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Sample records for blending facility highly

  1. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  2. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  3. Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) or uranium hexafluoride (UF 3 ), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study's scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO 2 or UF 6 , blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM)

  4. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  5. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  6. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF 6 and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF 6 with diluent UF 6 to produce LWR grade LEU-UF 6 . The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry

  7. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  8. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

  9. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation

  10. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  11. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  12. Nuclear blenders: blended learning from Rensselaer's Reactor Critical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Rensselaer's senior level undergraduate nuclear engineering course 'Critical Reactor Laboratory' is highly regarded and much loved. If you can get in, that is. But now it's a required course, nuclear engineering enrollment is up, and others are knocking on our door to get in. How might one offer such a unique course to the masses, without losing the whole point of a laboratory experience? This presentation looks at the costs and benefits of the transition to a 'blended learning' mode -- the merging of traditional, face-to-face instruction and web-based instruction as a solution. As part of the presentation, the course and the facility will be highlighted by short excepts from the 50 minute movie 'Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Neutron Chain Reactions (but were afraid to ask)'.

  13. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending

  14. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  15. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  16. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ VIEWS ON BLENDED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Umit YAPICI,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students’ views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of “Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity” with 47 9th grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of 2009-2010. The lessons were taught in a way appropriate to the blended learning model both via the Internet and on face-to-face basis. As the online dimension of the blended learning model, Moodle, a Learning Management System (LMS, was used. The application lasted 10 weeks. The scale of learners’ views on blended learning was applied and interviews were held to determine the views. As a result of the analysis of the scale, it was seen that their views were “highly” positive. The interviews held with the students revealed that the blended learning model provided students with various opportunities such as getting prepared for the lessons, reviewing the lessons as many times as wanted, reaching the subject-related materials without being dependent on time and place, testing oneself and communicating with the teacher and other students out of the school. The interviews also revealed that there were various problems though such as lack of Internet connection at home and problems experienced while playing the videos.

  17. High School Students' Views on Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Ibrahim Umit; Akbayin, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students' views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of "Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity" with 47 9[superscript th] grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of…

  18. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  19. Blended Learning and Student Engagement in an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    A metropolitan school district wanted to understand blended learning as it existed in one of their high schools. Blended learning had been school-wide for four years, and district administrators wanted to know how students, teachers, and school administrators perceived blended learning and its impact on student engagement. This was a…

  20. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF6 blending alternative to produce LEU UF6 for commercial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF 6 to produce a UF 6 product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF 6 blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed

  1. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU UNH for commercial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form that is more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UNH blending HEU disposition option. Process requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste/emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

  2. Nuclear blenders: blended learning from Rensselaer's Reactor Critical Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, T.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Rensselaer's senior level undergraduate nuclear engineering course 'Critical Reactor Laboratory' is highly regarded and much loved. If you can get in, that is. But now it's a required course, nuclear engineering enrollment is up, and others are knocking on our door to get in. How might one offer such a unique course to the masses, without losing the whole point of a laboratory experience? This presentation looks at the costs and benefits of the transition to a 'blended learning' mode -- the merging of traditional, face-to-face instruction and web-based instruction as a solution. As part of the presentation, the course and the facility will be highlighted by short excepts from the 50 minute movie 'Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Neutron Chain Reactions (but were afraid to ask)'.

  3. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Oxide blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for commercial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the oxide blending HEU disposition option. This option provides for a yearly HEU throughput of 1 0 metric tons (MT) of uranium metal with an average U235 assay of 50% blended with 165 MT of natural assay triuranium octoxide (U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) per year to produce 177 MT of 4% U235 assay U{sub 3} O{sub 8}, for LWR fuel. Since HEU exists in a variety of forms and not necessarily in the form to be blended, worst case scenarios for preprocessing prior to blending will be assumed for HEU feed streams.

  4. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Oxide blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for commercial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the oxide blending HEU disposition option. This option provides for a yearly HEU throughput of 1 0 metric tons (MT) of uranium metal with an average U235 assay of 50% blended with 165 MT of natural assay triuranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ) per year to produce 177 MT of 4% U235 assay U 3 O 8 , for LWR fuel. Since HEU exists in a variety of forms and not necessarily in the form to be blended, worst case scenarios for preprocessing prior to blending will be assumed for HEU feed streams

  5. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur, Anant Achyut [Niskayuna, NY; Srivastava, Alok Mani [Niskayuna, NY; Comanzo, Holly Ann [Niskayuna, NY; Manivannan, Venkatesan [Clifton Park, NY; Beers, William Winder [Chesterland, OH; Toth, Katalin [Pomaz, HU; Balazs, Laszlo D [Budapest, HU

