroxides, is believed to be present in environments close to the Fe(II)/Fe(III) transition zone. Attempts to identify members of this family in nature have proven difficult because the material is oxidized after only a few minutes exposure...

  12. Determining the feasibility of objective adherence measurement with blister packaging smart technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Onzenoort, Hein A; Neef, Cees; Verberk, Willem W; van Iperen, H Peter; de Leeuw, Peter W; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M

    2012-05-15

    The results of a feasibility study of blister-pack smart technology for monitoring medication adherence are reported. Research in the area of objective therapy compliance measurement has led to the development of microprocessor-driven systems that record the time a unit dose is removed from blister packaging. One device under development is the Smart Blister-a label imprinted with event-detection circuitry that can be affixed to standard commercial blister cards. In the first trial of the device in actual clinical practice, 115 community-dwelling Dutch patients receiving valsartan maintenance therapy (160 mg once daily) were given 14-day blister packages equipped with the Smart Blister. On the return of empty blister cards to the 20 participating community pharmacies, the stored information was scanned and downloaded for data analysis and patient counseling purposes. A total of 245 Smart Blister-equipped packages were used by valsartan recipients during the eight-month study. The device was largely effective in recording patient and blister-card identification data and other desired information. However, in 17% of cases, the Smart Blister system registered multiple tablet-removal events at the same time, presumably indicating unintentional breakage of nearby conductive circuits and the need for design refinements. The Smart Blister-equipped medication cards were generally well received by patients and pharmacies. An evaluation of the functionality and robustness of the Smart Blister in a real-world clinical practice situation yielded some promising results, but the findings also indicated a need for design refinements and additional performance testing of the device.

  13. 75 FR 44881 - Black Stem Rust; Additions of Rust-Resistant Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... direct final rule notified the public of our intention to amend the black stem rust quarantine and...

  14. 76 FR 3011 - Black Stem Rust; Additions of Rust-Resistant Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... notified the public of our intention to amend the black stem rust quarantine and regulations by adding four...

  15. Accumulation and release of implanted hydrogen from blisters in Si during the thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, P.A.; Baranova, E.K.; Baranova, I.V.; Budaragin, V.V.; Litvinov, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    The processes of accumulation of ion implanted hydrogen in blisters in silicon and its release during the thermal treatment at 350-1020 deg C have been studied by optical techniques. It is established that accumulation of gaseous hydrogen inside blisters takes place at temperatures lower than ∼ 450-500 deg C and is accompanied by the growth of blisters thickness and deformation of their caps. At higher temperatures hydrogen leaves cavities and dissolves in silicon. Due to internal pressure dropping the elasticity deformed top layer partially relaxes, and the blister thickness decreases. Etching of the surface layer reveals the agglomerations of small voids ( [ru

  16. Multi-scale characterization of surface blistering morphology of helium irradiated W thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.J.; Zhu, H.L.; Wan, Q.; Peng, M.J.; Ran, G.; Tang, J.; Yang, Y.Y.; Liao, J.L.; Liu, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-scale blistering morphology of He irradiated W film was studied. • This complex morphology was first characterized by wavelet transform approach. - Abstract: Surface blistering morphologies of W thin films irradiated by 30 keV He ion beam were studied quantitatively. It was found that the blistering morphology strongly depends on He fluence. For lower He fluence, the accumulation and growth of He bubbles induce the intrinsic surface blisters with mono-modal size distribution feature. When the He fluence is higher, the film surface morphology exhibits a multi-scale property, including two kinds of surface blisters with different characteristic sizes. In addition to the intrinsic He blisters, film/substrate interface delamination also induces large-sized surface blisters. A strategy based on wavelet transform approach was proposed to distinguish and extract the multi-scale surface blistering morphologies. Then the density, the lateral size and the height of these different blisters were estimated quantitatively, and the effect of He fluence on these geometrical parameters was investigated. Our method could provide a potential tool to describe the irradiation induced surface damage morphology with a multi-scale property

  17. Rust dissolution and removal by iron-reducing bacteria: A potential rehabilitation of rusted equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosvetsky, J.; Kamari, R.; Farber, Y.; Bilanović, D.; Armon, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The present study demonstrated the high reductive capacity of both strains: the collection S. oneidensis and the wild strain Geobacter spp. (soil isolate). • The experimental strains were successful in Fe 3+ reduction for both states: soluble and crystalline (originally prepared from rust). • Rust dissolution can be improved by: addition of AFC at low concentration (0.2 g/l), increasing bacterial initial inoculum and rust reactive surface. • Both experimental IRB strains were able to completely remove previously formed rust on carbon steel coupons. • Additional results (not showed) revealed that culture S. oneidensis and the environmental isolate Geobacter spp., apparently have a different mechanism of iron reduction that requires further study. - Abstract: Iron reducing bacteria (IRB), to be used in rust dissolution and removal, have been isolated and enriched from different environmental sources. Comparative measurements revealed that a soil isolate (Geobacter sulfurreducens sp.) had the highest reductive activity equivalent to Shewanella oneidensis (strain CIP 106686, pure culture). Both reductive microorganisms can use Fe 3+ ions as electron acceptors from soluble as well as from crystalline sources. In nutrient medium containing soluble Fe 3+ , the highest reductive activity obtained for G. sulfurreducens sp. and S. oneidensis was 93 and 97% respectively. Successful removal of rust from carbon steel coupons has been achieved with both experimental bacteria.

  18. Zoete rust : Een muzikale soap-detective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, P.

    1989-01-01

    De komedie' Zoete Rust' werd geschreven in opdracht van Theater de Tobbe in Voorburg . Naast de circa 120 professionele voorstellingen die elk seizoen in dit theater plaats vinden, organiseert De Tobbe een maal per laar een eigen theaterproduktie, die wordt gespeeld door het Tobbe-toneel, een ad-hoc

  19. Induced mutations for soybean rust resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, S.; Wongpiyasatid, A.; Lamseejan, S.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean mutation experiments for inducing rust resistance in the cultivars G 8375, Wakashima mutant number 10, Taichung N, S.J.2, S.J.4, BM 50, BM 98, G 8377, G 8586 and G 8587 have been carried out since 1979. Six pods from each of 4438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked (M 2 bulk). In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly (M 2 single). M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both, M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants, together with the remaining M 2 -bulk seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980 in Nong Hoi Valley (altitude about 1000 m above sea level) and at Mae Joe Station, both in Chiang Mai Province (latitude 18 deg. 31'-19 deg. N). Based on the IWGSR rating system, soybean plants with slow growth of rust were selected from both locations. The results were as follows: Six plants were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Further evaluation of these selections for rust resistance will be carried out in the rainy season of 1981 in Nong Hoi Valley, Chiang Mai. (author)

  20. Determination of rust resistance genes in pakistani bread wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.; Ahmad, S.D.; Rabbani, M.A.; Shinwari, Z.K.

    2014-01-01

    Stripe and leaf rusts are the major constraints to bread wheat production in Pakistan. Molecular markers were used to investigate the presence of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance gene cluster Lr34/Yr18 and stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in 52 Pakistani bread wheat cultivars/lines. PCR amplification of DNA fragments using DNA marker csLV-34 showed that 13 of the studied cultivars/lines, namely 03FJ26, NR 337, NR 339, NR 347, NR 350, Manthar, Margalla 99, Iqbal 2000, Saleem 2000, Wafaq 2001, Marwat 2001, Pirsabak 2004 and Fareed 2006 carry leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes Lr34/Yr18. Stem rust resistance gene Sr2 was observed in 36 Pakistani spring wheat cultivars/lines using stm560.3tgag marker. The slow rusting gene Sr2 needs to be combined with additional stem rust resistance genes to establish durable resistance against Ug99 in modern wheat cultivars. Low frequency of Lr34/Yr18 was found in Pakistani wheats. This gene cluster needs to be incorporated into Pakistani wheats for durable rust resistance. (author)

  1. Characterization of skin blister fluids from children with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Taizo; Toma, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Hanae; Koizumi, Eiko; Shirahashi, Tetsujiro; Matsuda, Yusuke; Yachie, Akihiro

    2018-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T- or natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by chronic proliferation of EBV-infected lymphocytes. Patients may present with severe skin manifestations, including hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) and hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like eruption, which are characterized by blister formation and necrotic ulceration. Skin biopsy specimens show inflammatory reactions comprising EBV-infected lymphocytes. However, blister fluids have not been fully assessed in patients with this disease. Blister fluids were collected from three patients with EBV-associated LPD: two with HMB and one with HV. Immunophenotyping of blister lymphocytes and measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in blister fluids were performed. The patients with HMB and HV exhibited markedly increased percentages of NK and γδ T cells, respectively, in both peripheral blood and blister fluids. These NK and γδ T cells strongly expressed the activation marker human leukocyte antigen-DR and were considered to be cellular targets of EBV infections. TNF-α was highly elevated in all blister fluids. Severe local skin reactions of EBV-associated LPD may be associated with infiltrating EBV-infected lymphocytes and a high TNF-α concentration in blister fluids. © 2018 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  2. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellouin-De-Menibus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author) [fr

  3. Simulation Analysis of the Mutual Influence of the Stress Intensity Factor on the Multiple Blisters Caused by Hydrogen Induced Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Congwei; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen blisters are taken as the research object by using the finite element software ABAQUS. The stress intensity factors of blister cracks are numerically calculated at varying depths and different edge distances for established three-dimensional finite element models of single-blister and double-blisters, respectively. The mutual influence of the stress intensity factors of the multiple blisters is obtained. It shows that the blister crack is easier to expand when the crack is closer to inner wall of the cylinder. What’s more, the crack growth rate increases firstly and then decreases as the increasing of the distance between two blisters cracks. The investigated result is of great reference value for predicting the trend of blister crack growth.

  4. Friction Blisters on the Hands Treated Successfully Using 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearhart, Peter A; Gaspar, Michael P; Jacoby, Sidney M

    Friction blisters on the hand are challenging to treat as conventional dressings are prone to saturation, contamination, and loosening with active hand use and other mechanical stresses. Alternative methods and materials for dressing hand blisters warrant exploration. A 48-year-old male surgeon presented with friction blisters over his bilateral thumbs. The patient complained of significant difficulty in keeping his dressings clean and dry, significant pain with hand hygiene, and functional limitations at work. The patient's blisters were dressed with 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon US LLC, Somerville, New Jersey), applied directly onto the wound bed. The patient was able to perform his normal duties immediately, without the need for additional intervention. Six days postapplication, the Dermabond sloughed off, revealing an epithelialized surface. Dermabond is a promising agent for dressing unroofed blisters of the hand, as it provides a barrier to moisture and contamination, while allowing the wound to epithelialize, without functional cost.

  5. Temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless steel exposed to curium-242 alpha radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.; Dillich, S.

    1981-01-01

    Implantation of helium in materials exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 242 Cm causes surface blistering at elevated temperatures. The temperature thresholds for such blistering are of practical importance to the selection of suitable container materials for radionuclides, and are of fundamental interest with regard to the mechanisms of helium blistering of materials in radiation environments. The purpose of this investigation was to establish temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless-steel container materials by post-irradiation heating of specimens exposed at room temperature to alpha particles from an external 242 Cm source. These thresholds were compared with (1) the analogous temperature thresholds for surface blistering of materials exposed to external beams of accelerator helium ions, and (2) thresholds for swelling and grain-boundary cracking of materials in which helium is generated internally by (n,α) reactions during reactor exposures

  6. Hydrogen blister formation on cold-worked tungsten with layered structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Dai; Sugimoto, Takanori; Takamura, Shuichi; Ye, Minyou; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2005-01-01

    Low-energy ( 10 21 m -2 s -1 ) hydrogen plasma exposures were performed on cold-worked powder metallurgy tungsten (PM-W), recrystallized cold-worked PM-W and hot-worked PM-W. Large blisters with a diameter of approximately 100-200 μm were observed only on the surface of cold-worked PM-W. The blister formation mechanism has not been clarified thus far. PM-W has a consisting of 1-μm-thick layers, which is formed by press-roll processing. A detailed observation of the cross section of those blisters shows for the first time that the blisters are formed by cleaving the upper layer along the stratified layer. These experimental results indicate that the manufacturing process of tungsten material is one of the key factors for blister formation on the tungsten surface. (author)

  7. Climate change impacts on coffee rust disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Koga-Vicente, A.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Coltri, P. P.; Zullo, J., Jr.; Patricio, F. R.; Avila, A. M. H. D.; Gonçalves, R. R. D. V.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in climate conditions and in extreme weather events may affect the food security due to impacts in agricultural production. Despite several researches have been assessed the impacts of extremes in yield crops in climate change scenarios, there is the need to consider the effects in pests and diseases which increase losses in the sector. Coffee Arabica is an important commodity in world and plays a key role in Brazilian agricultural exports. Although the coffee crop has a world highlight, its yield is affected by several factors abiotic or biotic. The weather as well pests and diseases directly influence the development and coffee crop yield. These problems may cause serious damage with significant economic impacts. The coffee rust, caused by the fungus Hemileia vastarix,is among the diseases of greatest impact for the crop. The disease emerged in Brazil in the 70s and is widely spread in all producing regions of coffee in Brazil, and in the world. Regions with favorable weather conditions for the pathogen may exhibit losses ranging from 30% to 50% of the total grain production. The evaluation of extreme weather events of coffee rust disease in futures scenarios was carried out using the climatic data from CMIP5 models, data field of coffee rust disease incidence and, incubation period simulation data for Brazilian municipalities. Two Regional Climate Models were selected, Eta-HadGEM2-ES and Eta-MIROC5, and the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 w/m2 was adopted. The outcomes pointed out that in these scenarios the period of incubation tends to decrease affecting the coffee rust disease incidence, which tends to increase. Nevertheless, the changing in average trends tends to benefit the reproduction of the pathogen. Once the temperature threshold for the disease reaches the adverse conditions it may be unfavorable for the incidence.

  8. Waste management regroups units into Rust International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-01-01

    Three Waste Management (Oak Brook, IL) subsidiaries have proposed merging units from Chemical Waste Management (CWM) and Wheelabrator Technologies with the Brand Companies (Park Ridge, IL). Waste Management says the new company, to be called Rust International, will become one of the US's largest environmental consulting and infrastructure organizations and will include design and construction services. Waste Management expects the merged company's 1993 revenues to reach $1.8 billion. It will be based in Birmingham, AL and have 12,000 employees

  9. Tolerance of Loblolly Pines to Fusiform Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Walkinshaw; James P. Barnett

    1995-01-01

    Loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) that were 8 to 17 yr old tolerated one to three fusiform rust (Cronartium quercuum [Berk.] Miyabe ex Shirai f. sp. fusiforme) galls in their stems.Families with four or more galls in their stems lost 2.5% or more of the trees by age 17.In living trees with less than four stem galls, diameter growth was comparable to...

  10. Essential Oils for Alternative Teak Rust Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Raymundo Argüelles Osorio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of lemon grass, citronella grass, Mexican-tea and noni essential oils on urediniospore germination of Olivea neotectonae , the agent responsible for rust in Teak (Tectona grandis L.f.; to evaluate the phytotoxic effect of these essential oils on teak seedlings; and to evaluate the use of essential oils to control rust in teak plants when preventively and curatively applied. We found that the noni and lemon grass essential oils inhibited 100% of urediniospore germination. On the other hand, the essential oils from noni and lemon grass caused phytotoxicity when applied to seedlings at concentrations of 2000 and 1500 μL L-1, respectively. The major constituents found in lemon grass essential oil were Geranial and Neral, while Octanoic Acid was found in noni oil. Lower values in the area below the rust progress curve were observed with the preventive application of lemon grass and noni essential oils.

  11. Effect of solute elements in Ni alloys on blistering under He + and D + ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, E.; Ezawa, T.; Takenaka, T.; Imamura, J.; Tanabe, T.; Oshima, R.

    2007-08-01

    Effects of solute atoms on microstructural evolution and blister formation have been investigated using Ni alloys under 25 keV He + and 20 keV D + irradiation at 500 °C to a dose of about 4 × 10 21 ions/m 2. The specimens used were pure Ni, Ni-Si, Ni-Co, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn and Ni-Pd alloys. The volume size factors of solute elements for the Ni alloys range from -5.8% to +63.6%. The formations of blisters were observed in the helium-irradiated specimens, but not in the deuteron-irradiated specimens. The areal number densities of blisters increased with volume size difference of solute atoms. The dependence of volume size on the areal number densities of blisters was very similar to that of the number densities of bubbles on solute atoms. The size of the blisters inversely decreased with increasing size of solute atoms. The formation of blisters was intimately related to the bubble growth, and the gas pressure model for the formation of blisters was supported by this study.

  12. On the blister formation in copper alloys due to the helium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D.; Eliezer, D.

    1997-01-01

    Structural materials in fusion reactors will be exposed to alpha radiation and helium implantation over a broad range of energies. A new approach to the blister-formation phenomenon is discussed by means of the mathematical solution on a uniformly loaded circular plate with clamped edges (circular diaphragm). In the present investigation, it was found that blister formation depends on the mechanical properties of the alloys and the near-surface concentration of the implanted gas, which itself is contingent on the crystallographic orientation by means of the stopping power of the implanted atoms. The reported model is based on the fact that at certain depths from the surface, the pressure in the cavities approaches the yield stress of the metal and blistering starts. The thickness of this thin film depends on the mechanical properties of the specific metal. Once a blister cavity is formed, the deformation of the thin film to form a blister cap depends on the buildup of pressure in the cavity contingent on the implanted dose. For the present model, it is sufficient to say that the thickness of the blister's cap cannot be correlated with the projected range of the implantation, as assumed by other authors. The implanted helium concentration needed to build up enough gas pressure to create a blister at a depth which is close to the projected range is higher by 50 times than the gas helium concentration in the cavity. Experimental results, such as the fact that the blisters have burst at the edge of the circular skin, where the maximum stresses are developed, and the fact that at high implantation energy (large projected range), the bursting of the blisters occurs by multilayer caps, support the present model

  13. Coprecipitation of Arsenate and Arsenite with Green Rust Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the extent and nature of arsenic co-precipitation with green rusts and to examine the influence of arsenic incorporation on the mineralogy of formed solid phases. Stoichiometric green rusts were obtained by coprecipitation of fe...

  14. Incomplete resistance to coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Incomplete resistance to coffee leaf rust ( Hemileia vastatrix ) may be of value in obtaining durable resistance, which is of great importance for the perennial coffee crop. Methods were developed to assess incomplete resistance to coffee leaf rust by using illustrated scales

  15. Leaf and stripe rust resistance among Ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result indicated that 20 varieties and lines harbor resistance to the leaf rust and 26 to the stripe rust pathotypes showing infection types <2+. Twelve bread wheat varieties and lines (Et-13 A2, HAR 1407 [Tusie], HAR 1775 [Tura], HAR 1920, HAR 2192, HAR 2534, HAR 2536, HAR 2561, HAR 2563 and three durum lines ...

  16. Interacting genes in the pine-fusiform rust forest pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.V. Amerson; T.L. Kubisiak; S.A. Garcia; G.C. Kuhlman; C.D. Nelson; S.E. McKeand; T.J. Mullin; B. Li

    2005-01-01

    Fusiform rust (FR) disease of pines, caused by Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme (Cqf), is the most destructive disease in pine plantations of the southern U. S. The NCSU fusiform rust program, in conjunction with the USDA-Forest Service in Saucier, MS and Athens, GA, has research underway to elucidate some of the genetic interactions in this...

  17. Transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of area, the bread wheat producing regions of China comprise the largest area in the world that is constantly threatened by stripe rust epidemics. Consequently, it is important to exploit new adultplant resistance genes in breeding. This study reports the transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to ...

  18. Wheat rusts in the United States in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2016, wheat stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. graminis was widespread throughout the United States. Cool temperatures and abundant rainfall in the southern Great Plains allowed stripe rust to become widely established and spread throughout the Great Plains and eastern United State...

  19. stem rust seedling resistance genes in ethiopian wheat cultivars

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is one of the major biotic limiting factors for wheat production in Ethiopia. Host plant resistance is the best option to manage stem rust from its economic and environmental points of view. Wheat cultivars are released for production without carrying race specific tests against ...

  20. 29-34 Yellow Rust Resistance in Advanced Lines and Commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rust pathogen. The objective of this study was to characterize seedling yellow rust resistance in 21 advanced bread wheat lines and 20 cultivars from Ethiopia. Yellow rust infection types (ITs) produced on test wheat lines and cultivars from nine yellow rust races were compared with ITs produced on standard differential lines ...

  1. Characterization of stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in Indian wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem rust or black rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. In India, central, peninsular and southern hill zones are particularly prone to stem rust where favourable environmental conditions exist. The recent emergence of wheat stem rust race Ug99 (TTKSK) and related strains threatens global wheat ...

  2. Cantharidin biosynthesis in a blister beetle: inhibition by 6-fluoromevalonate causes chemical disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, J E; Doom, J P; McCormick, J P

    1986-07-15

    Biosynthesis of cantharidin in a blister beetle, Lytta polita, is effectively inhibited by 6-fluoromevalonate. Inhibition is attributed specifically to the fluorine substituent. Biochemical inhibition has not been demonstrated previously for an arthropod's defensive substance.

  3. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Y. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Gong, U. S.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, S. S.; Choo, K.N.

    2000-09-01

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described

  4. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Y M; Kim, Y S; Gong, U S; Kwon, S C; Kim, S S; Choo, K N

    2000-09-01

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described.

  5. Surface erosion of fusion reactor components due to radiation blistering and neutron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation blistering and neutron sputtering can lead to the surface erosion of fusion reactor components exposed to plasma radiations. Recent studies of methods to reduce the surface erosion caused by these processes are discussed

  6. The formation and characteristics of hydride blisters in c.w. Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, E G [ed.

    1994-09-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, a consultants` meeting was arranged in Vienna, 1994 July 25-29, at which a Canadian delegation, consisting of AECL and Ontario Hydro Technologies personnel, presented information on their knowledge of the behaviour of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes. This document contains the 10 papers presented by the Canadian delegation to the meeting. It is believed that they represent a good reference document on hydride blister phenomena.

  7. Whisker growth: a new mechanism for helium blistering of surfaces in complex radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Implantation of helium concurrent with the generation of large numbers of displaced atoms in surface layers of materials exposed to 252 Cf α-particles and fission fragments produces a unique form of low temperature surface blistering. The purpose of this paper is to formulate a basis for the whisker-growth mechanism for helium blistering as an aid to the specification of conditions under which the mechanism might apply

  8. The role of implanted gas and lateral stress in blister formation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the parts played by gas and lateral stress in blister formation on metal surfaces after helium implantation are critically reviewed. Although measurements show the existence of lateral stresses in implanted surfaces, an analysis indicates that these stresses can play little part in blister formation. Conversely, there is a strong case for a gas driven model. One possible mechanism, that involving the interbubble fracture of overpressurised helium bubbles, is outlined and revised to take recent measurements into account. (Auth.)

  9. Physical water treatment against calcification and rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to Germany, where the installation of small-sized, decentralised plants is still prefered, water supply companies in countries such as Denmark have already for some time successfully been using physical water treatment systems. Although the health and environmental benefits of this non-chemical method of water treatment are undisputed and its proper application is also economically beneficial, there is still a widerspread lack of information as to where such plants can be used. Consequently, older methods are often resorted to combatting calcification and rust. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiation blistering of niobium in sequence irradiated by helium ions with different energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminskij, M.S.; Guseva, M.I.; Gusev, V.M.; Krasulin, Yu.L.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Rozina, I.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the investigation of the blistering of the surface of polycrystalline niobium foils subjected to successive irradiation by helium ions of energies of 3 to 50 keV are reported. The critical doses of irradiation, the types of blisters and the rate of erosion were determined. A comparative analysis of the formation of blisters on cold-rolled and annealed niobium has been made. On cold-rolled niobium the blistering is mainly due to ions with energies of 3 to 80 keV, on annealed niobium of 100 to 500 keV. The erosion of cold-rolled niobium takes place through blisters formed by the action of helium ions with energies of the order of 45 keV, and that of annealed niobium, through helium ions with energies of 100 to 500 keV. The observed differences in the formation of blisters on niobium irradiated with helium ions of a wide range of energies are explained by the change in the diffusion kinetics of implanted ions having a uniform distribution across the thickness of the target

  11. Obtention of the constitutive equation of hydride blisters in fuel cladding from nanoindentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin.rengel@upm.es [E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/ Profesor Aranguren, 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, AMS, Bilbao (Spain); Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J. [E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/ Profesor Aranguren, 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    It is well known that the presence of hydrides in nuclear fuel cladding may reduce its mechanical and fracture properties. This situation may be worsened as a consequence of the formation of hydride blisters. These blisters are zones with an extremely high hydrogen concentration and they are usually associated to the oxide spalling which may occur at the outer surface of the cladding. In this work, a method which allows us to reproduce, in a reliable way, hydride blisters in the laboratory has been devised. Depth-sensing indentation tests with a spherical indenter were conducted on a hydride blister produced in the laboratory with the aim of measuring its mechanical behaviour. The plastic stress-strain curve of the hydride blister was calculated for first time by combining depth-sensing indentation tests results with an iterative algorithm using finite element simulations. The algorithm employed reduces, in each iteration, the differences between the numerical and the experimental results by modifying the stress-strain curve. In this way, an almost perfect adjustment of the experimental data was achieved after several iterations. The calculation of the constitutive equation of the blister from nanoindentation tests, may involve a lack of uniqueness. To evaluate it, a method based on the optimization of parameters of analytical equations has been proposed in this paper. An estimation of the error which involves this method is also provided.

  12. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M., E-mail: marta.dias@itn.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, D. [CENIMAT-I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hanada, K. [AIST, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-8564 Ibaraki (Japan); Sârbu, C. [National Institute of Materials and Physics, 105bis Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); and others

    2013-11-15

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He{sup +} (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) and/or D{sup +} (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D{sup +} remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He{sup +} evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He{sup +} pre-implantation.

  13. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.; Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Hanada, K.; Sârbu, C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He + (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) and/or D + (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D + remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He + evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He + pre-implantation

  14. Relationship between sugarcane rust severity and soil properties in louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard M; Grisham, Michael P; Richard, Edward P

    2007-06-01

    ABSTRACT The extent of spatial and temporal variability of sugarcane rust (Puccinia melanocephala) infestation was related to variation in soil properties in five commercial fields of sugarcane (interspecific hybrids of Saccharum spp., cv. LCP 85-384) in southern Louisiana. Sugarcane fields were grid-soil sampled at several intensities and rust ratings were collected at each point over 6 to 7 weeks. Soil properties exhibited significant variability (coefficients of variation = 9 to 70.1%) and were spatially correlated in 39 of 40 cases with a range of spatial correlation varying from 39 to 201 m. Rust ratings were spatially correlated in 32 of 33 cases, with a range varying from 29 to 241 m. Rust ratings were correlated with several soil properties, most notably soil phosphorus (r = 0.40 to 0.81) and soil sulfur (r = 0.36 to 0.68). Multiple linear regression analysis resulted in coefficients of determination that ranged from 0.22 to 0.73, and discriminant analysis further improved the overall predictive ability of rust models. Finally, contour plots of soil properties and rust levels clearly suggested a link between these two parameters. These combined data suggest that sugarcane growers that apply fertilizer in excess of plant requirements will increase the incidence and severity of rust infestations in their fields.

  15. Host jumps shaped the diversity of extant rust fungi (Pucciniales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Alistair R; Shivas, Roger G; van der Nest, Magriet A; Roux, Jolanda; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the evolutionary time line for rust fungi and date key speciation events using a molecular clock. Evidence is provided that supports a contemporary view for a recent origin of rust fungi, with a common ancestor on a flowering plant. Divergence times for > 20 genera of rust fungi were studied with Bayesian evolutionary analyses. A relaxed molecular clock was applied to ribosomal and mitochondrial genes, calibrated against estimated divergence times for the hosts of rust fungi, such as Acacia (Fabaceae), angiosperms and the cupressophytes. Results showed that rust fungi shared a most recent common ancestor with a mean age between 113 and 115 million yr. This dates rust fungi to the Cretaceous period, which is much younger than previous estimations. Host jumps, whether taxonomically large or between host genera in the same family, most probably shaped the diversity of rust genera. Likewise, species diversified by host shifts (through coevolution) or via subsequent host jumps. This is in contrast to strict coevolution with their hosts. Puccinia psidii was recovered in Sphaerophragmiaceae, a family distinct from Raveneliaceae, which were regarded as confamilial in previous studies. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Nonhost resistance to rust pathogens – a continuation of continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eBettgenhaeuser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rust fungi (order: Pucciniales are a group of widely distributed fungal plant pathogens, which can infect representatives of all vascular plant groups. Rust diseases significantly impact several crop species and considerable research focuses on understanding the basis of host specificity and nonhost resistance. Like many pathogens, rust fungi vary considerably in the number of hosts they can infect, such as wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina, which can only infect species in the genera Triticum and Aegilops, whereas Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi is known to infect over 95 species from over 42 genera. A greater understanding of the genetic basis determining host range has the potential to identify sources of durable resistance for agronomically important crops. Delimiting the boundary between host and nonhost has been complicated by the quantitative nature of phenotypes in the transition between these two states. Plant-pathogen interactions in this intermediate state are characterized either by (1 the majority of accessions of a species being resistant to the rust or (2 the rust only being able to partially complete key components of its life cycle. This leads to a continuum of disease phenotypes in the interaction with different plant species, observed as a range from compatibility (host to complete immunity within a species (nonhost. In this review we will highlight how the quantitative nature of disease resistance in these intermediate interactions is caused by a continuum of defense barriers, which a pathogen needs to overcome for successfully establishing itself in the host. To illustrate continua as this underlying principle, we will discuss the advances that have been made in studying nonhost resistance towards rust pathogens, particularly cereal rust pathogens.

  17. Nonhost resistance to rust pathogens – a continuation of continua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettgenhaeuser, Jan; Gilbert, Brian; Ayliffe, Michael; Moscou, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The rust fungi (order: Pucciniales) are a group of widely distributed fungal plant pathogens, which can infect representatives of all vascular plant groups. Rust diseases significantly impact several crop species and considerable research focuses on understanding the basis of host specificity and nonhost resistance. Like many pathogens, rust fungi vary considerably in the number of hosts they can infect, such as wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina), which can only infect species in the genera Triticum and Aegilops, whereas Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is known to infect over 95 species from over 42 genera. A greater understanding of the genetic basis determining host range has the potential to identify sources of durable resistance for agronomically important crops. Delimiting the boundary between host and nonhost has been complicated by the quantitative nature of phenotypes in the transition between these two states. Plant–pathogen interactions in this intermediate state are characterized either by (1) the majority of accessions of a species being resistant to the rust or (2) the rust only being able to partially complete key components of its life cycle. This leads to a continuum of disease phenotypes in the interaction with different plant species, observed as a range from compatibility (host) to complete immunity within a species (nonhost). In this review we will highlight how the quantitative nature of disease resistance in these intermediate interactions is caused by a continuum of defense barriers, which a pathogen needs to overcome for successfully establishing itself in the host. To illustrate continua as this underlying principle, we will discuss the advances that have been made in studying nonhost resistance towards rust pathogens, particularly cereal rust pathogens. PMID:25566270

  18. Nonhost resistance to rust pathogens - a continuation of continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettgenhaeuser, Jan; Gilbert, Brian; Ayliffe, Michael; Moscou, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    The rust fungi (order: Pucciniales) are a group of widely distributed fungal plant pathogens, which can infect representatives of all vascular plant groups. Rust diseases significantly impact several crop species and considerable research focuses on understanding the basis of host specificity and nonhost resistance. Like many pathogens, rust fungi vary considerably in the number of hosts they can infect, such as wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina), which can only infect species in the genera Triticum and Aegilops, whereas Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is known to infect over 95 species from over 42 genera. A greater understanding of the genetic basis determining host range has the potential to identify sources of durable resistance for agronomically important crops. Delimiting the boundary between host and nonhost has been complicated by the quantitative nature of phenotypes in the transition between these two states. Plant-pathogen interactions in this intermediate state are characterized either by (1) the majority of accessions of a species being resistant to the rust or (2) the rust only being able to partially complete key components of its life cycle. This leads to a continuum of disease phenotypes in the interaction with different plant species, observed as a range from compatibility (host) to complete immunity within a species (nonhost). In this review we will highlight how the quantitative nature of disease resistance in these intermediate interactions is caused by a continuum of defense barriers, which a pathogen needs to overcome for successfully establishing itself in the host. To illustrate continua as this underlying principle, we will discuss the advances that have been made in studying nonhost resistance towards rust pathogens, particularly cereal rust pathogens.

  19. Incorporation of Monovalent Cations in Sulfate Green Rust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, B. C.; Dideriksen, K.; Katz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Green rust is a naturally occurring layered mixed-valent ferrous-ferric hydroxide, which can react with a range of redox-active compounds. Sulfate-bearing green rust is generally thought to have interlayers composed of sulfate and water. Here, we provide evidence that the interlayers also contain...... with water showed that Na+ and K+ were structurally fixed in the interlayer, whereas Rb+ and Cs+ could be removed, resulting in a decrease in the basal layer spacing. The incorporation of cations in the interlayer opens up new possibilities for the use of sulfate green rust for exchange reactions with both...

  20. Slow rusting response of different wheat genotypes against the leaf rust in relation to epidemiological factors in Faisalabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Haider, M.M.; Hussain, M.; Ahmad, S.

    2007-01-01

    Wheat genotypes were screened against leaf rust to evaluate slow rusting response. Among one hundred and sixty varieties/lines, 86 showed response to leaf rust while all other remained immune or showed no response. The slow rusting, wheat varieties/ lines displayed 20-40% severity level and these were Maxi-Pak65, Blue silver, Pothohar, Punjab81, Faisalabd-83, Shalimar-88, Kohnoor-83, Pasban-90, Inqilab-91, Uqab-99-94105, Punjab-76, Parwaz-94, HD2169, HD2179, HD2204, HD2285, Lr27+31, LrB, LR17, Lr14A, Lr15 and Yr1-E-1 while the fast rusting varieties/lines that showed severity level up to 90% were WL-711, Morocco, PAK-1, Punjab-85 and Chakwal-86 SA42, SA75, Lr1, Lr2A, Lr2B. Lr23, Lr3KA, Lr3g, Lr10, Lr18, Lr21, Lr24, Yr2-E35 and 95153 respectively. Slow rusting genotypes exhibited low AUDPC (200-400) values while fast rusters displayed high AUDPC (400-1500) values. Leaf rust severity displayed significant correlation with maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall and sunshine radiation. It was observed that with an increase of these environmental conditions a significant increase in disease severity was recorded

  1. Genetic analysis of rust resistance genes in global wheat cultivars: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktar-Uz-Zaman, Md; Tuhina-Khatun, Mst; Hanafi, Mohamed Musa; Sahebi, Mahbod

    2017-01-01

    Rust is the most devastating fungal disease in wheat. Three rust diseases, namely, leaf or brown rust caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks, stem or black rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici West, and stripe or yellow rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. Tritici Eriks, are the most economically significant and common diseases among global wheat cultivars. Growing cultivars resistant to rust is the most sustainable, cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach for controlling rust diseases. To date, more than 187 rust resistance genes (80 leaf rust, 58 stem rust and 49 stripe rust) have been derived from diverse wheat or durum wheat cultivars and the related wild species using different molecular methods. This review provides a detailed discussion of the different aspects of rust resistance genes, their primitive sources, their distribution in global wheat cultivars and the importance of durable resistant varieties for controlling rust diseases. This information will serve as a foundation for plant breeders and geneticists to develop durable rust-resistant wheat varieties through marker-assisted breeding or gene pyramiding

  2. Genetic characterisation of novel resistance alleles to stem rust and stripe rust in wheat-alien introgression lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmatov, Mahbubjon

    2016-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) is one of the most important food crops world-wide, but is attacked by many diseases and pests that cause significant yield losses. Globally, stem rust (Sr) (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Erikss & E. Henning), stripe rust (Yr) (Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Eriks) and leaf rust (Lr) (Puccinia triticina Eriks) are a great threat to wheat production. The majority of the Sr, Yr and Lr resistance genes are already defeated...

  3. Summary of the works on blistering and related erosion phenomena in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohji

    1980-01-01

    The works in JAERI on the blistering and related erosion phenomena on material surfaces have been made theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical studies were concerned with the blistering and flaking mechanisms from the standpoint of pressure driven model. A condition for blistering was introduced as a result of the theoretical work. Assuming ductile crack propagation in an ion-irradiated subsurface layer due to the presence of small spherical bubbles, blistering and flaking are reasonably discriminated on the basis of a single mechanism of gas driven model. Experimentally, the in-situ observations of blistered surfaces were carried out with a scanning electron microscope connected to a 2 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. Targets were single crystals of Nb, Mo, Cu and Al. The flaking in pyrolytic graphite due to He + , Ne + , Ar + and N + ion bombardments, and the hole-formation in glassy carbon by Ne + ion bombardment were also studied. The theoretical explanation gave satisfactory agreements with the experimental results. The in-situ observation of blistering and subsequent exfoliation during 100 keV He + bombardment on a polycrystalline Mo surface was carried with a 400 keV Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator. It was found by scanning electron microscopy that the surface erosion due to blistering was effectively reduced by the multi-groove structure. The phenomena named grain ejection were found by bombardment with pulsed intense beam of 25 keV H + , as well as H 2 + , in the temperature range of 150 to 250 degree C. (Kato, T.)

  4. Rust types from JSON samples - Approximating type providers with procedural macros in Rust

    OpenAIRE

    Vesteraas, Erik Andreas

    2017-01-01

    When programmers access external data in a statically typed programming language, they are often faced with a dilemma between convenient and type-safe access to the data. In the programming language F#, a concept called type providers has been proposed as a solution to this problem by having compiler support for libraries with the capability to generate types at compile time. This thesis presents "json_typegen", a project which aims to show the feasibility of similar solutions in the Rust pro...