    2008-06-24

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  6. High performance concrete with blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  7. Facile fabrication of HDPE-g-MA/nanodiamond nanocomposites via one-step reactive blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping'an; Yu, Youming; Wu, Qiang; Fu, Shenyuan

    2012-06-29

    In this letter, nanocomposites based on maleic anhydride grafted high density polyethylene (HDPE-g-MA) and amine-functionalized nanodiamond (ND) were fabricated via one-step reactive melt-blending, generating a homogeneous dispersion of ND, as evidenced by transmission electron microscope observations. Thermal analysis results suggest that addition of ND does not affect significantly thermal stability of polymer matrix in nitrogen. However, it was interestingly found that incorporating pure ND decreases the thermal oxidation degradation stability temperature, but blending amino-functionalized ND via reactive processing significantly enhances it of HDPE in air condition. Most importantly, cone tests revealed that both ND additives and reactive blending greatly reduce the heat release rate of HDPE. The results suggest that ND has a potential application as flame retardant alternative for polymers. Tensile results show that adding ND considerably enhances Young's modulus, and reactive blending leads to further improvement in Young's modulus while hardly reducing the elongation at break of HDPE.

  8. An integrated video- and weight-monitoring system for the surveillance of highly enriched uranium blend down operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenarduzzi, R.; Castleberry, K.; Whitaker, M.; Martinez, R.

    1998-01-01

    An integrated video-surveillance and weight-monitoring system has been designed and constructed for tracking the blending down of weapons-grade uranium by the US Department of Energy. The instrumentation is being used by the International Atomic Energy Agency in its task of tracking and verifying the blended material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio. The weight instrumentation developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory monitors and records the weight of cylinders of the highly enriched uranium as their contents are fed into the blending facility while the video equipment provided by Sandia National Laboratory records periodic and event triggered images of the blending area. A secure data network between the scales, cameras, and computers insures data integrity and eliminates the possibility of tampering. The details of the weight monitoring instrumentation, video- and weight-system interaction, and the secure data network is discussed

  9. HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLEND DOWN PROGRAM AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE PRESENT AND FUTURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magoulas, V; Charles Goergen, C; Ronald Oprea, R

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) entered into an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 40 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to TVA for conversion to fuel for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant. Savannah River Site (SRS) inventories included a significant amount of this material, which resulted from processing spent fuel and surplus materials. The HEU is blended with natural uranium (NU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) with a 4.95% 235U isotopic content and shipped as solution to the TVA vendor. The HEU Blend Down Project provided the upgrades needed to achieve the product throughput and purity required and provided loading facilities. The first blending to low enriched uranium (LEU) took place in March 2003 with the initial shipment to the TVA vendor in July 2003. The SRS Shipments have continued on a regular schedule without any major issues for the past 5 years and are due to complete in September 2008. The HEU Blend program is now looking to continue its success by dispositioning an additional approximately 21 MTU of HEU material as part of the SRS Enriched Uranium Disposition Project

  10. High-pressure water facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    NASA Test Operations Group employees, from left, Todd Pearson, Tim Delcuze and Rodney Wilkinson maintain a water pump in Stennis Space Center's high-pressure water facility. The three were part of a group of employees who rode out Hurricane Katrina at the facility and helped protect NASA's rocket engine test complex.

  11. An optimal retrieval, processing, and blending strategy for immobilization of Hanford high-level tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoza, M.

    1996-01-01

    Hanford tank waste will be separated into high-level and low-level portions; each portion will then be vitrified (other waste forms are also being considered for low-level waste) to produce a stable glass form for disposal. Because of the wide variability in the tank waste compositions, blending is being considered as a way to reduce the number of distinct compositions that must be vitrified and to minimize the resultant volume of vitrified waste. Three years of computational glass formulation and blending studies have demonstrated that blending of the high-level waste before vitrification can reduce the volume of high-level waste glass required by as much as 50 percent. This level of reduction would be obtained if all the high-level waste were blended together (Total Blend) prior to vitrification, requiring the retrieval and pretreatment of all tank waste before high-level vitrification was started. This paper will present an overall processing strategy that should be able to match the blending performance of the Total Blend and be more logistically feasible. The strategy includes retrieving, pretreating, blending and vitrifying Hanford tank waste. This strategy utilizes blending both before and after pretreatment. Similar wastes are blended before pretreatment, so as not to dilute species targeted for removal. The high-level portions of these pretreated early blends are then selectively blended to produce a small number of high-level vitrification feed streams