  5. A gene network bioinformatics analysis for pemphigoid autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Antonio; Toti, Paolo; Giuca, Maria Rita; Derchi, Giacomo; Covani, Ugo

    2015-07-01

    In this theoretical study, a text mining search and clustering analysis of data related to genes potentially involved in human pemphigoid autoimmune blistering diseases (PAIBD) was performed using web tools to create a gene/protein interaction network. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) database was employed to identify a final set of PAIBD-involved genes and to calculate the overall significant interactions among genes: for each gene, the weighted number of links, or WNL, was registered and a clustering procedure was performed using the WNL analysis. Genes were ranked in class (leader, B, C, D and so on, up to orphans). An ontological analysis was performed for the set of 'leader' genes. Using the above-mentioned data network, 115 genes represented the final set; leader genes numbered 7 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interferon gamma (IFNG), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)), class B genes were 13, whereas the orphans were 24. The ontological analysis attested that the molecular action was focused on extracellular space and cell surface, whereas the activation and regulation of the immunity system was widely involved. Despite the limited knowledge of the present pathologic phenomenon, attested by the presence of 24 genes revealing no protein-protein direct or indirect interactions, the network showed significant pathways gathered in several subgroups: cellular components, molecular functions, biological processes and the pathologic phenomenon obtained from the Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. The molecular basis for PAIBD was summarised and expanded, which will perhaps give researchers promising directions for the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  6. Induced resistance and gene expression in wheat against leaf rust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... 2Department of Soil, Crop and Climate Sciences, University of the Free State, P.O Box ... Key words: Wheat leaf rust, induced resistance, priming, gene ..... transformation: susceptibility of transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris plants.

  7. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seedling resistance is usually race-specific, but often pro- vides complete ... Genomic DNA was extracted using the CTAB method of. Saghai-Maroof ... Polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed in ..... The continuous supply of the rust ...

  8. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrum-derived leaf rust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mona Singh

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... Abstract. This study was undertaken to pyramid two effective leaf rust resistance genes (Lr19 and Lr24) derived from ... genes such as Lr9, Lr19, Lr26 and Lr28 became ineffective ..... Disease management recommendations.

  9. Depth distribution of bubbles in 4He+-ion irradiated nickel and the mechanism of blister formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    While the radiation blistering phenomenon has been widely studied, the mechanism of blister formation is still not well understood. The present studies on depth distribution of helium bubbles in nickel were carried out in order to obtain a better understanding of the radiation blistering process. Particularly, the aim was to understand the experimental observation that the blister skin thickness for many metals irradiated with He + ions of energies lower than 20-keV is a factor of two or more larger than the calculated projected range. (Auth.)

  10. Two distinct classes of QTL determine rust resistance in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuemin; Mace, Emma; Hunt, Colleen; Cruickshank, Alan; Henzell, Robert; Parkes, Heidi; Jordan, David

    2014-12-31

    Agriculture is facing enormous challenges to feed a growing population in the face of rapidly evolving pests and pathogens. The rusts, in particular, are a major pathogen of cereal crops with the potential to cause large reductions in yield. Improving stable disease resistance is an on-going major and challenging focus for many plant breeding programs, due to the rapidly evolving nature of the pathogen. Sorghum is a major summer cereal crop that is also a host for a rust pathogen Puccinia purpurea, which occurs in almost all sorghum growing areas of the world, causing direct and indirect yield losses in sorghum worldwide, however knowledge about its genetic control is still limited. In order to further investigate this issue, QTL and association mapping methods were implemented to study rust resistance in three bi-parental populations and an association mapping set of elite breeding lines in different environments. In total, 64 significant or highly significant QTL and 21 suggestive rust resistance QTL were identified representing 55 unique genomic regions. Comparisons across populations within the current study and with rust QTL identified previously in both sorghum and maize revealed a high degree of correspondence in QTL location. Negative phenotypic correlations were observed between rust, maturity and height, indicating a trend for both early maturing and shorter genotypes to be more susceptible to rust. The significant amount of QTL co-location across traits, in addition to the consistency in the direction of QTL allele effects, has provided evidence to support pleiotropic QTL action across rust, height, maturity and stay-green, supporting the role of carbon stress in susceptibility to rust. Classical rust resistance QTL regions that did not co-locate with height, maturity or stay-green QTL were found to be significantly enriched for the defence-related NBS-encoding gene family, in contrast to the lack of defence-related gene enrichment in multi-trait effect

  11. Wheat Rust Information Resources - Integrated tools and data for improved decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodson, David; Hansen, Jens Grønbech; Lassen, Poul

    giving access to an unprecedented set of data for rust surveys, alternate hosts (barberry), rust pathotypes, trap nurseries and resistant cultivars. Standardized protocols for data collection have permitted the development of a comprehensive data management system, named the Wheat Rust Toolbox....... Integration of the CIMMYT Wheat Atlas and the Genetic Resources Information System (GRIS) databases provides a rich resource on wheat cultivars and their resistance to important rust races. Data access is facilitated via dedicated web portals such as Rust Tracker (www.rusttracker.org) and the Global Rust...

  12. Mapping of quantitative adult plant field resistance to leaf rust and stripe rust in two European winter wheat populations reveals co-location of three QTL conferring resistance to both rust pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerstmayr, Maria; Matiasch, Lydia; Mascher, Fabio; Vida, Gyula; Ittu, Marianna; Robert, Olivier; Holdgate, Sarah; Flath, Kerstin; Neumayer, Anton; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    We detected several, most likely novel QTL for adult plant resistance to rusts. Notably three QTL improved resistance to leaf rust and stripe rust simultaneously indicating broad spectrum resistance QTL. The rusts of wheat (Puccinia spp.) are destructive fungal wheat diseases. The deployment of resistant cultivars plays a central role in integrated rust disease management. Durability of resistance would be preferred, but is difficult to analyse. The Austrian winter wheat cultivar Capo was released in the 1989 and grown on a large acreage during more than two decades and maintained a good level of quantitative leaf rust and stripe rust resistance. Two bi-parental mapping populations: Capo × Arina and Capo × Furore were tested in multiple environments for severity of leaf rust and stripe rust at the adult plant stage in replicated field experiments. Quantitative trait loci associated with leaf rust and stripe rust severity were mapped using DArT and SSR markers. Five QTL were detected in multiple environments associated with resistance to leaf rust designated as QLr.ifa-2AL, QLr.ifa-2BL, QLr.ifa-2BS, QLr.ifa-3BS, and QLr.ifa-5BL, and five for resistance to stripe rust QYr.ifa-2AL, QYr.ifa-2BL, QYr.ifa-3AS, QYr.ifa-3BS, and QYr.ifa-5A. For all QTL apart from two (QYr.ifa-3AS, QLr.ifa-5BL) Capo contributed the resistance improving allele. The leaf rust and stripe rust resistance QTL on 2AL, 2BL and 3BS mapped to the same chromosome positions, indicating either closely linked genes or pleiotropic gene action. These three multiple disease resistance QTL (QLr.ifa-2AL/QYr.ifa-2AL, QLr.ifa.2BL/QYr.ifa-2BL, QLr.ifa-3BS/QYr.ifa.3BS) potentially contribute novel resistance sources for stripe rust and leaf rust. The long-lasting resistance of Capo apparently rests upon a combination of several genes. The described germplasm, QTL and markers are applicable for simultaneous resistance improvement against leaf rust and stripe rust.

  13. Leaf rust of cultivated barley: pathology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Robert F; Golegaonkar, Prashant G; Derevnina, Lida; Sandhu, Karanjeet S; Karaoglu, Haydar; Elmansour, Huda M; Dracatos, Peter M; Singh, Davinder

    2015-01-01

    Leaf rust of barley is caused by the macrocyclic, heteroecious rust pathogen Puccinia hordei, with aecia reported from selected species of the genera Ornithogalum, Leopoldia, and Dipcadi, and uredinia and telia occurring on Hordeum vulgare, H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum, Hordeum bulbosum, and Hordeum murinum, on which distinct parasitic specialization occurs. Although Puccinia hordei is sporadic in its occurrence, it is probably the most common and widely distributed rust disease of barley. Leaf rust has increased in importance in recent decades in temperate barley-growing regions, presumably because of more intensive agricultural practices. Although total crop loss does not occur, under epidemic conditions yield reductions of up to 62% have been reported in susceptible varieties. Leaf rust is primarily controlled by the use of resistant cultivars, and, to date, 21 seedling resistance genes and two adult plant resistance (APR) genes have been identified. Virulence has been detected for most seedling resistance genes but is unknown for the APR genes Rph20 and Rph23. Other potentially new sources of APR have been reported, and additivity has been described for some of these resistances. Approaches to achieving durable resistance to leaf rust in barley are discussed.

  14. Moessbauer Characterization of Rust Obtained in an Accelerated Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Arroyave, C. E.; Barrero, C. A.; Cook, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed drying-humectation cyclical processes (CEBELCOR) on eight A36 low carbon steel coupons in NaCl solutions containing 1x10 -2 M and 1x10 -1 M concentrations. The main purpose of these experiments is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for akaganeite formation. Additionally, and with the idea to perform a complete characterization of the rust, this work also considers the formation of other iron oxide phases. The corrosion products were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gravimetric analysis demonstrates that the coupons presented high corrosion rates. Magnetite/maghemite was common in the rust stuck to the steel surface, whereas akaganeite was present only in traces. In the rust collected from the solutions, i.e., the rust that goes away from the metal surface easily, a magnetite/maghemite was not present and akaganeite showed up in larger quantities. These results support the idea that high concentrations of Cl - ions are required for the akaganeite formation. We concluded that akaganeite is not easily bonded to the rust layer; this may lead to the formation of a less protective rust layer and to higher corrosion rates.

  15. An interbubble fracture mechanism of blister formation on helium-irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a new model of surface blister formation in which a blister is nucleated by the interbubble fracture of highly overpressurized helium bubbles. As in other gas-driven models, the internal release of helium then provides the driving force for blister lid deformation. The high pressures required for the suggested mode of fracture are a result of the difficulty, experienced by the bubbles in acquiring vacancies. By considering the bubble growth mechanisms, the critical conditions for interbubble fracture are shown to depend on the helium dose and energy, the bubble size, and their depth in the irradiated material. These parameters and other aspects of blister formation are discussed on the basis of the proposed model. One important result concerns the position of the fracture plane; because of the usual displacement of damage and helium peaks relative to depth, this plane can lie well beyond the helium peak. Thus, the disagreement inherent in previous gas models between helium range and measured blister lid thickness values can be resolved without recourse to lateral stress arguments. (Auth.)

  16. Blistering and exfoliation of 304 stainless steel studied by SEM and RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, M.; Emmoth, B.; Whitton, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Blistering and exfoliation induced by helium irradiation have been studied in polycrystalline stainless steel with the aim of measuring flake or blister skin thicknesses for different implantation energies in the keV region. The authors present measurements of skin thicknesses determined both by direct SEM observations and RBS techniques. The results of the RBS studies show for all implantation energies used that the thickness measured in target atoms/unit area of a flake equals the calculated implantation range with an accuracy of about 10%. Conversely, the SEM measurements show that swelling gives rise to a geometrical skin thickness much greater than the corresponding implantation range. Thus from the SEM and RBS data swelling as a function of the implantation energy is obtained and the linear relative swelling is shown to be strongly dependent on the energy. In addition a comparison between the skin thickness of blisters and flakes has been made for the same material. Blisters were observed at low implantation temperatures and room temperature while exfoliation occurs at elevated temperatures. The result of this comparison is that within the experimental accuracy the flake and blister thicknesses are the same. (Auth.)

  17. Reduction of surface erosion caused by helium blistering in sintered beryllium and sintered aluminum powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to find materials with microstructures which minimize the formation of blisters. A promising class of materials appears to be sintered metal powder with small average grain sizes and low atomic number Z. Studies of the surface erosion of sintered aluminum powder (SAP 895) and of aluminum held at 400 0 C due to blistering by 100 keV helium ions have been conducted and the results are compared to those obtained earlier for room temperature irradiation. A significant reduction of the erosion rate in SAP 895 in comparison to annealed aluminum and SAP 930 is observed. In addition results on the blistering of sintered beryllium powder (type I) irradiated at room temperature and 600 0 C by 100 keV helium ions are given. These results will be compared with those reported recently for vacuum cast beryllium foil and a foil of sintered beryllium powder (type II) which was fabricated differently, than type I. For room temperature irradiation only a few blisters could be observed in sintered beryllium powder type I and type II and they are smaller in size and in number than in vacuum cast beryllium. For irradiation at 600 0 C large scale exfoliation of blisters was observed for vacuum cast beryllium but much less exfoliation was seen for sintered beryllium powder, type I, and type II. The results show a reduction in erosion rate cast beryllium, for both room temperature and 600 0 C

  18. Internal Carotid Artery Blister-Like Aneurysm Caused by Aspergillus – Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masaki; Sakurai, Keita; Kawaguchi, Takatsune; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Nakagawa, Motoo; Okita, Kenji; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Blister-like aneurysm of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) is a well-documented cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Generally, this type of aneurysm is associated with various conditions such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and ICA dissection. Although Aspergillus is the most common organism causing intracranial fungal aneurysmal formation, there is no report of a blister-like aneurysm caused by Aspergillus infection. An 83-year-old man received corticosteroid pulse therapy followed by oral steroid therapy for an inflammatory pseudotumor of the clivus. Two months later, the patient was transported to an emergency department due to the diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, classified as Fisher group 4. Subsequent 3D computed tomography angiogram revealed a blister-like aneurysm at the superior wall of the left ICA. Six days later, the patient died of subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by the left ICA aneurysm rerupture. Autopsy revealed proliferation of Aspergillus hyphae in the wall of the aneurysm. Notably, that change was present more densely in the inner membrane than in the outer one. Thus, it was considered that Aspergillus hyphae caused infectious aneurysm formation in the left ICA via hematogenous seeding rather than direct invasion. The blister-like aneurysm is a rare but important cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case report documents another cause of blister-like aneurysms, that is an infectious aneurysm associated with Aspergillus infection

  19. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY VERSUS IMMUNOFLUORESENCE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs, the diagnostic gold standard has classically been direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF, despite inherent technical problems of autofluorescence. Aim: We sought to overcome autofluorescence issues and compare the reliability of immunofluorescence versus immunohistochemistry (IHC staining in the diagnoses of these diseases. Methods: We tested via IHC for anti-human IgG, IgM, IgA, IgD, IgE, Kappa light chains, Lambda light chains, Complement/C3c, Complement/C1q, Complement/C3d, albumin and fibrinogen in 30 patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia (El Bagre-EPF, and 30 control biopsies from the endemic area. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with ABDs whose diagnoses were made clinically, histopathologically and by DIF/IIF studies from 2 independent dermatopathology laboratories in the USA. Specifically, we tested 34 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 18 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 30 control skin samples from plastic esthetic surgery reduction surgeries. Results: The diagnostic correlation between IHC and DIF-IIF was almost 98% in most cases. IHC revealed evidence of autofluorescence around dermal blood vessels, dermal eccrine glands and neurovascular packages feeding skin appendices in ABDs; this autofluorescence may represent a non-specific immune response. Strong patterns of positivity were seen also in endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, as well as between dermal fibrohistiocytic cells. In PV, we noted strong reactivity to neurovascular packages supplying sebaceous glands, as well as apocrine glands with edematous changes. Conclusions: We suggest that IHC is as reliable as DIF or IIF for the diagnosis of ABDs; our findings further suggest that what has previously been considered DIF/IIF autofluorescence

  20. Identification of QTL conferring resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei) and leaf rust (Puccinia hordei) in barley using nested association mapping (NAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatter, Thomas; Maurer, Andreas; Perovic, Dragan; Kopahnke, Doris; Pillen, Klaus; Ordon, Frank

    2018-01-01

    The biotrophic rust fungi Puccinia hordei and Puccinia striiformis are important barley pathogens with the potential to cause high yield losses through an epidemic spread. The identification of QTL conferring resistance to these pathogens is the basis for targeted breeding approaches aiming to improve stripe rust and leaf rust resistance of modern cultivars. Exploiting the allelic richness of wild barley accessions proved to be a valuable tool to broaden the genetic base of resistance of barley cultivars. In this study, SNP-based nested association mapping (NAM) was performed to map stripe rust and leaf rust resistance QTL in the barley NAM population HEB-25, comprising 1,420 lines derived from BC1S3 generation. By scoring the percentage of infected leaf area, followed by calculation of the area under the disease progress curve and the average ordinate during a two-year field trial, a large variability of resistance across and within HEB-25 families was observed. NAM based on 5,715 informative SNPs resulted in the identification of twelve and eleven robust QTL for resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust, respectively. Out of these, eight QTL for stripe rust and two QTL for leaf rust are considered novel showing no overlap with previously reported resistance QTL. Overall, resistance to both pathogens in HEB-25 is most likely due to the accumulation of numerous small effect loci. In addition, the NAM results indicate that the 25 wild donor QTL alleles present in HEB-25 strongly differ in regard to their individual effect on rust resistance. In future, the NAM concept will allow to select and combine individual wild barley alleles from different HEB parents to increase rust resistance in barley. The HEB-25 results will support to unravel the genetic basis of rust resistance in barley, and to improve resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust of modern barley cultivars.

  1. Identification of QTL conferring resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei) and leaf rust (Puccinia hordei) in barley using nested association mapping (NAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatter, Thomas; Maurer, Andreas; Perovic, Dragan; Kopahnke, Doris; Pillen, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The biotrophic rust fungi Puccinia hordei and Puccinia striiformis are important barley pathogens with the potential to cause high yield losses through an epidemic spread. The identification of QTL conferring resistance to these pathogens is the basis for targeted breeding approaches aiming to improve stripe rust and leaf rust resistance of modern cultivars. Exploiting the allelic richness of wild barley accessions proved to be a valuable tool to broaden the genetic base of resistance of barley cultivars. In this study, SNP-based nested association mapping (NAM) was performed to map stripe rust and leaf rust resistance QTL in the barley NAM population HEB-25, comprising 1,420 lines derived from BC1S3 generation. By scoring the percentage of infected leaf area, followed by calculation of the area under the disease progress curve and the average ordinate during a two-year field trial, a large variability of resistance across and within HEB-25 families was observed. NAM based on 5,715 informative SNPs resulted in the identification of twelve and eleven robust QTL for resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust, respectively. Out of these, eight QTL for stripe rust and two QTL for leaf rust are considered novel showing no overlap with previously reported resistance QTL. Overall, resistance to both pathogens in HEB-25 is most likely due to the accumulation of numerous small effect loci. In addition, the NAM results indicate that the 25 wild donor QTL alleles present in HEB-25 strongly differ in regard to their individual effect on rust resistance. In future, the NAM concept will allow to select and combine individual wild barley alleles from different HEB parents to increase rust resistance in barley. The HEB-25 results will support to unravel the genetic basis of rust resistance in barley, and to improve resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust of modern barley cultivars. PMID:29370232

  2. Identification of QTL conferring resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei and leaf rust (Puccinia hordei in barley using nested association mapping (NAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Vatter

    Full Text Available The biotrophic rust fungi Puccinia hordei and Puccinia striiformis are important barley pathogens with the potential to cause high yield losses through an epidemic spread. The identification of QTL conferring resistance to these pathogens is the basis for targeted breeding approaches aiming to improve stripe rust and leaf rust resistance of modern cultivars. Exploiting the allelic richness of wild barley accessions proved to be a valuable tool to broaden the genetic base of resistance of barley cultivars. In this study, SNP-based nested association mapping (NAM was performed to map stripe rust and leaf rust resistance QTL in the barley NAM population HEB-25, comprising 1,420 lines derived from BC1S3 generation. By scoring the percentage of infected leaf area, followed by calculation of the area under the disease progress curve and the average ordinate during a two-year field trial, a large variability of resistance across and within HEB-25 families was observed. NAM based on 5,715 informative SNPs resulted in the identification of twelve and eleven robust QTL for resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust, respectively. Out of these, eight QTL for stripe rust and two QTL for leaf rust are considered novel showing no overlap with previously reported resistance QTL. Overall, resistance to both pathogens in HEB-25 is most likely due to the accumulation of numerous small effect loci. In addition, the NAM results indicate that the 25 wild donor QTL alleles present in HEB-25 strongly differ in regard to their individual effect on rust resistance. In future, the NAM concept will allow to select and combine individual wild barley alleles from different HEB parents to increase rust resistance in barley. The HEB-25 results will support to unravel the genetic basis of rust resistance in barley, and to improve resistance against stripe rust and leaf rust of modern barley cultivars.

  3. Coma blisters in children: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Laura; Schena, Donatella; Colato, Chiara; Biban, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2013-12-01

    Coma-induced blisters is a rare condition associated with prolonged impairment of conscious level, which is relatively well-known in adults following overdose with barbiturates. However, it has been very rarely described in children. A case of coma-bullae occurring in an 11-year-old child with meningoencephalitis is herein reported. The bullous lesions occurred on the limbs and trunks, and evolved into necrotic ulcers in a few days. No correlation with any drug overdosage was found. A skin biopsy revealed epidermal and eccrine sweat gland necrosis with abundant neutrophils, and thrombosis of the vessels in the lower dermis. A comprehensive review of the literature showed that only 5 cases of coma-bullae in children have been published so far. Coma blistering resolves spontaneously within days or weeks. Diagnosis of coma-bullae may require careful clinical-pathologic correlation to exclude other blistering diseases in children.

  4. Comparative morphological analysis of apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nal., a new pest in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vidović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nalepa, 1926 (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea, has been recently found in Serbia as a new pest of apple. The history of its research, the results of a morphological analysis and degree of infestation are presented. A comparison of the main morphological features of mites from different populations of remote geographical origin has shown that the apple blister mite from Serbia is most similar to another European population (Bulgarian [or Austrian?] while it differs from E. mali originating from the USA and New Zealand. The percentage of infestation varied from 1.6% to 87.6%, with an average of 22.4%.

  5. Rust fungi on some poaceous weeds of wheat crops in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    NAJAM-UL-SEHAR AFSHAN*; ABDUL REHMAN NIAZI

    2013-01-01

    The article enlists common poaceous weeds found in wheat crop sand their specific parasitic rust fungi. In this study, four (04) plant taxa of Poaceae infected with rust fungi are collected from different wheat crops grown in different areas of Pakistan. The rust fungi are isolated, characterized and identified. All these host plants are known weeds of wheat crop in Pakistan. This work would help to identify and enlist the potential rust fungi on weeds of wheat crop that could be utilized to ...

  6. Legume breeding for rust resistance: Lessons to learn from the model Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Rubiales, Diego; Castillejo Sánchez, M. Ángeles; Madrid, Eva; Barilli, Eleonora; Rispail, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Rusts are major biotic constraints of legumes worldwide. Breeding for rust resistance is regarded as the most cost efficient method for rust control. However, in contrast to common bean for which complete monogenic resistance exists and is efficiently used, most of the rust resistance reactions described so far in cool season food legumes are incomplete and of complex inheritance. Incomplete resistance has been described in faba bean, pea, chickpea and lentil and several of their associated Q...

  7. Attempts to induce mutations for resistance of wheat to mildew, stem rust and leaf rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, Z.; Barabas, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Research carried out between 1971 and 1981 is summarized. Attempts to find induced mutants with full resistance to pathotype mixtures of the three pathogens were not successful. Reasons are discussed. Studies on wheat lines tolerant to stem rust infection led to the conclusion that this disease reaction may be often accompanied by a reduced number of infection sites and a longer lag period resulting in reduced spore production. Various selection methods have been evaluated. Selecting for the multigenic 'non race specific' way is promising. (author)

  8. Genetic variability among the brown rust resistant and susceptible genotypes of sugarcane by RAPD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown leaf rust in sugarcane is caused by Puccinia melanocephala (Syd. & P. Syd.), which is major cause of cultivar withdrawal. We attempted to analyze the RAPD diversity of two discrete phenotypic classes i.e. rust resistant (R) and rust susceptible (S) of six commercially available sugarcane elite...

  9. Glyphosate Control of Orange and Brown Rusts in Glyphosate-Sensitive Sugarcane Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: Brown and orange rust diseases cause substantial yield reductions on sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in Florida and other regions where sugarcane is grown. Brown rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala Syd. & P. Syd has been present in Florida since 1978 and orange rust caused by Pucci...

  10. DIVERSITY OF PUCCINIA KUEHNII AND P. MELANOCEPHALA CAUSING RUST DISEASES ON BRAZILIAN SUGARCANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane industry in Brazil suffers yield loss due to brown rust (Puccinia melanocephala) since 1986 and orange rust (P. kuehnii) as recent as 2009. The main control measure for both diseases has been cultivar resistance. Nevertheless, recent onsets of orange rust on previously resistant cultivars ...

  11. Identification of leaf rust resistant gene Lr10 in Pakistani wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf (brown) rust is the major disease of wheat in Pakistan and other countries. The disease is more effectively controlled when several rust resistance genes are pyramided into a single line. Molecular survey was conducted to screen 25 Pakistan wheat germplasm for the presence of leaf rust resistance gene Lr10 using ...

  12. Genetic characterization of stem rust resistance in a global spring wheat germplasm collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust is considered one of the most damaging diseases of wheat. The recent emergence of the stem rust Ug99 race group poses a serious threat to world wheat production. Utilization of genetic resistance in cultivar development is the optimal way to control stem rust. Here we report association ma...

  13. Aecidium kalanchoe sp. nov., a new rust on Kalanchoe blossfeldiana (Crassulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernádez, José R; Aime, M Catherine; Newbry, Brad

    2004-07-01

    A rust fungus found on cultivars of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana (Crassulaceae) is described as a new species, Aecidium kalanchoe sp. nov., and compared to the other described rusts on members of the Crassulaceae. Only one other rust is known to parasitize Kalanchoe spp. A DNA sequence of A. kalanchoe suggests that the teleomorph is related to Puccinia.

  14. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens causing considerable damage on crop plants. P. graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and M. larici-populina, the poplar rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impact on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. The recently r...

  15. Painting rusted steel: The role of aluminum phosphosilicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselli, S.N.; Amo, B. del; Carbonari, R.O.; Di Sarli, A.R.; Romagnoli, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Aluminum phosphosilicate is an acid pigment which could act as mild phosphating agent. •Aluminum phosphosilicate can phosphatize iron oxides on rusted surfaces. •Aluminum phosphosilicate is compatible with acid binders. •Aluminum phosphosilicate could replace chromate in complete painting schemes. •Aluminum phosphosilicate primers improve paints adhesion on rusted surfaces. -- Abstract: Surface preparation is a key factor for the adequate performance of a paint system. The aim of this investigation is to employ a wash-primer to accomplish the chemical conversion of rusted surface when current cleaning operations are difficult to carry out. The active component of the wash-primer was aluminum phosphosilicate whose electrochemical behavior and the composition of the generated protective layer, both, were studied by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Primed rusted steel panels were coated with an alkyd system to perform accelerated tests in the salt spray chamber and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS). These tests were conducted in parallel with a chromate wash primer and the same alkyd system. Results showed that the wash-primer containing aluminum phosphosilicate could be used satisfactorily to paint rusted steel exhibiting a similar performance to the chromate primer

  16. BLISTERING AND DEGRADATION OF POLYURETHANE COATINGS UNDER DIFFERENT ACCELERATED WEATHERING TESTS. (R828081E01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An epoxy primer with a high gloss polyurethane topcoat coating system was exposed either only in a QUV chamber or exposed in a QUV chamber and a Prohesion chamber, alternatively, in this study. AFM studies found that micro blisters formed on the coating surface after both expo...

  17. Determining the feasibility of objective adherence measurement with blister packaging smart technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onzenoort, H.A. van; Neef, C.; Verberk, W.W.; van Iperen, H.P.; Leeuw, P.W. de; van der Kuy, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The results of a feasibility study of blister-pack smart technology for monitoring medication adherence are reported. METHODS: Research in the area of objective therapy compliance measurement has led to the development of microprocessor-driven systems that record the time a unit dose is

  18. Blistering effects in neutral injection systems operated with helium and hydrogen gases: a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    The practical effects of blistering and flaking in neutral injection systems are studied. These effects will soon be more important because of energy increases in systems now under development and because of their operation with fast helium ions as well as hydrogen and deuterium ions. Two main effects were studied: enhanced erosion rate and possible voltage breakdown from sharp flakes and gas emission

  19. Depth distribution of bubbles in He-ion irradiated nickel and the mechanism of blister formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Studies carried out to understand the experimental observation that the blister skin thickness for many metals irradiated with He + ions of energies lower than 20 keV is a factor of two or more larger than the calculated projected range are reported. Nickel foils were used with 20 and 500 keV helium ions

  20. Cyclosporin A levels in suction-blister fluid of patients with psoriasis treated systemically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, M. M.; van Eendenburg, J. P.; Oosting, J.; van Boxtel, C. J.; de Rie, M. A.; Bos, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Oral cyclosporin A (CyA) is highly effective in the treatment of psoriasis. The long-term use is limited by dose-dependent side-effects, and the local concentration of CyA is a determining factor in treatment. The concentration of CyA in suction-blister fluid (SBF) and in whole blood was assessed

  1. Hydrogen-induced blistering of Mo/Si multilayers: Uptake and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Gleeson, M.A.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    We report on the uptake of deuterium by thin-film Mo/Si multilayer samples as a result of exposure to fluxes of predominantly thermal atomic and molecular species, but also containing a small fraction of energetic (800–1000 eV) ions. These exposures result in blister formation characterized by layer

  2. Hydrogen-induced blistering of Mo/Si multilayers: Uptake and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Gleeson, M. A.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on the uptake of deuterium by thin-film Mo/Si multilayer samples as a result of exposure to fluxes of predominantly thermal atomic and molecular species, but also containing a small fraction of energetic (800 1000 eV) ions. These exposures result in blister formation

  3. Studies on stem and leaf rust resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Stem and leaf rust resistance was successfully transferred from Agropyron to wheat by radiation-induced translocations. Mutation induction subsequently proved to be useful in separating an undesired gene for yellow pigment from the resistance. The homoeologous pairing mutant obtained by Sears was also used successfully in obtaining transfers through crossing-over between wheat and Agropyron chromosomes. Another experimental series succeeded in accumulating minor genes for rust resistance, after eliminating major genes for specific resistance. The resistance is polygenic and widely effective although not general. It is recessively inherited, and hoped to be more durable than major gene resistance used so far in the Canadian prairies. An attempt to induce mutations for leaf rust resistance in a small-scale experiment with leading Canadian wheat varieties Manitou and Neepawa using gamma rays and EMS has not been successful. (author)

  4. Induced mutations for resistance to leaf rust in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borojevic, K.

    1983-01-01

    Problems related to the induction of mutations for disease resistance were investigated under several aspects, using the wheat/leaf rust system. Previously selected mutant lines, tested in M 11 and M 13 , were found to differ with regard to infection type and disease severity from the original varieties. To verify the induced-mutation origin, these mutants were examined further using test crosses with carriers of known genes for leaf rust resistance and electrophoresis. A separate experiment to induce mutations for leaf rust resistance in the wheat varieties Sava, Aurora and Siete Cerros, using gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS, yielded mutants with different disease reaction in the varieties Sava and Aurora at a frequency of about 1x10 - 3 per M 1 plant progenies. (author)

  5. Synoptic climatology of the long-distance dispersal of white pine blister rust I. Development of an upper level synoptic classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. L. Frank; L. S. Kalkstein; B. W. Geils; H. W. Thistle

    2008-01-01

    This study developed a methodology to temporally classify large scale, upper level atmospheric conditions over North America, utilizing a newly-developed upper level synoptic classification (ULSC). Four meteorological variables: geopotential height, specific humidity, and u- and v-wind components, at the 500 hPa level over North America were obtained from the NCEP/NCAR...

  6. Weather and Climate Indicators for Coffee Rust Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, S.; Imbach, P. A.; Avelino, J.; Anzueto, F.; del Carmen Calderón, G.

    2014-12-01

    Coffee rust is a disease that has significant impacts on the livelihoods of those who are dependent on the Central American coffee sector. Our investigation has focussed on the weather and climate indicators that favoured the high incidence of coffee rust disease in Central America in 2012 by assessing daily temperature and precipitation data available from 81 weather stations in the INSIVUMEH and ANACAFE networks located in Guatemala. The temperature data were interpolated to determine the corresponding daily data at 1250 farms located across Guatemala, between 400 and 1800 m elevation. Additionally, CHIRPS five day (pentad) data has been used to assess the anomalies between the 2012 and the climatological average precipitation data at farm locations. The weather conditions in 2012 displayed considerable variations from the climatological data. In general the minimum daily temperatures were higher than the corresponding climatology while the maximum temperatures were lower. As a result, the daily diurnal temperature range was generally lower than the corresponding climatological range, leading to an increased number of days where the temperatures fell within the optimal range for either influencing the susceptibility of the coffee plants to coffee rust development during the dry season, or for the development of lesions on the coffee leaves during the wet season. The coffee rust latency period was probably shortened as a result, and farms at high altitudes were impacted due to these increases in minimum temperature. Factors taken into consideration in developing indicators for coffee rust development include: the diurnal temperature range, altitude, the environmental lapse rate and the phenology. We will present the results of our study and discuss the potential for each of the derived weather and climatological indicators to be used within risk assessments and to eventually be considered for use within an early warning system for coffee rust disease.

  7. Postulation of rust resistance genes in Nordic spring wheat genotypes and identification of widely effective sources of resistance against the Australian rust flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Mandeep; Bansal, Urmil; Lillemo, Morten; Miah, Hanif; Bariana, Harbans

    2016-11-01

    Wild relatives, landraces and cultivars from different geographical regions have been demonstrated as the sources of genetic variation for resistance to rust diseases. This study involved assessment of diversity for resistance to three rust diseases among a set of Nordic spring wheat cultivars. These cultivars were tested at the seedling stage against several pathotypes of three rust pathogens in the greenhouse. All stage stem rust resistance genes Sr7b, Sr8a, Sr12, Sr15, Sr17, Sr23 and Sr30, and leaf rust resistance genes Lr1, Lr3a, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr16 and Lr20 were postulated either singly or in different combinations among these cultivars. A high proportion of cultivars were identified to carry linked rust resistance genes Sr15 and Lr20. Although 51 cultivars showed variation against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotypes used in this study, results were not clearly contrasting to enable postulation of stripe rust resistance genes in these genotypes. Stripe rust resistance gene Yr27 was postulated in four cultivars and Yr1 was present in cultivar Zebra. Cultivar Tjalve produced low stripe rust response against all Pst pathotypes indicating the presence either of a widely effective resistance gene or combination of genes with compensating pathogenic specificities. Several cultivars carried moderate to high level of APR to leaf rust and stripe rust. Seedling stem rust susceptible cultivar Aston exhibited moderately resistant to moderately susceptible response, whereas other cultivars belonging to this class were rated moderately susceptible or higher. Molecular markers linked with APR genes Yr48, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, Lr68 and Sr2 detected the presence of these genes in some genotypes.

  8. Increased Activity and Apoptosis of Eosinophils in Blister Fluids, Skin and Peripheral Blood of Patients with Bullous Pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Judith; Rüdrich, Urda; Behrens, Georg; Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Gehring, Manuela; Kapp, Alexander; Raap, Ulrike

    2017-04-06

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that is more common in elderly individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the functional activity of eosinophils in patients with BP compared with healthy donors. Blood, skin and blister-derived eosinophils were strongly activated in patients with BP, seen by increased surface expression of CD69 compared with controls. CD11b was also increased in BP blood eosinophils, which may explain the striking accumulation of eosinophils in BP (1×106 per ml blister fluid). Furthermore, CCL26 was expressed by activated eosinophils in BP skin and in blister fluid. BP eosinophils also released IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1α in BP blister fluids. Apoptosis in cultivated BP eosinophils was increased and accompanied by enhanced surface externalization of CD95. Caspase 3 positive eosinophils in lesional BP skin and blister fluid also showed the initiation of apoptosis. These results reveal novel pathophysiological aspects of BP, with a strong activation pattern and increased apoptosis of eosinophils in the peripheral blood, skin and blister fluids.

  9. Induced mutations for rust resistance in bread wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of variety ''Lalbahadur'' were treated with 0.04% NMH. M 2 plants were inoculated with a mixture of pathotypes of each of the 3 Puccinia species (P. graminis, P. recondita, P. striiformis). Plants with simultaneous resistance to all 3 rusts were selected. Repeated testing in subsequent generations confirmed the resistance. The mutant lines are morphologically similar to the parent cultivar and therefore could be used as components of a multiline variety. Comparison of variety pattern against the Indian pathotypes of rusts suggests that the mutant genes are different from the ones known already in bread wheat. (author)

  10. Use of gamma radiation for inducing rust resistance in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, Sumit; Wongpiyasatid, Arunee; Lamseejan, Siranut; Naritoom, Kruik

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on induced mutations for rust resistance in 11 soybean cultivars were started in the rainy season of 1979. M 1 seeds were grown at Farm Suwan, Pak Chong, Nakorn Rajchasima Province. Six plods from each of 4,438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked. In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly. M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both of M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants together with M 2 -bulk plants derived from remnant M 2 seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980. The IWGSR rust rating system was used. Based on the slow growth of rust reaction on the plant (323,333) compared with the average IWGSR rust rating notation of the rates (343) in the same row, 121 plants were selected. Among them, six were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Seeds of each selection harvested. Only 88 lines of M 4 and M 5 were available for further rust evaluation in the rainy season of 1981. The results were as follows: At 77 days after planting, 82 selected lines were rated 333, 323 in comparison with 87 out of 137 rows of control S.J.1, S.J.2, S.J.4 and T.K.5 were rated 343. At 86 days after planting, most of the selections reached the diseased level 343. However, six lines which were derived from G8586 were still rated 333. In addition, a plant with slow growth of rust (323) from Taichung N No. 81-1-032 was selected. The six selected lines having characteristics of slow growth of rust reaction on the plants will be further tested. The high yielding selections among 82 selected lines having low percentage of shrivelled seeds will be used for further yield evaluation in the rainy season of 1982

  11. Investigation of blister formation in sputtered Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} absorbers for thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bras, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.bras@angstrom.uu.se [Midsummer AB, Elektronikhöjden 6, SE-17543 Järfälla, Sweden and Solid State Electronics, Angström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Sterner, Jan [Midsummer AB, Elektronikhöjden 6, SE-17543 Järfälla (Sweden); Platzer-Björkman, Charlotte [Solid State Electronics, Angström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    Blister formation in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films sputtered from a quaternary compound target is investigated. While the thin film structure, composition, and substrate material are not correlated to the blister formation, a strong link between sputtering gas entrapment, in this case argon, and blistering effect is found. It is shown that argon is trapped in the film during sputtering and migrates to locally form blisters during the high temperature annealing. Blister formation in CZTS absorbers is detrimental for thin film solar cell fabrication causing partial peeling of the absorber layer and potential shunt paths in the complete device. Reduced sputtering gas entrapment, and blister formation, is seen for higher sputtering pressure, higher substrate temperature, and change of sputtering gas to larger atoms. This is all in accordance with previous publications on blister formation caused by sputtering gas entrapment in other materials.

  12. Reproduction in Laboratory and characterization of Blister of Hydride of zirconium in nuclear fuel pods; Reproduccion en laboratorio y caracterizacion de Blisters de hidroduro de circonio en muestras de vaina de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Rengel, M. A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Munoz, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper have replicated in laboratory blisters of different size in samples of pod of ZIRLO pre-hydrided evenly with 500 ppm of hydrogen. For these samples was used a technique of cathodic charging in basic medium. To produce the blister was heated up to about 350 degree centigrade in its outer surface sample. With the aim of producing a point cold on the surface of the sheath contacted the surface with a piece of aluminum water-cooled (cold finger). Was held a morphological characterization of the blisters by means of optical microscopy and found that the size of the produced blister is function of the contact time between fuel pod and cold finger. (Author)

  13. Characterization of molecular diversity and genome-wide mapping of loci associated with resistance to stripe rust and stem rust in Ethiopian bread wheat accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleta, Kebede T; Rouse, Matthew N; Rynearson, Sheri; Chen, Xianming; Buta, Bedada G; Pumphrey, Michael O

    2017-08-04

    The narrow genetic basis of resistance in modern wheat cultivars and the strong selection response of pathogen populations have been responsible for periodic and devastating epidemics of the wheat rust diseases. Characterizing new sources of resistance and incorporating multiple genes into elite cultivars is the most widely accepted current mechanism to achieve durable varietal performance against changes in pathogen virulence. Here, we report a high-density molecular characterization and genome-wide association study (GWAS) of stripe rust and stem rust resistance in 190 Ethiopian bread wheat lines based on phenotypic data from multi-environment field trials and seedling resistance screening experiments. A total of 24,281 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers filtered from the wheat 90 K iSelect genotyping assay was used to survey Ethiopian germplasm for population structure, genetic diversity and marker-trait associations. Upon screening for field resistance to stripe rust in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Ethiopia over multiple growing seasons, and against multiple races of stripe rust and stem rust at seedling stage, eight accessions displayed resistance to all tested races of stem rust and field resistance to stripe rust in all environments. Our GWAS results show 15 loci were significantly associated with seedling and adult plant resistance to stripe rust at false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted probability (P) rust in the Ethiopian wheat accessions. Many of the identified resistance loci were mapped close to previously identified rust resistance genes; however, three loci on the short arms of chromosomes 5A and 7B for stripe rust resistance and two on chromosomes 3B and 7B for stem rust resistance may be novel. Our results demonstrate that considerable genetic variation resides within the landrace accessions that can be utilized to broaden the genetic base of rust resistance in wheat breeding germplasm. The molecular markers identified in

  14. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudate introgression line in wheat and its genetic association with leaf rust resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Puneet Inder; Kaur, Satinder; Bansal, Mitaly; Yadav, Bharat; Chhuneja, Parveen

    2016-12-01

    A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated wheat. Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcrossrecombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a wheat-Ae. caudata introgression line (IL) T291- 2(pau16060) with wheat cv. PBW343 is reported here. Segregation of BC-RILs for stripe rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%. IL T291-2 had earlier been reported to carry introgressions on wheat chromosomes 2D, 3D, 4D, 5D, 6D and 7D. Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS enriched the target region harbouring stripe and leaf rust resistance genes. Stripe rust resistance locus, temporarily designated as YrAc, mapped at the distal most end of 5DS linked with a group of four colocated SSRs and two resistance gene analogue (RGA)-STS markers at a distance of 5.3 cM. LrAc mapped at a distance of 9.0 cM from the YrAc and at 2.8 cM from RGA-STS marker Ta5DS_2737450, YrAc and LrAc appear to be the candidate genes for marker-assisted enrichment of the wheat gene pool for rust resistance.

  15. Control of Bean Rust using Antibiotics Produced by Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic culture filtrates produced by Bacillus (CA5) and Streptomyces spp. were tested for translocation and persistence when applied on snap beans inoculated with rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) in greenhouse pot experiments. The antibiotics were applied on the first trifoliate leaves and translocation was assessed as ...

  16. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrum-derived leaf rust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrum-derived leaf rust resistance genes Lr19 and Lr24 in bread wheat variety ...

  17. Stem rust seedling resistance genes in Ethiopian wheat cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty durum wheat (19 commercial cultivars and 11 breeding lines) and 30 bread wheat (20 commercial cultivars and 10 breeding lines) were tested for gene postulation. Stem rust infection types produced on wheat cultivars and breeding lines by ten Pgt races was compared with infection types produced on 40 near ...

  18. Reductive and sorptive properties of sulfate green rust (GRSO4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedel, Sorin

    The Fe(II), Fe(III) hydroxide containing sulfate in its structure, called sulfate green rust (GRSO4), can effectively reduce and convert contaminants to less mobile and less toxic forms. However, the ability of GRSO4 to remove positively charged species from solution, via sorption, is very limited...

  19. Sources of stem rust resistance in Ethiopian tetraploid wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem or black rust of wheat caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Ericks and Henn (Pgt) is an important disease on wheat worldwide. Pgt is an obligate biotroph, heteroceous in its life cycle and heterothallic in mating type. Seedlings of 41 emmer (Triticum dicoccum), 56 durum (T. durum) wheat accessions were ...

  20. Screening of fungicides for the management of wattle rust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of the revenue from the species obtained from the timber and 15% from the bark. From 2012/13 a wattle rust disease has spread throughout the black wattle plantation area in KwaZulu-Natal and from 2015 it was recorded in southern ...

  1. Developing clones of Eucalyptus cloeziana resistant to rust (Puccinia psidii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael F. Alfenas; Marcelo M. Coutinho; Camila S. Freitas; Rodrigo G. Freitas; Acelino C. Alfenas

    2012-01-01

    Besides its high resistance to Chrysoporthe cubensis canker, Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell. is a highly valuable tree species for wood production. It can be used for furniture, electric poles, fence posts, and charcoal. Nevertheless, it is highly susceptible to the rust caused by Puccinia psidii, which...

  2. Taxonomy, phylogeny, and coevolution of pines and their stem rusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. I. Millar; B. B. Kinloch

    1991-01-01

    We review and reinterpret major events in the evolution of pines and their stem rusts using information from their taxonomy, genetics, biogeography, and fossil history. Understanding of pine evolution has been significantly revised in the last 20 years. Pines appear to have evolved early in the Mesozoic and to have diversified and migrated throughout middle latitudes...

  3. Molecular Characterization of wheat stem rust races in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem or black rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) Erikss. & Henning causes severe losses to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), historically threatening global wheat production. Characterizing prevalent isolates of Pgt would enhance the knowledge of population dynamics and evolution of t...

  4. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrumderived leaf rust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-20

    Mar 20, 2017 ... resistance genes Lr19 and Lr24 using marker assisted foreground .... is linked with stem rust resistance gene Sr24(McIntosh et al. 1976). .... Received 29 July 2016, in final revised form 3 March 2017; accepted 16 March 2017.

  5. Contribution to Kinetics of Formation of White Rust on Galvanized Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, D. J.; Pyun, Su Il; Hahn, Y. D.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of formation of white rust on galvanized steel coated with various chromating solutions was studied. White rust occurs as a mixture of zinc oxide and zinc hydroxide. White rust formation rate was measured with a salt spray test as related to Cr 3+ ion amount, ratio of Cr 3+ to Cr 6+ ion(by weight) and surface roughness of the chromate film. Incubation time of white rust formation increased as the ratio of Cr 3+ to Cr 6+ ion in the chromate film increased. White rust propagation rate decreased as the amount of Cr 3+ ion increased. Surface roughness had no detectable relationship with incubation time and white rust propagation rate. Experimental results showed that kinetics of white rust formation was as follows: chromate film consists of insoluble Cr 3+ ion and soluble Cr 6+ ion, the latter act: as a corrosion inhibitor. Leaching rate of Cr 6+ ion from the film decreases with an increase of the ratio of Cr 3+ to Cr 6+ ion in the chromate film. When Cr 6+ ion is leached from the film, a bare zine layer is exposed to air and discontinuities occur in the film where white rust formation is initiated. Further white rust formation occurs due to destruction of the chromate film by chlorine ion. It is concluded that two stages of white rust formation are present and can be ascribed to Cr 6+ ion leaching and destruction of the chromate film by chlorine ion

  6. Laboratory, greenhouse and field methods for screening rust-resistant wheat cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashaal, S.F.; Kiraly, Z.; Barabas, Z.; Barna, B.; Cereal Research Inst., Szeged, Hungary)

    1977-01-01

    Detached flag leaf cultures were not suitable for evaluation of stem-rust resistance in our screening programme. On the basis of yield evaluation it was possible to screen out ten stem-rust ''tolerant'' wheat lines in field experiments. Rusted and protected microplots of each line were paired within a replicate. After artificial inoculation, the protected plants were sprayed with fungicides (benomyl plus dithiocarbamate plus copper salt) at weekly intervals until maturation to keep each protected plot rust-free. The thousand-kernel weights of rusted and protected plots were compared. When the thousand-kernel weight of protected plot increased only slightly and the rust reaction type of plants was susceptible in the rusted plot, the line was screened out as putative ''tolerant''. On the basis of three-year field trial ten ''tolerant'' lines were selected. Nine out of ten lines proved to be resistant to two stem-rust races in greenhouse tests in the seedling stage, when resistance was determined on the basis of reduced spore production instead of infection types. Resistance of these seedlings related partly to the reduced number of pustules and partly to a slow rusting character of plants. It seems possible to screen resistant cultivars in the greenhouse by the method outlined in this paper, when resistance is determined on the basis of a reduced number of infection sites and/or by the slow rusting capacity. (author)

  7. The effect of alpha incident- and poloidal-angle distributions on blister-induced first-wall erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Hively, L.; Miley, G.

    1979-01-01

    The incident velocity distribution of high-energy alpha particles bombarding the first wall of an axisymmetric tokamak is evaluated as a function of poloidal angle (theta). The resulting helium concentration profile as a function of the poloidal angle and the implant depth is calculated for a typical Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) design. The critical helium concentration for blistering is first exceeded at theta approx. 55 0 . Peak concentrations are reduced somewhat through continuous D-T sputtering which, dependent on theta, reduces the blister skin thicknesses. The blistering-induced impurity level is found to increase drastically (< approx. 50%), relative to sputtering-induced impurities, at periodic intervals corresponding to approx. 4000 hours operation when each generation of blister begins to exfoliate. (orig.)

  8. Structure and Charge Hopping Dynamics in Green Rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wander, Matthew C.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    Green rust is a family of mixed-valent iron phases formed by a number of abiotic and biotic processes under alkaline suboxic conditions. Due to its high Fe2+ content, green rust is a potentially important phase for pollution remediation by serving as a powerful electron donor for reductive transformation. However, mechanisms of oxidation of this material are poorly understood. An essential component of the green rust structure is a mixed-valent brucite-like Fe(OH)2 sheet comprised of a two dimensional network of edge-sharing iron octahedra. Room temperature Mossbauer spectra show a characteristic signature for intermediate valence on the iron atoms in this sheet, indicative of a Fe2+-Fe3+ valence interchange reaction faster than approximately 107s-1. Using Fe(OH)2 as structural analogue for reduced green rust, we performed Hartree-Fock calculations on periodic slab models and cluster representations to determine the structure and hopping mobility of Fe3+ hole polarons in this material, providing a first principles assessment of the Fe2+-Fe3+ valence interchange reaction rate. The calculations show that among three possible symmetry unique iron-to-iron hops within a sheet, a hop to next-nearest neighbors at an intermediate distance of 5.6Angstroms is the fastest. The predicted rate is on the order of 1012 s-1 consistent the Mossbauer-based constraint. All other possibilities, including hopping across interlayer spaces, are predicted to be slower than 107s-1. Collectively, the findings suggest the possibility of hole self-diffusion along sheets as a mechanism for regeneration of lattice Fe2+ sites, consistent with previous experimental observations of edge-inward progressive oxidation of green rust.

  9. Blister formation and hydrogen retention in aluminium and beryllium: A modeling and experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Quirós

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed in a low pressure-high density plasma reactor in order to study the impact of hydrogen retention in aluminium under plasma conditions. Microscopy scans of the surface were performed before and after 1h plasma exposure (fluence 6.1 ×1023ions/m2 where it is seen that blisters start to nucleate at the grain boundaries. Investigation on blister growth kinetics was performed for fluences ranging between 6 ×1023 and 3.7 ×1024ions/m2. The evolution of the characteristic size of the projected area was also analyzed. Finally, a macroscopic rate equations (MRE code was used to simulate hydrogen retention and diffusion in Al and bubble growth in the bulk was simulated using experimental results. This model was also used to simulate these phenomena in Be and compare its behavior with respect to Al.

  10. Effect of periodic deuterium ion irradiation on deuterium retention and blistering in Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of periodic irradiation on Deuterium (D retention and blistering in Tungsten (W was investigated. W samples were exposed to D plasma at a fixed fluence while varying the irradiation cycle number (1-shot, 2-shots and 3-shots. Exposure energy and flux were ∼50eV and ∼1 ×1022 D m−2 s−1, respectively. Sample temperatures were 537K and 643K. At 573K, D retention and blister density decreased with increasing number of irradiation cycle. In contrast at 643K, D retention showed no dependence on number of irradiation cycle. Therefore, sample temperature during irradiation is an important parameter in comparing the results of continuous and periodic irradiation, especially in studies involving extremely-high-flux (>1024 D m−2 s−1 irradiation and fluence dependency of D retention.

  11. Host status of false brome grass to the leaf rust fungus Puccinia brachypodii and the stripe rust fungus P. Striiformis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, M.; Marcel, T.C.; Niks, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Purple false brome grass (Brachypodium distachyon) has recently emerged as a model system for temperate grasses and is also a potential model plant to investigate plant interactions with economically important pathogens such as rust fungi. We determined the host status of five Brachypodium species

  12. Introgression of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance from Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis Eig) into bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, E; Manisterski, J; Ben-Yehuda, P; Distelfeld, A; Deek, J; Wan, A; Chen, X; Steffenson, B J

    2014-06-01

    Leaf rust and stripe rust are devastating wheat diseases, causing significant yield losses in many regions of the world. The use of resistant varieties is the most efficient way to protect wheat crops from these diseases. Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis or AES), which is a diploid wild relative of wheat, exhibits a high frequency of leaf and stripe rust resistance. We used the resistant AES accession TH548 and induced homoeologous recombination by the ph1b allele to obtain resistant wheat recombinant lines carrying AES chromosome segments in the genetic background of the spring wheat cultivar Galil. The gametocidal effect from AES was overcome by using an "anti-gametocidal" wheat mutant. These recombinant lines were found resistant to highly virulent races of the leaf and stripe rust pathogens in Israel and the United States. Molecular DArT analysis of the different recombinant lines revealed different lengths of AES segments on wheat chromosome 6B, which indicates the location of both resistance genes.

  13. Boat Hull Blisters: Repair Techniques and Long Term Effects on Hull Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    X 12’ waxed glass mold. Orthophthalic Acid/ Neopentyl glycol based gel coat was used in the R, RA, RA and RD series. Isophthalic acid/keopentyl glycol ...a boat manufacturer. The gel coat was isophthalic acid and / neopentyl glycol based. The laminating resin used was isophthalic acid/propylene glycol ...something present in the resin itself. We have reported blistering vhen sorbitol is added to the resin. Pritchard has reported on the role of excess glycol

  14. The use of suction blisters to measure sunscreen protection against UVR-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Gwendal; Douki, Thierry; Le Digabel, Jimmy; Gravier, Eleonore; Questel, Emmanuel

    2018-02-01

    The formation of DNA photoproducts caused by solar UVR exposure needs to be investigated in-vivo and in particular in order to assess sunscreens' level of protection against solar genotoxicity. The study's purposes were: i) to evaluate if the roof of suction blisters is an appropriate sampling method for measuring photoproducts, and ii) to measure in-vivo sunscreen protection against cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Skin areas on the interior forearms of eight healthy volunteers were exposed in-vivo to 2 MED of simulated solar radiation (SSR) and to 15 MED on a sunscreen protected area. After irradiation, six suction blisters were induced and the blister roofs were collected. Analysis of SSR-induced CPDs was performed by two independent methods: a chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS/MS) approach and a 3D-imaging of CPD immunostaining by multiphoton microscopy on floating epidermal sheets. HPLC-MS/MS analyses showed that SSR-unexposed skin presented no CPD dimers, whereas 2 MED SSR-exposed skin showed a significant number of TT-CPD. The sunscreen covered skin exposed to 15 MED appeared highly protected from DNA damage, as the amount of CPD-dimers remained below the detection limit. The multiphoton-immunostaining analysis consistently showed that no CPD staining was observed on the non-SSR-exposed skin. A significant increase of CPD staining intensity and number of CPD-positive cells were observed on the 2 MED SSR-exposed skin. Sunscreen protected skin presented a very low staining intensity and the number of CPD-positive cells remained very close to non-SSR-exposed skin. This study showed that suction blister samples are very appropriate for measuring CPD dimers in-vivo, and that sunscreens provide high protection against UVR-induced DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Observations of suppressed retention and blistering for tungsten exposed to deuterium-helium mixture plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Morito, S.; Ono, K.; Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P.; Baldwin, M.J.; Hanna, J.; Ueda, Y.; Kurishita, H.

    2009-01-01

    Blister formation and D retention in W have been investigated for low energy (∼55 ± 15 eV), high flux (∼10 22 m -2 s -1 ), high fluence (≤4.5 x 10 26 m -2 ) ion bombardment at moderate temperature (∼573 K) in mixed species D+He plasmas in the linear divertor plasma simulator PISCES-A. The amount of D retained in W is found to decrease significantly when compared with that in W exposed to pure D plasmas, as measured with high resolution thermal desorption spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy observations reveal the suppression of the blisters, a surface feature known to drive up retention, in the D + He mixture plasma exposed W samples. Reduced D retention is accompanied by the formation of nano-sized high density He bubbles in the near surface, observed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is believed that the nano-bubbles act as a diffusion barrier to implanted D atoms and consequently reduce the amount of uptake in the W material. This newly observed effect implies that current predictions of D retention in W, in actual fusion devices, may be overestimated, since there will be He ash in fusion plasma. Toughness enhanced, fine-grained (grain size of ∼1 μm) W-TiC samples, exposed to pure D plasma conditions, also show little or no evidence of blistering. The measured D retention in the W-TiC samples was approximately 1 x 10 19 D m -2 corresponding to about 2 x 10 -7 of the implanted D fluence, and is very low compared with the retention in pure stress relieved W, which exhibited surface blisters and had a D retention of about 1 x 10 21 D m -2 .

  16. Fine element (F.E.) modelling of hydrogen migration and blister formation in PHWR coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Sinha, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of a cold spot in pressure tube due to its contact with calandria tube of PHWR coolant results in the migration of Hydrogen in pressure tube towards contact zone from its surrounding material. A 3-D finite element code SPARSH is developed to model the hydrogen redistribution and consequent hydride blister formation due to thermal and Hydrogen concentration gradients. In the present paper, the details and performance of this code are presented. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  17. Evidence for a role of eosinophils in blister formation in bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graauw, E; Sitaru, C; Horn, M; Borradori, L; Yousefi, S; Simon, H-U; Simon, D

    2017-07-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune bullous disease of the skin characterized by subepidermal blister formation due to tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal antigens BP180 and BP230. Although eosinophils and their toxic mediators are found abundantly in BP lesions, their role in blister formation has remained unclear. To investigate the role of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of BP with a specific focus on blister formation and to define conditions inducing dermal-epidermal separation (DES). In an ex vivo human model of BP, normal human skin cryosections were incubated with purified human peripheral blood eosinophils with or without activation in the presence or absence of BP autoantibodies, brefeldin A, diphenyleneiodonium, DNase or blocking F(ab') 2 fragments to CD16, CD18, CD32 and CD64. Dermal-epidermal separation was assessed by light microscopy studies and quantified using Fiji software. Following activation with IL-5 and in the presence of BP autoantibodies, eosinophils induced separation along the dermal-epidermal junction of ex vivo skin. Dermal-epidermal separation was significantly reduced by blocking any of the following: Fcγ receptor binding (P = 0.048), eosinophil adhesion (P = 0.046), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (P = 0.002), degranulation (P eosinophil extracellular trap (EET) formation (P = 0.048). Our results provide evidence that IL-5-activated eosinophils directly contribute to BP blister formation in the presence of BP autoantibodies. Dermal-epidermal separation by IL-5-activated eosinophils depends on adhesion and Fcγ receptor activation, requires elevated ROS production and degranulation and involves EET formation. Thus, targeting eosinophils may be a promising therapeutic approach for BP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Bullous impetigo and pregnancy: Case report and review of blistering conditions in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-04-18

     Bullous impetigo results from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) release of exfoliative toxins type A and type B thatresults in flaccid, easily ruptured, bullae in the upper layers of the epidermis.  Physiologic, gestation-associated, and incidental skin changes can occur in pregnancy.  Blisters in pregnant women can occur secondary to either common skin disorders orspecific dermatoses of pregnancy.  To describe a pregnant woman with bullous impetigo and review bullous conditions in pregnant women.  PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination:  blister, blistering, bullous, gestationis, herpes, herpetiformis, impetigo, pemphigoid, pregnancy, pregnant, psoriasis, pustular, virus. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated.  Flaccid, easily rupturing, pustules, which developed into superficial annular erosions with peripheral scale and central healing appeared in a woman of 7-weeks gestation and allergy to penicillin on her lower abdomen, suprapubic region, perineum, buttocks, and proximal legs.  A bacterial culture subsequently isolated methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.  All of the lesions resolved after treatment with clindamycin.  Bullous impetigo should be considered in the differential diagnosis of common skin diseases presenting as blistersin pregnant women.

  19. Superficial Dsg2 Expression Limits Epidermal Blister Formation Mediated by Pemphigus Foliaceus Antibodies and Exfoliative Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Brennan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion mediated by desmosomes is crucial for maintaining proper epidermal structure and function, as evidenced by several severe and potentially fatal skin disorders involving impairment of desmosomal proteins. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS are subcorneal blistering diseases resulting from loss of function of the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1. To further study the pathomechanism of these diseases and to assess the adhesive properties of Dsg2, we employed a recently established transgenic (Tg mouse model expressing Dsg2 in the superficial epidermis. Neonatal Tg and wild type (WT mice were injected with purified ETA or PF Ig. We showed that ectopic expression of Dsg2 reduced the extent of blister formation in response to both ETA and PF Ig. In response to PF Ig, we observed either a dramatic loss or a reorganization of Dsg1-α, Dsg1-β, and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1-γ, in WT mice. The Inv-Dsg2 Tg mice showed enhanced retention of Dsg1 at the cell-cell border. Collectively, our data support the role for Dsg2 in cell adhesion and suggest that ectopic superficial expression of Dsg2 can increase membrane preservation of Dsg1 and limit epidermal blister formation mediated by PF antibodies and exfoliative toxins.

  20. Kinetics of structural rust transformation in environments containing chloride and SO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon, J. L.; Valencia, A.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of the rusts produced on low carbon steel exposed in industrial atmospheres, at different distances from the sea, was studied by simulating the wetting-drying cycle in a CEBELCOR type apparatus. Coupons electrode potential was monitored and rust layer was analyzed by gravimetric techniques, optical microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. A particular chloride/sulfur ratio in the atmosphere was found, for which there is a particular behaviour in rust formation. For this ratio, corrosion rates were much less than expected. it is postulated a kinetic mechanism for rust layer formation as the origin of this special behavior. An electrode potential similar to that in a weathering steel was observed, this is reflected in the low corrosion rate obtained. The proposed kinetic mechanism for rust formation under these exposure conditions enables new research lines on layer formation and the development of protective rust for industrial marine atmospheres. (Author) 8 refs

  1. New Rust Disease of Korean Willow (Salix koreensis) Caused by Melampsora yezoensis, Unrecorded Pathogen in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Ahn, Geum Ran; Yoon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Hoo Hyun; Son, Seung Yeol; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    During the growing season of 2015, leaf specimens with yellow rust spots were collected from Salix koreensis Andersson, known as Korean willow, in riverine areas in Cheonan, Korea. The fungus on S. koreensis was identified as the rust species, Melampsora yezoensis , based on the morphology of urediniospores observed by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the molecular properties of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region. Pathogenicity tests confirmed that the urediniospores are the causal agent of the rust symptoms on the leaves and young stems of S. koreensis . Here, we report a new rust disease of S. koreensis caused by the rust fungus, M. yezoensis , a previously unrecorded rust pathogen in Korea.

  2. Reaction of Rust on Some Bread Wheat Varieties in Çukurova Region

    OpenAIRE

    AY, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with 126 varieties of wheat between 2009-2010 years in Adana. There has not been artificially inoculated yellow, leaf and stem rusts. Races of rust in natural were evaluated in both years. Between 2009-2010 this study was conducted in Adana, with 126 varieties of bread wheat. In both years, only the natural environment leaf rust races inoculated for assessments reactions of bread wheat. According to results, 49 bread wheat varieties were found resistant, 6 bread wheat...

  3. Transformation of the flax rust fungus, Melampsora lini: selection via silencing of an avirulence gene

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Gregory J.; Dodds, Peter N.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Rust fungi cause devastating diseases on many important food crops, with a damaging stem rust epidemic currently affecting wheat production in Africa and the Middle East. These parasitic fungi propagate exclusively on plants, precluding the use of many biotechnological tools available for other culturable fungi. In particular the lack of a stable transformation system has been an impediment to the genetic manipulation required for molecular analysis of rust pathogenicity. We have developed an...

  4. Influence of yellow rust infection on /sup 32/P transport in detached barley leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, J. (Akademie der Landwirtschaftswissenschaften der DDR, Aschersleben. Inst. fuer Phytopathologie)

    1982-01-01

    Several barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) differing in their resistance to yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis West.) were tested for relationships between changes of /sup 32/P transport in detached leaves and resistance to yellow rust disease. Investigation carried out with detached second leaves from plants infected at their first leaf revealed a matter transport in these leaves changed by the infection. Transport was also influenced by inoculation with yellow rust uredospores. In that case rust infection influenced the basipetal transport less strongly in resistent plants than in susceptible ones. Connected with the findings the influence of fungal substances on transport processes is discussed in general.

  5. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Pendleton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world’s most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host’s cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of sixteen diverse fungal species, which include fifteen basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: i arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or ii contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity.

  6. Influence of yellow rust infextion on 32P transport in detached barley leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.

    1982-01-01

    Several barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) differing in their resistance to yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis West.) were tested for relationships between changes of 32 P transport in detached leaves and resistance to yellow rust disease. Investigation carried out with detached second leaves from plants infected at their first leaf revealed a matter transport in these leaves changed by the infection. Transport was also influenced by inoculation with yellow rust uredospores. In that case rust infection influenced the basipetal transport less strongly in resistent plants than in susceptible ones. Connected with the findings the influence of fungal substances on transport processes is discussed in general. (author)

  7. Physical Localization of a Locus from Agropyron cristatum Conferring Resistance to Stripe Rust in Common Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Song, Liqiang; Han, Haiming; Zhou, Shenghui; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2017-11-13

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici ( Pst ), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2 n = 28, PPPP), one of the wild relatives of wheat, exhibits resistance to stripe rust. In this study, wheat- A . cristatum 6P disomic addition line 4844-12 also exhibited resistance to stripe rust. To identify the stripe rust resistance locus from A . cristatum 6P, ten translocation lines, five deletion lines and the BC₂F₂ and BC₃F₂ populations of two wheat- A . cristatum 6P whole-arm translocation lines were tested with a mixture of two races of Pst in two sites during 2015-2016 and 2016-2017, being genotyped with genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and molecular markers. The result indicated that the locus conferring stripe rust resistance was located on the terminal 20% of 6P short arm's length. Twenty-nine 6P-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) markers mapped on the resistance locus have been acquired, which will be helpful for the fine mapping of the stripe rust resistance locus. The stripe rust-resistant translocation lines were found to carry some favorable agronomic traits, which could facilitate their use in wheat improvement. Collectively, the stripe rust resistance locus from A . cristatum 6P could be a novel resistance source and the screened stripe rust-resistant materials will be valuable for wheat disease breeding.

  8. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Amanda L; Smith, Katherine E; Feau, Nicolas; Martin, Francis M; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hamelin, Richard; Nelson, C Dana; Burleigh, J Gordon; Davis, John M

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world's most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host's cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of 16 diverse fungal species, which include 15 basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: (i) arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or (ii) contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity.

  9. Resistance to rusts (uromyces pisi and u. viciae-fabae) in pea

    OpenAIRE

    Barilli, Eleonora; Sillero, Josefina C.; Prats, Elena; Rubiales, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Pea is the second most important food legume crop in the world. Rust is a pea disease widely distributed, particularly in regions with warm, humid weather. Pea rust can be incited by Uromyces viciae-fabae and by U. pisi. U. viciae-fabae prevails in tropical and subtropical regions such as India and China, while U. pisi prevails in temperate regions. Chemical control of rust is possible, but the use of host plant resistance is the most desired means of rust control. In this paper we revise and...

  10. An analysis of the risk of introduction of additional strains of the rust puccinia psidii Winter ('Ohi'a Rust) to Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, Lloyd; La Rosa, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    In April 2005, the rust fungus Puccinia psidii (most widely known as guava rust or eucalyptus rust) was found in Hawai'i. This was the first time this rust had been found outside the Neotropics (broadly-defined, including subtropical Florida, where the rust first established in the 1970s). First detected on a nursery-grown 'ohi'a plant, it became known as ''ohi'a rust'in Hawai'i. The rust spread rapidly and by August 2005 had been found throughout the main Hawaiian Islands. The rust probably reached Hawai'i via the live plant trade or via the foliage trade. In Hawai'i, the rust has infected three native plant species and at least eight non-native species. Effects have been substantial on the endangered endemic plant Eugenia koolauensis and the introduced rose apple, Syzygium jambos. Billions of yellow, asexual urediniospores are produced on rose apple, but a complete life cycle (involving sexual reproduction) has not yet been observed. The rust is autoecious (no alternate host known) on Myrtaceae. The strain introduced into Hawai'i is found sparingly on 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha), the dominant tree of Hawai'i's forests, with sporadic damage detected to date. The introduction of a rust strain that causes widespread damage to 'ohi'a would be catastrophic for Hawai'i's native biodiversity. Most imports of material potentially contaminated with rust are shipped to Hawai'i from Florida and California (from which P. psidii was reported in late 2005 by Mellano, 2006). Florida is known to have multiple strains. The identity of the strain or strains in California is unclear, but one of them is known to infect myrtle, Myrtus communis, a species commonly imported into Hawai'i. It is important to ecosystem conservation and commercial forestry that additional rust strains or genotypes be prevented from establishing in Hawai'i. The purpose of this analysis of risk is to evaluate the need for an interim rule by the Hawai'i Department of Agriculture to regulate plant

  11. Magnetic property based characterization of rust on weathering steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, T.; Ishii, Y.; Okada, T.; Kimura, M.; Kihira, H.

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of rusts on weathering steels is important in understanding the origin of their corrosion resistance. Rust consists of several phases, e.g. α-, β- and γ-FeOOH, which are anti-ferromagnetic with different Neel temperatures. Rust on so-called advanced weathering steel containing 3 wt.% Ni [H. Kihira, A. Usami, K. Tanabe, M. Ito, G. Shigesato, Y. Tomita, T. Kusunoki, T. Tsuzuki, S. Ito, T. Murata, in: Proc. Symp. on Corrosion and Corrosion Control in Saltwater Environments, Honolulu, 1999, The Electrochemical Soc., pp. 127-136] contains in addition a ferrimagnetic spinel phase [M. Kimura, H. Kihira, Y. Ishii, T. Mizoguchi, in: Proc. 13th Asian-Pacific Corrosion Control Conference, Osaka, 2003; M. Kimura, H. Kihira, N. Ohta, M. Hashimoto, T. Senuma, Corros. Sci., this volume; M. Kimura, N. Ohta, H. Kihira, Mater. Trans. JIM, in press]. The nanostructure of real rust cannot be elucidated satisfactorily only with conventional analytical methods such as X-ray diffraction, because of the complex mixture of phases with fine and imperfect crystallites. Because of the short range of the super-exchange coupling between Fe ions in a solid, the magnetic properties can give information on local configurations even in the absence of perfect crystalline coherence. Therefore, the magnetic properties of rust samples were investigated in detail using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer and Moessbauer spectroscopy. SQUID magnetometry is effective to determine the quantity of the ferrimagnetic phase. The temperature dependence of the Moessbauer spectrum gives information about not only the fractions of the phases but also the distribution of grain volume, V, in each phase according to the super-paramagnetic relaxation effect. This approach has been applied to rust of conventional [T. Okada, Y. Ishii, T. Mizoguchi, I. Tamura, Y. Kobayashi, Y. Takagi, S. Suzuki, H. Kihira, M. Ito, A. Usami, K. Tanabe, K. Masuda, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39

  12. Studies on general resistance to stem rust in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Eight cultivars that were thought to have field resistance to stem rust were selected and crossed to produce four four-cultivar hybrids. From those crosses lines were produced that lacked seedling resistance to race 15B-1 of stem rust but had good field resistance to it. They also proved to have field resistance to many other races and it is hoped that the resistance is general. Genetic studies indicated that there is some variation in the lines, but resistance is generally inherited as a quantitative character with several largely recessive genes having small additive effects. This suggests that in an induced mutation programme, no one plant is likely to accumulate sufficient mutant genes that it will appear resistant. (author)

  13. Protective, curative and eradicative activities of fungicides against grapevine rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francislene Angelotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective, eradicative and curative activities of the fungicides azoxystrobin, tebuconazole, pyraclostrobin+metiram, and ciproconazole against grapevine rust, were determined in greenhouse. To evaluate the protective activity, leaves of potted ´Niagara´ (Vitis labrusca vines were artificially inoculated with an urediniospore suspension of Phakopsora euvitis four, eight or forteen days after fungicidal spray; and to evaluate the curative and eradicative activities, leaves were sprayed with fungicides two, four or eight days after inoculation. Disease severity was assessed 14 days after each inoculation. All tested fungicides present excellent preventive activity against grapevine rust; however, tebuconazole and ciproconazole provide better curative activity than azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin+metiram. It was observed also that all tested fungicides significantly reduced the germination of urediniospore produced on sprayed leaves.

  14. Study of a low alloy steel rust using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, I.A.; Saragovi-Badler, C.; Labenski, F.

    1978-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to analyze the internal and external rust layers of a weathering steel exposed for ten months to an urban-industrial atmosphere. Superparamagnetic α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH were found in both layers. The external one also contained small sized delta-FeOOH and/or amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. These compounds were not present in the internal layer at this stage of the patina formation. (author)

  15. Influence of lactate ions on the formation of rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabot, R.; Jeannin, M.; Gadouleau, M.; Guo, Q.; Sicre, E.; Refait, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The formation of rust can be simulated by oxidation of aqueous suspensions of Fe(OH) 2 obtained by mixing solutions of NaOH and a Fe(II) salt. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of organic species associated with microbially influenced corrosion. The lactate anion, often used as a carbon and electrons source for the development of microorganisms, was chosen as an example. Then, in the first part of the study, Fe(OH) 2 was precipitated using iron(II) lactate and NaOH. Its oxidation process involved two stages, as usually observed. The first stage led to a Fe(II-III) intermediate compound, the lactate green rust, GR(C 3 H 5 O 3 - ). This compound has never been reported yet. Its existence demonstrates that the GR structure is able to incorporate a very wide range of anions, whatever the size and geometry. The second stage corresponded to the oxidation of GR(C 3 H 5 O 3 - ). It led to ferrihydrite, the most poorly ordered form of iron(III) oxides and oxyhydroxides. In the second part of the study, the formation of rust in seawater was simulated by oxidation of Fe(OH) 2 in an aqueous media containing both Cl - and SO 4 2- anions. The first stage led to the sulphate green rust, GR(SO 4 2- ), the second stage to lepidocrocite γ-FeOOH. Small amounts of iron(II) lactate were added to the reactants. Lactate ions did not modify the first stage but drastically perturbed the second stage, as ferrihydrite was obtained instead of γ-FeOOH

  16. Identification and Severity Determination of Wheat Stripe Rust and Wheat Leaf Rust Based on Hyperspectral Data Acquired Using a Black-Paper-Based Measuring Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Liu; Wang, Rui; Liu, Qi; Ma, Zhanhong; Li, Xiaolong; Cheng, Pei; Wang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    It is important to implement detection and assessment of plant diseases based on remotely sensed data for disease monitoring and control. Hyperspectral data of healthy leaves, leaves in incubation period and leaves in diseased period of wheat stripe rust and wheat leaf rust were collected under in-field conditions using a black-paper-based measuring method developed in this study. After data preprocessing, the models to identify the diseases were built using distinguished partial least squares (DPLS) and support vector machine (SVM), and the disease severity inversion models of stripe rust and the disease severity inversion models of leaf rust were built using quantitative partial least squares (QPLS) and support vector regression (SVR). All the models were validated by using leave-one-out cross validation and external validation. The diseases could be discriminated using both distinguished partial least squares and support vector machine with the accuracies of more than 99%. For each wheat rust, disease severity levels were accurately retrieved using both the optimal QPLS models and the optimal SVR models with the coefficients of determination (R2) of more than 0.90 and the root mean square errors (RMSE) of less than 0.15. The results demonstrated that identification and severity evaluation of stripe rust and leaf rust at the leaf level could be implemented based on the hyperspectral data acquired using the developed method. A scientific basis was provided for implementing disease monitoring by using aerial and space remote sensing technologies. PMID:27128464

  17. Identification and Severity Determination of Wheat Stripe Rust and Wheat Leaf Rust Based on Hyperspectral Data Acquired Using a Black-Paper-Based Measuring Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Qin, Feng; Ruan, Liu; Wang, Rui; Liu, Qi; Ma, Zhanhong; Li, Xiaolong; Cheng, Pei; Wang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    It is important to implement detection and assessment of plant diseases based on remotely sensed data for disease monitoring and control. Hyperspectral data of healthy leaves, leaves in incubation period and leaves in diseased period of wheat stripe rust and wheat leaf rust were collected under in-field conditions using a black-paper-based measuring method developed in this study. After data preprocessing, the models to identify the diseases were built using distinguished partial least squares (DPLS) and support vector machine (SVM), and the disease severity inversion models of stripe rust and the disease severity inversion models of leaf rust were built using quantitative partial least squares (QPLS) and support vector regression (SVR). All the models were validated by using leave-one-out cross validation and external validation. The diseases could be discriminated using both distinguished partial least squares and support vector machine with the accuracies of more than 99%. For each wheat rust, disease severity levels were accurately retrieved using both the optimal QPLS models and the optimal SVR models with the coefficients of determination (R2) of more than 0.90 and the root mean square errors (RMSE) of less than 0.15. The results demonstrated that identification and severity evaluation of stripe rust and leaf rust at the leaf level could be implemented based on the hyperspectral data acquired using the developed method. A scientific basis was provided for implementing disease monitoring by using aerial and space remote sensing technologies.