  12. High Pressure Industrial Water Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis, the Nordberg Water Pumps at the High Pressure Industrial Water Facility provide water for cooling the flame deflectors at the test stands during test firings.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of High Injection Pressure Blended Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel have great potential for substitution with petrol fuel for the purpose of achieving clean energy production and emission reduction. Among the methods that can control the combustion properties, controlling of the fuel injection conditions is one of the successful methods. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of high injection pressure of biodiesel blends on spray characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Injection pressure was observed at 220 MPa, 250 MPa and 280 MPa. The ambient temperature was kept held at 1050 K and ambient pressure 8 MPa in order to simulate the effect of boost pressure or turbo charger during combustion process. Computational Fluid Dynamics were used to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends such as spray penetration length, spray angle and mixture formation of fuel-air mixing. The results shows that increases of injection pressure, wider spray angle is produced by biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The injection pressure strongly affects the mixture formation, characteristics of fuel spray, longer spray penetration length thus promotes the fuel and air mixing.

  14. High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Caley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, Emily [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brooker, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Steve [Lexidyne, LLC, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Leiby, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, Rocio Uria [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oladosu, Gbadebo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Maxwell L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The United States government has been promoting increased use of biofuels, including ethanol from non-food feedstocks, through policies contained in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The objective is to enhance energy security, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and provide economic benefits. However, the United States has reached the ethanol blend wall, where more ethanol is produced domestically than can be blended into standard gasoline. Nearly all ethanol is blended at 10 volume percent (vol%) in gasoline. At the same time, the introduction of more stringent standards for fuel economy and GHG tailpipe emissions is driving research to increase the efficiency of spark ignition (SI) engines. Advanced strategies for increasing SI engine efficiency are enabled by higher octane number (more highly knock-resistant) fuels. Ethanol has a research octane number (RON) of 109, compared to typical U.S. regular gasoline at 91-93. Accordingly, high RON ethanol blends containing 20 vol% to 40 vol% ethanol are being extensively studied as fuels that enable design of more efficient engines. These blends are referred to as high-octane fuel (HOF) in this report. HOF could enable dramatic growth in the U.S. ethanol industry, with consequent energy security and GHG emission benefits, while also supporting introduction of more efficient vehicles. HOF could provide the additional ethanol demand necessary for more widespread deployment of cellulosic ethanol. However, the potential of HOF can be realized only if it is adopted by the motor fuel marketplace. This study assesses the feasibility, economics, and logistics of this adoption by the four required participants--drivers, vehicle manufacturers, fuel retailers, and fuel producers. It first assesses the benefits that could motivate these participants to adopt HOF. Then it focuses on the drawbacks and barriers that these participants could face when adopting HOF and proposes strategies--including incentives and

  15. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  16. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF{sub 6} blending alternative to produce LEU UF{sub 6} for commercial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF{sub 6} to produce a UF{sub 6} product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF{sub 6} blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

  17. Morphology and mechanical properties of PA12/plasticized starch blends prepared by high-shear extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssandier, F.; Cassagnau, P.; Gérard, J.F.; Mignard, N.; Mélis, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High shear rate processing was found to greatly impact PA12/starch blend morphologies. ► The morphology was observed to be stable under subsequent processing conditions. ► The mechanical properties of the blends under high-shear rate were greatly improved. ► Polymer blend preparation via high-shear processing has proved to be very effective. ► Finally, polymer blends with improved mechanical properties were obtained. - Abstract: PA12/plasticized starch blends (PA12/TPS) were prepared by high-shear twin screw extruder. The morphology development and the mechanical properties of the blends were investigated as a function of the apparent shear rate. High-shear processing has proved to be an efficient method to finely disperse thermoplastic starch in polyamide 12 matrix. Blends containing TPS domains with a size at the nano-scale (R n ∼ 150 nm) homogeneously dispersed in PA12 matrix were obtained. From a modeling point of view, the variation of the droplet radius is closer to the Wu's predictions compared to the Serpe's predictions. From the basic hypothesis of these models, it can be then assumed that compatibilization between both phases occurs during the blend processing. Furthermore, this morphology of the blends has been proved to be stable after a reprocessing step in an internal mixer most likely due to either strong hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups of starch and amide groups of polyamide 12 or to potentially cross reactions between macroradicals accounting for in situ formation of graft copolymers with the potential function of compatibilizers. Mechanical properties of the blends were found to be strongly dependent on the shear rate parameter of blend processing as the mechanical properties increase with shear rate. In agreement to the blend morphology, the elongation at break of the blends was greatly improved attesting of a good adhesion between both phases.