  18. Induced mutations in beans and peas for resistance to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, F.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma rays and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) were applied in a mutation-induction programme for rust resistance in bean and pea. Bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked 2 hours before irradiation with 9, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical mutagen treatments bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked for 8 hours and treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. M 2 seeds of beans and peas were planted in 1979. Resistant M 2 plants were selected for their rust resistance and other morphological characters. M 3 seeds of selected plants were planted in 1980. In 1980 more seeds of the same varieties of beans and peas were treated with 0.1 and 0.3% EMS with the aim to produce rust-resistant mutants. Seed germination was reduced by gamma rays or EMS. Dwarf, malformed and abnormal plants were noticed. Some resistant M 2 plants selected gave high grain yields. Some were different in morphological characters. In the M 3 of selected plants various other mutant characters appeared, such as different height of plants, early and late flowering, resistance to powdery mildew in peas, altered grain yield, thickness of stem, pod shape and flower colour. (author)

  19. The genome sequence and effector complement of the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane eNemri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi cause serious yield reductions on crops, including wheat, barley, soybean, coffee, and represent real threats to global food security. Of these fungi, the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini has been developed extensively over the past 80 years as a model to understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. During infection, M. lini secretes virulence effectors to promote disease. The number of these effectors, their function and their degree of conservation across rust fungal species is unknown. To assess this, we sequenced and assembled de novo the genome of M. lini isolate CH5 into 21,130 scaffolds spanning 189 Mbp (scaffold N50 of 31 kbp. Global analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that repetitive elements, primarily retrotransposons, make up at least 45% of the genome. Using ab initio predictions, transcriptome data and homology searches, we identified 16,271 putative protein-coding genes. An analysis pipeline was then implemented to predict the effector complement of M. lini and compare it to that of the poplar rust, wheat stem rust and wheat stripe rust pathogens to identify conserved and species-specific effector candidates. Previous knowledge of four cloned M. lini avirulence effector proteins and two basidiomycete effectors was used to optimise parameters of the effector prediction pipeline. Markov clustering based on sequence similarity was performed to group effector candidates from all four rust pathogens. Clusters containing at least one member from M. lini were further analysed and prioritized based on features including expression in isolated haustoria and infected leaf tissue and conservation across rust species. Herein, we describe 200 of 940 clusters that ranked highest on our priority list, representing 725 flax rust candidate effectors. Our findings on this important model rust species provide insight into how effectors of rust fungi are conserved across species and how they may act to promote

  20. The genome sequence and effector complement of the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemri, Adnane; Saunders, Diane G O; Anderson, Claire; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Win, Joe; Lawrence, Gregory J; Jones, David A; Kamoun, Sophien; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi cause serious yield reductions on crops, including wheat, barley, soybean, coffee, and represent real threats to global food security. Of these fungi, the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini has been developed most extensively over the past 80 years as a model to understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. During infection, M. lini secretes virulence effectors to promote disease. The number of these effectors, their function and their degree of conservation across rust fungal species is unknown. To assess this, we sequenced and assembled de novo the genome of M. lini isolate CH5 into 21,130 scaffolds spanning 189 Mbp (scaffold N50 of 31 kbp). Global analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that repetitive elements, primarily retrotransposons, make up at least 45% of the genome. Using ab initio predictions, transcriptome data and homology searches, we identified 16,271 putative protein-coding genes. An analysis pipeline was then implemented to predict the effector complement of M. lini and compare it to that of the poplar rust, wheat stem rust and wheat stripe rust pathogens to identify conserved and species-specific effector candidates. Previous knowledge of four cloned M. lini avirulence effector proteins and two basidiomycete effectors was used to optimize parameters of the effector prediction pipeline. Markov clustering based on sequence similarity was performed to group effector candidates from all four rust pathogens. Clusters containing at least one member from M. lini were further analyzed and prioritized based on features including expression in isolated haustoria and infected leaf tissue and conservation across rust species. Herein, we describe 200 of 940 clusters that ranked highest on our priority list, representing 725 flax rust candidate effectors. Our findings on this important model rust species provide insight into how effectors of rust fungi are conserved across species and how they may act to promote infection on their

  1. Investigation of the Cause of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell K Meyer

    2012-06-01

    Blister–threshold testing of fuel plates is a standard method through which the safety margin for operation of plate-type in research and test reactors is assessed. The blister-threshold temperature is indicative of the ability of fuel to operate at high temperatures for short periods of time (transient conditions) without failure. This method of testing was applied to the newly developed U-Mo monolithic fuel system. Blister annealing studies on the U-Mo monolithic fuel plates began in 2007, with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 experiment, and they have continued as the U-Mo fuel system has evolved through the research and development process. Blister anneal threshold temperatures from early irradiation experiments (RERTR-6 through RERTR-10) ranged from 400 to 500°C. These temperatures were projected to be acceptable for NRC-licensed research reactors and the high-power Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) based on current safety-analysis reports (SARs). Initial blister testing results from the RERTR-12 experiment capsules X1 and X2 showed a decrease in the blister-threshold temperatures. Blister threshold temperatures from this experiment ranged from 300 to 400°C. Selected plates from the AFIP-4 experiment, which was fabricated using a process similar to that used to fabricate the RERTR-12 experiment, also underwent blister testing to determine whether results would be similar. The measured blister-threshold temperatures from the AFIP-4 plates fell within the same blister-threshold temperature range measured in the RERTR-12 plates. Investigation of the cause of this decrease in bister threshold temperature is being conducted under the guidance of Idaho National Laboratory PLN-4155, “Analysis of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments,” and is driven by hypotheses. The main focus of the investigation is in the following areas: 1. Fabrication variables 2. Pre

  2. A perspective of leaf rust race fhprn and its impact on leaf rust resistance in pakistani wheat varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohail, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf rust infected leaves of a widely growing variety Seher-06 were collected in wheat season of 2011-12. The leaf rust isolates were assessed on Thatcher derived Lr isogenic lines and a race FHPRN was identified. Seventy six wheat varieties/lines besides Lr isogenic lines were screened against this race for seedling in glass house and for adult plant resistance at Bahawalpur and Faisalabad during 2012-13. Lr1, Lr2a, Lr9, Lr19, Lr24, Lr10+27+31 (Gatcher) and Lr28 were found completely resistant at both stages against FHPRN. Molecular screening of the wheat varieties/lines indicated the presence of leaf rust resistance genes Lr9 (0%), Lr13 (43%), Lr19 (1%), Lr20 (0%), Lr24 (4%), Lr26 (23%), Lr28 (0%), Lr34 (38%), Lr37 (1%) and Lr47 (1%) in them. Field data suggested that As-02 (Lr10+26+34), Bhakar-02 (Lr13) and Shafaq-06 (Lr10+13+27) were resistant; Pasban-90 (Lr10+13+26+27), Chenab-2000 (Lr10+13+26+27+31+34), Fbd-08 (Lr10), Millat-11 (unknown) and Punjab-11 (unknown) were found moderately resistant; Blue silver (Lr13+14a), Pak-81 (Lr10+23+26+31), Bahawalpur-97 (Lr13+26) and Lasani-08 (Lr13+27+31) were susceptible while Sh-88 (unknown), Auqab-2000 (Lr10+23+26+27+31), Iqbal-2000 (Lr3+10+13+26+27+31), Bahawalpur-2000 (Lr34) and Seher-06 (Lr10+27+31) were found highly susceptible against FHPRN. Present and previous studies revealed the presence of Lr3, 10, 13, 14a, 23, 26, 27, 31 and 34 in the Pakistani wheat varieties yet lacking Lr9, 19, 24 and 28. Therefore, the latter genes and their effective combinations should be incorporated in Pakistani varieties to combat leaf rust effectively. (author)

  3. Spread, genetic variation and methods for the detection of Puccinia kuehnii, the causal agent of sugarcane orange rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane is susceptible to infection by two rust pathogens, Puccinia melanocephala and P. kuehnii, causing brown and orange rust, respectively. Orange rust of sugarcane was first reported in the Western hemisphere in Florida in July 2007. The pathogen was found to be distributed widely throughout t...

  4. Blistering in a porous surface layer of materials. [He ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afrikanov, I.N.; Vladimirov, B.G.; Guseva, M.I.; Ivanov, S.M.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Nikol' skij, Yu.V.; Ryazanov, A.I.

    1981-03-01

    The effect of porous structure on the nature and rate of radiation erosion during implantation of helium ions into nickel and the OKh15N15M3B stainless steel is studied. The investigation results showed sharp dependence of the erosion rate due to blistering on the dimension and density of pores in the by-surface layer. The rate of the surface erosion increased in one order as compared with the control specimens without pores at 1% swelling for stainless steel and 4% for nickel.

  5. The influence of microstructure on blistering and bubble formation by He ion irradiation in Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, S.R.; Tolley, A.; Sánchez, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of microstructure and composition on the effects of ion irradiation in Al alloys was studied combining Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For this purpose, irradiation experiments with 20 keV He + ions at room temperature were carried out in Al, an Al–4Cu (wt%) supersaturated solid solution, and an Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge (wt.%) alloy with a very high density of precipitates, and the results were compared. In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were found with an average size in between 1 nm and 2 nm that was independent of fluence. The critical fluence for bubble formation was higher in Al–4Cu than in Al. He bubbles were also observed below the critical fluence after post irradiation annealing in Al–4Cu. The incoherent interfaces between the equilibrium θ phase and the Al matrix were found to be favorable sites for the formation of He bubbles. Instead, no bubbles were observed in the precipitate rich Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy. In all alloys, blistering was observed, leading to surface erosion by exfoliation. The blistering effects were more severe in the Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy, and they were enhanced by increasing the fluence rate. - Highlights: • In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were formed, but no bubbles were observed in Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge. • Bubble formation was enhanced at incoherent matrix/precipitate interfaces in Al–4Cu. • The bubble size was insensitive to displacement rate in pure Al. • In Al and Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge blistering was observed, which was more severe in the alloy. • Blistering effects were enhanced by increasing the displacement rate in Al and Al–4Cu.

  6. Pill in the blister pack: a rare cause of dysphagia in an elderly adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Syed Mudassir; Rai, Ayesha Aslam; Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Majid, Zain

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body impaction in the esophagus amongst adults is not a common cause of dysphagia. Fish bone, food bolus, dentures may cause symptoms of dysphagia, odynophagia, chest pain or respiratory distress. It needs prompt evaluation along with removal of the substance either surgically or endoscopically to avoid the development of life threatening complications. Here we are reporting a case of an elderly male, who presented to us with a history of absolute dysphagia for one week, as a consequence of ingestion of a pill in blister pack. PMID:26918072

  7. Morphology and AFLP markers suggest three Hordeum chilense ecotypes that differ in avoidance to rust fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz Patto, M.C.; Aardse, A.; Buntjer, J.; Rubiales, D.; Martin, A.; Niks, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    In Hordeum chilense Roem. & Schult., a high variation in the level of avoidance to infection of barley leaf rust (Puccinia hordei Otth) occurs. Probably resulting from the properties of the stomata, the rust germ tube overgrows stomata, and the infection process fails in an early stage. In the

  8. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota; Rubiales, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance (NHR) responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus) and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus) rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However, responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non-specific and specific responses underlying this legume NHR to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and NHR mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species. PMID:25426128

  9. Bulked fusiform rust inocula and Fr gene interactions in loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikret Isik; Henry Amerson; Saul Garcia; Ross Whetten; Steve. McKeand

    2012-01-01

    Fusiform rust disease in loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var elliottii) pine plantations in the southern United States causes multi-million dollar annual losses. The disease is endemic to the region. The fusiform rust fungus (Cronartium quercuum sp.

  10. Targeted introgression of stem rust Ug99 resistance from wheatgrasses into pasta and bread wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past 50 years, a number of stem rust resistance (Sr) genes have been transferred from several wheat-related grasses into durum (i.e. pasta) and bread wheat through chromosome translocations and additions. To utilize these genes for controlling the Ug99 races of the stem rust pathogen, we ini...

  11. Genetic and environmental variation in rust frequency on mature mountain birch trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elamo, Pirjo; Saloniemi, Irma; Helander, M.L.; Neuvonen, Seppo [Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology) and (Kevo Subarctic Research Inst., Turku (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    This study investigated genetic and environmental variation in the frequency of birch rust, the most important leaf disease of birch species, The same half-sib families of mature mountain birch trees were studied in two areas corresponding to their natural growing habitats over 3 yrs. The frequency of birch rust was examined both in the field and from detached leaves inoculated in the laboratory. The frequency of birch rust varied among the mountain birch families. However, the heritability of birch rust resistance was found to be fairly low, with the heritability of naturally occurring birch rust varying between 0.27 and 0.41. The frequency of birch rust varied highly between the two study areas and among study years. Nevertheless, the relative frequency of birch rust among tree individuals and tree families remained similar and as a result no notable genotype x environment interaction was observed. The field and in vitro results differed with respect to the ranking of birch families by birch rust resistance.

  12. Genetics of leaf rust resistance in the hard red winter wheat cultivars Santa Fe and Duster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina is a common and important disease of hard red winter wheat in the Great Plains of the United States. The hard red winter wheat cultivars 'Santa Fe' and 'Duster' have had effective leaf rust resistance since their release in 2003 and 2006, respectively. Both cul...

  13. Stem and stripe rust resistance in wheat induced by gamma rays and thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorda, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts were made to produce rust-resistant mutants in wheat cultivars. Seeds of G-38290 and G-58383 (T. aestivum), Methoni and Ilectra (T. durum) varieties were irradiated with different doses of γ-rays (3.5, 5, 8, 11, 15 and 21 krad) and thermal neutrons (1.7, 4, 5.5, 7.5, 10.5 and 12.5x10 12 ) and the M 1 plants were grown under isolation in the field. The objective was mainly to induce stripe, leaf and stem rust resistance in G-38290, Methoni and Ilectra varieties and leaf rust resistance in G-58383. Mutations for rust resistance were detected by using the ''chimera method'' under natural and artificial field epiphytotic conditions in M 2 and successive generations. The mutants detected were tested for resistance to a broad spectrum of available races. Mutants resistant or moderately resistant to stripe and stem rusts but not to leaf rust, were selected from G-38290. From the other three varieties tested no rust-resistant mutants were detected. The frequency of resistant mutants obtained increased with increased γ-ray dose-rate, but not with increased thermal neutron doses. Some mutants proved to be resistant or moderately resistant to both rusts and others to one of them. Twenty of these mutants were evaluated for yield from M 5 to M 8 . Some of them have reached the final stage of regional yield trials and one, induced by thermal neutrons, was released this year. (author)

  14. Effect of orange rust on sugarcane breeding program at canal Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange rust of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids), caused by Puccinia kuehnii (W. Krüger) E.J. Butler, appeared in the Western Hemisphere ten years ago. Orange rust substantially reduces yields in susceptible sugarcane genotypes. Majority of the commercial cultivars were susceptible at the time of o...

  15. Abnormal germling development by brown rust and powdery mildew on cer barley mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubiales, D.; Ramirez, M.C.; Carver, T.L.W.; Niks, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    The barley leaf rust fungus forms appressoria over host leaf stomata and penetrates via the stomatal pore. High levels of avoidance to leaf rust fungi have been described in some wild accessions of Hordeum species where a prominent wax layer on the stomata inhibits triggering of fungal appressorium

  16. Prescreening slash pine and Cronartium pedigrees for evaluation of complementary gene action in fusiform rust disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E. Stelzer; Robert L. Doudrick; Thomas L. Kubisiak; C. Dana Nelson

    1999-01-01

    Single-urediniospore cultures of the fusiform rust fungus were used to inoculate seedlings from 10 full-sib families of a five-parent slash pine diallel at two different times in 1994. The presence or absence of fusiform rust galls was recorded for each inoculated seedling at 9 months postinoculation, and percent infection levels for each family-inoculum-time...

  17. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tance genes (Lr) and 48 stripe rust resistance genes (Yr) have .... Leaf rust reaction of the parents, wheat – Ae. caudata introgression lines and representative F2 plants developed from the cross: .... segregation ratio, which is otherwise a serious problem with ... Financial assistance was provided by the USDA-ARS under the.

  18. Unveiling common responses of Medicago truncatula to appropriate and inappropriate rust species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carlota eVaz Patto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the nature of effective defense mechanisms in legumes to pathogens of remotely related plant species. Some rust species are among pathogens with broad host range causing dramatic losses in various crop plants. To understand and compare the different host and nonhost resistance responses of legume species against rusts, we characterized the reaction of the model legume Medicago truncatula to one appropriate (Uromyces striatus and two inappropriate (U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus rusts. We found that similar pre and post-haustorial mechanisms of resistance appear to be operative in M. truncatula against appropriate and inappropriate rust fungus. The appropriate U. striatus germinated better on M. truncatula accessions then the inappropriate U. viciae-fabae and U. lupinicolus, but once germinated, germ tubes of the three rusts had a similar level of success in finding stomata and forming an appressoria over a stoma. However responses to different inappropriate rust species also showed some specificity, suggesting a combination of non specific and specific responses underlying this legume nonhost resistance to rust fungi. Further genetic and expression analysis studies will contribute to the development of the necessary molecular tools to use the present information on host and nonhost resistance mechanisms to breed for broad-spectrum resistance to rust in legume species.

  19. Effect of fungicide on the development of wheat stem rust and yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f.sp tritici Erik. & E. Henn. is a highly destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The effects of fungicide application on stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici) epidemics and yield of three bread wheat varieties varying in reaction to the disease were studied in two major wheat ...

  20. Determining yield loss caused by brown rust in production fields of sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections of Puccinia melanocephala, the causal agent of brown rust, appear on Louisiana sugarcane in the spring. Disease expression is usually limited to 2 to 3 months until temperatures exceed those favorable for spore production. The affected sugarcane is harvested 4 to 6 months after rust sympt...

  1. Utilization of a major brown rust resistance gene in sugarcane breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by Puccinia melanocephala has had devastating effects on sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding programs and on commercial production. The discovery of Bru1, a major gene conferring resistance to brown rust represented a substantial breakthrough and markers for the detection of Bru1 ...

  2. Detection, breeding, and selection of durable resistance to brown rust in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane in Louisiana. The adaptability of the pathogen has repeatedly resulted in resistant cultivars becoming susceptible once they are widely grown. The frequency of the brown rust resistance gene Bru1 was low in the breedi...

  3. Screening for sugarcane brown rust in first clonal stage of the Canal Point sugarcane breeding program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) brown rust (caused by Puccinia melanocephala H. & P. Sydow) was first reported in the United States in 1978 and is still one of great challenges for sugarcane production. A better understanding of sugarcane genotypic variation in response to brown rust will help optimize b...

  4. Detection of wheat stem rust race RRTTF in Ecuador in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat stem rust is a devastating disease that has incited numerous severe epidemics resulting in extreme yield losses over the past century. Stem rust infection in plots of wheat line UC11075, known to carry the Sr38 resistance gene, was severe in February 2016 in a nursery at the Instituto Nacional...

  5. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Crown Rust Resistance in Oat Elite Germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Kathy Esvelt; Yimer, Belayneh A; Babiker, Ebrahiem M; Beattie, Aaron D; Bonman, J Michael; Carson, Martin L; Chong, James; Harrison, Stephen A; Ibrahim, Amir M H; Kolb, Frederic L; McCartney, Curt A; McMullen, Michael; Fetch, Jennifer Mitchell; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Murphy, J Paul; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2017-07-01

    Oat crown rust, caused by f. sp. , is a major constraint to oat ( L.) production in many parts of the world. In this first comprehensive multienvironment genome-wide association map of oat crown rust, we used 2972 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 631 oat lines for association mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). Seedling reaction to crown rust in these lines was assessed as infection type (IT) with each of 10 crown rust isolates. Adult plant reaction was assessed in the field in a total of 10 location-years as percentage severity (SV) and as infection reaction (IR) in a 0-to-1 scale. Overall, 29 SNPs on 12 linkage groups were predictive of crown rust reaction in at least one experiment at a genome-wide level of statistical significance. The QTL identified here include those in regions previously shown to be linked with seedling resistance genes , , , , , and and also with adult-plant resistance and adaptation-related QTL. In addition, QTL on linkage groups Mrg03, Mrg08, and Mrg23 were identified in regions not previously associated with crown rust resistance. Evaluation of marker genotypes in a set of crown rust differential lines supported as the identity of . The SNPs with rare alleles associated with lower disease scores may be suitable for use in marker-assisted selection of oat lines for crown rust resistance. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  6. MICROCOSM STUDY OF DEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS ON SYNTHETIC GREEN RUST MINERALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green rust minerals contain ferrous ion in their structure that can potentially serve as a chemical reductant for degradation of chlorinated solvents. Green rusts are found in zerovalent iron based permeable reactive barriers and in certain soil and sediments. Some previous labor...

  7. Genome-wide association study of rust traits in orchardgrass using SLAF-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bing; Yan, Haidong; Liu, Xinchun; Zang, Wenjing; Zhang, Ailing; Zhou, Sifan; Huang, Linkai; Liu, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    While orchardgrass ( Dactylis glomerata L.) is a well-known perennial forage species, rust diseases cause serious reductions in the yield and quality of orchardgrass; however, genetic mechanisms of rust resistance are not well understood in orchardgrass. In this study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology in orchardgrass. A total of 2,334,889 SLAF tags were generated to produce 2,309,777 SNPs. ADMIXTURE analysis revealed unstructured subpopulations for 33 accessions, indicating that this orchardgrass population could be used for association analysis. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed an average r 2 of 0.4 across all SNP pairs, indicating a high extent of LD in these samples. Through GWAS, a total of 4,604 SNPs were found to be significantly ( P  rust trait. The bulk analysis discovered a number of 5,211 SNPs related to rust trait. Two candidate genes, including cytochrome P450, and prolamin were implicated in disease resistance through prediction of functional genes surrounding each high-quality SNP ( P  rust traits based on GWAS analysis and bulk analysis. The large number of SNPs associated with rust traits and these two candidate genes may provide the basis for further research on rust resistance mechanisms and marker-assisted selection (MAS) for rust-resistant lineages.

  8. Genomic dissection of nonhost resistance to wheat stem rust in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat stem rust caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f.sp. tritici (Pgt) is a devastating disease that has largely been controlled for decades by the deployment of resistance genes. However, new races of this pathogen have emerged that overcome many important wheat stem rust resistance genes used ...

  9. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  10. Long-term changes in fusiform rust incidence in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    KaDonna C. Randolph; Ellis B. Cowling; Dale A. Starkey

    2015-01-01

    Fusiform rust is the most devastating disease of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in the southeastern United States. Since the 1970s, the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program has assessed fusiform rust incidence on its network of ground plots in 13 states across the...

  11. Wheat stem rust in South Africa: Current status and future research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . In South Africa, stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici. Eriks. & E. Henn. (Pgt) is an important disease of wheat. Records of stem rust occurrence in South Africa date back to the late 1720's, when it was first discovered in the ...

  12. Mapping genes for resistance to stripe rust in spring wheat landrace PI 480035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikks. is an economically important disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Hexaploid spring wheat landrace PI 480035 was highly resistant to stripe rust in the field in Washington during 2011 and 2012. The objective of this resear...

  13. Studies of the genetics of inheritance of stem rust resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five resistant wheat lines (KSL-2, KSL-3, KSL-5, KSL-12 and KSL-19) which were resistant in tests during 2008, 2009 and 2010 were used as parents in crosses with stem rust susceptible line CACUKE to develop genetic populations for determining the inheritance of resistance to stem rust. F3 populations were evaluated ...

  14. Characterization of the rust formed on weathering steel exposed to Qinghai salt lake atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.X.; Wang, Z.Y.; Han, W.; Han, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    The product formed on weathering steel exposed to salt lake atmosphere for 12 months was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and electrochemical techniques. The rust was mainly composed of β-FeOOH, Fe 8 (O,OH) 16 Cl 1.3 and a little γ-FeOOH. Amorphous δ-FeOOH was only on skyward surface. The rust layer suppressed anodic reaction and facilitated the cathodic reaction. The very small value of rust resistance R r in this work indicated that the rust had poor protective ability. Cl element was rich in the whole rust layer and played an important role in accelerating the corrosion of weathering steel in salt lake atmosphere

  15. Mechanical properties of the rust layer induced by impressed current method in reinforced mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Care, S.; Nguyen, Q.T.; L'Hostis, V.; Berthaud, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical effects of rust layer formed in reinforced mortar through accelerated tests of corrosion. The morphological and physico-chemical properties (composition, structures) of the corrosion system were characterized at different stages by using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion pattern was mainly characterized by a rust layer confined at the interface between the steel and the mortar. Expansion coefficient of rust products was determined from the rust thickness and the Faraday's law. Furthermore, in order to understand the mechanical effects of corrosion on the damage of mortar, displacement field measurements were obtained by using digital image correlation. An analytical model (hollow cylinder subjected to inner and outer pressures) was used with a set of experimental data to deduce the time of cracking and the order of magnitude of the mechanical properties of the rust layer

  16. Resistance Potential of Bread Wheat Genotypes Against Yellow Rust Disease Under Egyptian Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amer F; Hassan, Mohamed I; Amein, Karam A

    2015-12-01

    Yellow rust (stripe rust), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most destructive foliar diseases of wheat in Egypt and worldwide. In order to identify wheat genotypes resistant to yellow rust and develop molecular markers associated with the resistance, fifty F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between resistant and susceptible bread wheat landraces were obtained. Artificial infection of Puccinia striiformis was performed under greenhouse conditions during two growing seasons and relative resistance index (RRI) was calculated. Two Egyptian bread wheat cultivars i.e. Giza-168 (resistant) and Sakha-69 (susceptible) were also evaluated. RRI values of two-year trial showed that 10 RILs responded with RRI value >6 2 rust. However, further molecular analyses would be performed to confirm markers associated with the resistance and suitable for marker-assisted selection. Resistant RILs identified in the study could be efficiently used to improve the resistance to yellow rust in wheat.

  17. Identification and characterization of pleiotropic and co-located resistance loci to leaf rust and stripe rust in bread wheat cultivar Sujata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Caixia; Zhang, Yelun; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Basnet, Bhoja R; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Lagudah, Evans S; Singh, Ravi P

    2015-03-01

    Two new co-located resistance loci, QLr.cim - 1AS/QYr.cim - 1AS and QLr.cim - 7BL/YrSuj , in combination with Lr46 / Yr29 and Lr67/Yr46 , and a new leaf rust resistance quantitative trait loci, conferred high resistance to rusts in adult plant stage. The tall Indian bread wheat cultivar Sujata displays high and low infection types to leaf rust and stripe rust, respectively, at the seedling stage in greenhouse tests. It was also highly resistant to both rusts at adult plant stage in field trials in Mexico. The genetic basis of this resistance was investigated in a population of 148 F5 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross Avocet × Sujata. The parents and RIL population were characterized in field trials for resistance to leaf rust during 2011 at El Batán, and 2012 and 2013 at Ciudad Obregón, Mexico, and for stripe rust during 2011 and 2012 at Toluca, Mexico; they were also characterized three times for stripe rust at seedling stage in the greenhouse. The RILs were genotyped with diversity arrays technology and simple sequence repeat markers. The final genetic map was constructed with 673 polymorphic markers. Inclusive composite interval mapping analysis detected two new significant co-located resistance loci, QLr.cim-1AS/QYr.cim-1AS and QLr.cim-7BL/YrSuj, on chromosomes 1AS and 7BL, respectively. The chromosomal position of QLr.cim-7BL overlapped with the seedling stripe rust resistance gene, temporarily designated as YrSuj. Two previously reported pleiotropic adult plant resistance genes, Lr46/Yr29 and Lr67/Yr46, and a new leaf rust resistance quantitative trait loci derived from Avocet were also mapped in the population. The two new co-located resistance loci are expected to contribute to breeding durable rust resistance in wheat. Closely linked molecular markers can be used to transfer all four resistance loci simultaneously to modern wheat varieties.

  18. The surface blistering kinetics and the H-platelet evolution in H-implanted germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Fan; Zhang Xuanxiong; Ye Tianchun; Zhuang Songlin

    2012-01-01

    The surface blistering phenomenon produced in H-implanted Ge by a series of low temperature annealing processes was investigated. The kinetic plot of the onset of blistering contains a break point that separates the straight-line plot into two parts, with two distinct slopes based on the calculated activation energy from the different temperature regions for 3×10 16 cm -2 and 5×10 16 cm -2 H-implanted doses. This plot indicates the existence of distinct, temperature dependent mechanisms, probably caused by the release of different types of H-platelets. The turning direction (from low to high temperature) of the Arrhenius plot with the break point is contrary to that of other known materials. The formation and evolution of the H-platelets under the Ge surface was revealed by TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM results demonstrate that the 〈0 0 1〉 platelets parallel to the sample surface are first produced by a low H implantation dose; however, the vertical 〈0 1 0〉 platelets perpendicular to the sample surface form later as the H implantation dose increases. The H-platelets combine with each other, becoming micro-cracks. The {1 1 1} and {3 1 1} micro-cracks serve as interconnections between the 〈0 0 1〉-oriented micro-cracks below the substrate surface. Finally, the accumulated H 2 pressure in the cracks deforms the surface to generate Ge surface exfoliation.

  19. Correlation between RUST assessments of fracture healing to structural and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Margaret E; Hussein, Amira I; Lybrand, Kyle E; Wulff, Alexander; Simmons, Erin; Choi, Jeffrey H; Litrenta, Jody; Ricci, William M; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V; Morgan, Elise F; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Tornetta, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Radiographic Union Score for Tibia (RUST) and modified RUST (mRUST) are radiographic tools for quantitatively evaluating fracture healing using a cortical scoring system. This tool has high intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs); however, little evidence has evaluated the scores against the physical properties of bone healing. Closed, stabilized fractures were made in the femora of C3H/HeJ male mice (8-12 week-old) of two dietary groups: A control and a phosphate restricted diet group. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) and torsion testing were carried out at post-operative days (POD) 14, 21, 35, and 42 (n = 10-16) per group time-point. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographic views were constructed from the µCT scans and scored by five raters. The raters also indicated if the fracture were healed. ICCs were 0.71 (mRUST) and 0.63 (RUST). Both RUST scores were positively correlated with callus bone mineral density (BMD) (r = 0.85 and 0.80, p RUST scores positively correlated with callus strength (r = 0.35 and 0.26, p RUST ≥10 and had excellent relationship to structural and biomechanical metrics. Effect of delayed healing due to phosphate dietary restrictions was found at later time points with all mechanical properties (p RUST scores (p > 0.318). Clinical relevance of this study is both RUST scores showed high correlation to physical properties of healing and generally distinguished healed vs. non-healed fractures. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:945-953, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of two Triticum-Secale-Thinopyrum Trigeneric Hybrids Exhibiting Superior Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight, Leaf Rust, and Stem Rust Race Ug99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Duan, Yamei; Liu, Huiping; Chi, Dawn; Cao, Wenguang; Xue, Allen; Gao, Yong; Fedak, George; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), leaf rust, and stem rust are the most destructive fungal diseases in current world wheat production. The diploid wheatgrass, Thinopyrum elongatum (Host) Dewey (2 n = 2 x = 14, EE) is an excellent source of disease resistance genes. Two new Triticum-Secale-Thinopyrum trigeneric hybrids were derived from a cross between a hexaploid triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack, 2 n = 6 x = 42, AABBRR) and a hexaploid Triticum trititrigia (2 n = 6 x = 42, AABBEE), were produced and analyzed using genomic in situ hybridization and molecular markers. The results indicated that line RE21 contained 14 A-chromosomes, 14 B-chromosomes, three pairs of R-chromosomes (4R, 6R, and 7R), and four pairs of E-chromosomes (1E, 2E, 3E, and 5E) for a total chromosome number of 2 n = 42. Line RE62 contained 14 A-chromosomes, 14 B-chromosomes, six pairs of R-chromosomes, and one pair of translocation chromosomes between chromosome 5R and 5E, for a total chromosome number of 2 n = 42. At the seedling and adult growth stages under greenhouse conditions, line RE21 showed high levels of resistance to FHB, leaf rust, and stem rust race Ug99, and line RE62 was highly resistant to leaf rust and stem rust race Ug99. These two lines (RE21 and RE62) display superior disease resistance characteristics and have the potential to be utilized as valuable germplasm sources for future wheat improvement.

  1. Blister/hole formation on tungsten surface due to low-energy and high-flux deuterium/helium plasma exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Iwakiri, H.; Yoshida, N.; Ye, M.Y.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    Deuterium/helium plasma exposures on tungsten surface bring serious damages such as blister and hole. Blistering occurs by cleaving along layered structure intrinsic to the press-roll manufacturing process. Mechanical polishing and helium pre-exposure on mirror-finished powder metallurgy tungsten drastically suppress blister formation. Small cracks made by a polishing would become paths to the surface for diffusing deuterium atoms in the substrate, resulting in no gas accumulation and no blister formation on the surface. Helium pre-exposure would make a helium-enriched layer near the surface, which becomes a kind of diffusion barrier for incident deuterium atoms. Blister formation and deuterium retention are suppressed on the surface with helium-enriched layer. (author)

  2. Characterization of the effect generated by the preformed and formed processes applied to drainage catheters of Quadrathane"T"M, in the blistered defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Forero, Diana Catalina

    2014-01-01

    The effect generated by preformed and formed processes on drainage catheters is characterized in the blistered defect. The potential root causes generated from the blistered defect are identified by the experimental design of one factor at a time. The experimental phases performed on the blistered defect have been: chemical interaction, humidity, mechanical stress, parameters RO Bonding, parameters of temperature and time of retention in the forming process. The application of quality control process methodology is recommended to obtain robust information about the defect and the process in general. Polymeric extrusions and construction of drainage catheters processes are described. The processes of preformed, formed and blistered defect are explained. The incidence of blistered defect and the yields of each batch produced of catheters should be controlled by means of weekly records to avoid further complications at the level of yield or quality [es

  3. Screening and incorporation of rust resistance from Allium cepa into bunching onion (Allium fistulosum) via alien chromosome addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Tadayuki; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Ohara, Takayoshi; Kojima, Akio; Yaguchi, Shigenori; Shimazaki, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Naoko; Sakai, Takako; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.; 2n = 16), bulb onion (Allium cepa L. Common onion group), and shallot (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group) cultivars were inoculated with rust fungus, Puccinia allii, isolated from bunching onion. Bulb onions and shallots are highly resistant to rust, suggesting they would serve as useful resources for breeding rust resistant bunching onions. To identify the A. cepa chromosome(s) related to rust resistance, a complete set of eight A. fistulosum - shallot monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) were inoculated with P. allii. At the seedling stage, FF+1A showed a high level of resistance in controlled-environment experiments, suggesting that the genes related to rust resistance could be located on shallot chromosome 1A. While MAAL, multi-chromosome addition line, and hypoallotriploid adult plants did not exhibit strong resistance to rust. In contrast to the high resistance of shallot, the addition line FF+1A+5A showed reproducibly high levels of rust resistance.

  4. An overview of sugarcane brown rust in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María La O

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Multiple pathogens affect sugarcane, among them Puccinia melanocephala, the causal agent of brown rust. This disease was first reported in Cuba in 1979 when it was responsible for a severe attack on the main sugarcane variety B4362. The aims of the present study were to give an overview of sugarcane brown rust in Cuba and show the current disease situation in the country. A retrospective analysis regard to sugarcane cultivar composition resistant to brown rust in Cuba was carried out. In addition 154 genotypes, including the most used progenitors in the breeding program and commercial varieties were evaluated under natural infection conditions. The identity of P. melanocephala was verified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and by sequencing the ITS1 region. After the introduction of P. melanocephala into Cuba, the susceptible variety, B4362, was replaced by Ja60-5 which remained resistant until 1998. Since 2002, a varietal policy supported by a governmental resolution establishing that any single cultivar cannot occupy more than 20 % of the production area for each production company, local area and province, has been applied. Out of the genotypes evaluated, 49 showed resistance to the disease and 35 intermediate behavior, while 39 were susceptible and 31, highly susceptible. P. melanocephala was detected by PCR in all symptomatic samples and its identify confirmed by sequencing the ITS1 region. The adopted measurement together with permanent phytosanitary monitoring and commercial release of resistant or intermediate cultivars succeeded in avoiding any new epidemic. Inoculum pressure was reduced, even on susceptible and highly susceptible varieties since, by resolution, they cannot occupy more than 10 % of the planted area.

  5. Effectiveness of carboxylic acids from Pichia membranifaciens against coffee rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Laura Andrade Melchor

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coffee rust is a fungal disease that has affected every coffee-producing region in the world. Given that the effectivity of the protectant and systemic fungicides applied routinely to control the spread of the causative agent of the disease (Hemileia vastatrix has gradually diminished, besides are harmful to mammals and ecosystems, the objective of this work was to search for a mixture of harmless natural compounds with the potential to be applied in the field. So, a yeast strain producing a battery of long-chain carboxylic acids (CA with fungicide properties was isolated from soil of coffee crop and identified as Pichia membranifaciens by ITS sequencing. Culture conditions of the yeast were optimized and the CA in the solution were characterized by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS as ethyl formate (55.5 g L-1, octadecenoic acid (3.5 g L-1, propionic acid (7.2 g L-1, 3-(octadecanoyl-propionic acid (7.2 g L-1 and methyl acetate (8.4 g L-1. Randomized field studies were conducted in three different locations in Chiapas, México. Five treatments were tested including three concentrations of the CA solution (389, 584 and 778 ppm and copper oxychloride (5 000 ppm as conventional control. The initial coffee rust incidence averages varied between sites: Maravillas (3-9%, Santo Domingo (10-16% and Búcaro (16-22%. The treatments of CA solution proved to be effective at slowing down the progress of the rust disease even for the sites where initial incidence was high. Likewise, the CA solution reduced the viability of H. vastatrix spores, as assessed by fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Effectors from Wheat Rust Fungi Suppress Multiple Plant Defense Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sowmya R; Yin, Chuntao; Kud, Joanna; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Mahoney, Aaron K; Xiao, Fangming; Hulbert, Scot H

    2017-01-01

    Fungi that cause cereal rust diseases (genus Puccinia) are important pathogens of wheat globally. Upon infection, the fungus secretes a number of effector proteins. Although a large repository of putative effectors has been predicted using bioinformatic pipelines, the lack of available high-throughput effector screening systems has limited functional studies on these proteins. In this study, we mined the available transcriptomes of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis to look for potential effectors that suppress host hypersensitive response (HR). Twenty small (wheat, confirming its activity in a homologous system. Overall, this study provides the first evidence for the presence of effectors in Puccinia species suppressing multiple plant defense responses.

  7. Characteristics of superior soybean breeding lines tolerance to rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfi Inayati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Soybean rust caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is one of the most important diseases which limits soybean production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance of 28 superior soybean lines and their tolerance to rust. The study was conducted at a screen house and arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD; three replications. All genotypes tested were artificially inoculated with P. pachyrhizi, and a set of un-inoculated genotypes was planted as a comparison. Number of pustules was recorded weekly, and resistant criteria was rated based on the International working group on soybean rust IWGSR method. Lesion color (LC, sporulation level (SL, number of uredia (NoU, frequency of pustule which had uredia, and yield were also recorded. Among 28 genotypes tested, only one was categorized as resistant and 2 genotypes were susceptible. Resistant genotypes had few pustules, lower AUDPC values, low disease severity, and Reddish Brown lesion type. Soybean rust affected yield components, i.e. number of intact pods and yield per plant. Yield loses due to rust in this study varied from 5-89%, and the average was 51%. The set of lines from Tanggamus pedigree showed more resistant to rust but less tolerant compared to Sinabung pedigree.How to CiteInayati, A., & Yusnawan, E. (2016. Characteristics of superior soybean breeding lines tolerancet to rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd.. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(1, 47-55.

  8. Study of Rust Effect on the Corrosion Behavior of Reinforcement Steel Using Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensabra, Hakim; Azzouz, Noureddine

    2013-12-01

    Most studies on corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete are conducted on steel samples with polished surface (free of all oxides) in order to reproduce the same experimental conditions. However, before embedding in concrete, the steel bars are often covered with natural oxides (rust), which are formed during exposure to the atmosphere. The presence of this rust may affect the electrochemical behavior of steel rebar in concrete. In order to understand the effect of rust on the corrosion behavior of reinforcement steel, potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were carried out in a simulated concrete pore solution using steel samples with two different surface conditions: polished and rusted samples. The obtained results have shown that the presence of rust on the steel bar has a negative effect on its corrosion behavior, with or without the presence of chlorides. This detrimental effect can be explained by the fact that the rust provokes a decrease of the electrolyte resistance at the metal-concrete interface and reduces the repassivating ability. In addition, the rust layer acts as a barrier against the hydroxyl ion diffusion, which prevents the realkalinization phenomenon.

  9. Plant-pathogen interactions: leaf physiology alterations in poplars infected with rust (Melampsora medusae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortari, Fermín; Guiamet, Juan José; Graciano, Corina

    2018-01-23

    Rust produced by Melampsora sp. is considered one of the most relevant diseases in poplar plantations. Growth reduction in poplar plantations takes place because rust, like other pathogens, alters leaf physiology. There is not a complete evaluation of several of the physiological traits that can be affected by rust at leaf level. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate, in an integrative way and in the same pathosystem, which physiological processes are affected when Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. leaves are infected by rust (Melampsora medusae Thümen). Leaves of two clones with different susceptibility to rust were analyzed. Field and pot experiments were performed, and several physiological traits were measured in healthy and infected leaves. We conclude that rust affects leaf mesophyll integrity, and so water movement in the leaf in liquid phase is affected. As a consequence, gas exchange is reduced, affecting both carbon fixation and transpiration. However, there is an increase in respiration rate, probably due to plant and fungal respiration. The increase in respiration rate is important in the reduction of net photosynthetic rate, but also some damage in the photosynthetic apparatus limits leaf capacity to fix carbon. The decrease in chlorophyll content would start later and seems not to explain the reduction in net photosynthetic rate. Both clones, although they have different susceptibility to rust, are affected in the same physiological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A reassessment of the risk of rust fungi developing resistance to fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    Rust fungi are major pathogens of many annual and perennial crops. Crop protection is largely based on genetic and chemical control. Fungicide resistance is a significant issue that has affected many crop pathogens. Some pathogens have rapidly developed resistance and hence are regarded as high-risk species. Rust fungi have been classified as being low risk, in spite of sharing many relevant features with high-risk pathogens. An examination of the evidence suggests that rust fungi may be wrongly classified as low risk. Of the nine classes of fungicide to which resistance has developed, six are inactive against rusts. The three remaining classes are quinone outside inhibitors (QoIs), demethylation inhibitors (DMIs) and succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHIs). QoIs have been protected by a recently discovered intron that renders resistant mutants unviable. Low levels of resistance have developed to DMIs, but with limited field significance. Older SDHI fungicides were inactive against rusts. Some of the SDHIs introduced since 2003 are active against rusts, so it may be that insufficient time has elapsed for resistance to develop, especially as SDHIs are generally sold in mixtures with other actives. It would therefore seem prudent to increase the level of vigilance for possible cases of resistance to established and new fungicides in rusts. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Blistering in ALD Al2O3 passivation layers as rear contacting for local Al BSF Si solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermang, B.; Goverde, J.C.; Uruena, A.; Lorenz, A.; Cornagliotti, E.; Rothschild, A.; John, J.; Poortmans, J.; Mertens, R.

    2012-01-01

    Random Al back surface field (BSF) p-type Si solar cells are presented, where a stack of Al2O3 and SiNx is used as rear surface passivation layer containing blisters. It is shown that no additional contact opening step is needed, since during co-firing local Al BSFs are induced at the location of

  12. Chitosan-induced immunity in Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze against blister blight disease is mediated by nitric-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2017-06-01

    Blister blight disease, caused by an obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen, Exobasidium vexans Massee is posing a serious threat for tea cultivation in Asia. As the use of chemical pesticides on tea leaves substantially increases the toxic risks of tea consumption, serious attempts are being made to control such pathogens by boosting the intrinsic natural defense responses against invading pathogens in tea plants. In this study, the nature and durability of resistance offered by chitosan and the possible mechanism of chitosan-induced defense induction in Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze plants against blister blight disease were investigated. Foliar application of 0.01% chitosan solution at 15 days interval not only reduced the blister blight incidence for two seasons, but also maintained the induced expressions of different defense related enzymes and total phenol content compared to the control. Defense responses induced by chitosan were found to be down regulated under nitric oxide (NO) deficient conditions in vivo, indicating that the observed chitosan-induced resistance is probably activated via NO signaling. Such role of NO in host defense response was further established by application of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which produced similar defense responses accomplished through chitosan treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that increased production of NO in chitosan-treated tea plants may play a critical role in triggering the innate defense responses effective against plant pathogens, including that causing the blister blight disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Size determinations, by ultrasonic techniques, of cracks in hydride blisters formed in Zr-2.5 % Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trujillo Badillo, Giovanna; Desimone, Carlos; Domizzi, Gladys

    1999-01-01

    Non destructive techniques (NDT) are very useful in the detection of flaws produced in structural components in service. During the service of CANDU nuclear power reactors, it is possible that pressure tubes (PT) may contact calandria tubes (CT). After the PT/CT contact, zirconium hydride blisters may form at the point of contact depending on the concentration of hydrogen/deuterium. Zirconium hydride is brittle and is therefore prone to cracking under stress. Ultrasonic NDT is routinely use during PT in service inspection. In order to be able of detecting cracked blisters, it is of great importance the development of standards to calibrate the employed equipment. On this purpose, hydride blisters were grown, in laboratory, on sections of pressure tube. The cracks in the blisters were detected and measured by ultrasonic techniques. The obtained results were compared with measurements carried out in optic microscope, on successive sections of the samples. The crack tip diffraction technique was found to be the more effective for the mentioned ends. (author)

  14. Creation and validation of a simulator for corneal rust ring removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednick, Zale; Tabanfar, Reza; Alexander, Ashley; Simpson, Sarah; Baxter, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    To create and validate a simulation model for corneal rust ring removal. Rust rings were created on cadaveric eyes with the use of small particles of metal. The eyes were mounted on suction plates at slit lamps and the trainees practiced rust ring removal. An inexperienced cohort of medical students and first year ophthalmology residents (n=11), and an experienced cohort of senior residents and faculty (n=11) removed the rust rings from the eyes with the use of a burr. Rust ring removal was evaluated based on removal time, percentage of rust removed and incidence of corneal perforation. A survey was administered to participants to determine face validity. Time for rust ring removal was longer in the inexperienced group at 187±93 seconds (range of 66-408 seconds), compared to the experienced group at 117±54 seconds (range of 55-240 seconds) (p=0.046). Removal speed was similar between groups, at 4847±4355 pixels/minute and 7206±5181 pixels/minute in the inexperienced and experienced groups, respectively (p=0.26). Removal percentage values were similar between groups, at 61±15% and 69±18% (p=0.38). There were no corneal perforations. 100% (22/22) of survey respondents believed the simulator would be a valuable practice tool, and 89% (17/19) felt the simulation was a valid representation of the clinical correlate. The corneal rust ring simulator presented here is a valid training tool that could be used by early trainees to gain greater comfort level before attempting rust ring removal on a live patient. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Brachypodium distachyon as a nonhost model against switchgrass rust pathogen Puccinia emaculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Upinder S; Uppalapati, Srinivasa R; Nakashima, Jin; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-05-08

    Switchgrass rust, caused by Puccinia emaculata, is an important disease of switchgrass, a potential biofuel crop in the United States. In severe cases, switchgrass rust has the potential to significantly affect biomass yield. In an effort to identify novel sources of resistance against switchgrass rust, we explored nonhost resistance against P. emaculata by characterizing its interactions with six monocot nonhost plant species. We also studied the genetic variations for resistance among Brachypodium inbred accessions and the involvement of various defense pathways in nonhost resistance of Brachypodium. We characterized P. emaculata interactions with six monocot nonhost species and identified Brachypodium distachyon (Bd21) as a suitable nonhost model to study switchgrass rust. Interestingly, screening of Brachypodium accessions identified natural variations in resistance to switchgrass rust. Brachypodium inbred accessions Bd3-1 and Bd30-1 were identified as most and least resistant to switchgrass rust, respectively, when compared to tested accessions. Transcript profiling of defense-related genes indicated that the genes which were induced in Bd21after P. emaculata inoculation also had higher basal transcript abundance in Bd3-1 when compared to Bd30-1 and Bd21 indicating their potential involvement in nonhost resistance against switchgrass rust. In the present study, we identified Brachypodium as a suitable nonhost model to study switchgrass rust which exhibit type I nonhost resistance. Variations in resistance response were also observed among tested Brachypodium accessions. Brachypodium nonhost resistance against P. emaculata may involve various defense pathways as indicated by transcript profiling of defense related genes. Overall, this study provides a new avenue to utilize novel sources of nonhost resistance in Brachypodium against switchgrass rust.

  16. Molecular mapping and improvement of leaf rust resistance in wheat breeding lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilo, Toi J; Kolmer, James A; Anderson, James A

    2014-08-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina, is the most common and widespread disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. Deployment of host-plant resistance is one of the strategies to reduce losses due to leaf rust disease. The objective of this study was to map genes for adult-plant resistance to leaf rust in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population originating from MN98550-5/MN99394-1. The mapping population of 139 RILs and five checks were evaluated in 2005, 2009, and 2010 in five environments. Natural infection occurred in the 2005 trials and trials in 2009 and 2010 were inoculated with leaf rust. Four quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 2BS, 2DS, 7AL, and 7DS were detected. The QTL on 2BS explained up to 33.6% of the phenotypic variation in leaf rust response, whereas the QTL on 2DS, 7AL, and 7DS explained up to 15.7, 8.1, and 34.2%, respectively. Seedling infection type tests conducted with P. triticina races BBBD and SBDG confirmed that the QTL on 2BS and 2DS were Lr16 and Lr2a, respectively, and these genes were expressed in the seedling and field plot tests. The Lr2a gene mapped at the same location as Sr6. The QTL on 7DS was Lr34. The QTL on 7AL is a new QTL for leaf rust resistance. The joint effects of all four QTL explained 74% of the total phenotypic variation in leaf rust severity. Analysis of different combinations of QTL showed that the RILs containing all four or three of the QTL had the lowest average leaf rust severity in all five environments. Deployment of these QTL in combination or with other effective genes will lead to successful control of leaf rust.

  17. Induced mutations for tolerance of oats to crown rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, M.D.; Frey, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    Seeds of three oat (Avena sativa and A. abyssinica) strains were treated with ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), and crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata var. avenae) tolerance ratios of M 5 -derived lines were compared with untreated checks. Tolerance ratios of mutant lines tended to be distributed in both plus and minus directions. No mutant oat line had a significant increase in grain yield, but many showed significantly depressed yields. With C.I. 6665, only five of 130 mutagen-derived lines were not significantly below the check for grain yield; one of these had significantly improved tolerance. Re-treatment of selected strains from a previous EMS treatment (original cultivar was Clintland-60) gave one M 5 -derived oat line (of 100 tested) that was equal to Clintland-60 in grain yield and sustained no damage from crown rust (i.e. it had a tolerance ratio of 100). EMS treatment of the highly susceptible tetraploid C.I. 2110 resulted in both significantly increased and reduced tolerance. (author)

  18. Protein modeling of yellow rust disease in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, S.E.; Bano, R.; Zayed, M.E.; Elshikh, M.S.; Khan, M.H.; Chaudhry, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wheat production in Pakistan is affected by yellow rust disease caused by a fungus Puccinia striiformis. There is a need to broaden the genetic basis of wheat by identifying new resistance genes. The present study was aimed to identify an alternate resistance gene for yellow rust disease in wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis. Genome sequence was compared with databases and similar gene was identified for disease resistance in rye plant. Structural analysis of RGA1 gene (resistance gene in wheat) was carried out using different bioinformatics tools and an alternative gene having same structure was identified on the basis of structural and sequence homology. Rye plant is the proposed plant for the alternate new resistance gene. The result of pairwise alignment of RGA1 gene in wheat and gene of rye plant is 94.2% with accession DQ494535 .The secondary structures of both the genes was compared and found similar to each other. These comparisons between the wheat resistance gene and gene from rye plant depict structural similarities between the two genes. Results of RGA1 gene's structural analysis in wheat is as follow: Helices: 59, Extended sheets: 30, Turns: 12, Coils: 13 and for alternate resistance genes in Rye is as follow: Helices: 52, Extended sheets: 30, Turns: 14, Coils: 17. As structures are similar, the alternate identified gene could be used for resistance in wheat. (author)

  19. Activated charcoal and baking soda to reduce odor associated with extensive blistering disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Arun; Srinivas, C R; Mathew, Anil C

    2008-01-01

    Skin disease leading to extensive blistering and loss of skin is associated with a characteristic smell. Odor can cause physiologic disturbances such as increase in heart rate and respiratory rate. It can also cause nausea and vomiting and is disturbing to bystanders. To test odor reducing capability of activated charcoal. In this blinded experimental study we used putrefied amniotic membrane to produce odor and studied the effectiveness of activated charcoal and soda-bi-carbonate to reduce odor. Statistical analysis with Kruskal Wall's Chi Square Test and Man Whitney U test showed significant reduction of odor using activated charcoal by itself or along with soda-bi-carbonate. We recommend the usage of activated charcoal with/without soda bicarbonate as an inexpensive practical measure to reduce foul odor associated with extensive skin loss.

  20. Activated charcoal and baking soda to reduce odor associated with extensive blistering disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthi Arun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin disease leading to extensive blistering and loss of skin is associated with a characteristic smell. Odor can cause physiologic disturbances such as increase in heart rate and respiratory rate. It can also cause nausea and vomiting and is disturbing to bystanders. Aims: To test odor reducing capability of activated charcoal. Methods: In this blinded experimental study we used putrefied amniotic membrane to produce odor and studied the effectiveness of activated charcoal and soda-bi-carbonate to reduce odor. Results: Statistical analysis with Kruskal Wall′s Chi Square Test and Man Whitney U test showed significant reduction of odor using activated charcoal by itself or along with soda-bi-carbonate. Conclusion: We recommend the usage of activated charcoal with/without soda bicarbonate as an inexpensive practical measure to reduce foul odor associated with extensive skin loss.

  1. Genetic transformation with the gfp gene of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates from coffee with blister spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Armesto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Blister spot (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is now widespread in most coffee producing states of Brazil, becoming a limiting factor for production. The lack of data relating to the reproduction of typical symptoms (light green, oily patches leaves a gap within the pathosystem, forcing the search for new methodologies for monitoring the disease. Monitoring of genetically modified organisms has proven to be an effective tool in understanding the host x pathogen interactions. Thus, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two systems of genetic transformation in obtaining mutants using the gfp reporter gene. Using the two transformation systems (PEG and electroporation revealed the efficiency of both, confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin-B, when incorporated into the culture medium. The fungus maintained its cultural and morphological characteristics when compared to wild strains. When inoculated on coffee seedlings, it was found that the pathogenicity of the processed isolates had not changed.

  2. Complete genome sequence of a proposed new tymovirus, tomato blistering mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Cícero; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2015-02-01

    In a previous work, a distinct tymovirus infecting tomato plants in Brazil was reported and tentatively named tomato blistering mosaic virus (ToBMV). In this study, the complete genome sequence of ToBMV was determined and shown to have a size of 6277 nucleotides and three ORFs: ORF 1 encodes the replication-complex polyprotein, ORF 2 the movement protein, and ORF 3 the coat protein. The cleavage sites of the replication-complex polyprotein (GS/LP and VAG/QSP) of ToBMV were predicted by alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of other tymoviruses. In the phylogenetic tree, ToBMV clustered with the tymoviruses that infect solanaceous hosts.

  3. Deuterium implantation into Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped and pure tungsten: Deuterium retention and blistering behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Jacob, W., E-mail: wolfgang.jacob@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Manhard, A.; Gao, L.; Balden, M.; Toussaint, U. von [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Zhou, Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-04-15

    The blistering and near-surface deuterium retention of a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped tungsten (W) and two different pure W grades were studied after exposure to deuterium (D) plasma at elevated temperatures (370, 450 and 570 K). Samples were exposed to a deuterium fluence of 6 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2} applying a moderate ion flux of about 9 × 10{sup 19} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} at an ion energy of 38 eV/D. Morphological modifications at the surface were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The D depth profiles and the accumulated D inventories within the topmost 8 μm were determined by nuclear reaction analysis. Blistering and deuterium retention were strongly dependent on the implantation temperature. In addition, blistering was sensitively influenced by the used tungsten grade, although the total amount of retained D measured by nuclear reaction analysis was comparable. Among the three different investigated tungsten grades, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped W exhibited the lowest degree of surface modification despite a comparable total D retention. - Highlights: •Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped W and 2 pure W were exposed to D plasma at 370, 450 and 570 K. •D retention in all 3 materials is comparable. •D plasma exposure leads to blister formation on all investigated W grades. •Blister morphology and size distribution depend strongly on W grade. •Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped W shows the lowest degree of surface modification.

  4. Relationship between theoretical molecular weight and blister fluid/serum ratio of cytokines and five other molecules evaluated in patients with bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, L; Pimpinelli, F; Ferraro, C; D'Ambrogio, G; Giacalone, B; Bellocci, M; Ameglio, F

    1998-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) blisters contain several molecules, some of which spread into the blisters from the interstitial fluid, while others are produced locally and migrate into the circulation. The calculation of the ratios between blister/serum concentrations may help to distinguish between these two types of molecules. The rules regulating the diffusion of the molecules have been described only in suction blisters, where the theoretical molecular weight (MW) represents one of the principal influencing factors. The aim of the present study was to analyse the relationship between theoretical MWs and the ratios of concentrations of several molecules evaluated both in sera and in blister fluids. Eight cytokines (interleukin-2, interleukin-3, interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, oncostatin-M and vascular endothelial growth factor), two acute phase reactants (alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin), albumin, one soluble membrane molecule with adhesion functions (sICAM-1) and the eosinophil cathionic protein (ECP) were measured in samples from 15 patients affected with BP by means of commercially available tests. The data suggest that the MW may influence the rate of diffusion throughout the blister, both in input and output directions, despite the discontinuity observed at the basement membrane level on the BP blister floor.

  5. REVIEW - Advances on molecular studies of the interaction soybean - Asian rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguida Maria Alves Pereira Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective management practices are essential for controlling rust outbreaks. The main control methodused is the application of fungicides, which increases substantially the cost of production and is harmful to theenvironment. Prevention is still the best way to avoid more significant losses in soybean yields. Alternatives,such as planting resistant varieties to the fungus, are also important. The use of resistant or tolerant varietiesis the most promising method for controlling Asian soybean rust. Recently, five dominant genes resistant to soybean rust were described: Rpp1, Rpp2, Rpp3, Rpp4 and Rpp5. However, little is known about the molecular interaction among soybean plant and soybean rust and on the molecular pathway triggered by pathogen recognition. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in defense responses is of primary importance for planning strategies to control stress and, consequently, to increase plant adaptation to limiting conditions

  6. Studies of the genetics of inheritance of stem rust resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... increased production of wheat could help to ensure food and nutritional ... also characterized by genes with additive effects and non hypersensitive .... to create an artificial stem rust epidemic in the field (Hickey et al.,. 2012 ...

  7. Hyperfine interactions and structures of ferrous hydroxide and green rust II in sulfated aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olowe, A.A.; Genin, J.M.R.; Bauer, P.

    1988-01-01

    A sulfated ferrous hydroxide is obtained by mixing NaOH with melanterite depending on the R = [SO 4 -- ]/[OH - ] ratio and leading by oxidation to the green rust II transient compound. Hyperfine parameters are presented. (orig.)

  8. Nanostructure of protective rust layer on weathering steel examined using synchrotron radiation x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masato; Uchida, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum of pure goethite around the Fe K absorption edge and that of the protective rust layer formed on weathering steel exposed for 17 years in an atmospheric environment around the Cr K edge, have been examined using synchrotron radiation X-rays. It was found that the rust layer on the weathering steel mainly consisted of Cr-goethite. By examining the fine structure at the Cr K edge and the Fe K edge, we concluded that Cr 3+ in the rust layer is coordinated with O 2- and is positioned in the double chains of vacant sites in the network of FeO 3 (OH) 3 octahedra in the goethite crystal. This Cr 3+ site indicates that the protective effect of the rust layer is due to the dense aggregation of fine crystals of Cr-goethite with cation selectivity. (author)

  9. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  10. Chemical reduction of rust on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel surface in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, N.; Shimoyashiki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Low-alloy Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been favored for the tube material of steam generators in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). However, this material rusts easily due to moisture condensation on its surface when left in air. Therefore, measures to prevent tube materials from rusting have been taken during manufacturing of the steam generators. When rust is present on tube surfaces, its oxygen and iron dissolve into liquid sodium. When the concentration of these impurities in the sodium increases rapidly, the cold traps can become choked locally and lose their removal ability. This work has been done, therefore, to clarify reduction processes of rust in sodium and to select optimum operating temperatures of steam generators in the initial operation

  11. Molecular tagging of a novel rust resistance gene R(12) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L; Hulke, B S; Gulya, T J; Markell, S G; Qi, L L

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower production in North America has recently suffered economic losses in yield and seed quality from sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) because of the increasing incidence and lack of resistance to new rust races. RHA 464, a newly released sunflower male fertility restorer line, is resistant to both of the most predominant and most virulent rust races identified in the Northern Great Plains of the USA. The gene conditioning rust resistance in RHA 464 originated from wild Helianthus annuus L., but has not been molecularly marked or determined to be independent from other rust loci. The objectives of this study are to identify molecular markers linked to the rust resistance gene and to investigate the allelism of this gene with the unmapped rust resistance genes present in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397. Virulence phenotypes of seedlings for the F(2) population and F(2:3) families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in RHA 464, and this gene was designated as R(12). Bulked segregant analysis identified ten markers polymorphic between resistant and susceptible bulks. In subsequent genetic mapping, the ten markers covered 33.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 11 of sunflower. A co-dominant marker CRT275-11 is the closest marker distal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 1.0 cM, while ZVG53, a dominant marker linked in the repulsion phase, is proximal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 9.6 cM. The allelism test demonstrated that R(12) is not allelic to the rust resistance genes in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397, and it is also not linked to any previously mapped rust resistance genes. Discovery of the R(12) novel rust resistance locus in sunflower and associated markers will potentially support the molecular marker-assisted introgression and pyramiding of R(12) into sunflower breeding lines.

  12. 16 CFR 23.10 - Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INDUSTRIES § 23.10 Misuse of “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive,” “corrosion resistant,” “rust proof,” “rust resistant,” etc. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to: (1) Use the terms “corrosion proof,” “noncorrosive... the product will be immune from rust and other forms of corrosion during the life expectancy of the...

  13. Differential resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis) in collections of basin wild rye (Leymus cinereus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank M. Dugan; Michael J. Cashman; Richard C. Johnson; Meinan Wang; Chen Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Differential resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis) in a planting of 111 wild collections of Basin wild rye (Leymus cinereus) was noted 2011-2013. In 2011, rust severity was rated on a scale of 1-9. Much lighter infection in 2012 and 2013 was rated as the number of symptomatic leaves per plant divided by plant circumference (to adjust for plant size). Effect...

  14. Lr67/Yr46 confers adult plant resistance to stem rust and powdery mildew in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Singh, Ravi P; Lillemo, Morten; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Bhavani, Sridhar; Singh, Sukhwinder; Lan, Caixia; Calvo-Salazar, Violeta; Lagudah, Evans S

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that Lr67/Yr46 has pleiotropic effect on stem rust and powdery mildew resistance and is associated with leaf tip necrosis. Genes are designated as Sr55, Pm46 and Ltn3 , respectively. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) accession RL6077, known to carry the pleiotropic slow rusting leaf and yellow rust resistance genes Lr67/Yr46 in Thatcher background, displayed significantly lower stem rust (P. graminis tritici; Pgt) and powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis tritici; Bgt) severities in Kenya and in Norway, respectively, compared to its recurrent parent Thatcher. We investigated the resistance of RL6077 to stem rust and powdery mildew using Avocet × RL6077 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from two photoperiod-insensitive F3 families segregating for Lr67/Yr46. Greenhouse seedling tests were conducted with Mexican Pgt race RTR. Field evaluations were conducted under artificially initiated stem rust epidemics with Pgt races RTR and TTKST (Ug99 + Sr24) at Ciudad Obregon (Mexico) and Njoro (Kenya) during 2010-2011; and under natural powdery mildew epiphytotic in Norway at Ås and Hamar during 2011 and 2012. In Mexico, a mean reduction of 41 % on stem rust severity was obtained for RILs carrying Lr67/Yr46, compared to RILs that lacked the gene, whereas in Kenya the difference was smaller (16 %) but significant. In Norway, leaf tip necrosis was associated with Lr67/Yr46 and RILs carrying Lr67/Yr46 showed a 20 % reduction in mean powdery mildew severity at both sites across the 2 years of evaluation. Our study demonstrates that Lr67/Yr46 confers partial resistance to stem rust and powdery mildew and is associated with leaf tip necrosis. The corresponding pleiotropic, or tightly linked, genes, designated as Sr55, Pm46, and Ltn3, can be utilized to provide broad-spectrum durable disease resistance in wheat.

  15. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane G O Saunders

    Full Text Available Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i contain a secretion signal, (ii are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv are small and cysteine rich, (v contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii contain internal repeats, and (viii do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  16. Evaluation of sugarcane introgression lines for resistance to brown rust disease caused by Puccinia melanocephala

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Wen-Feng, Li; Ying-Kun, Huang; Xin, Lu; Zhi-Ming, Luo; Jiong, Yin; Hong-Li, Shan; Rong-Yue, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane brown rust disease caused by Puccinia melanocephala is one of the important fungal diseases affecting sugarcane yield around the world. Cultivar resistance is the most appropriate control method for this disease. In this study, 62 introgression lines chosen from the crossing Saccharum officinarum L. cv. Ludashi x Erianthus rockii Yunnan 95-19 were evaluated for brown rust resistance using artificial inoculation. More than 30% of the introgression lines were identified as resistant. ...

  17. Sustracted library obtained from mutant sugarcane variety B 4362 resistant to rust

    OpenAIRE

    María I. Oloriz; Luis Rojas; Víctor Gil; Elio Jiménez

    2002-01-01

    The hypersensitive response is one of the most powerful mechanisms for which the plants resist pathogen attack. Mutations carried out previously on the variety B4362, of sugarcane, originated five mutants that express this mechanism towards the attack of rust (Puccinia melanocephala Syd.). By means of a subtractive hybridization among the cDNA obtained starting from the resistant clone inoculated with rust and a pool of cDNA of the susceptible variety (B4362) inoculated and of the resistant c...

  18. Pushing the boundaries of resistance: insights from Brachypodium-rust interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Melania; Castell-Miller, Claudia V.; Li, Feng; Hulbert, Scot H.; Bradeen, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The implications of global population growth urge transformation of current food and bioenergy production systems to sustainability. Members of the family Poaceae are of particular importance both in food security and for their applications as biofuel substrates. For centuries, rust fungi have threatened the production of valuable crops such as wheat, barley, oat, and other small grains; similarly, biofuel crops can also be susceptible to these pathogens. Emerging rust pathogenic races with i...

  19. Identification of Putative Coffee Rust Mycoparasites via Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing of Infected Pustules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Timothy Y; Marino, John A; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2016-01-15

    The interaction of crop pests with their natural enemies is a fundament to their control. Natural enemies of fungal pathogens of crops are poorly known relative to those of insect pests, despite the diversity of fungal pathogens and their economic importance. Currently, many regions across Latin America are experiencing unprecedented epidemics of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Identification of natural enemies of coffee rust could aid in developing management strategies or in pinpointing species that could be used for biocontrol. In the present study, we characterized fungal communities associated with coffee rust lesions by single-molecule DNA sequencing of fungal rRNA gene bar codes from leaf discs (≈28 mm(2)) containing rust lesions and control discs with no rust lesions. The leaf disc communities were hyperdiverse in terms of fungi, with up to 69 operational taxonomic units (putative species) per control disc, and the diversity was only slightly reduced in rust-infected discs, with up to 63 putative species. However, geography had a greater influence on the fungal community than whether the disc was infected by coffee rust. Through comparisons between control and rust-infected leaf discs, as well as taxonomic criteria, we identified 15 putative mycoparasitic fungi. These fungi are concentrated in the fungal family Cordycipitaceae and the order Tremellales. These data emphasize the complexity of diverse fungi of unknown ecological function within a leaf that might influence plant disease epidemics or lead to the development of species for biocontrol of fungal disease. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Genetics and mapping of a new leaf rust resistance gene in Triticum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic analysis in F1, F2 and F2.3 families at the seedling stage revealed that leaf rust resistance in Selection G12 is conditioned by a single incompletely dominant gene. The leaf rust resistance gene was mapped to chromosome 3BL with SSR markers Xgwm114 and Xgwm547 flanking the gene at a distance of 28.3 cM ...

  1. Evidence for Increased Aggressiveness in a Recent Widespread Strain of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Causing Stripe Rust of Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milus, Eugene A; Kristensen, Kristian; Hovmøller, Mogens S

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based on vir...... that wheat rust fungi can adapt to warmer temperatures and cause severe disease in previously unfavorable environments......Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based...... regimes for latent period, lesion length, lesion width, lesion area, and spore production on adult plants of a susceptible wheat cultivar with no known genes for resistance to stripe rust. "New" isolates (since 2000) were significantly more aggressive than "old" isolates (before 2000) for all variables...

  2. Effects of rust in the crack face on crack detection based on Sonic-IR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harai, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Takamatsu, T.; Sakagami, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sonic-IR, which is based on the thermographic detection of the temperature rise due to frictional heating at the defect faces under ultrasonic excitation, has an advantage in the detection of closed and small defects. However, this method has a lot of nuclear factors relating to heat generation. In this study, effects of rust in the crack faces on the crack detection based on the sonic-IR method is experimentally investigated by using crack specimens. The heat generation by ultrasonic excitation was observed regularly during rust accelerated test using original device. The distribution of temperature change around the crack was changed with the progress of rust. This change in heat generation, it believed to be due to change in the contact state of the crack surface due to rust. As a result, it was found that heat generation by ultrasonic excitation is affected by rust in the crack faces. And it was also found that crack detection can be conducted by sonic-IR even if rust was generated in the crack faces. (author)

  3. Barberry rust survey – developing tools for diagnosis, analysis and data management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Hansen, Jens Grønbech; Hovmøller, Mogens Støvring

    Barberry (Berberis spp.) may serve as alternate host of several Puccinia species including Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis causing stem and yellow rust on cereals and grasses, respectively. In order to study the importance of barberry in the epidemiology of Puccinia species in the CWANA regi...... a rust survey was initiated. The aim was to 1) develop a surveillance protocol 2) develop molecular diagnostic tools for identifying Puccinia spp. from aecial samples, and 3) develop a data management and display system of results as part of the Wheat Rust ToolBox (http....... Due to variable quality of aecial samples DNA extraction was not successful for 40% of the samples. Sequences of EF1α, β-tubulin or ITS were analysed and compared to reference sequences of rust fungi infecting cereals and grasses. The analysis supported the presence of P. graminis s.l., P....... arrhenatheri and P. striiformoides on barberry species. Survey and DNA sample maps with species designation were displayed in the Wheat Rust ToolBox. The future aim is to integrate barberry rust survey data based on molecular diagnostics and infection assays from research groups world-wide in order to gain...

  4. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  5. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Mitchell A; McMahon, Michael B; Bonde, Morris R; Palmer, Cristi L; Luster, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate pathogens with multiple life stages often including different spore types and multiple plant hosts. While individual rust pathogens are often associated with specific plants, a wide range of plant species are infected with rust fungi. To study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants, one must be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplished using the In situ hybridization (ISH) protocol described here. To validate reproducibility using the ISH protocol, samples of Chrysanthemum × morifolium infected with Puccinia horiana, Gladiolus × hortulanus infected with Uromyces transversalis and Glycine max infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi were tested alongside uninfected leaf tissue samples. The results of these tests show that this technique clearly distinguishes between rust pathogens and their respective host plant tissues. This ISH protocol is applicable to rust fungi and potentially other plant pathogenic fungi as well. It has been shown here that this protocol can be applied to pathogens from different genera of rust fungi with no background staining of plant tissue. We encourage the use of this protocol for the study of plant pathogenic fungi in paraffin embedded sections of host plant tissue.

  6. Investigating Gene Function in Cereal Rust Fungi by Plant-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Vinay; Bakkeren, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens, threatening grain production worldwide. Targeted breeding for resistance utilizing host resistance genes has been effective. However, breakdown of resistance occurs frequently and continued efforts are needed to understand how these fungi overcome resistance and to expand the range of available resistance genes. Whole genome sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic studies followed by genome-wide computational and comparative analyses have identified large repertoire of genes in rust fungi among which are candidates predicted to code for pathogenicity and virulence factors. Some of these genes represent defence triggering avirulence effectors. However, functions of most genes still needs to be assessed to understand the biology of these obligate biotrophic pathogens. Since genetic manipulations such as gene deletion and genetic transformation are not yet feasible in rust fungi, performing functional gene studies is challenging. Recently, Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged as a useful tool to characterize gene function in rust fungi while infecting and growing in host plants. We utilized Barley stripe mosaic virus-mediated virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) to induce HIGS of candidate rust fungal genes in the wheat host to determine their role in plant-fungal interactions. Here, we describe the methods for using BSMV-VIGS in wheat for functional genomics study in cereal rust fungi.

  7. Rust resistance evaluation of advanced wheat (triticum aestivum l.) genotypes using pcr-based dna markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.U.; Younis, M.; Iqbal, M.Z.; Nawaz, M.

    2014-01-01

    The most effective and environmental friendly approach for the control of wheat rust disease is the use of resistant genotypes. The present study was conducted to explore rust resistance potential of 85 elite wheat genotypes (36 varieties and 49 advanced lines) using various types of DNA markers like STS, SCAR and SSR. DNA markers linked with different genes conferring resistance to rusts (Leaf rust=Lr, Yellow rust=Yr and Stem rust=Sr) were employed in this study. A total of 18 genes, consisting of eleven Lr (lr1, lr10, lr19, lr21, lr28, lr34, lr39, lr46, lr47, lr51 and lr52), four Yr (yr5, yr18, yr26 and yr29) and three Sr genes (sr2, sr29, and sr36) were studied through linked DNA markers. Maximum number of Lr genes was found in 17 advanced lines and 9 varieties, Yr genes in 26 advanced lines and 20 wheat varieties, and Sr genes in 43 advanced lines and 27 varieties. Minimum number of Lr genes was found in advanced line D-97 and variety Kohinoor-83, Yr genes in wheat variety Bwp-97 and Sr genes in 6 advanced lines and 8 varieties. Molecular data revealed that genotypes having same origin, from a specified area showed resistance for similar type of genes. In this study, an average similarity of 84% was recorded among wheat genotypes. Out of 18 loci, 15 were found to be polymorphic. (author)

  8. Flavan-3-ols Are an Effective Chemical Defense against Rust Infection1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsicker, Sybille B.; Fellenberg, Christin; Schmidt, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic secondary metabolites are often thought to protect plants against attack by microbes, but their role in defense against pathogen infection in woody plants has not been investigated comprehensively. We studied the biosynthesis, occurrence, and antifungal activity of flavan-3-ols in black poplar (Populus nigra), which include both monomers, such as catechin, and oligomers, known as proanthocyanidins (PAs). We identified and biochemically characterized three leucoanthocyanidin reductases and two anthocyanidin reductases from P. nigra involved in catalyzing the last steps of flavan-3-ol biosynthesis, leading to the formation of catechin [2,3-trans-(+)-flavan-3-ol] and epicatechin [2,3-cis-(−)-flavan-3-ol], respectively. Poplar trees that were inoculated with the biotrophic rust fungus (Melampsora larici-populina) accumulated higher amounts of catechin and PAs than uninfected trees. The de novo-synthesized catechin and PAs in the rust-infected poplar leaves accumulated significantly at the site of fungal infection in the lower epidermis. In planta concentrations of these compounds strongly inhibited rust spore germination and reduced hyphal growth. Poplar genotypes with constitutively higher levels of catechin and PAs as well as hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus alba) overexpressing the MYB134 transcription factor were more resistant to rust infection. Silencing PnMYB134, on the other hand, decreased flavan-3-ol biosynthesis and increased susceptibility to rust infection. Taken together, our data indicate that catechin and PAs are effective antifungal defenses in poplar against foliar rust infection. PMID:29070515

  9. Molecular mapping of a sunflower rust resistance gene from HAR6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulos, Mariano; Ramos, María L; Altieri, Emiliano; Sala, Carlos A

    2013-03-01

    Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi Schw., can result in significant yield losses in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. var. macrocarpus Ckll.). HAR6 is a germplasm population resistant to most predominant rust races. The objectives of this study were to map the resistance factor present in HAR6 (R HAR6 ), and to provide and validate molecular tools for the identification of this gene for marker assisted selection purposes. Virulence reaction of seedlings for the F2 population and F2:3 families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in HAR6-1, a selected rust resistance line from the original population. Genetic mapping with eight markers covered 97.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. A co-dominant marker ZVG61 is the closest marker distal to R HAR6 at a genetic distance of 0.7 cM, while ORS581, a dominant marker linked in the coupling phase, is proximal to R HAR6 at a genetic distance of 1.5 cM. Validation of these markers was assessed by converting a susceptible line into a rust resistant isoline by means of marker assisted backcrossing. The application of these results to assist the breeding process and to design new strategies for rust control in sunflower is discussed.