  18. Hydrazine blending and storage facility, interim response action, draft implementation document for rinsewater transfer, phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-09

    This Draft Implementation Document (ID) for Rinsewater Transfer has been prepared as a requirement for conducting and completing the Interim Response Action (IRA) at the Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility (HBSF) located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Commerce City, Colorado. This document has been prepared in accordance with requirements set forth in the October 1988 Final Decision Document for the HBSF IRA (Peer, 1988) and the Amendment to the Final Decision Document (HLA, 1991). The HBSF IRA task was separated into two phases that comprise complete decommissioning of the HBSF as cited in the Federal Facility Agreement. The design portion of Phase I of the HBSF IRA included analytical methods development and laboratory certification for analysis of hydrazine fuel compounds (hydrazine, monomethyl hydrazine) (MMH), and unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH) and n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in HBSF rinsewater, chemical characterization of hydrazine rinsewater, bench- and pilot-scale testing of ultraviolet (UV) light/chemical oxidation treatment systems for treatment of hydrazine rinsewater, full-scale startup testing of a UV light/chemical oxidation treatment system, and air monitoring during startup testing as described in the Draft Final Treatment Report (HLA, 1991).

  19. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  20. Fuzzy linear programming based optimal fuel scheduling incorporating blending/transloading facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.; Babic, B.; Milosevic, B. [Electrical Engineering Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sobajic, D.J. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Power System Control; Pao, Y.H. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[AI WARE, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the blending/transloading facilities are modeled using an interactive fuzzy linear programming (FLP), in order to allow the decision-maker to solve the problem of uncertainty of input information within the fuel scheduling optimization. An interactive decision-making process is formulated in which decision-maker can learn to recognize good solutions by considering all possibilities of fuzziness. The application of the fuzzy formulation is accompanied by a careful examination of the definition of fuzziness, appropriateness of the membership function and interpretation of results. The proposed concept provides a decision support system with integration-oriented features, whereby the decision-maker can learn to recognize the relative importance of factors in the specific domain of optimal fuel scheduling (OFS) problem. The formulation of a fuzzy linear programming problem to obtain a reasonable nonfuzzy solution under consideration of the ambiguity of parameters, represented by fuzzy numbers, is introduced. An additional advantage of the FLP formulation is its ability to deal with multi-objective problems.

  1. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE) compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR) were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr) was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (M L) and maximum torque (M H) of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2) cure time (tc90), compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties.

  2. An investigation on chloroprene-compatibilized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blends of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber/high density polyethylene (NBR/HDPE compatibilized by Chloroprene rubber (CR were prepared. A fixed quantity of industrial waste such as marble waste (MW, 40 phr was also included. The effect of the blend ratio and CR on cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends was investigated. The results showed that the MW-filled NBR/HDPE blends revealed an increase in tensile strength, tear, modulus, hardness and cross-link density for increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The minimum torque (ML and maximum torque (MH of blends increased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE while scorch time (ts2 cure time (tc90, compression set and abrasion loss of blends decreased with increasing weight ratio of HDPE. The blends also showed a continuous reduction in elongation at break as well as swelling coefficient with increasing HDPE amount in blends. MW filled blends based on CR provided the most encouraging balance values of overall properties.

  3. High-Pressure Turbulent Flame Speeds and Chemical Kinetics of Syngas Blends with and without Impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Eric; Mathieu, Olivier; Morones, Anibal; Ravi, Sankar; Keesee, Charles; Hargis, Joshua; Vivanco, Jose

    2014-12-01

    This Topical Report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014. Efforts for this project included experiments to characterize the atmospheric-pressure turbulent flame speed vessel over a range of operating conditions (fan speeds and turbulent length scales). To this end, a new LDV system was acquired and set up for the detailed characterization of the turbulence field. Much progress was made in the area of impurity kinetics, which included a numerical study of the effect of impurities such as NO2, NO, H2S, and NH3 on ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds of syngas blends at engine conditions. Experiments included a series of laminar flame speed measurements for syngas (CO/H2) blends with various levels of CH4 and C2H6 addition, and the results were compared to the chemical kinetics model of NUI Galway. Also, a final NOx kinetics mechanism including ammonia was assembled, and a journal paper was written and is now in press. Overall, three journal papers and six conference papers related to this project were published this year. Finally, much progress was made on the design of the new high-pressure turbulent flame speed facility. An overall design that includes a venting system was decided upon, and the detailed design is in progress.

  4. High performance lignin-acrylonitrile polymer blend materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Tran, Chau D.

    2017-11-14

    A polymer blend material comprising: (i) a lignin component having a weight-average molecular weight of up to 1,000,000 g/mol; and (ii) an acrylonitrile-containing copolymer rubber component comprising acrylonitrile units in combination with diene monomer units, and having an acrylonitrile content of at least 20 mol %; wherein said lignin component is present in an amount of at least 5 wt % and up to about 95 wt % by total weight of components (i) and (ii); and said polymer blend material possesses a tensile yield stress of at least 5 MPa, or a tensile stress of at least 5 MPa at 10% elongation, or a tensile stress of at least 5 MPa at 100% elongation. Methods for producing the polymer blend, molded forms thereof, and articles thereof, are also described.