  10. Induced mutants in beans and peas resistant to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, F.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and peas (Pisum sativum) are important leguminous vegetable crops in Egypt. The area planted with beans is about 40,000 acres and peas 22,000 acres. These crops suffer from several diseases, particularly rusts, (Uromyces phaseoli/Uromyces pisi), which are mainly spread in northern Egypt. In our mutation induction programme we used 60 Co gamma rays and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS). Bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for two hours before exposure to 8, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical treatments, bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for eight hours and then treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. The M 1 was cultivated in 1978

  11. A summary of information on the rust Puccinia psidii Winter (guava rust) with emphasis on means to prevent introduction of additional strains to Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    The neotropical rust fungus Puccinia psidii(P. psidii) was originally described from the host common guava in its native Brazil but has been found since on hosts throughout the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), including a dramatic host jump to nonnative Eucalyptus plantations. Most rust fungi are able to live only on a very narrow range of host species. P. psidii is unusual both for having a broad host range and for the intensity of its damage to susceptible young growth. This rust first got a foothold in the United States in Florida more than three decades ago. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has since considered it a nonactionable, nonreportable pest. Hawaii and Florida are the only two states with native species in the myrtle family. Over a period of 30 years, this rust has done little damage to any of the scattered native Myrtaceae in Florida, although the host range of the rust has gradually grown to about 30 mostly nonnative species in the family, apparently because of increasing genetic variety of the rust by repeated introductions. However, Florida’s native Myrtaceae are among the roughly 1,100 neotropical species that are largely resistant to P. psidii. The 3,000 species of non-neotropical Myrtaceae of the Pacific, Australia, Asia, and Africa are expected to prove much more vulnerable to P. psidii. Little is known about the genetics or genetic strains of P. psidii, although existing literature shows that there are numerous strains that have differential ability to infect suites of host plants.

  12. Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of two Triticum–Secale–Thinopyrum Trigeneric Hybrids Exhibiting Superior Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight, Leaf Rust, and Stem Rust Race Ug99

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Dai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, leaf rust, and stem rust are the most destructive fungal diseases in current world wheat production. The diploid wheatgrass, Thinopyrum elongatum (Host Dewey (2n = 2x = 14, EE is an excellent source of disease resistance genes. Two new Triticum–Secale–Thinopyrum trigeneric hybrids were derived from a cross between a hexaploid triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack, 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR and a hexaploid Triticum trititrigia (2n = 6x = 42, AABBEE, were produced and analyzed using genomic in situ hybridization and molecular markers. The results indicated that line RE21 contained 14 A-chromosomes, 14 B-chromosomes, three pairs of R-chromosomes (4R, 6R, and 7R, and four pairs of E-chromosomes (1E, 2E, 3E, and 5E for a total chromosome number of 2n = 42. Line RE62 contained 14 A-chromosomes, 14 B-chromosomes, six pairs of R-chromosomes, and one pair of translocation chromosomes between chromosome 5R and 5E, for a total chromosome number of 2n = 42. At the seedling and adult growth stages under greenhouse conditions, line RE21 showed high levels of resistance to FHB, leaf rust, and stem rust race Ug99, and line RE62 was highly resistant to leaf rust and stem rust race Ug99. These two lines (RE21 and RE62 display superior disease resistance characteristics and have the potential to be utilized as valuable germplasm sources for future wheat improvement.

  13. Influence of Rust Permeability on Corrosion of E690 Steel in Industrial and Non-industrial Marine Splash Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mindong; Pang, Kun; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Junsheng; Li, Xiaogang

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behaviour of E690 steel in industrial and non-industrial marine splash environments was studied by environmental testing, morphology analysis, electrochemical measurements, and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. Chloride and sulphide anions were found to diffuse across the rust layer following the evaporation of seawater splashed on the steel's surface. The cation-selective permeability of the rust layer resulted in an anion concentration gradient across the rust layer, which was more significant in the presence of sulphur dioxide. In addition, sulphur dioxide enhanced the formation of α-FeOOH, which led to the formation of distinct anode and cathode areas at the rust/steel interface.

  14. Effect of preliminary neutron irradiation on helium blistering of 0Kh16N15M3B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, I.I.; Kalin, B.A.; Skorov, D.M.; Shishkin, G.N.; Ivanov, M.V.

    1982-01-01

    The method of electron microscopy has been applied to investigate the effect of preliminary neutron irradiation on the OKh16N15M3B steel blistering under irradiation by 20 keV helium ions with (1-10)x10 21 ion/m 2 doses at the temperature below 373 K. It is shown that neutron irradiation shifts critical doses of blister formation and intense scaling towards higher doses. But after the incubation period the erosion of steel preliminary neutron irradiated grows with the increase of helium ion dose above 7x10 21 ion/m 2 . Short-term heating of neutron irradiated samples during 15 min at 1173 K does not practically affect the beginning of intense scaling of the surface

  15. Nanorobotic investigation identifies novel visual, structural and functional correlates of autoimmune pathology in a blistering skin disease model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Seiffert-Sinha

    Full Text Available There remain major gaps in our knowledge regarding the detailed mechanisms by which autoantibodies mediate damage at the tissue level. We have undertaken novel strategies at the interface of engineering and clinical medicine to integrate nanoscale visual and structural data using nanorobotic atomic force microscopy with cell functional analyses to reveal previously unattainable details of autoimmune processes in real-time. Pemphigus vulgaris is a life-threatening autoimmune blistering skin condition in which there is disruption of desmosomal cell-cell adhesion structures that are associated with the presence of antibodies directed against specific epithelial proteins including Desmoglein (Dsg 3. We demonstrate that pathogenic (blister-forming anti-Dsg3 antibodies, distinct from non-pathogenic (non-blister forming anti-Dsg3 antibodies, alter the structural and functional properties of keratinocytes in two sequential steps--an initial loss of cell adhesion and a later induction of apoptosis-related signaling pathways, but not full apoptotic cell death. We propose a "2-Hit" model for autoimmune disruption associated with skin-specific pathogenic autoantibodies. These data provide unprecedented details of autoimmune processes at the tissue level and offer a novel conceptual framework for understanding the action of self-reactive antibodies.

  16. A novel blister test to evaluate the interface strength between nickel coating and low carbon steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, L.H.; Su, Xu Ping.; Wang, J.H.; Zhou, Y.C.

    2009-01-01

    A novel blister test theory model was developed based on the bending theory of beams for assessing the interface strength of the nickel coating/low carbon steel substrate material system. The strain energy of the debonded nickel coating was calculated analytically and by finite element analysis, respectively. The analytic solutions agree well with the FE calculation results. Some blister tests were carried out on the WII-5 Computer Controlled Material Mechanical Properties Testing Machine, using four nickel-coated specimens type-A, -B, -C and -D which were electrodeposited on low carbon steel substrate. Here, types A, B, C and D correspond to the nickel coating thickness of 5 μm, 10 μm, 15μm and 25μm, respectively. The interface strength, evaluated by this blister test method, is 196.86 J/m 2 and 269.40 J/m 2 for type-C and -D specimens, respectively. However the tests demonstrate that the type-A and -B specimens were cut through by the spindle and no delaminations between the coating and the substrate could be found

  17. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes involved in Blister Blight defense in Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaswall, Kuldip; Mahajan, Pallavi; Singh, Gagandeep; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Raina, Aparnashree; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2016-07-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanism of defense against blister blight (BB) disease caused by an obligate biotrophic fungus, Exobasidium vexans, transcriptome of BB interaction with resistance and susceptible tea genotypes was analysed through RNA-seq using Illumina GAIIx at four different stages during ~20-day disease cycle. Approximately 69 million high quality reads were assembled de novo, yielding 37,790 unique transcripts with more than 55% being functionally annotated. Differentially expressed, 149 defense related transcripts/genes, namely defense related enzymes, resistance genes, multidrug resistant transporters, transcription factors, retrotransposons, metacaspases and chaperons were observed in RG, suggesting their role in defending against BB. Being present in the major hub, putative master regulators among these candidates were identified from predetermined protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Further, confirmation of abundant expression of well-known RPM1, RPS2 and RPP13 in quantitative Real Time PCR indicates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, possibly induce synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, required to overcome the virulence of E. vexans. Compendiously, the current study provides a comprehensive gene expression and insights into the molecular mechanism of tea defense against BB to serve as a resource for unravelling the possible regulatory mechanism of immunity against various biotic stresses in tea and other crops.

  18. Degradation of the blister agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, on concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevett, Carol A.S.; Sumpter, Kenneth B.; Wagner, George W.; Rice, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The products formed from the degradation of the blister agent sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide] on concrete were identified using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC/MSD), 1 H NMR, 2D 1 H- 13 C NMR and 13 C solid state magic angle spinning (SSMAS) NMR. In situ and extraction experiments were performed. Sulfur mustard was detected in the in situ 13 C SSMAS samples for 12 weeks, whereas less than 5% of the sulfur mustard was detected in extracts from the concrete monoliths after 8 days. Sulfonium ions and (2-chloroethylthio)ethyl ether (T) were observed on the in situ samples after a period of 12 weeks, whereas vinyl species and bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfoxide were observed in the extracts of the concrete monoliths within 24 h. The differences between the extraction and the SSMAS data indicated that the sulfur mustard existed in the concrete in a non-extractable form prior to its degradation. Extraction methods alone were not sufficient to identify the products; methods to identify the presence of non-extractable degradation products were also required

  19. Fatigue and creep to leak tests of proton exchange membranes using pressure-loaded blisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongqiang; Dillard, David A.; Case, Scott W. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0219 (United States); Ellis, Michael W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0238 (United States); Lai, Yeh-Hung; Gittleman, Craig S.; Miller, Daniel P. [Fuel Cell Research Lab, GM R and D, General Motors Corporation, 10 Carriage Street, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472-0603 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    In this study, three commercially available proton exchange membranes (PEMs) are biaxially tested using pressure-loaded blisters to characterize their resistance to gas leakage under either static (creep) or cyclic fatigue loading. The pressurizing medium, air, is directly used for leak detection. These tests are believed to be more relevant to fuel cell applications than quasi-static uniaxial tensile-to-rupture tests because of the use of biaxial cyclic and sustained loading and the use of gas leakage as the failure criterion. They also have advantages over relative humidity cycling test, in which a bare PEM or catalyst coated membrane is clamped with gas diffusion media and flow field plates and subjected to cyclic changes in relative humidity, because of the flexibility in allowing controlled mechanical loading and accelerated testing. Nafion {sup registered} NRE-211 membranes are tested at three different temperatures and the time-temperature superposition principle is used to construct stress-lifetime master curve. Tested at 90 C, 2%RH extruded Ion Power {sup registered} N111-IP membranes have a longer lifetime than Gore trademark -Select {sup registered} 57 and Nafion {sup registered} NRE-211 membranes. (author)

  20. Acute fish liver intoxication induced blisters formation and generalized skin peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chung, Wen-Hung; Ho, Hsin-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Acute fish liver intoxication, including hypervitaminosis A and hypervitaminosis D, may result from the ingestion of certain fish livers. The typical symptoms of hypervitaminosis A include nausea, headache, blurred vision, and cutaneous manifestations, such as flushing, vesicles formation, and desquamation. Hypervitaminosis D may result in hypercalcemia. We report a case of acute fish liver intoxication with systemic and cutaneous manifestations. A 63-year-old male presented to the clinic with generalized desquamation and multiple clear-fluid filled flaccid vesicles after eating approximately two fist-sized portions (about 300-400 g) of cooked seerfish (Scomberomorus spp.) liver. Laboratory examination showed a high serum level of vitamin A and D, and hypercalcemia. Fish liver consumption from particular fish may result in acute hypervitaminosis A and D. In patients with skin detachment or blister formation, headache, drowsiness, and other symptoms and signs consistent with hypervitaminosis A and/or hypercalcemia, a history of fish intake should be sought, and a serum level of vitamin A and D should be measured.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Leaf Rust Response in a Durum Wheat Worldwide Germplasm Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Meriem; Breiland, Matthew; Kathryn Turner, M; Loladze, Alexander; Chao, Shiaoman; Xu, Steven S; Ammar, Karim; Anderson, James A; Kolmer, James A; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2016-11-01

    Leaf rust (caused by Erikss. []) is increasingly impacting durum wheat ( L. var. ) production with the recent appearance of races with virulence to widely grown cultivars in many durum producing areas worldwide. A highly virulent race on durum wheat was recently detected in Kansas. This race may spread to the northern Great Plains, where most of the US durum wheat is produced. The objective of this study was to identify sources of resistance to several races from the United States and Mexico at seedling stage in the greenhouse and at adult stage in field experiments. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) was used to identify single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with leaf rust response in a worldwide durum wheat collection of 496 accessions. Thirteen accessions were resistant across all experiments. Association mapping revealed 88 significant SNPs associated with leaf rust response. Of these, 33 SNPs were located on chromosomes 2A and 2B, and 55 SNPs were distributed across all other chromosomes except for 1B and 7B. Twenty markers were associated with leaf rust response at seedling stage, while 68 markers were associated with leaf rust response at adult plant stage. The current study identified a total of 14 previously uncharacterized loci associated with leaf rust response in durum wheat. The discovery of these loci through association mapping (AM) is a significant step in identifying useful sources of resistance that can be used to broaden the relatively narrow leaf rust resistance spectrum in durum wheat germplasm. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  2. McGISH identification and phenotypic description of leaf rust and yellow rust resistant partial amphiploids originating from a wheat × Thinopyrum synthetic hybrid cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Klaudia; Türkösi, Edina; Mayer, Marianna; Tóth, Viola; Vida, Gyula; Szakács, Éva; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2016-11-01

    A Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid wheatgrass is an excellent source of leaf and stem rust resistance produced by N.V.Tsitsin. Wheat line Mv9kr1 was crossed with this hybrid (Agropyron glael) in Hungary in order to transfer its advantageous agronomic traits into wheat. As the wheat parent was susceptible to leaf rust, the transfer of resistance was easily recognizable in the progenies. Three different partial amphiploid lines with leaf rust resistance were selected from the wheat/Thinopyrum hybrid derivatives by multicolour genomic in situ hybridization. Chromosome counting on the partial amphiploids revealed 58 chromosomes (18 wheatgrass) in line 194, 56 (14 wheatgrass) in line 195 and 54 (12 wheatgrass) in line 196. The wheat chromosomes present in these lines were identified and the wheatgrass chromosomes were characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using the repetitive DNA probes Afa-family, pSc119.2 and pTa71. The 3D wheat chromosome was missing from the lines. Molecular marker analysis showed the presence of the Lr24 leaf rust resistance gene in lines 195 and 196. The morphological traits were evaluated in the field during two consecutive seasons in two different locations.

  3. New Spectral Index for Detecting Wheat Yellow Rust Using Sentinel-2 Multispectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Zheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yellow rust is one of the most destructive diseases for winter wheat and has led to a significant decrease in winter wheat quality and yield. Identifying and monitoring yellow rust is of great importance for guiding agricultural production over large areas. Compared with traditional crop disease discrimination methods, remote sensing technology has proven to be a useful tool for accomplishing such a task at large scale. This study explores the potential of the Sentinel-2 Multispectral Instrument (MSI, a newly launched satellite with refined spatial resolution and three red-edge bands, for discriminating between yellow rust infection severities (i.e., healthy, slight, and severe in winter wheat. The corresponding simulative multispectral bands for the Sentinel-2 sensor were calculated by the sensor’s relative spectral response (RSR function based on the in situ hyperspectral data acquired at the canopy level. Three Sentinel-2 spectral bands, including B4 (Red, B5 (Re1, and B7 (Re3, were found to be sensitive bands using the random forest (RF method. A new multispectral index, the Red Edge Disease Stress Index (REDSI, which consists of these sensitive bands, was proposed to detect yellow rust infection at different severity levels. The overall identification accuracy for REDSI was 84.1% and the kappa coefficient was 0.76. Moreover, REDSI performed better than other commonly used disease spectral indexes for yellow rust discrimination at the canopy scale. The optimal threshold method was adopted for mapping yellow rust infection at regional scales based on realistic Sentinel-2 multispectral image data to further assess REDSI’s ability for yellow rust detection. The overall accuracy was 85.2% and kappa coefficient was 0.67, which was found through validation against a set of field survey data. This study suggests that the Sentinel-2 MSI has the potential for yellow rust discrimination, and the newly proposed REDSI has great robustness and

  4. New Spectral Index for Detecting Wheat Yellow Rust Using Sentinel-2 Multispectral Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiong; Huang, Wenjiang; Cui, Ximin; Shi, Yue; Liu, Linyi

    2018-03-15

    Yellow rust is one of the most destructive diseases for winter wheat and has led to a significant decrease in winter wheat quality and yield. Identifying and monitoring yellow rust is of great importance for guiding agricultural production over large areas. Compared with traditional crop disease discrimination methods, remote sensing technology has proven to be a useful tool for accomplishing such a task at large scale. This study explores the potential of the Sentinel-2 Multispectral Instrument (MSI), a newly launched satellite with refined spatial resolution and three red-edge bands, for discriminating between yellow rust infection severities (i.e., healthy, slight, and severe) in winter wheat. The corresponding simulative multispectral bands for the Sentinel-2 sensor were calculated by the sensor's relative spectral response (RSR) function based on the in situ hyperspectral data acquired at the canopy level. Three Sentinel-2 spectral bands, including B4 (Red), B5 (Re1), and B7 (Re3), were found to be sensitive bands using the random forest (RF) method. A new multispectral index, the Red Edge Disease Stress Index (REDSI), which consists of these sensitive bands, was proposed to detect yellow rust infection at different severity levels. The overall identification accuracy for REDSI was 84.1% and the kappa coefficient was 0.76. Moreover, REDSI performed better than other commonly used disease spectral indexes for yellow rust discrimination at the canopy scale. The optimal threshold method was adopted for mapping yellow rust infection at regional scales based on realistic Sentinel-2 multispectral image data to further assess REDSI's ability for yellow rust detection. The overall accuracy was 85.2% and kappa coefficient was 0.67, which was found through validation against a set of field survey data. This study suggests that the Sentinel-2 MSI has the potential for yellow rust discrimination, and the newly proposed REDSI has great robustness and generalized ability

  5. Characterization and Mapping of Leaf Rust and Stripe Rust Resistance Loci in Hexaploid Wheat Lines UC1110 and PI610750 under Mexican Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Caixia; Hale, Iago L; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil A; Basnet, Bhoja R; Randhawa, Mandeep S; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Singh, Ravi P

    2017-01-01

    Growing resistant wheat varieties is a key method of minimizing the extent of yield losses caused by the globally important wheat leaf rust (LR) and stripe rust (YR) diseases. In this study, a population of 186 F 8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between a synthetic wheat derivative (PI610750) and an adapted common wheat line (cv. "UC1110") were phenotyped for LR and YR response at both seedling and adult plant stages over multiple seasons. Using a genetic linkage map consisting of single sequence repeats and diversity arrays technology markers, in combination with inclusive composite interval mapping analysis, we detected a new LR adult plant resistance (APR) locus, QLr.cim-2DS , contributed by UC1110. One co-located resistance locus to both rusts, QLr.cim-3DC/QYr.cim-3DC , and the known seedling resistance gene Lr26 were also mapped. QLr.cim-2DS and QLr.cim-3DC showed a marginally significant interaction for LR resistance in the adult plant stage. In addition, two previously reported YR APR loci, QYr.ucw-3BS and Yr48 , were found to exhibit stable performances in rust environments in both Mexico and the United States and showed a highly significant interaction in the field. Yr48 was also observed to confer intermediate seedling resistance against Mexican YR races, thus suggesting it should be re-classified as an all-stage resistance gene. We also identified 5 and 2 RILs that possessed all detected YR and LR resistance loci, respectively. With the closely linked molecular markers reported here, these RILs could be used as donors for multiple resistance loci to both rusts in wheat breeding programs.

  6. Relative Fusiform Rust Resistance of Loblolly and Slash Pine Sources and Families in Georgia and South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. George Kuhlman; Harry R. Powers; William D. Pepper

    1995-01-01

    Loblolly and slash pine seedlings from the fusiform rust resistant orchards developed cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service and the Georgia Forestry Commission had significantly less rust 7 to 8 years after planting on four of five sites in the Southeastern United States than seedlings of the same species from orchard sources developed primarily for silvicultural...

  7. QTL mapping provides evidence for lack of association of the avoidance of leaf rust in Hordeum chilense with stomata density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz Patto, M.C.; Rubiales, D.; Martin, A.; Hernandez, P.; Lindhout, W.H.; Niks, R.E.; Stam, P.

    2003-01-01

    In cereals, rust fungi are among the most harmful pathogens. Breeders usually rely on short-lived hypersensitivity resistance. As an alternative, "avoidance" may be a more durable defence mechanism to protect plants to rust fungi. In Hordeum chilense avoidance is based on extensive wax covering of

  8. Identification of nine pathotype-specific genes conferring resistance to fusiform rust in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Amerson; C. Dana Nelson; Thomas L. Kubisiak; E.George Kuhlman; Saul Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Nearly two decades of research on the host-pathogen interaction in fusiform rust of loblolly pine is detailed. Results clearly indicate that pathotype-specific genes in the host interacting with pathogen avirulence cause resistance as defined by the non-gall phenotype under favorable environmental conditions for disease development. In particular, nine fusiform rust...

  9. 76 FR 13970 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Black Stem Rust...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Requirements for Addition of Rust-Resistant Varieties AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... Rust-Resistant Varieties. OMB Number: 0579-0186. Type of Request: Extension of approval of an... products to prevent the introduction of plant pests into the United States or their dissemination within...

  10. Adult plant leaf rust resistance derived from Toropi wheat is conditioned by Lr78 and three minor QTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazil, was noted to have long lasting leaf rust resistance that was effective only in adult plants. The objectives of this study were to determine the chromosome location of the leaf rust resistance genes derived from Toropi in two populations of recombinant inbred lines in a partial Thatcher wheat...

  11. Prediction of yield losses in wheat (triticum aestivum l.) caused by yellow rust in relation to epidemiological factors in Faisalabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Afzal, M.; Noorka, I.R.; Iqbal, Z.; Akhtar, N.; Iiftikhar, Y.; Kamran, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty six genotypes were screened against yellow rust to check their level of susceptibility or resistance. Among 36 genotypes screened against yellow rust, 18 were susceptible, 6 were moderately susceptible to susceptible, 7 were moderately resistant to moderately susceptible and 5 genotypes remained resistant. Yield losses were predicted in wheat on the basis of varying level of yellow rust severities. It was observed that susceptible genotypes showed higher yield losses as compared to resistant genotypes. Maximum severity of 90% of yellow rust resulted in 54% to 55% calculated and predicted losses, respectively. While 40, 50, 60 and 70% disease severity of yellow rust caused 35-34%, 38-37%, 42-40% and 46-47% calculated and predicted losses, respectively. However, the decline in losses was observed as the genotypes changed their reaction from susceptible to moderate susceptible. Similarly, losses were diminished as the varieties/lines showed moderate resistant reaction from moderate susceptible. Minimum temperature and relative humidity remained positively correlated while the maximum temperature showed negative correlation with stripe rust severity. With the increase of minimum temperature and relative humidity a rise up in stripe rust infection was seen while as the maximum temperature increased stripe rust infection decreased on different genotypes. It may be concluded from the study that environmental factors played major role in the spread of the disease which result in yield losses. (author)

  12. Tracking the distribution of Puccinia psidii genotypes that cause rust disease on diverse myrtaceous trees and shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; Rodrigo N. Graca; Acelino C. Alfenas; Tobin L. Peever; Jack W. Hanna; Janice Y. Uchida; Rob D. Hauff; Chris Y. Kadooka; Mee-Sook Kim; Phil G. Cannon; Shigetou Namba; Nami Minato; Sofia Simeto; Carlos A. Perez; Min B. Rayamajhi; Mauricio Moran; D. Jean Lodge; Marcela Arguedas; Rosario Medel-Ortiz; M. Armando Lopez-Ramirez; Paula Tennant; Morag Glen; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2014-01-01

    Puccinia psidii Winter (Basidiomycota, Uredinales) is a biotrophic rust fungus that was first reported in Brazil from guava in 1884 (Psidium guajava; Winter 1884) and later from eucalypt in 1912 (Joffily 1944). Considered to be of neotropical origin, the rust has also been reported to infect diverse myrtaceous hosts elsewhere in South America, Central America, the...

  13. Screening for Sugarcane Brown Rust in the First Clonal Stage of the Canal Point Sugarcane Breeding Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duli Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. brown rust (caused by Puccinia melanocephala Syd. & P. Syd. was first reported in the United States in 1978 and is still one of the great challenges for sugarcane production. A better understanding of sugarcane genotypic variation in response to brown rust will help optimize breeding and selection strategies for disease resistance. Brown rust ratings were scaled from non-infection (0 to severe infection (4 with intervals of 0.5 and routinely recorded for genotypes in the first clonal selection stage of the Canal Point sugarcane breeding program in Florida. Data were collected from 14,272 and 12,661 genotypes and replicated check cultivars in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Mean rust rating, % infection, and severity in each family and progeny of female parent were determined, and their coefficients of variation (CV within and among families (females were estimated. Considerable variation exists in rust ratings among families or females. The families and female parents with high susceptibility or resistance to brown rust were identified and ranked. The findings of this study can help scientists to evaluate sugarcane crosses and parents for brown rust disease, to use desirable parents for crossing, and to improve genetic resistance to brown rust in breeding programs.

  14. Distribution and frequency of Bru1, a major brown rust resistance gene, in the sugarcane world collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane worldwide. Molecular markers for a major brown rust resistance gene, Bru1, were used to screen a total of 1,282 clones in the World Collection of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) to determine the distribution and...

  15. Frequency and distribution of the brown rust resistance gene Bru1 and implications for the Louisiana sugarcane breeding programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane posing an increasing threat to sugarcane industries worldwide. A major gene, Bru1, has been shown to contribute a significant proportion of brown rust resistance in multiple sugarcane industries. The recent...

  16. Dissection of the multigenic wheat stem rust resistance present in the Montenegrin spring wheat accession PI 362698

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research to identify and characterize stem rust resistance genes in common wheat, Triticum aestivum, has been stimulated by the emergence of Ug99-lineage races of the wheat stem rust pathogen, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), in Eastern Africa. The Montenegrin spring wheat landrace PI 362698 ...

  17. Discovery of a novel stem rust resistance allele in durum wheat that exhibits differential reactions to Ug99 isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Erikss. & E. Henn, can incur yield losses on susceptible cultivars of durum wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husnot. Though several durum cultivars possess the stem rust resistance gene Sr13, additional genes in durum wheat effec...

  18. Localising QTLs for leaf rust resistance and agronomic traits in barley (¤Hordeum vulgare¤ L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kicherer, S.; Backes, G.; Walther, U.

    2000-01-01

    to leaf rust by means of artificial infection, heading date, plant height and Kernel weight were assessed. For leaf rust resistance, 4 QTLs were localised, that explained 96.1% of the genetic variation. One QTL on chromosome 4H confirmed a position found in another genetic background and one mapped...

  19. Genetic mapping of stem rust resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TRTTF in the Canadian wheat cultivar 'Harvest'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn.(Pgt), is a destructive disease of wheat that can be controlled by deploying effective stem rust resistance (Sr) genes. Highly virulent races of Pgt in Africa have been detected and characterized. These include race T...

  20. Mapping and characterization of wheat stem rust resistance genes SrTm5 and Sr60 from Triticum monococcum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence and spread of new virulent races of the wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici; Pgt), including the TTKSK (Ug99) race group, is a serious threat to global wheat production. In this study, we mapped and characterized two stem rust resistance genes from diploid wheat ...

  1. Morphology of germlings of urediniospores and its value for the identification and classification of grass rust fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swertz, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The identification and classification of grass rust fungi is often difficult since most traditionally used morphological characters are quantitative and subjective. Besides, when using the host range as a taxonomic criterion, it is important to realize that a rust fungus may have jumped to

  2. Blood blister-like aneurysms: Single center experience and systematic literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Ana Marcos; Narata, Ana Paula; Yilmaz, Hasan; Bijlenga, Philippe; Radovanovic, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Blood blister-like aneurysms (BBAs) are a controversial entity. They arise from non-branching sites on the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) and are suspected to originate from a dissection. Our aim is to describe the BBA cases seen in our center and to present a systematic review of the literature on BBAs. We analyzed the eleven cases of BBA admitted to our center from 2003 to 2012. We assessed the medical history, treatment modality (endovascular and/or surgery), complications and clinical outcome. The cohort included 8 women and 4 men with a mean age of 53.16 years. Treatment of the BBA consisted of stenting and coiling in 5 patients, stenting only in 4 patients, coiling and clipping in 1 patient, clipping only in 1 patient, and conservative treatment in 1 patient. A good outcome was found in 10 patients, as defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) less than or equal to two at three months. A systematic review of the literature was performed, and 314 reported patients were found: 221 patients were treated with a primarily surgical approach, and 87 patients were treated with a primarily endovascular approach. A rescue or second treatment was required in 46 patients (21%). The overall estimated treatment morbidity rate was 17%, and the mortality rate was 15%. BBAs exhibit more aggressive behavior compared to saccular aneurysms, and more intra-operative complications occur with BBAs, independent of the treatment type offered. They are also significantly more likely to relapse and rebleed after treatment. Endovascular treatment offers a lower morbidity–mortality compared with surgical approaches. Multilayer flow-diverting stents appear to be a promising strategy

  3. Creation of variation in Basella for rust resistance through mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makambila, C [Phytopathology Lab., Faculty of Sciences, Brazzaville (Congo)

    1997-07-01

    African spinach, basella is grown as a leafy vegetable in Central Africa. Basella cultivars belong to the species Basella alba and B. rubra which are seed propagated and are likely Asiatic in origin. Basella alba seeds were irradiated with doses of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 Gy to create variation for rust resistance which is caused by the fungus, Uromyces basellae Sidow. The effects of irradiation were investigated on seed germination, plant mortality and height. Seed germination varied from 97% for those irradiated with 50 Gy to 39% with 500 Gy, and LD{sub 50} for seed germination was between 300 to 400 Gy. Doses between 50 and 150 Gy did not cause any mortality of plants obtained from irradiated seeds; however, doses between 200 to 500 Gy caused high mortality among such plants. Irradiation with 150 Gy inhibited plant growth by 48% in relation to the growth of control plants. Based on the results, radiation doses above 150 and up to 400 Gy were used for the production of desired variation. (author). 11 refs, 9 figs.

  4. Creation of variation in Basella for rust resistance through mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makambila, C.

    1997-01-01

    African spinach, basella is grown as a leafy vegetable in Central Africa. Basella cultivars belong to the species Basella alba and B. rubra which are seed propagated and are likely Asiatic in origin. Basella alba seeds were irradiated with doses of 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 Gy to create variation for rust resistance which is caused by the fungus, Uromyces basellae Sidow. The effects of irradiation were investigated on seed germination, plant mortality and height. Seed germination varied from 97% for those irradiated with 50 Gy to 39% with 500 Gy, and LD 50 for seed germination was between 300 to 400 Gy. Doses between 50 and 150 Gy did not cause any mortality of plants obtained from irradiated seeds; however, doses between 200 to 500 Gy caused high mortality among such plants. Irradiation with 150 Gy inhibited plant growth by 48% in relation to the growth of control plants. Based on the results, radiation doses above 150 and up to 400 Gy were used for the production of desired variation. (author). 11 refs, 9 figs

  5. Environment-Friendly Control of Pear Scab and Rust Using Lime Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hoon Cha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pear scab and rust are the major diseases causing severe epidemics in organic cultivation of pear trees. Incidences of pear scab and rust were compared in organically managed plots and conventionally managed plots to obtain optimum application schedule of environment-friendly control agents in organically managed plots. Organically cultural practice with 10 time-applications of lime sulfur and Bordeaux mixture showed higher than 40% of control efficacies of pear scab and rust compared to conventionally cultural practice. Organically cultural practice with 8 time-applications of lime sulfur considering weather condition showed higher than 30% of control efficacies of pear scab compared to conventionally cultural practice. The results suggest that proper application of environment-friendly control agents such as lime sulfur considering weather condition will enable effective control of the major diseases for organic cultivation of pear.

  6. Rust formed on cannons of XVIII century under two environment conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindra Fonseca, M.P.; Bastos, I.N.; Caytuero, A.; Baggio Saitovitch, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion products of two ancient cannons exposed to atmospheric corrosion were analysed by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After almost three centuries exposed in marine environment one of them was moved to a rural region and was maintained in this environment for approximately 30 years. The inland region has an altitude of 1000 m above sea level and consequently low aggressiveness. The studied rusts were obtained from external and internal surfaces of the cannon barrels. This investigation, using three different techniques, was done to check if the relatively short time (ca. 30 years) in rural area was sufficient to change the characteristics of the thick rust formed during long time exposure (ca. 300 years) in marine atmosphere. The time-environment effects change the physical nature of rust, mainly observed by Moessbauer spectroscopy results

  7. Corrosion-resistant amorphous alloy ribbons for electromagnetic filtration of iron rusts from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Asahi; Asami, Katsuhiko; Sato, Takeaki; Hashimoto, Koji

    1985-01-01

    An attempt was made to use corrosion-resistant amorphous Fe-9Cr-13P-7C alloy ribbons as an electromagnetic filter material for trapping various iron rusts suspended in water at 40 0 C. The ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 rust was trapped with the 100 % efficiency and paramagnetic rusts such as α-Fe 2 O 3 , α-FeOOH and amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide were trapped with certain efficiencies at the magnetic field strength of 0.5-10 kOe. The regeneration of the filter by back-washing was easy. The trapping capacity of electromagnetic filter was proportional to the edge length of the filter material where the high magnetic field strength existed. Therefore, melt-spun thin and narrow amorphous alloy ribbons having the high corrosion resistance have the potential utility as electromagnetic filter material. (author)

  8. A coupled carbonation-rust formation mechanical damage model for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Huyen; Bary, B.; L'Hostis, Valerie; DeLarrard, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a strategy to simulate the corrosion of steel reinforcement due to carbonation of concrete in atmospheric environment. We propose a model coupling drying, carbonation, diffusion of oxygen, formation of rust and mechanics to describe these phenomena. The rust layer is assumed to be composed of two sub-layers with different elastic modulus. An unstable layer with a low modulus (from 0.1 to 5 GPa) is located next to the transformed medium, and another more stable one with a higher modulus (from 100 to 150 GPa) at the interface with steel reinforcement. This model is applied to a numerical meso-structure composed of 4 phases: mortar matrix, randomly distributed aggregates, steel rebar and rust layers to underline the effect of aggregates on damage initiation and corresponding crack pattern of concrete cover. (authors)

  9. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad-spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in field-grown seedlings. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when grown under field conditions. This D genome-encoded bread wheat gene was transferred to tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum) cultivar Stewart by transformation. Transgenic durum lines were produced with elevated gene expression levels when compared with the endogenous hexaploid gene. Unlike nontransgenic hexaploid and durum control lines, these transgenic plants showed robust seedling resistance to pathogens causing wheat leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew disease. The effectiveness of seedling resistance against each pathogen correlated with the level of transgene expression. No evidence of accelerated leaf necrosis or up-regulation of senescence gene markers was apparent in these seedlings, suggesting senescence is not required for Lr34 resistance, although leaf tip necrosis occurred in mature plant flag leaves. Several abiotic stress-response genes were up-regulated in these seedlings in the absence of rust infection as previously observed in adult plant flag leaves of hexaploid wheat. Increasing day length significantly increased Lr34 seedling resistance. These data demonstrate that expression of a highly durable, broad-spectrum adult plant resistance gene can be modified to provide seedling resistance in durum wheat. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Fine Mapping of Ur-3, a Historically Important Rust Resistance Locus in Common Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar P. Hurtado-Gonzales

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bean rust, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, is a devastating disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris in the Americas and Africa. The historically important Ur-3 gene confers resistance to many races of the highly variable bean rust pathogen that overcome other rust resistance genes. Existing molecular markers tagging Ur-3 for use in marker-assisted selection produce false results. Here, we describe the fine mapping of the Ur-3 locus for the development of highly accurate markers linked to Ur-3. An F2 population from the cross Pinto 114 (susceptible × Aurora (resistant with Ur-3 was evaluated for its reaction to four different races of U. appendiculatus. A bulked segregant analysis using the SNP chip BARCBEAN6K_3 placed the approximate location of Ur-3 in the lower arm of chromosome Pv11. Specific SSR and SNP markers and haplotype analysis of 18 sequenced bean varieties positioned Ur-3 in a 46.5 kb genomic region from 46.96 to 47.01 Mb on Pv11. We discovered in this region the SS68 KASP marker that was tightly linked to Ur-3. Validation of SS68 on a panel of 130 diverse common bean cultivars containing all known rust resistance genes revealed that SS68 was highly accurate and produced no false results. The SS68 marker will be of great value in pyramiding Ur-3 with other rust resistance genes. It will also significantly reduce time and labor associated with the current phenotypic detection of Ur-3. This is the first utilization of fine mapping to discover markers linked to rust resistance in common bean.

  11. Fine Mapping of Ur-3, a Historically Important Rust Resistance Locus in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Valentini, Giseli; Gilio, Thiago A S; Martins, Alexandre M; Song, Qijian; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A

    2017-02-09

    Bean rust, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus , is a devastating disease of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ) in the Americas and Africa. The historically important Ur-3 gene confers resistance to many races of the highly variable bean rust pathogen that overcome other rust resistance genes. Existing molecular markers tagging Ur-3 for use in marker-assisted selection produce false results. Here, we describe the fine mapping of the Ur-3 locus for the development of highly accurate markers linked to Ur-3 An F 2 population from the cross Pinto 114 (susceptible) × Aurora (resistant with Ur-3 ) was evaluated for its reaction to four different races of U. appendiculatus A bulked segregant analysis using the SNP chip BARCBEAN6K_3 placed the approximate location of Ur-3 in the lower arm of chromosome Pv11. Specific SSR and SNP markers and haplotype analysis of 18 sequenced bean varieties positioned Ur-3 in a 46.5 kb genomic region from 46.96 to 47.01 Mb on Pv11. We discovered in this region the SS68 KASP marker that was tightly linked to Ur-3 Validation of SS68 on a panel of 130 diverse common bean cultivars containing all known rust resistance genes revealed that SS68 was highly accurate and produced no false results. The SS68 marker will be of great value in pyramiding Ur-3 with other rust resistance genes. It will also significantly reduce time and labor associated with the current phenotypic detection of Ur-3 This is the first utilization of fine mapping to discover markers linked to rust resistance in common bean. Copyright © 2017 Hurtado-Gonzales et al.

  12. Discovery and characterization of two new stem rust resistance genes in Aegilops sharonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guotai; Champouret, Nicolas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Olivera, Pablo D; Simmons, Jamie; Williams, Cole; Johnson, Ryan; Moscou, Matthew J; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Green, Phon; Sela, Hanan; Millet, Eitan; Jones, Jonathan D G; Ward, Eric R; Steffenson, Brian J; Wulff, Brande B H

    2017-06-01

    We identified two novel wheat stem rust resistance genes, Sr-1644-1Sh and Sr-1644-5Sh in Aegilops sharonensis that are effective against widely virulent African races of the wheat stem rust pathogen. Stem rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. When single stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are deployed in wheat, they are often rapidly overcome by the pathogen. To this end, we initiated a search for novel sources of resistance in diverse wheat relatives and identified the wild goatgrass species Aegilops sharonesis (Sharon goatgrass) as a rich reservoir of resistance to wheat stem rust. The objectives of this study were to discover and map novel Sr genes in Ae. sharonensis and to explore the possibility of identifying new Sr genes by genome-wide association study (GWAS). We developed two biparental populations between resistant and susceptible accessions of Ae. sharonensis and performed QTL and linkage analysis. In an F 6 recombinant inbred line and an F 2 population, two genes were identified that mapped to the short arm of chromosome 1S sh , designated as Sr-1644-1Sh, and the long arm of chromosome 5S sh , designated as Sr-1644-5Sh. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh confers a high level of resistance to race TTKSK (a member of the Ug99 race group), while the gene Sr-1644-5Sh conditions strong resistance to TRTTF, another widely virulent race found in Yemen. Additionally, GWAS was conducted on 125 diverse Ae. sharonensis accessions for stem rust resistance. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh was detected by GWAS, while Sr-1644-5Sh was not detected, indicating that the effectiveness of GWAS might be affected by marker density, population structure, low allele frequency and other factors.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Stem Rust Resistance in Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Ahmad H; Tyagi, Priyanka; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Hulse, Alex; Steffenson, Brian J

    2017-10-05

    Stem rust was one of the most devastating diseases of barley in North America. Through the deployment of cultivars with the resistance gene Rpg1 , losses to stem rust have been minimal over the past 70 yr. However, there exist both domestic (QCCJB) and foreign (TTKSK aka isolate Ug99) pathotypes with virulence for this important gene. To identify new sources of stem rust resistance for barley, we evaluated the Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) (314 ecogeographically diverse accessions of Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum ) for seedling resistance to four pathotypes (TTKSK, QCCJB, MCCFC, and HKHJC) of the wheat stem rust pathogen ( Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici , Pgt ) and one isolate (92-MN-90) of the rye stem rust pathogen ( P. graminis f. sp. secalis , Pgs ). Based on a coefficient of infection, the frequency of resistance in the WBDC was low ranging from 0.6% with HKHJC to 19.4% with 92-MN-90. None of the accessions was resistant to all five cultures of P. graminis A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to map stem rust resistance loci using 50,842 single-nucleotide polymorphic markers generated by genotype-by-sequencing and ordered using the new barley reference genome assembly. After proper accounting for genetic relatedness and structure among accessions, 45 quantitative trait loci were identified for resistance to P. graminis across all seven barley chromosomes. Three novel loci associated with resistance to TTKSK, QCCJB, MCCFC, and 92-MN-90 were identified on chromosomes 5H and 7H, and two novel loci associated with resistance to HKHJC were identified on chromosomes 1H and 3H. These novel alleles will enhance the diversity of resistance available for cultivated barley. Copyright © 2017 Sallam et al.

  14. Defeating the Warrior: genetic architecture of triticale resistance against a novel aggressive yellow rust race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert, Dominik; Maurer, Hans Peter; Leiser, Willmar L; Würschum, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association mapping of resistance against the novel, aggressive 'Warrior' race of yellow rust in triticale revealed a genetic architecture with some medium-effect QTL and a quantitative component, which in combination confer high levels of resistance on both leaves and ears. Yellow rust is an important destructive fungal disease in small grain cereals and the exotic 'Warrior' race has recently conquered Europe. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic architecture of yellow rust resistance in hexaploid winter triticale as the basis for a successful resistance breeding. To this end, a diverse panel of 919 genotypes was evaluated for yellow rust infection on leaves and ears in multi-location field trials and genotyped by genotyping-by-sequencing as well as for known Yr resistance loci. Genome-wide association mapping identified ten quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yellow rust resistance on the leaves and seven of these also for ear resistance. The total genotypic variance explained by the QTL amounted to 44.0% for leaf and 26.0% for ear resistance. The same three medium-effect QTL were identified for both traits on chromosomes 1B, 2B, and 7B. Interestingly, plants pyramiding the resistance allele of all three medium-effect QTL were generally most resistant, but constitute less than 5% of the investigated triticale breeding material. Nevertheless, a genome-wide prediction yielded a higher predictive ability than prediction based on these three QTL. Taken together, our results show that yellow rust resistance in winter triticale is genetically complex, including both medium-effect QTL as well as a quantitative resistance component. Resistance to the novel 'Warrior' race of this fungal pathogen is consequently best achieved by recurrent selection in the field based on identified resistant lines and can potentially be assisted by genomic approaches.

  15. Flavan-3-ols Are an Effective Chemical Defense against Rust Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Chhana; Unsicker, Sybille B; Fellenberg, Christin; Constabel, C Peter; Schmidt, Axel; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic secondary metabolites are often thought to protect plants against attack by microbes, but their role in defense against pathogen infection in woody plants has not been investigated comprehensively. We studied the biosynthesis, occurrence, and antifungal activity of flavan-3-ols in black poplar ( Populus nigra ), which include both monomers, such as catechin, and oligomers, known as proanthocyanidins (PAs). We identified and biochemically characterized three leucoanthocyanidin reductases and two anthocyanidin reductases from P. nigra involved in catalyzing the last steps of flavan-3-ol biosynthesis, leading to the formation of catechin [2,3-trans-(+)-flavan-3-ol] and epicatechin [2,3-cis-(-)-flavan-3-ol], respectively. Poplar trees that were inoculated with the biotrophic rust fungus ( Melampsora larici-populina ) accumulated higher amounts of catechin and PAs than uninfected trees. The de novo-synthesized catechin and PAs in the rust-infected poplar leaves accumulated significantly at the site of fungal infection in the lower epidermis. In planta concentrations of these compounds strongly inhibited rust spore germination and reduced hyphal growth. Poplar genotypes with constitutively higher levels of catechin and PAs as well as hybrid aspen ( Populus tremula × Populus alba ) overexpressing the MYB134 transcription factor were more resistant to rust infection. Silencing PnMYB134 , on the other hand, decreased flavan-3-ol biosynthesis and increased susceptibility to rust infection. Taken together, our data indicate that catechin and PAs are effective antifungal defenses in poplar against foliar rust infection. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Remapping of the stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cuiling; Wu, Jingzheng; Yan, Baiqiang; Hao, Qunqun; Zhang, Chaozhong; Lyu, Bo; Ni, Fei; Caplan, Allan; Wu, Jiajie; Fu, Daolin

    2018-02-23

    Yr10 is an important gene to control wheat stripe rust, and the search for Yr10 needs to be continued. Wheat stripe rust or yellow rust is a devastating fungal disease caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). Host disease resistance offers a primary source for controlling wheat stripe rust. The stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 confers the race-specific resistance to most tested Pst races in China including CYR29. Early studies proposed that Yr10 was a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat gene archived as GenBank accession AF149112 (hereafter designated the Yr10 candidate gene or Yr10 CG ). In this study, we revealed that 15 Chinese wheat cultivars positive for Yr10 CG are susceptible to CYR29. We then expressed the Yr10 CG cDNA in the common wheat 'Bobwhite'. The Yr10 CG -cDNA positive transgenic plants were also susceptible to CYR29. Thus, it is highly unlikely that Yr10 CG corresponds to the Yr10 resistance gene. Using the Yr10 donor 'Moro' and the Pst-susceptible wheat 'Huixianhong', we generated two F 3 populations that displayed a single Mendelian segregation on the Yr10 gene, and used them to remap the Yr10 gene. Six markers were placed in the Yr10 region, with the Yr10 CG gene now mapping about 1.2-cM proximal to the Yr10 locus and the Xsdauw79 marker is completely linked to the Yr10 locus. Apparently, the Yr10 gene has not yet been identified. Fine mapping and positional cloning of Yr10 is important for gene pyramiding for stripe rust resistance in wheat.

  17. Experimental study of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Mingye; Huang Haifen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage. Methods: 80 patients with vitiligo in progressive stage were divided into two groups (vulgaris vitiligo groups : n=54, segmental vitiligo groups : n=26) Their blister fluid levels of NPY and GM-CSF were determined by radioimmunoassay(RIA), and IL-12 and sICAM-1 were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results: The levels of skin blister fluid NPY were definitely higher in vitiliginous skin than those in non-vitiliginous patches in segmental vitiligo groups (P 0.05). The levels of skin blister fluid IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF were all obviously higher in vitiliginous skin than that in non-vitiliginous patches in vulgaris vitiligo groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: The changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in vitiliginous skin may be closely related to development of difference type vitiligo patients with vitiligo, determination of 4 indexes might be helpful for studying the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of vitiligo. (authors)

  18. Partial resistance to stripe rust and its effect on sustainability of wheat yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.; Din, R.U.; Gardazi, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici) poses a serious threat to wheat production in cooler areas of Pakistan. The 70% area of wheat in Pakistan is prone to stripe rust disease. It can cause 10-17% yield losses if susceptible cultivars are planted under favorable conditions. Level of partial plant resistance in bread wheat and its impact on sustainable wheat production was studied at the National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad under natural conditions in the field. Eleven Pakistani commercial wheat cultivars/advance lines including check (Inqalab 91) were assessed for the level of partial resistance against stripe rust using Area Under the Disease Progress Curve (AUDPC), disease severity (DS) and epidemic growth rate in comparison with wheat cultivar, Inqalab 91. During 2007 cropping season, natural epidemic was developed and relative AUDPC was recorded from 0 to 100% whereas the 2008 cropping season was dry and no stripe rust appeared. Two advanced lines (NR 268 and NR 285) showed the infection type (IT) less than 7 (incompatible reaction) to the mixture of prevailing stripe rust inoculums. Very low level of DS and AUDPC were recorded in the remaining cultivars/lines indicating a high level of partial resistance to stripe rust compared to the susceptible check cultivar, Inqalab 91. Among eight cultivars/lines that showed compatible type of reaction (IT greater then equal to 7), one was resistant (relative AUDPC = 20% of Inqalab 91) and six showed very high resistance levels (relative AUDPC greater then equal to 5%). Maximum level of resistance (relative AUDPC = 0.1%) was observed in advanced line, NR 271. The wheat cultivars/lines that showed a slow disease development (low DS and AUDPC), could be considered as -1 partially resistant for stripe rust infection. The yield (2178 kg ha) of susceptible check cultivar Inqalab-91 during 2007 was reduced to 45% as -1 compared to its yield (3945 kg ha) in epidemic free year (2008). Thus the use

  19. Use of AFLP marker system on sugarcane somaclones to study their resistance to rust

    OpenAIRE

    María Ileana Oloriz; Luis Rojas; Víctor Gil; Milady Mendoza; Ariel Arencibia; Elva Rosa Carmona; Elio Jiménez

    2002-01-01

    AFLPs (amplified fragment length polymorphism) was carried out from genomic DNA of five rust resistant sugar cane somaclons and their susceptible donor, Saccharum officinarum var B 4362, using three combinations of primers (EcoRI/aca: MseI/acc; EcoRI/aca: MseI/atg and EcoRI/aca: MseI/agg). Six polymorphic bands were obtained, two of these only appeared in the resistant genotypes, which are probably DNA sequences, related to rust resistance locus. These fragments have been cloned to study thei...

  20. Reaction of some soybean mutant lines to natural rust fungus caused by (phakopsora pachyrhizi syd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratma, R.

    1988-01-01

    Reaction of some soybean mutant lines to natural rust fungus caused by (phakopsora pachyhizi syd). Eleven soybean mutant lines of orba variety derived from gamma fungus disease in the wet season 1985/86 at the experimental station of Citayam, Bogor. Based on IWGSR rating system, soybean mutant lines No 18/PsJ was moderately resistant to rust fungus disease. The other mutant lines, 14/PsJ, 15/PsJ, 20/PsJ, 102/PsJ, 106/PsJ, 111/PsJ, 118/PsJ, 119/PsJ and 220/PsJ were susceptible. (author). 4 figs.; 8 refs

  1. The estimation of rust disease of daylily leaf images with GLCM based different classification methods

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZERDEM, Mehmet Siraç; ACAR, Emrullah

    2011-01-01

    Crop diseases can affect yield and/or quality of the harvested commodity. This can influence profitability and raise the risks of farming. When the diseases are estimated early, the yield will increase by taking measures thanks to farmers. The rust disease is one of the most major crop diseases that affect crop yield. Rust disease can be defined as a fungus; it makes the crops weak by blocking food to the roots and leaves. It is named “rust” disease, since the spots on the leaves look like gr...

  2. Genomic and pedigree-based prediction for leaf, stem, and stripe rust resistance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliana, Philomin; Singh, Ravi P; Singh, Pawan K; Crossa, Jose; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Lan, Caixia; Bhavani, Sridhar; Rutkoski, Jessica E; Poland, Jesse A; Bergstrom, Gary C; Sorrells, Mark E

    2017-07-01

    Genomic prediction for seedling and adult plant resistance to wheat rusts was compared to prediction using few markers as fixed effects in a least-squares approach and pedigree-based prediction. The unceasing plant-pathogen arms race and ephemeral nature of some rust resistance genes have been challenging for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding programs and farmers. Hence, it is important to devise strategies for effective evaluation and exploitation of quantitative rust resistance. One promising approach that could accelerate gain from selection for rust resistance is 'genomic selection' which utilizes dense genome-wide markers to estimate the breeding values (BVs) for quantitative traits. Our objective was to compare three genomic prediction models including genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP), GBLUP A that was GBLUP with selected loci as fixed effects and reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces-markers (RKHS-M) with least-squares (LS) approach, RKHS-pedigree (RKHS-P), and RKHS markers and pedigree (RKHS-MP) to determine the BVs for seedling and/or adult plant resistance (APR) to leaf rust (LR), stem rust (SR), and stripe rust (YR). The 333 lines in the 45th IBWSN and the 313 lines in the 46th IBWSN were genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing and phenotyped in replicated trials. The mean prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31-0.74 for LR seedling, 0.12-0.56 for LR APR, 0.31-0.65 for SR APR, 0.70-0.78 for YR seedling, and 0.34-0.71 for YR APR. For most datasets, the RKHS-MP model gave the highest accuracies, while LS gave the lowest. GBLUP, GBLUP A, RKHS-M, and RKHS-P models gave similar accuracies. Using genome-wide marker-based models resulted in an average of 42% increase in accuracy over LS. We conclude that GS is a promising approach for improvement of quantitative rust resistance and can be implemented in the breeding pipeline.

  3. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid...... aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model...

  4. The viability of PVC/Al blister reuse and PVC property studies after ionizing radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Alex Terela Pinheiro de

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to separate, by means of a process of dissolution, the PVC and the aluminum that compose blister packs, generally used for pharmaceutical pills. We also studied the effect of the ionizing radiation on the PVC, and, finally, the mechanical recycling of the separated PVC, by a process of extrusion. The material we used in this work is the surplus of the pharmaceutical industry, i.e., packs with defects or burrs. We ground the material to facilitate the handling and the homogenization of the system. After that, we chose two bases for the dissolution of the aluminum: the sodium hydroxide and the potassium hydroxide. We used a system with two concentrations (1 and 2M) for each base, and for every solution we had also an agitated and a non-agitated process. From this method resulted eight experiments. After the dissolution, the samples of the material were submitted to ionizing radiation with doses of 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy in the Dynamitron II electron accelerator of the CTR-IPEN/CNEN-SP. In the following, these samples were submitted to traction resistance tests to analyze which modifications the irradiation caused. The last step of the research was the recycling of the PVC separated from the Aluminum. We made the recycling in industrial equipment, a PVC tube extruder. The material was combined with lubricants, heat stabilizers and pigment in an intensive mixer and processed into the form of rigid PVC electrical conduits. After the eight experiments, the system with potassium hydroxide base, concentration of 2M and agitation presented the best relation between time of dissolution and characteristics of the resulting material, without degradation of the PVC. In the irradiated samples, the color of the material changed as well as its extension that was as larger as the dose of irradiation they received, indicating the dissociation of the PVC molecules. The extrusion of the PVC was successfully realized: about 200 kg (440 pounds) of

  5. Introduction of chemical, physical and mechanical coupling in the study of the blistering phenomena for semi-crystalline polymers; Une approche multiphysique de l'endommagement de polymeres en milieu petrolier: exemple du blistering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cangemi, L.; Klopffer, M.H.; Martin, J. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France); Grandidier, J.C. [Poitiers Univ., Lab. de Mecanique et de Physique des Materiaux, UMR 6617 CNRS, ENSMA, 86 (France)

    2005-09-01

    Polymer materials are used in numerous oil applications where the knowledge and the control of their barrier properties are required: thermosetting coatings, rubber seals, thermoplastic liners. In that case, thermoplastic materials are in contact with water, hydrocarbons, gases and all carried fluids at high temperature and high pressure (up to 13 deg C and to 100 MPa). Under these extreme conditions, gases contained in petroleum products (such as H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}) have a high tendency to dissolve into semi-crystalline polymers (polyolefins, fluorinated polymers). A decompression, i.e. a rupture of the thermodynamic equilibrium may eventually lead to gas concentration and temperature gradients in the polymer structures. The resulting damaging phenomenon is called blistering and can be really dramatic for the material because it is irreversible and may end the pipe leak-proofness. As a matter of fact, the condition of damage is mainly correlated to the temperature, the rate of decompression and the properties of the material. Thereby, it is important to have an accurate knowledge of all the involved phenomena in order to quantify and then predict the barrier properties of the materials in those aggressive conditions. The aim of this study is to identify the various mechanism involved in the blistering phenomena for semi-crystalline polymers (such as PVF2, PE), to establish some relations between the polymer microstructure (morphology), its mechanical properties and the damage and to build physicochemical models which will take into account some mechanical, thermal and diffusional aspects. (authors)

  6. Control of Fe(O,OH)6 nano-network structures of rust for high atmospheric-corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masao; Kihira, Hiroshi; Ohta, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Misao; Senuma, Takehide

    2005-01-01

    A new-type of weathering steel containing 3.0 mass% Ni and 0.4 mass% Cu ('advanced weathering steel') exhibits good atmospheric-corrosion resistance in an atmosphere containing relatively high air-born salinity. Here, we show that the high performance was successfully achieved by controlling Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on their surfaces. A novel technique using synchrotron radiation has been developed for the in situ observation of rust-formation during wet-dry cycles. It has been revealed that the evolution of Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network structures of rust formed on the advanced weathering steel was more unique than those of conventional weathering steel and mild steel. At an early stage of reaction, Fe 2 NiO 4 and CuO phases precipitate, which provide sites for the nucleation of the Fe(O,OH) 6 nano-network resulting in the formation of rust composed of fine and dense-packed grains. The existence of Fe 2 NiO 4 in the nano-network changes the ion-exchanging properties of rust from anion to cation selective. Then, the rust on the advanced weathering steel 'breathes out' chloride ions from the rust/steel interface, and protects steel for more than a century by reducing the life cycle maintenance cost in an environment-friendly manner

  7. Adult Plant Leaf Rust Resistance Derived from Toropi Wheat is Conditioned by Lr78 and Three Minor QTL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, J A; Bernardo, A; Bai, G; Hayden, M J; Chao, S

    2018-02-01

    Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina is an important disease of wheat in many regions worldwide. Durable or long-lasting leaf rust resistance has been difficult to achieve because populations of P. triticina are highly variable for virulence to race-specific resistance genes, and respond to selection by resistance genes in released wheat cultivars. The wheat cultivar Toropi, developed and grown in Brazil, was noted to have long-lasting leaf rust resistance that was effective only in adult plants. The objectives of this study were to determine the chromosome location of the leaf rust resistance genes derived from Toropi in two populations of recombinant inbred lines in a partial Thatcher wheat background. In the first population, a single gene with major effects on chromosome 5DS that mapped 2.2 centimorgans distal to IWA6289, strongly reduced leaf rust severity in all 3 years of field plot tests. This gene for adult plant leaf rust resistance was designated as Lr78. In the second population, quantitative trait loci (QTL) with small effects on chromosomes 1BL, 3BS, and 4BS were found. These QTL expressed inconsistently over 4 years of field plot tests. The adult plant leaf rust resistance derived from Toropi involved a complex combination of QTL with large and small effects.

  8. Multiple genotypes within aecial clusters in Puccinia graminis and Puccinia coronata: improved understanding of the biology of cereal rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Anna; Samils, Berit; Andersson, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi ( Puccinia spp.) are among the most economically important plant pathogens. These fungi have a complex life cycle, including five spore stages and two hosts. They infect one grass host on which they reproduce clonally and cause the cereal rust diseases, while the alternate host is required for sexual reproduction. Although previous studies clearly demonstrate the importance of the alternate host in creating genetic diversity in cereal rust fungi, little is known about the amount of novel genotypes created in each successful completion of a sexual reproduction event. In this study, single sequence repeat markers were used to study the genotypic diversity within aecial clusters by genotyping individual aecial cups. Two common cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis causing stem rust and Puccinia coronata the causal agent of crown rust were investigated. We showed that under natural conditions, a single aecial cluster usually include several genotypes, either because a single pycnial cluster is fertilized by several different pycniospores, or because aecia within the cluster are derived from more than one fertilized adjoining pycnial cluster, or a combination of both. Our results imply that although sexual events in cereal rust fungi in most regions of the world are relatively rare, the events that occur may still significantly contribute to the genetic variation within the pathogen populations.

  9. Skin blister formation together with patterned intradermal hematoma: a special type of tire mark injury in victims run over by a wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, R; Epting, T; Schmidt, U; Geisenberger, D; Pollak, S; Kramer, L

    2015-04-01

    A traffic accident victim run over by a vehicle may show a patterned skin hematoma reflecting the grooves of the tire's profile. Apart from this well-known type of imprint mark, the affected skin can also be blistered provided that the wheel exerts high pressure on the body for a prolonged period of time. The macro- and micromorphological findings as well as the protein composition of the blister fluid were investigated on the basis of a relevant autopsy case. Analogous to blisters associated with hanging marks, the transudation of serous fluid with consecutive detachment of the epidermis is interpreted as a pressure-related effect which cannot be regarded as a sign of vitality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Theoretical Study on Synchronous Characterization of Surface and Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Thin-Film/Substrate Systems with Residual Stress Based on Pressure Blister Test Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-xin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, based on the pressure blister test technique, a theoretical study on the synchronous characterization of surface and interfacial mechanical properties of thin-film/substrate systems with residual stress was presented, where the problem of axisymmetric deformation of a blistering film with initial stress was analytically solved and its closed-form solution was presented. The expressions to determine Poisson’s ratios, Young’s modulus, and residual stress of surface thin films were derived; the work done by the applied external load and the elastic energy stored in the blistering thin film were analyzed in detail and their expressions were derived; and the interfacial adhesion energy released per unit delamination area of thin-film/substrate (i.e., energy release rate was finally presented. The synchronous characterization technique presented here has theoretically made a big step forward, due to the consideration for the residual stress in surface thin films.

  11. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  12. Churg-Strauss syndrome with coexistence of eosinophilic vasculitis, granulomatous phlebitis and granulomatous dermatitis in bullous pemphigoid-like blisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masafumi; Kudo, Saori; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Shimai, Nobuko; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2011-03-01

    The main histopathological features in the cutaneous lesions of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) are dermal leukocytoclastic vasculitis with a variable eosinophilic infiltrate and non-vasculitic tissue eosinophilia with granuloma formation. This wide histopathological spectrum may account for the various skin manifestations of CSS. However, the unique histopathological combination of dermal eosinophilic vasculitis and subcutaneous granulomatous phlebitis accompanied by bulla formation has not been previously described. We report an unusual CSS case showing dermal necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis and granulomatous phlebitis in purpuric lesions coupled with subepidermal blistering. The blisters showed dermal granulomatous dermatitis and eosinophilia without evidence of vasculitis. Dermal necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis was characterized by fibrinoid alteration of the vessel wall, a prominent perivascular eosinophilic infiltrate, a few infiltrating histiocytes along the affected vessel wall, and the absence of neutrophilic infiltration. The underlying subcutaneous granulomatous phlebitis was characterized by an angiocentric histiocytic infiltrate surrounded by marked eosinophilic infiltrate. Deposition of cytotoxic proteins and radicals derived from eosinophils in the vessel walls and papillary dermis followed by a secondary granulomatous response may account for the unique clinical and histopathological features in this case. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Cytoskeleton and pericellular matrix organization of pure adult human keratinocytes cultured from suction-blister roof epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariniemi, A L; Lehto, V P; Vartio, T; Virtanen, I

    1982-12-01

    Pure adult human keratinocyte cultures were raised from suction-blister roof epidermis and cultured in MCDB-151 medium. In primary culture the epidermal cells rapidly adhered, spread and began to proliferate on collagen-coated growth substrata but not on uncoated plastic or glass substrata. A fibrillar keratin-specific fluorescence, showing a typical cell-cell arrangement, was seen in all cells in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, whereas only some cells also showed vimentin-specific staining. A fine fibrillar fibronectin-specific surface staining was seen at the margin of attaching cells and in marginal cells of spreading cell islands, whereas no fluorescence could be seen in epidermal cells, with antibodies against type IV collagen or laminin. Interestingly, the marginal cells also showed intracellular fibronectin. The synthesis of fibronectin in epidermal cell cultures could also be revealed by metabolic labelling experiments with [35S]methionine. In contrast to primary cultures, subcultivated keratinocytes also adhered to uncoated plastic and glass substrata. After subcultivation, keratin and surface fibronectin distribution remained unaltered but after some subcultivations, most of the cells also showed fibrillar vimentin and expressed fibronectin intracellularly. The results show that the suction-blister method provides an easy way to obtain pure epidermal cell cultures without contaminating mesenchymal cells. Our results also suggest a direct role for fibronectin but not for collagen type IV or laminin in adhesion and spreading of epidermal cells in vitro.

  14. CYCLO-OXYGENASE 2 IS PRESENT IN THE MAJORITY OF LESIONAL SKIN FROM PATIENTS WITH AUTOINMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The in situ immune response within skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs is not well characterized. Aim: Based on the fact that the ABD immune response is considered an adaptive immune response, both an innate immune response and inflammation would be expected in these diseases. Our investigation investigates the presence of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2, since this enzyme is commonly involved in innate immune responses. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry (IHC to evaluate the presence of COX-2 in lesional skin biopsies of patients affected by ABDs. We tested 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the endemic area, and 15 biopsies from healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABDs, including 20 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus and 12 with dermatitis herpetiformis. Results: Most ABD biopsies stained positive for COX-2 in the lesional blister and/or the dermal inflammatory infiltrate, accentuated in the upper neurovascular plexus. In BP and EPF, the COX-2 staining was also seen in the sweat glands. All controls were negative. Conclusions: We document that COX-2 is expressed in lesional skin of patients with ABDs.

  15. Correlation between blister skin thickness, the maximum in the damage-energy distribution, and projected ranges of He+ ions in metals: Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Fenske, G.

    1975-01-01

    The skin thicknesses of blisters formed on niobium by helium-ion irradiation at room temperature for energies from 100 to 1500 keV have been measured. The projected ranges of helium ions in Nb for this energy range were calculated using either Brice's formalism or the one given by Schiott. For the damage-energy distribution Brice's formalism was used. The measured skin-thickness values corrleate more closely with the maxima in the projected-range probability distributions than with the maxima in the damage-energy distributions. The results are consistent with our model for blister formation and rupture proposed earlier

  16. CD1a, HAM56, CD68 and S-100 are present in lesional skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune blistering diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous research on autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABD has primarily focused on the humoral immune response; moreover, little attention has been given to the potential role of the antigen presenting cells (APCs in lesional skin. Aim: The purpose of our study was to immunophenotype selected APC in the lesional skin of ABDs, utilizing immunohistochemistry (IHC stains. Materials and Methods: We utilized IHC to stain for dendritic cells (DC, staining with CD1a, CD68, HAM56, and S-100 in lesional skin from 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABD, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 2 with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA. Results: Cells stained by CD68, HAM56 and S-100 were present in the majority of the ABD skin biopsies; these cells were located primarily in perivascular infiltrates surrounding dermal vessels subjacent to the blisters. However, these cells were also noted within the blisters, in vessels supplying dermal eccrine glands and ducts, and in areas of dermal endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, especially in BP cases. In our CD1a staining, the number and location of positive staining cells varied with each disease, being abundant in most ABD in the epidermis suprajacent to the blisters, or in the epidermis surrounding the blister site if the blister site epidermis was missing. In the control biopsies, most did not display positive IHC staining, with the exception of a few CD1a positive cells in the epidermis Conclusion: Our findings confirm positive IHC staining for APCs in areas of the skin besides the disease blisters. Our findings suggest that the antigen presentation in ABD proceeds in areas distant from the blister site

  17. Uromyces ciceris-arietini, the cause of chickpea rust: new hosts in the Trifolieae, Fabaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants of Medicago polymorpha in Riverside and San Diego, California were collected with severe rust caused by Uromyces ciceris-arietini. Reported hosts of U. ciceris-arietini are Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Medicago polyceratia. To confirm the potential new host range, a monouredinial isolate RM...

  18. First Report of Garlic Rust Caused by Puccinia allii on Allium sativum in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    In July 2010, Allium sativum, cultivar German Extra Hardy Porcelain plants showing foliar symptoms typical of rust infection were brought to the Plant Disease Clinic at the University of Minnesota by a commercial grower from Fillmore county Minnesota. Infected leaves showed circular to oblong lesio...

  19. Expression of a synthetic rust fungal virus cDNA in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycoviruses are viruses that infect fungi. Recently, mycovirus-like RNAs were sequenced from the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of soybean rust. One of the RNAs appeared to represent a novel mycovirus and was designated Phakopsora pachyrhizi virus 2383 (PpV2383). The genome of PpV...

  20. Modification of tolerance of oats to crown rust induced by chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, M.D.; Browning, J.A.; Frey, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Seeds of crown rust (Puccinia coronata) susceptible cultivated oats (Avena sativa) were treated with the mutagenic chemical ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), and pure lines derived from these treated seeds were tested in later generations for the relative amount of reduction in yield and seed weight caused by crown rust infection. In the absence of crown rust, the yield of most of the treated lines was greatly reduced. The overall means of the treated lines for both yield and seed weight response to infection were significantly lower than the control, but 10 lines significantly exceeded the control for yield response and 15 exceeded it for seed weight response. Recurrent EMS treatment of once-treated lines rated as tolerant resulted in groups of lines that were more tolerant, on the average, than groups of lines from recurrently treated lines rated as susceptible. A few of the recurrently treated individual lines derived from tolerant parents had a higher degree of tolerance than their parental lines. EMS treatment of diploid (A. strigosa) and tetraploid (A. abyssinica) oats resulted in groups of lines showing significant genetic variance for response to crown rust, indicating that treatment had induced real genetic change. A few diploid lines were a little more tolerant than their control, but none of the tetraploid lines showed any consistent improvement. (author)

  1. First report of leaf rust of blueberry caused by Thekopsora minima in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is becoming an important crop in the states of Jalisco and Michoacan in Mexico. As the area under blueberry cultivation increases, new diseases causing severe losses are appearing. Leaf rust is one of the most destructive diseases of blueberry in Mexico. Sori on t...

  2. Mapping fusiform rust resistance genes within a complex mating design of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tania Quesada; Marcio F.R. Resende Jr.; Patricio Munoz; Jill L. Wegrzyn; David B. Neale; Matias Kirst; Gary F. Peter; Salvador A. Gezan; C.Dana Nelson; John M. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Fusiform rust resistance can involve gene-for-gene interactions where resistance (Fr) genes in the host interact with corresponding avirulence genes in the pathogen, Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme (Cqf). Here, we identify trees with Fr genes in a loblolly pine population derived from a complex mating design challenged with two Cqf inocula (one gall and 10 gall...

  3. Sequencing Ug99 and Other Stem Rust Races: Progress and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last decade a number of different molecular methods have been used to characterize genetic diversity in Puccinia graminis. Multilocus DNA fingerprinting methods (AFLPs, RAPDs, SAMs and S-SAPs) have proven to be useful, but limited to phenotypic analysis due to the dikaryotic nature of rust ...

  4. Somatic recombination in wheat stem rust leads to virulence for Ug99-effective SR50 resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race-specific resistance genes protect much of the global wheat crop from stem rust disease caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), but often break down due to evolution of new virulent pathogen races. To understand the molecular mechanisms of virulence evolution in Pgt we identified the p...

  5. Prehaustorial and posthaustorial resistance to wheat leaf rust in diploid wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anker, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    In modern wheat cultivars, resistance to wheat leaf rust, Puccinia triticina , is either based on hypersensitivity resistance or on partial resistance. Hypersensitivity resistance in wheat is monogenic, often complete and posthaustorial: it is induced after the

  6. Comparison of multi- and hyperspectral imaging data of leaf rust infected wheat plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Rascher, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    In the context of precision agriculture, several recent studies have focused on detecting crop stress caused by pathogenic fungi. For this purpose, several sensor systems have been used to develop in-field-detection systems or to test possible applications of remote sensing. The objective of this research was to evaluate the potential of different sensor systems for multitemporal monitoring of leaf rust (puccinia recondita) infected wheat crops, with the aim of early detection of infected stands. A comparison between a hyperspectral (120 spectral bands) and a multispectral (3 spectral bands) imaging system shows the benefits and limitations of each approach. Reflectance data of leaf rust infected and fungicide treated control wheat stand boxes (1sqm each) were collected before and until 17 days after inoculation. Plants were grown under controlled conditions in the greenhouse and measurements were taken under consistent illumination conditions. The results of mixture tuned matched filtering analysis showed the suitability of hyperspectral data for early discrimination of leaf rust infected wheat crops due to their higher spectral sensitivity. Five days after inoculation leaf rust infected leaves were detected, although only slight visual symptoms appeared. A clear discrimination between infected and control stands was possible. Multispectral data showed a higher sensitivity to external factors like illumination conditions, causing poor classification accuracy. Nevertheless, if these factors could get under control, even multispectral data may serve a good indicator for infection severity.

  7. Label-Free Detection of Soybean Rust Spores using Photonic Crystal Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust, caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of the most devastating foliar diseases affecting soybeans grown worldwide. The disease was reported for the first time in the United States in 2004. Early spore detection, prior to the appearance of visible symptoms, is critical to ef...

  8. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust fungi infect a wide range of plant species making them of particular interest to plant pathologists. In order to study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants it is useful to be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplish...

  9. Enhanced resistance to stripe rust disease in transgenic wheat expressing the rice chitinase gene RC24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan; Wang, Jian; Du, Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Li, Lan; Xu, Ziqin

    2013-10-01

    Stripe rust is a devastating fungal disease of wheat worldwide which is primarily caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici. Transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) expressing rice class chitinase gene RC24 were developed by particle bombardment of immature embryos and tested for resistance to Puccinia striiformis f.sp tritici. under greenhouse and field conditions. Putative transformants were selected on kanamycin-containing media. Polymease chain reaction indicated that RC24 was transferred into 17 transformants obtained from bombardment of 1,684 immature embryos. Integration of RC24 was confirmed by Southern blot with a RC24-labeled probe and expression of RC24 was verified by RT-PCR. Nine transgenic T1 lines exhibited enhanced resistance to stripe rust infection with lines XN8 and BF4 showing the highest level of resistance. Southern blot hybridization confirmed the stable inheritance of RC24 in transgenic T1 plants. Resistance to stripe rust in transgenic T2 and T3 XN8 and BF4 plants was confirmed over two consecutive years in the field. Increased yield (27-36 %) was recorded for transgenic T2 and T3 XN8 and BF4 plants compared to controls. These results suggest that rice class I chitinase RC24 can be used to engineer stripe rust resistance in wheat.

  10. Extraction of High Molecular Weight DNA from Fungal Rust Spores for Long Read Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Rathjen, John P

    2017-01-01

    Wheat rust fungi are complex organisms with a complete life cycle that involves two different host plants and five different spore types. During the asexual infection cycle on wheat, rusts produce massive amounts of dikaryotic urediniospores. These spores are dikaryotic (two nuclei) with each nucleus containing one haploid genome. This dikaryotic state is likely to contribute to their evolutionary success, making them some of the major wheat pathogens globally. Despite this, most published wheat rust genomes are highly fragmented and contain very little haplotype-specific sequence information. Current long-read sequencing technologies hold great promise to provide more contiguous and haplotype-phased genome assemblies. Long reads are able to span repetitive regions and phase structural differences between the haplomes. This increased genome resolution enables the identification of complex loci and the study of genome evolution beyond simple nucleotide polymorphisms. Long-read technologies require pure high molecular weight DNA as an input for sequencing. Here, we describe a DNA extraction protocol for rust spores that yields pure double-stranded DNA molecules with molecular weight of >50 kilo-base pairs (kbp). The isolated DNA is of sufficient purity for PacBio long-read sequencing, but may require additional purification for other sequencing technologies such as Nanopore and 10× Genomics.

  11. Copper-mediated reductive dechlorination by green rust intercalated with dodecanoate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lizhi; Yin, Zhou; Cooper, Nicola G.A.