  5. High-performance ferroelectric memory based on phase-separated films of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser; Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj; Almadhoun, Mahmoud N.; Odeh, Ihab N.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    High-performance polymer memory is fabricated using blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene-fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) and highly insulating poly(p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). The blend films spontaneously phase separate into amorphous PPO nanospheres embedded in a semicrystalline P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Using low molecular weight PPO with high miscibility in a common solvent, i.e., methyl ethyl ketone, blend films are spin cast with extremely low roughness (Rrms ≈ 4.92 nm) and achieve nanoscale phase seperation (PPO domain size < 200 nm). These blend devices display highly improved ferroelectric and dielectric performance with low dielectric losses (<0.2 up to 1 MHz), enhanced thermal stability (up to ≈353 K), excellent fatigue endurance (80% retention after 106 cycles at 1 KHz) and high dielectric breakdown fields (≈360 MV/m). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High-performance ferroelectric memory based on phase-separated films of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2013-10-29

    High-performance polymer memory is fabricated using blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene-fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) and highly insulating poly(p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). The blend films spontaneously phase separate into amorphous PPO nanospheres embedded in a semicrystalline P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Using low molecular weight PPO with high miscibility in a common solvent, i.e., methyl ethyl ketone, blend films are spin cast with extremely low roughness (Rrms ≈ 4.92 nm) and achieve nanoscale phase seperation (PPO domain size < 200 nm). These blend devices display highly improved ferroelectric and dielectric performance with low dielectric losses (<0.2 up to 1 MHz), enhanced thermal stability (up to ≈353 K), excellent fatigue endurance (80% retention after 106 cycles at 1 KHz) and high dielectric breakdown fields (≈360 MV/m). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Thermal and mechanical properties of injection molded recycled high density polyethylene blends with virgin isotactic polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recycled high density polyethylene and isotactic polypropylene blends have been prepared by melt compounding. ► Thermal study showed that iPP is not well dispersed into the rHDPE matrix. ► Tensile testing shows that there is strong correlation between the thermal properties and the tensile behavior of rHDPE/ipp blends. - Abstract: Polymer blending has become an important field in polymer research and especially in the area of recycling. In this research the target was to reduce the polymer waste problem. Therefore, recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE) and virgin isotactic polypropylene (vPP) blends containing upto 30 wt% of vPP have been prepared by melt compounding method using injection molding at 220 °C. The thermal properties, thermal degradation and the mechanical properties of the polymer blends were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and tensile testing method. DSC study shows that in all the blends there are two melting peaks, one around the melting temperature of rHDPE and another one around the melting point of vPP, indicating that vPP is not well dispersed into the rHDPE matrix. The changes in the heat of fusion for the rHDPE/iPP polymer blends versus vPP content suggests that incorporating vPP affects the crystallinity of the system. TGA analysis of the polymer blends shows that parts of rHDPE with 95/5 upto 80/20 of vPP are mostly stable composition which brings about valuable stabilization to the rHDPE. Tensile testing shows that there is strong correlation between the thermal properties and the tensile behavior of rHDPE/vpp blends

  8. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  9. Gas Separation Membranes Derived from High-Performance Immiscible Polymer Blends Compatibilized with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panapitiya, Nimanka P; Wijenayake, Sumudu N; Nguyen, Do D; Huang, Yu; Musselman, Inga H; Balkus, Kenneth J; Ferraris, John P

    2015-08-26

    An immiscible polymer blend comprised of high-performance copolyimide 6FDA-DAM:DABA(3:2) (6FDD) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) was compatibilized using 2-methylimidazole (2-MI), a commercially available small molecule. Membranes were fabricated from blends of 6FDD:PBI (50:50) with and without 2-MI for H2/CO2 separations. The membranes demonstrated a matrix-droplet type microstructure as evident with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging where 6FDD is the dispersed phase and PBI is the continuous phase. In addition, membranes with 2-MI demonstrated a uniform microstructure as observed by smaller and more uniformly dispersed 6FDD domains in contrast to 6FDD:PBI (50:50) blend membranes without 2-MI. This compatibilization effect of 2-MI was attributed to interfacial localization of 2-MI that lowers the interfacial energy similar to a surfactant. Upon the incorporation of 2-MI, the H2/CO2 selectivity improved remarkably, compared to the pure blend, and surpassed the Robeson's upper bound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a small molecule to compatibilize a high-performance immiscible polymer blend. This approach could afford a novel class of membranes in which immiscible polymer blends can be compatibilized in an economical and convenient fashion.

  10. Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Barrigo, P

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Consortium for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (ACIGA) in collaboration with LIGO is developing a high optical power research facility at the AIGO site, Gingin, Western Australia. Research at the facility will provide solutions to the problems that advanced gravitational wave detectors will encounter with extremely high optical power. The problems include thermal lensing and parametric instabilities. This article will present the status of the facility and the plan for the future experiments

  11. Equilibrating high-molecular-weight symmetric and miscible polymer blends with hierarchical back-mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Takahiro; Kremer, Kurt; Daoulas, Kostas

    2018-05-01

    Understanding properties of polymer alloys with computer simulations frequently requires equilibration of samples comprised of microscopically described long molecules. We present the extension of an efficient hierarchical backmapping strategy, initially developed for homopolymer melts, to equilibrate high-molecular-weight binary blends. These mixtures present significant interest for practical applications and fundamental polymer physics. In our approach, the blend is coarse-grained into models representing polymers as chains of soft blobs. Each blob stands for a subchain with N b microscopic monomers. A hierarchy of blob-based models with different resolution is obtained by varying N b. First the model with the largest N b is used to obtain an equilibrated blend. This configuration is sequentially fine-grained, reinserting at each step the degrees of freedom of the next in the hierarchy blob-based model. Once the blob-based description is sufficiently detailed, the microscopic monomers are reinserted. The hard excluded volume is recovered through a push-off procedure and the sample is re-equilibrated with molecular dynamics (MD), requiring relaxation on the order of the entanglement time. For the initial method development we focus on miscible blends described on microscopic level through a generic bead-spring model, which reproduces hard excluded volume, strong covalent bonds, and realistic liquid density. The blended homopolymers are symmetric with respect to molecular architecture and liquid structure. To parameterize the blob-based models and validate equilibration of backmapped samples, we obtain reference data from independent hybrid simulations combining MD and identity exchange Monte Carlo moves, taking advantage of the symmetry of the blends. The potential of the backmapping strategy is demonstrated by equilibrating blend samples with different degree of miscibility, containing 500 chains with 1000 monomers each. Equilibration is verified by comparing

  12. Ternary Blend Composed of Two Organic Donors and One Acceptor for Active Layer of High-Performance Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Won; Choi, Yoon Suk; Ahn, Hyungju; Jo, Won Ho

    2016-05-04

    Ternary blends composed of two donor absorbers with complementary absorptions provide an opportunity to enhance the short-circuit current and thus the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells. In addition to complementary absorption of two donors, ternary blends may exhibit favorable morphology for high-performance solar cells when one chooses properly the donor pair. For this purpose, we develop a ternary blend with two donors (diketopyrrolopyrrole-based polymer (PTDPP2T) and small molecule ((TDPP)2Ph)) and one acceptor (PC71BM). The solar cell made of a ternary blend with 10 wt % (TDPP)2Ph exhibits higher PCE of 7.49% as compared with the solar cells with binary blends, PTDPP2T:PC71BM (6.58%) and (TDPP)2Ph:PC71BM (3.21%). The higher PCE of the ternary blend solar cell is attributed mainly to complementary absorption of two donors. However, a further increase in (TDPP)2Ph content in the ternary blend (>10 wt %) decreases the PCE. The ternary blend with 10 wt % (TDPP)2Ph exhibits well-developed morphology with narrow-sized fibrils while the blend with 15 wt % (TDPP)2Ph shows phase separation with large-sized domains, demonstrating that the phase morphology and compatibility of ternary blend are important factors to achieve a high-performance solar cell made of ternary blends.

  13. Experimental investigation of CI engine combustion, performance and emissions in DEE–kerosene–diesel blends of high DEE concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, K.R.; Thipse, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First ever study on DEE–kerosene–diesel blends used in CI engine. • DEE–diesel blends have reduced the trade-off between PM and NOx of diesel engine. • Optimum performance blend has been found as DE15D. • Adulteration effects of kerosene with diesel have also been investigated. • Additions of kerosene with DE15D blend have deteriorated the overall engine performance. - Abstract: An experimental investigation had been carried out to evaluate the effects of oxygenated cetane improver diethyl ether (DEE) blends with kerosene and diesel on the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine. Initially, 2%, 5%, 8%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% DEE (by volume) were blended into diesel. The DEE–diesel blends have reduced the trade-off between PM and NOx of diesel engine and the optimum performance blend has been found as DE15D. Similarly, 5%, 10% and 15% kerosene (by volume) were blended into diesel to investigate the adulteration effect. In addition, a study was carried out to evaluate the effects of kerosene adulteration on DE15D by blending with 5%, 10% and 15% kerosene (by volume). The engine tests were carried out at 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of full load for all test fuels. Laboratory fuel tests showed that the DEE is completely miscible with diesel and kerosene in any proportion. It was observed that the density, kinematic viscosity and calorific value of the blends decreases, while the oxygen content and cetane number of the blends increases with the concentration of DEE addition. The experimental test results showed that the DEE–kerosene–diesel blends have low brake thermal efficiency, high brake specific fuel consumption, high smoke at full load, low smoke at part load, overall low NO, almost similar CO, high HC at full load and low HC at part load as compared to DE15D blend