    2018-01-01

    A layered FeII-FeIII hydroxide (green rust, GR) was intercalated with dodecanoate (known as GRC12) and then amended with CuII (GRC12(Cu)) before reaction with chloroform (CF), carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE) or tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Reduction of CT by GRC12(Cu) was 37 times...

  12. Glycine buffered synthesis of layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides (green rusts)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Huang, Lizhi; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund

    2017-01-01

    Layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) are efficient reducing agents against oxidizing contaminants such as chromate, nitrate, selenite, and nitroaromatic compounds and chlorinated solvents. In this study, we adopted a buffered precipitation approach where glycine (GLY) was used...

  13. Multi-location wheat stripe rust QTL analysis: genetic background and epistatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M Dolores; Zemetra, Robert; Peterson, C James; Chen, Xianming M; Heesacker, Adam; Mundt, Christopher C

    2015-07-01

    Epistasis and genetic background were important influences on expression of stripe rust resistance in two wheat RIL populations, one with resistance conditioned by two major genes and the other conditioned by several minor QTL. Stripe rust is a foliar disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) caused by the air-borne fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and is present in most regions around the world where commercial wheat is grown. Breeding for durable resistance to stripe rust continues to be a priority, but also is a challenge due to the complexity of interactions among resistance genes and to the wide diversity and continuous evolution of the pathogen races. The goal of this study was to detect chromosomal regions for resistance to stripe rust in two winter wheat populations, 'Tubbs'/'NSA-98-0995' (T/N) and 'Einstein'/'Tubbs' (E/T), evaluated across seven environments and mapped with diversity array technology and simple sequence repeat markers covering polymorphic regions of ≈1480 and 1117 cM, respectively. Analysis of variance for phenotypic data revealed significant (P located in chromosomes 2AS and 6AL, with epistatic interaction between them, were responsible for the main phenotypic response. For the T/N population, eight QTL were identified, with those in chromosomes 2AL and 2BL accounting for the largest percentage of the phenotypic variance.

  14. The rust fungus Gymnosporangium in Korea including two new species, G. monticola and G. unicorne

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey was conducted of species of the rust fungus Gymnosporangium in Korea. The previously known species were recollected, namely Gymnosporangium asiaticum, G. clavariiforme, G. globosum, G. japonicum, and G. yamadae. Although G. cornutum was reported from Korea, collections similar to that speci...

  15. Genetics and mapping of a new leaf rust resistance gene in Triticum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AMIT KUMAR SINGH

    Selection G12 carries a new gene for leaf rust resistance, tentatively named as LrSelG12. [Singh A. K. ..... long arm of chromosome 3B were found to be polymor- phic between ... due to the evolution of new virulent races in India (Tomar et al.

  16. Sources of stem rust resistance in wheat-alien introgression lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat and the novel highly virulent race of TTKSK and its lineage are threatening wheat production worldwide. The objective of the study was to identify new sources of resistance in wheat-alien introgre...

  17. Green rust formation controls nutrient availability in a ferruginous water column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G.

    2013-01-01

    a mechanism for reconstructing ancient ocean chemistry. Such reconstructions depend, however, on precise knowledge of the iron minerals formed in the water column. Here, we combine mineralogical and geochemical analyses to demonstrate formation of the mixed-valence iron mineral, green rust, in ferruginous...

  18. The formation of green rust induced by tropical river biofilm components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorand, F.; Zegeye, A.; Ghanbaja, J.; Abdelmoula, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the Sinnamary Estuary (French Guiana), a dense red biofilm grows on flooded surfaces. In order to characterize the iron oxides in this biofilm and to establish the nature of secondary minerals formed after anaerobic incubation, we conducted solid analysis and performed batch incubations. Elemental analysis indicated a major amount of iron as inorganic compartment along with organic matter. Solid analysis showed the presence of two ferric oxides ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Bacteria were abundant and represented more than 10 11 cells g -1 of dry weight among which iron reducers were revealed. Optical and electronic microscopy analysis revealed than the bacteria were in close vicinity of the iron oxides. After anaerobic incubations with exogenous electron donors, the biofilm's ferric material was reduced into green rust, a Fe II -Fe III layered double hydroxide. This green rust remained stable for several years. From this study and previous reports, we suggest that ferruginous biofilms should be considered as a favorable location for GR biomineralization when redox conditions and electron donors availability are gathered. - Research highlights: → Characterization of ferruginous biofilm components by solid analysis methods. → Lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite were the main iron oxides. → Anaerobic incubation of biofilm with electron donors produced green rust. → Biofilm components promote the formation of the green rust. → Ferruginous biofilm could contribute to the natural mercury attenuation.

  19. The formation of green rust induced by tropical river biofilm components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorand, F., E-mail: jorand@pharma.uhp-nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME) UMR 7564, CNRS-Nancy-Universite, Institut Jean Barriol, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, F-54600 Villers-les Nancy (France); Zegeye, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME) UMR 7564, CNRS-Nancy-Universite, Institut Jean Barriol, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, F-54600 Villers-les Nancy (France); Ghanbaja, J. [Service Commun de Microscopies Electroniques et Microanalyses X (SCMEM), Nancy-Universite, Bvd des Aiguillettes, BP 239, 54506, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Abdelmoula, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (LCPME) UMR 7564, CNRS-Nancy-Universite, Institut Jean Barriol, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, F-54600 Villers-les Nancy (France)

    2011-06-01

    In the Sinnamary Estuary (French Guiana), a dense red biofilm grows on flooded surfaces. In order to characterize the iron oxides in this biofilm and to establish the nature of secondary minerals formed after anaerobic incubation, we conducted solid analysis and performed batch incubations. Elemental analysis indicated a major amount of iron as inorganic compartment along with organic matter. Solid analysis showed the presence of two ferric oxides ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Bacteria were abundant and represented more than 10{sup 11} cells g{sup -1} of dry weight among which iron reducers were revealed. Optical and electronic microscopy analysis revealed than the bacteria were in close vicinity of the iron oxides. After anaerobic incubations with exogenous electron donors, the biofilm's ferric material was reduced into green rust, a Fe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} layered double hydroxide. This green rust remained stable for several years. From this study and previous reports, we suggest that ferruginous biofilms should be considered as a favorable location for GR biomineralization when redox conditions and electron donors availability are gathered. - Research highlights: {yields} Characterization of ferruginous biofilm components by solid analysis methods. {yields} Lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite were the main iron oxides. {yields} Anaerobic incubation of biofilm with electron donors produced green rust. {yields} Biofilm components promote the formation of the green rust. {yields} Ferruginous biofilm could contribute to the natural mercury attenuation.

  20. Evaluation of brown rust resistance in the Louisiana basic breeding program’s first clonal trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past decade, the Louisiana sugarcane industry has experienced increasing levels of pressure from brown rust (Puccinia melanocephala). In 2000, an epidemic spread throughout the Louisiana industry, severely affecting the state’s top yielding variety, previously resistant LCP85-384, which at ...

  1. Identification of RAPD marker associated with brown rust resistance in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility to brown rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala is a major reason for the withdrawal of sugarcane cultivars from production. An efficient way to control the disease is to breed cultivars with durable resistance. Our aim was to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers ...

  2. Genotyping Sugarcane for the Brown Rust Resistance Locus Bru1 Using Unlabeled Probe Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia melanocephala, is a major disease of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in Florida, Louisiana, and other sugarcane growing regions. The Bru1 locus has been used as a durable and effective source of resistance, and markers are available to select for the trait. The...

  3. Risk assessment with current deployment strategies for fusiform rust-resistant loblolly and slash pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd Bridgwater; Tom Kubisiak; Tom Byram; Steve Mckeand

    2004-01-01

    In the southeastern USA, fusiform rust resistant loblolly and slash pines may be deployed as 1) ulked seed orchard mixes. 2) half-sibling (sib) family mixtures. 3) single half-sib families. 4) full-sib cross seeds or as 6) clones of individual genotypes. These deployment types are respectively greater genetic gains from higher selection intensity. Currently, bulked...

  4. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    areas of temperate zones (Johnson 1988). Yield losses can be considerable, ranging from about 40 per cent to com- plete destruction of the crop depending upon the growth stage at which the disease attacks. Using diverse genes for resistance against stripe rust disease is the most eco- nomical and environmentally safe ...

  5. First Report of Orange Rust of Sugarcane caused by Puccinia kuehnii in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange rust, Puccinia kuehnii (W. Krüger) E.J. Butler, is an important disease of sugarcane (complex hybrid of Saccharum L. species) that causes yield losses, and impacts breeding programs. Initially confined to the Asia-Oceania region (5), P. kuehnii was reported in Florida in June 2007 (2) and lat...

  6. Harvest intensity and competition control impacts on loblolly pine fusiform rust incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Eaton; Paula Spaine; Felipe G. Sanchez

    2006-01-01

    The Long Term Soil Productivity experiment tests the effects of soil compaction, surface organic matter removal, and understory control on net primary productivity. An unintended consequence of these treatments may be an effect on the incidence of fusiform rust [Cronartium quercuum (Berk.) Miy. ex Shirai f. sp. fusiforme Burdsall et Snow]. Loblolly pine (Pinus...

  7. Genetics and mapping of a new leaf rust resistance gene in Triticum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AMIT KUMAR SINGH

    seedling stage revealed that leaf rust resistance in Selection G12 is conditioned by a single ... closely or distantly related species of wheat (McIntosh et al. 2013 ... An effort was also made to determine the chromo- ... Materials and methods.

  8. Phylogeny and taxonomy of grass rusts with aecia on Ranunculus and Ficaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabětová, M.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Marková, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2015) ISSN 1617-416X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Rust fungi * Pucciniales * Puccinia Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2015

  9. Genetics and mapping of a new leaf rust resistance gene in Triticum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Triticum timopheevii-derived bread wheat line, Selection G12, was screened with 40 pathotypes of leaf rust pathogen, Puccinia triticina at seedling stage and with two most commonly prevalent pathotypes 77-5 and 104-2 at adult plant stage. Selection G12 showed resistance at both seedling and adult plant stages.

  10. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  11. URS Brava – a new oat cultivar with partial resistance to crown rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Federizzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cultivar URS Brava, obtained from a simple cross between the line ‘UFRGS 995078-2’ and the cultivar ‘URS 21’, shows high grain yield and stability, high grain quality, desirable agronomical traits and partial resistance to crown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae.

  12. Paradoxes in Policy Practice: Signaling Postsecondary Pathways in the Rust Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Dana; Halabi, Saamira

    2012-01-01

    Context: Research increasingly suggests that the high school diploma has lost its meaning as a symbol of life preparation. Having faced economic struggles earlier and longer than most regions of the United States, the "Rust Belt" region offers important lessons for the broader nation regarding how high schools might prepare youth for…

  13. Civic Capacity in Educational Reform Efforts: Emerging and Established Regimes in Rust Belt Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Dana L.; Frick, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Using urban regime theory, the article examines two Rust Belt cities that tried to break the cycle of social reproduction in their communities by reforming their schools. The article contributes to the development of urban regime theory by comparing an "emerging" regime to an "established" regime. The comparison highlights the interdependent…

  14. Discovery of a seventh Rpp soybean rust resistance locus in soybean accession PI 605823

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust, caused by the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd, is a disease threat to soybean production in regions of the world with mild winters. Host plant resistance to P. pachyrhizi conditioned by Rpp genes has been found in numerous soybean accessions, and at...

  15. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of wheat introgression lines carrying the stem rust resistance gene Sr39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn., poses a serious threat to global wheat production because of the emergence of Pgt-TTKSK (Ug99). The TTKSK resistant gene Sr39 was derived from Aegilops speltoides through chromosome translocation. In this study, we ch...

  16. Flavonoid Accumulation Plays an Important Role in the Rust Resistance of Malus Plant Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfen Lu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cedar-apple rust (Gymnosporangium yamadai Miyabe is a fungal disease that causes substantial injury to apple trees and results in fruit with reduced size and quality and a lower commercial value. The molecular mechanisms underlying the primary and secondary metabolic effects of rust spots on the leaves of Malus apple cultivars are poorly understood. Using HPLC, we found that the contents of flavonoid compounds, especially anthocyanin and catechin, were significantly increased in rust-infected symptomatic tissue (RIT. The expression levels of structural genes and MYB transcription factors related to flavonoid biosynthesis were one- to seven-fold higher in the RIT. Among these genes, CHS, DFR, ANS, FLS and MYB10 showed more than a 10-fold increase, suggesting that these genes were expressed at significantly higher levels in the RIT. Hormone concentration assays showed that the levels of abscisic acid (ABA, ethylene (ETH, jasmonate (JA and salicylic acid (SA were higher in the RIT and were consistent with the expression levels of McNCED, McACS, McLOX and McNPR1, respectively. Our study explored the complicated crosstalk of the signal transduction pathways of ABA, ETH, JA and SA; the primary metabolism of glucose, sucrose, fructose and sorbitol; and the secondary metabolism of flavonoids involved in the rust resistance of Malus crabapple leaves.

  17. Characterization of stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in Indian wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SONY

    2013-05-01

    May 1, 2013 ... accelerating wheat production in the last forty years and ensured food security of the Nation. In the present investigation, Sr2 specific molecular markers were used to assess their efficacy for assessing the deployment of Sr2 gene in Indian wheat cultivars of highly productive north-west plains and stem rust ...

  18. Identification of rust resistance genes Lr10 and Sr9a in Pakistani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of rust resistance genes Lr10 and Sr9a in Pakistani wheat germplasm using PCR based molecular markers. M Babar, AF Mashhadi, A Mehvish, AN Zahra, R Waheed, A Hasnain, S ur-Rahman, N Hussain, M Ali, I Khaliq, A Aziz ...

  19. Appraisal of wheat germplasm for adult plant resistance against stripe rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Kamran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The resurgence of wheat stripe rust is of great concern for world food security. Owing to resistance breakdown and the appearance of new virulent high-temperature adapted races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, many high yielding commercial varieties in the country lost their yield potential. Searching for new sources of resistance is the best approach to mitigate the problem. Quantitative resistance (partial or adult plant or durable resistance is reported to be more stable than race specific resistance. In the current perusal, a repertoire of 57 promising wheat lines along with the KLcheck line Morocco, developed through hybridisation and selection of local and international lines with International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT origin, were evaluated under natural field conditions at Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB during the 2012−2013 and 2013−2014 time periods. Final rust severity (FRS, the area under the rust progress curve (AURPC, the relative area under the rust progress curve (rAURPC, and the coefficient of infection (CI were unraveled to infer the level of quantitative resistance. Final rust severity was recorded when the susceptible check exhibited 100% severity. There were 21 lines which were immune (no disease, 16 which were resistant, five moderately resistant, two resistant-to-moderately resistant, one moderately resistant-to-moderately susceptible, 5 moderately susceptible-to-susceptible, one moderately susceptible, and six exhibited a susceptible response. Nevertheless, 51 lines exhibited a high level of partial resistance while the three lines, NW-5-1212-1, NW-7-30-1, and NW-7-5 all showed a moderate level of partial resistance based on FRS, while 54 lines, on the basis of AURPC and rAURPC, were identified as conferring a high level of partial resistance. Moreover, adult plant resistance was conferred by 47 wheat lines, based on CI value. It was striking that, 13 immune lines

  20. Gene discovery in EST sequences from the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina sexual spores, asexual spores and haustoria, compared to other rust and corn smut fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rust fungi are biotrophic basidiomycete plant pathogens that cause major diseases on plants and trees world-wide, affecting agriculture and forestry. Their biotrophic nature precludes many established molecular genetic manipulations and lines of research. The generation of genomic resources for these microbes is leading to novel insights into biology such as interactions with the hosts and guiding directions for breakthrough research in plant pathology. Results To support gene discovery and gene model verification in the genome of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt), we have generated Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) by sampling several life cycle stages. We focused on several spore stages and isolated haustorial structures from infected wheat, generating 17,684 ESTs. We produced sequences from both the sexual (pycniospores, aeciospores and teliospores) and asexual (germinated urediniospores) stages of the life cycle. From pycniospores and aeciospores, produced by infecting the alternate host, meadow rue (Thalictrum speciosissimum), 4,869 and 1,292 reads were generated, respectively. We generated 3,703 ESTs from teliospores produced on the senescent primary wheat host. Finally, we generated 6,817 reads from haustoria isolated from infected wheat as well as 1,003 sequences from germinated urediniospores. Along with 25,558 previously generated ESTs, we compiled a database of 13,328 non-redundant sequences (4,506 singlets and 8,822 contigs). Fungal genes were predicted using the EST version of the self-training GeneMarkS algorithm. To refine the EST database, we compared EST sequences by BLASTN to a set of 454 pyrosequencing-generated contigs and Sanger BAC-end sequences derived both from the Pt genome, and to ESTs and genome reads from wheat. A collection of 6,308 fungal genes was identified and compared to sequences of the cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) and stripe rust, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), and poplar

  1. Gene discovery in EST sequences from the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina sexual spores, asexual spores and haustoria, compared to other rust and corn smut fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynhoven Brian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rust fungi are biotrophic basidiomycete plant pathogens that cause major diseases on plants and trees world-wide, affecting agriculture and forestry. Their biotrophic nature precludes many established molecular genetic manipulations and lines of research. The generation of genomic resources for these microbes is leading to novel insights into biology such as interactions with the hosts and guiding directions for breakthrough research in plant pathology. Results To support gene discovery and gene model verification in the genome of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt, we have generated Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs by sampling several life cycle stages. We focused on several spore stages and isolated haustorial structures from infected wheat, generating 17,684 ESTs. We produced sequences from both the sexual (pycniospores, aeciospores and teliospores and asexual (germinated urediniospores stages of the life cycle. From pycniospores and aeciospores, produced by infecting the alternate host, meadow rue (Thalictrum speciosissimum, 4,869 and 1,292 reads were generated, respectively. We generated 3,703 ESTs from teliospores produced on the senescent primary wheat host. Finally, we generated 6,817 reads from haustoria isolated from infected wheat as well as 1,003 sequences from germinated urediniospores. Along with 25,558 previously generated ESTs, we compiled a database of 13,328 non-redundant sequences (4,506 singlets and 8,822 contigs. Fungal genes were predicted using the EST version of the self-training GeneMarkS algorithm. To refine the EST database, we compared EST sequences by BLASTN to a set of 454 pyrosequencing-generated contigs and Sanger BAC-end sequences derived both from the Pt genome, and to ESTs and genome reads from wheat. A collection of 6,308 fungal genes was identified and compared to sequences of the cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt and stripe rust, P. striiformis f. sp

  2. Pushing the boundaries of resistance: insights from Brachypodium-rust interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania eFigueroa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The implications of global population growth urge transformation of current food and bioenergy production systems to sustainability. Members of the family Poaceae are of particular importance both in food security and for their applications as biofuel substrates. For centuries, rust fungi have threatened the production of valuable crops such as wheat, barley, oat and other small grains; similarly, biofuel crops can also be susceptible to these pathogens. Emerging rust pathogenic races with increased virulence and recurrent rust epidemics around the world point out the vulnerability of monocultures. Basic research in plant immunity, especially in model plants, can make contributions to understanding plant resistance mechanisms and improve disease management strategies. The development of the grass Brachypodium distachyon as a genetically tractable model for monocots, especially temperate cereals and grasses, offers the possibility to overcome the experimental challenges presented by the genetic and genomic complexities of economically valuable crop plants. The numerous resources and tools available in Brachypodium have opened new doors to investigate the underlying molecular and genetic bases of plant-microbe interactions in grasses and evidence demonstrating the applicability and advantages of working with B. distachyon is increasing. Importantly, several interactions between B. distachyon and devastating plant pathogens, such rust fungi, have been examined in the context of non-host resistance. Here, we discuss the use of B. distachyon in these various pathosystems. Exploiting B. distachyon to understand the mechanisms underpinning disease resistance to non-adapted rust fungi may provide effective and durable approaches to fend off these pathogens. The close phylogenetic relationship among Brachypodium spp. and grasses with industrial and agronomic value support harnessing this model plant to improve cropping systems and encourage its use in

  3. Stem rust (Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola Urban its hosts and harmfulness in grasses grown for seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prończuk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem rust development on four species of grasses was studied in field experiments conducted at Radzików in 1997-2001. Population of Puccinia graminis ssp. graminicola from different hosts was characterised and their harmfulness for grass grown for seed was estimated. The materials for study were ecotypes and strains of Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis and Deschampsia caespitosa collected in breeding nursery and cultivars and strains of L.perenne, F.rubra, P.pratensis cultivated for seed. It was found that the changes in environmental conditions during last years influenced earlier occurrence of stem rust on grasses in Poland. All examined species were the host of P.graminis ssp. graminicola, however the period of infection of particular hosts were different. L.perenne and D.caespitosa were infected in early summer but F.rubra and P.pratensis in late summer or in the autumn. Morphological analysis of spores of P.graminis ssp. graminicola have shoved significant differences between populations obtained from L.perenne and D.caespitosa. Some differences were found between populations from F.rubra and P.pratensis also, but they need more study. Every year occurrence of stem rust on L.perenne and D.caespitosa and its relation with spring temperature in Radzików indicated that populations of patogen could overwinter in local turf. Incidental appearance of stem rust on F.rubra and P.pratensis in centre of Poland allowed to suppose that spores of these forms might be transfer by wind from other regions. The investigation revealed that stem rust can be dangerous for L.perenne grown for seed when infection occurs at flowering time. It has been established that infection of F.rubra and P.pratensis in autumn should not be disregarded. Damages of leaves by P.graminis ssp. graminicola substantially limited plant heading in the next year.

  4. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  5. Survey the Effect of Mycorrhiza and Azospirillum of Wheat Cultivars Resistance in Yellow Rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jiriaie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wheat is one of the major agricultural crops with respect to human nutrition. It is cultivated over a wide range of environments, because of wide adaptation to diverse environmental conditions. In Iran, 6.2 million hectares are under wheat cultivation, of which 33% is irrigated and 67% is rain-fed, the irrigated wheat growing areas (2 million hectares are located mostly in southern, central and east of Iran Production of crops is under the influence of plant genetic structure, environmental conditions and their interactions. Biotic and abiotic stresses are considered to lower production. Among the biotic stress, the fungal disease is the main factor limiting production of crop plants in hot and humid regions. Stripe rust was not a serious economic concern to the wheat industry for most of the 1990’s due to the use of resistant varieties. However, by 2003 it had developed into a significant issue, particularly as new path types evolved. Even in the dry years of 2003 and 2004, stripe rust cost growers significant income. Provide country's need for wheat as a strategic product, meanwhile, production is free from chemical fungicide is a high but achievable goal. So in order to achieve fertilizer and fungicide resources that in addition to having no adverse effects on consumers and the environment, has been economically able to provide nutrition need of crop plant, is very important. Materials and Methods: With this approach, to survey the effect of Mycorrhiza and Azospirillum in resistance to yellow rust in wheat cultivars, an experiment was conducted at the research station of the Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran in 2012-13. The experimental design was factorial based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. The treatments include of Mycorrhiza fungi in three levels (without application of Mycorrhiza strain and using strain Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae, Azospirillum lipoferum bacterium in two

  6. X-ray diffraction analysis of rust layer on a weathering steel bridge with surface treatment using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masato; Hara, Shuichi; Kamimura, Takayuki; Miyuki, Hideaki; Sato, Masugu

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the structure of rust layer formed on a weathering steel bridge, to which the surface treatment, employing the effect of Cr 2 (SO 4 ) 3 sophisticatedly designed to form the protective goethite (α-FeOOH) rust layer which contains a certain amount of Cr, Cr-goethite, was applied in 1996, using X-ray diffraction at SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. It was shown that the formation of α-FeOOH was promoted and/or crystal growth of γ-FeOOH was suppressed by the surface treatment. The increase in the protective ability index (PAI) of the rust layer indicates that the protective goethite was predominantly formed under the effect of the surface treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that the surface treatment worked well to promote the formation of the protective goethite rust layer on the weathering steel bridge during the 10-year exposure. (author)

  7. Tagging and mapping of SSR marker for rust resistance gene in lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, H K; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, D; Aski, M; Jain, Neelu; Hegde, V S; Basandrai, A K; Basandrai, D; Sharma, T R

    2016-06-01

    Lentil, as an economical source of protein, minerals and vitamins, plays important role in nutritional security of the common man. Grown mainly in West Asia, North Africa (WANA) region and South Asia, it suffers from several biotic stresses such as wilt, rust, blight and broomrape. Lentil rust caused by autoecious fungus Uromyces viciae fabae (Pers.) Schroet is a serious lentil disease in Algeria, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Morocco, Pakistan and Nepal. The disease symptoms are observed during flowering and early podding stages. Rust causes severe yield losses in lentil. It can only be effectively controlled by identifying the resistant source, understanding its inheritance and breeding for host resistance. The obligate parasitic nature of pathogen makes it difficult to maintain the pathogen in culture and to apply it to screen segregating progenies under controlled growth conditions. Hence, the use of molecular markers will compliment in identification of resistant types in different breeding programs. Here, we studied the inheritance of resistance to rust in lentil using F₁, F₂ and F₂:₃ from cross PL 8 (susceptible) x L 4149 (resistant) varieties. The phenotyping of lentil population was carried out at Sirmour, India. The result of genetic analysis revealed that a single dominant gene controls rust resistance in lentil genotype L 4149. The F2 population from this cross was used to tag and map the rust resistance gene using SSR and SRAP markers. Markers such as 270 SRAP and 162 SSR were studied for polymorphism and 101 SRAP and 33 SSRs were found to be polymorphic between the parents. Two SRAP and two SSR markers differentiated the resistant and susceptible bulks. SSR marker Gllc 527 was estimated to be linked to rust resistant locus at a distance of 5.9 cM. The Gllc 527 marker can be used for marker assisted selection for rust resistance; however, additional markers closer to rust resistant locus are required. The markers linked to the rust

  8. SEASONALITY OF THE LEAF MINER, LEVEL OF PREDATION AND TEMPORAL OCCURRENCE OF RUST CORRELATED TO ABIOTIC FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. R. Melo; F. B. S. Botelho; J. S. M. Silva; D. F. F. Lima; E. R. Moreira

    2018-01-01

    The coffee leaf miner and a rust are considered as major diseases that are able to reduce productivity in coffee plantations. These agents are influenced by abiotic factors, and their occurrence may suffer oscillation over the years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal fluctuation of the coffee leaf miner, incidence of coffee prediction and rust, correlated with abiotic factors. The study was performed IFSULDEMINAS-Campus Inconfidentes, in a coffee crop of the cultivar Ru...

  9. Race-Specific Adult-Plant Resistance in Winter Wheat to Stripe Rust and Characterization of Pathogen Virulence Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milus, Eugene A; Moon, David E; Lee, Kevin D; Mason, R Esten

    2015-08-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of wheat in the Great Plains and southeastern United States. Growing resistant cultivars is the preferred means for managing stripe rust, but new virulence in the pathogen population overcomes some of the resistance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the stripe rust resistance in contemporary soft and hard red winter wheat cultivars, to characterize the virulence of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates based on the resistances found in the cultivars, and to determine wheat breeders' perceptions on the importance and methods for achieving stripe rust resistance. Seedlings of cultivars were susceptible to recent isolates, indicating they lacked effective all-stage resistance. However, adult-plants were resistant or susceptible depending on the isolate, indicating they had race-specific adult-plant resistance. Using isolates collected from 1990 to 2013, six major virulence patterns were identified on adult plants of twelve cultivars that were selected as adult-plant differentials. Race-specific adult-plant resistance appears to be the only effective type of resistance protecting wheat from stripe rust in eastern United States. Among wheat breeders, the importance of incorporating stripe rust resistance into cultivars ranged from high to low depending on the frequency of epidemics in their region, and most sources of stripe rust resistance were either unknown or already overcome by virulence in the pathogen population. Breeders with a high priority for stripe rust resistance made most of their selections based on adult-plant reactions in the field, whereas breeders with a low priority for resistance based selections on molecular markers for major all-stage resistance genes.

  10. [Prediction model of meteorological grade of wheat stripe rust in winter-reproductive area, Sichuan Basin, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Wang, Ming Tian; Zhang, Guo Zhi

    2017-12-01

    The winter reproductive areas of Puccinia striiformis var. striiformis in Sichuan Basin are often the places mostly affected by wheat stripe rust. With data on the meteorological condition and stripe rust situation at typical stations in the winter reproductive area in Sichuan Basin from 1999 to 2016, this paper classified the meteorological conditions inducing wheat stripe rust into 5 grades, based on the incidence area ratio of the disease. The meteorological factors which were biologically related to wheat stripe rust were determined through multiple analytical methods, and a meteorological grade model for forecasting wheat stripe rust was created. The result showed that wheat stripe rust in Sichuan Basin was significantly correlated with many meteorological factors, such as the ave-rage (maximum and minimum) temperature, precipitation and its anomaly percentage, relative humidity and its anomaly percentage, average wind speed and sunshine duration. Among these, the average temperature and the anomaly percentage of relative humidity were the determining factors. According to a historical retrospective test, the accuracy of the forecast based on the model was 64% for samples in the county-level test, and 89% for samples in the municipal-level test. In a meteorological grade forecast of wheat stripe rust in the winter reproductive areas in Sichuan Basin in 2017, the prediction was accurate for 62.8% of the samples, with 27.9% error by one grade and only 9.3% error by two or more grades. As a result, the model could deliver satisfactory forecast results, and predicate future wheat stripe rust from a meteorological point of view.

  11. Dynamics of hydrogen induced blistering of a low carbon steel sheet by lamb waves analysis; Ramuha no teiryo kaiseki ni yoru hakubanteitansoko no suiso hare no dainamikkusu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Teruyoshi.; Takemoto, Mikio. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering

    1999-06-15

    With the aim of studying the fracture dynamics of environmentally assisted fractures in thin plates, we developed a new source simulation method of the zeroth-order symmetric (or S{sub 0}-) Lamb wave using the experimental overall-transfer function of the system. The transfer function was determined by the time-domain deconvolution of detected S{sub 0}-Lamb component by the artificial fracture source of a compression -type PZT element whose vibration kinetics was estimated by the iteration so that the S{sub o}-waveform detected. Hydrogen induced blistering was found to be caused by the succession of fast Mode-I fracture with source rise times from 0.6 to 1.0{mu}s. The crack volume estimated by the source simulation corresponded to that of fine blistering with an opening displacement of 5{mu}m. As the estimated fracture kinetics of hydrogen blistering coincide with those of delayed fracture of high tension low alloy steel under tensile loading, the kinetics of first and micro-fractures and blistering induced by hydrogen gas precipitation appears to be independent on the hydrogen solubility and strength of steels, the applied stresses and the orientation of cracks. (author)

  12. Rust Layer Formed on Low Carbon Weathering Steels with Different Mn, Ni Contents in Environment Containing Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-qin FU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rusting evolution of low carbon weathering steels with different Mn, Ni contents under a simulated environment containing chloride ions has been investigated to clarify the correlation between Mn, Ni and the rust formed on steels. The results show that Mn contents have little impact on corrosion kinetics of experimental steels. Content increase of Ni both enhances the anti-corrosion performance of steel substrate and the rust. Increasing Ni content is beneficial to forming compact rust. Semi-quantitative XRD phase analysis shows that the quantity ratio of α/γ*(α-FeOOH/(γ-FeOOH+Fe3O4 decreases as Mn content increases but it increases as Ni content increases. Ni enhances rust layer stability but Mn content exceeding 1.06 wt.% is disadvantageous for rust layer stability. The content increase of Mn does not significantly alter the parameters of the polarization curve. However, as Ni contents increases, Ecorr has shifted to the positive along with decreased icorr values indicating smaller corrosion rate especially as Ni content increases from 0.42 wt.% to 1.50 wt.%.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12844

  13. Identifying Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) and Developing Diagnostic Markers Linked to Orange Rust Resistance in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiping; Islam, Md S; Sood, Sushma; Maya, Stephanie; Hanson, Erik A; Comstock, Jack; Wang, Jianping

    2018-01-01

    Sugarcane ( Saccharum spp.) is an important economic crop, contributing up to 80% of table sugar used in the world and has become a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Sugarcane production has been threatened by many diseases, and fungicide applications for disease control have been opted out for sustainable agriculture. Orange rust is one of the major diseases impacting sugarcane production worldwide. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and developing diagnostic markers are valuable for breeding programs to expedite release of superior sugarcane cultivars for disease control. In this study, an F 1 segregating population derived from a cross between two hybrid sugarcane clones, CP95-1039 and CP88-1762, was evaluated for orange rust resistance in replicated trails. Three QTLs controlling orange rust resistance in sugarcane (qORR109, qORR4 and qORR102) were identified for the first time ever, which can explain 58, 12 and 8% of the phenotypic variation, separately. We also characterized 1,574 sugarcane putative resistance ( R ) genes. These sugarcane putative R genes and simple sequence repeats in the QTL intervals were further used to develop diagnostic markers for marker-assisted selection of orange rust resistance. A PCR-based Resistance gene-derived maker, G1 was developed, which showed significant association with orange rust resistance. The putative QTLs and marker developed in this study can be effectively utilized in sugarcane breeding programs to facilitate the selection process, thus contributing to the sustainable agriculture for orange rust disease control.

  14. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sherry R.; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J.; Parimalan, R.; Sivaswamy, M.; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N. S.; Chowdhury, A. K.; Saha, B. C.; Bhattacharya, P. M.; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M. C.; Gangwar, O. P.; Prasad, P.; Bharadwaj, S. C.; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J. B.; GM, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M. S.; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T. V.; Sharma, R. K.; Dutta, M.; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat–Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011–14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels. PMID:27942031

  15. 75 FR 53861 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Robert E. Rust... CFR part 39) to include an AD that would apply to all Robert E. Rust, Jr. Models DeHavilland DH.C1...

  16. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sundeep; Archak, Sunil; Tyagi, R K; Kumar, Jagdish; Vk, Vikas; Jacob, Sherry R; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J; Parimalan, R; Sivaswamy, M; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N S; Chowdhury, A K; Saha, B C; Bhattacharya, P M; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M C; Gangwar, O P; Prasad, P; Bharadwaj, S C; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J B; Gm, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M S; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T V; Sharma, R K; Dutta, M; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K C

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  17. Difference between Cr and Ni K-edge XANES spectra of rust layers formed on Fe-based binary alloys exposed to Cl-rich environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Yamashita, Masato; Uchida, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The rust layer formed on weathering steel possesses a strong protective ability against corrosives in an atmospheres. This ability is related to the structure of the rust layer. The difference in the protective ability of a rust layer. The difference in the protective ability of a rust layer in a Cl-rich environment between conventional weathering steel containing Cr and advanced weathering steel containing Ni is believed to be caused by the differences in local structural and chemical properties between alloying elements. Cr and Ni, in the rust layer. In order to examine the effect of these alloying elements on the structure of the rust layer formed on steel in a Cl-rich environment, we have performed Cr and Ni K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni binary alloys exposed to a Cl-rich atmosphere using synchrotron radiation. The results of the Cr K-edge XANES measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Cr binary alloys show that the atomic geometry around Cr depends on the concentration of Cr. Therefore, it is expected that the local structure around Cr in the rust layer is unstable. On the other hand, from the results of the Ni K-edge XANES measurements for the rust layer of Fe-Ni binary alloys. Ni is considered to be positioned at a specific site in the crystal structure of a constituent of the rust layer, such as akaganeite or magnetite. As a consequence, Ni negligibly interacts with Cl - ions in the rust layer. (author)

  18. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kumar

    Full Text Available A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu, a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab, a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal, a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  19. Kinetics of structural rust transformation in environments containing chloride and SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the rusts produced on low carbon steel exposed in industrial atmospheres, at different distances from the sea, was studied by simulating the wetting-drying cycle in a CEBELCOR type apparatus. Coupons electrode potential was monitored and rust layer was analyzed by gravimetric techniques, optical microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A particular chloride/sulfur ratio in the atmosphere was found, for which there is a particular behavior in rust formation. For this ratio, corrosion rates were much less than expected. It is postulated a kinetic mechanism for rust layer formation as the origin of this special behavior. An electrode potential similar to that in a weathering steel was observed, this is reflected in the low corrosion rate obtained. The proposed kinetic mechanism for rust formation under these exposure conditions enables new research lines on layer formation and the development of protective rust for industrial marine atmospheres.Se estudió el comportamiento de las herrumbres de un acero de bajo carbono expuesto en la simulación de atmósferas industriales con diferentes distancias al mar, con del ciclo de humectación y secado en el ensayo CEBELCOR y en soluciones representativas de las atmósferas en cuestión. Se hizo seguimiento del potencial de electrodo de los cuerpos de prueba y se analizó la capa de productos de corrosión por técnicas gravimétricas, microscopía óptica y espectroscopia Mössbauer. Se determinó un valor de cloruros y sulfatos en la atmósfera que genera un comportamiento particular en la formación de la herrumbre, presentando velocidades de corrosión menores a las esperadas para el tenor de agentes agresivos, y se postuló un mecanismo cinético en la formación de la película como causante del fenómeno particular. Se observó un comportamiento del potencial próximo al de un acero autoprotector, que se refleja en una menor velocidad de corrosión. La propuesta del mecanismo cin

  20. Mobile health (mHealth) based medication adherence measurement - a pilot trial using electronic blisters in diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brath, Helmut; Morak, Jürgen; Kästenbauer, Thomas; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Strohner-Kästenbauer, Hermine; Schwarz, Mark; Kort, Willem; Schreier, Günter

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a mobile health (mHealth) based remote medication adherence measurement system (mAMS) in elderly patients with increased cardiovascular risk treated for diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension. Cardiovascular risk was defined as the presence of at least two out of the three risk factors: type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension. For treatment of diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension, four predefined routinely used drugs were selected. Drug adherence was investigated in a controlled randomized doctor blinded study with crossover design. The mAMS was used to measure and improve objectively the adherence by means of closed-loop interactions. The mean age of the 53 patients (30 female) was 69.4 ± 4.8 years. A total of 1654 electronic blisters were handed out. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.04) between the monitoring and the control phase was observed for the diabetes medication only. In a post-study questionnaire twenty-nine patients appreciated that their physician knew if and when they had taken their medications and 13 asked for more or automated communication with their physicians. Only one subject withdrew from the study because of technical complexity. The results indicate that mHealth based adherence management is feasible and well accepted by patients with increased cardiovascular risk. It may help to increase adherence, even in patients with high baseline adherence and, subsequently, lead to improved control of indicators including blood pressure and cholesterol concentrations. Electronic blisters can be used in a multi-medication regimen but need to be carefully designed for day-to-day application. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.