  14. Decommissioning high-level waste surface facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The protective storage, entombment and dismantlement options of decommissioning a High-Level Waste Surface Facility (HLWSF) was investigated. A reference conceptual design for the facility was developed based on the designs of similar facilities. State-of-the-art decommissioning technologies were identified. Program plans and cost estimates for decommissioning the reference conceptual designs were developed. Good engineering design concepts were on the basis of this work identified

  15. High-performance ternary blend polymer solar cells involving both energy transfer and hole relay processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luyao; Chen, Wei; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping

    2015-06-04

    The integration of multiple materials with complementary absorptions into a single junction device is regarded as an efficient way to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells (OSCs). However, because of increased complexity with one more component, only limited high-performance ternary systems have been demonstrated previously. Here we report an efficient ternary blend OSC with a PCE of 9.2%. We show that the third component can reduce surface trap densities in the ternary blend. Detailed studies unravel that the improved performance results from synergistic effects of enlarged open circuit voltage, suppressed trap-assisted recombination, enhanced light absorption, increased hole extraction, efficient energy transfer and better morphology. The working mechanism and high device performance demonstrate new insights and design guidelines for high-performance ternary blend solar cells and suggest that ternary structure is a promising platform to boost the efficiency of OSCs.

  16. Catalysts for producing high octane-blending value olefins for gasoline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.; Bruijn, de J.N.H.

    2001-01-01

    New restrictions on gasoline components mean that oxygenates and aromatics must be replaced by other high octane components. The dimerization of linear butene to form high octane gasoline blending components is evaluated under liquid phase reaction conditions over a number of different heterogeneous

  17. A formative evaluation of a high school blended learning biology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellman, Stephen William

    As growing student populations continue to tax the resources of public high schools, administrators are constantly looking for ways to address the needs of all students. One option for increasing the number of students in a classroom without sacrificing quality of instruction is to use "blended learning". Blended learning is defined by Marsh et al. (2003, p.2) as a situation where "face-to-face and distance education delivery methods and resources are merged". In such a course, students receive the benefits of classroom-based instruction, while also benefiting from several aspects of distance learning. This is especially true for science courses that rely heavily on both hands-on labs and various multimedia. The purpose of this study was a formative evaluation of a high school blended learning biology course, focusing on a genetics unit. The research question addressed by the study was "Will participants increase their domain knowledge and problem-solving skills after instruction in a high school level blended distance learning biology course? Also investigated was if higher levels of self-regulation skills were correlated to higher levels of content-understanding and problem-solving. The study was composed of a pilot study and a main study. Participants were students in an urban Southern California public high school biology course. Classroom instruction was from a single instructor, and online content was managed using the "Moodle" course management system. Participants were assessed for their gains in genetics content-understanding, genetics problem-solving skills (Punnett squares), and self-regulation. Additionally, participant reactions to the blended instruction model were surveyed. Results indicated that significant increases (pself-regulation skills were not shown to be significantly correlated to increased content-understanding, or problem-solving skills. Participants reacted positively to the blended model, suggesting that it be used more often in their

  18. THOREX processing and zeolite transfer for high-level waste stream processing blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, S. Jr.; Meess, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) completed the pretreatment of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) prior to the start of waste vitrification. The HLW originated form the two million liters of plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) and thorium extraction (THOREX) wastes remaining from Nuclear Fuel Services' (NFS) commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing operations at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) from 1966 to 1972. The pretreatment process removed cesium as well as other radionuclides from the liquid wastes and captured these radioactive materials onto silica-based molecular sieves (zeolites). The decontaminated salt solutions were volume-reduced and then mixed with portland cement and other admixtures. Nineteen thousand eight hundred and seventy-seven 270-liter square drums were filled with the cement-wastes produced from the pretreatment process. These drums are being stored in a shielded facility on the site until their final disposition is determined. Over 6.4 million liters of liquid HLW were processed through the pretreatment system. PUREX supernatant was processed first, followed by two PUREX sludge wash solutions. A third wash of PUREX/THOREX sludge was then processed after the neutralized THOREX waste was mixed with the PUREX waste. Approximately 6.6 million curies of radioactive cesium-137 (Cs-137) in the HLW liquid were removed and retained on 65,300 kg of zeolites. With pretreatment complete, the zeolite material has been mobilized, size-reduced (ground), and blended with the PUREX and THOREX sludges in a single feed tank that will supply the HLW slurry to the Vitrification Facility

  19. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  20. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamani, Raj K.; Latchireddi, Sanjeeva; Devrani, Vikas; Sethi, Harappan; Henry, Roger; Chipman, Nate

    2003-01-01

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide

  1. A new simplex chemometric approach to identify olive oil blends with potentially high traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmar, N; Laroussi-Mezghani, S; Grati-Kamoun, N; Hammami, M; Artaud, J

    2016-10-01

    Olive oil blends (OOBs) are complex matrices combining different cultivars at variable proportions. Although qualitative determinations of OOBs have been subjected to several chemometric works, quantitative evaluations of their contents remain poorly developed because of traceability difficulties concerning co-occurring cultivars. Around this question, we recently published an original simplex approach helping to develop predictive models of the proportions of co-occurring cultivars from chemical profiles of resulting blends (Semmar & Artaud, 2015). Beyond predictive model construction and validation, this paper presents an extension based on prediction errors' analysis to statistically define the blends with the highest predictability among all the possible ones that can be made by mixing cultivars at different proportions. This provides an interesting way to identify a priori labeled commercial products with potentially high traceability taking into account the natural chemical variability of different constitutive cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of synthetic blended fibers to reduce cracking risk in high performance concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate a relatively new technique to control early-age cracking; the : use of blended size polypropylene fibers in high performance concrete mixtures. The key findings : from this work were that the use of drying s...

  3. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  4. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other trace elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  5. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.; Bowman, W.W.; Zeh, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, which is sponsored and funded by the United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  6. Morphology control in polymer blend fibers—a high throughput computing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesha Sarath Pokuri, Balaji; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-08-01

    Fibers made from polymer blends have conventionally enjoyed wide use, particularly in textiles. This wide applicability is primarily aided by the ease of manufacturing such fibers. More recently, the ability to tailor the internal morphology of polymer blend fibers by carefully designing processing conditions has enabled such fibers to be used in technologically relevant applications. Some examples include anisotropic insulating properties for heat and anisotropic wicking of moisture, coaxial morphologies for optical applications as well as fibers with high internal surface area for filtration and catalysis applications. However, identifying the appropriate processing conditions from the large space of possibilities using conventional trial-and-error approaches is a tedious and resource-intensive process. Here, we illustrate a high throughput computational approach to rapidly explore and characterize how processing conditions (specifically blend ratio and evaporation rates) affect the internal morphology of polymer blends during solvent based fabrication. We focus on a PS: PMMA system and identify two distinct classes of morphologies formed due to variations in the processing conditions. We subsequently map the processing conditions to the morphology class, thus constructing a ‘phase diagram’ that enables rapid identification of processing parameters for specific morphology class. We finally demonstrate the potential for time dependent processing conditions to get desired features of the morphology. This opens up the possibility of rational stage-wise design of processing pathways for tailored fiber morphology using high throughput computing.

  7. Highly conductive thermoplastic composite blends suitable for injection molding of bipolar plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mighri, F.; Huneault, M.A.; Champagne, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at developing highly conductive, lightweight, and low-cost bipolar plates for use in proton exchange membranes (PEM) fuel cells. Injection and compression molding of highly filled polypropylene, PP, and polyphenylene sulfide, PPS, based blends were used as a mean for mass production of bipolar plates. Loadings up to 60-wt% in the form of graphite, conductive carbon black and carbon fibers were investigated. The developed formulations have a combination of properties and processability suitable for bipolar plate manufacturing, such as good chemical resistance, sufficient fluidity, and good electrical and thermal conductivity. Electrical resistivities around 0.15 and 0.09 Ohm-cm were respectively achieved for the PP and PPS-based blends, respectively. Two bipolar plate designs were successfully fabricated by molding the gas flow channels over aluminum plates to form a metallic/polymer composite plate, or simply by direct injection molding of the conductive polymer composite. For the first design, overall plate resistivities of 0.2 and 0.1 Ohm-cm were respectively attained using PP and PPS based blends as conductive skin. A lower volume resistivity of around 0.06 Ohm-cm was attained for the second injected plate design with PPS based blend. (author)

  8. Blended Learning Based on Schoology: Effort of Improvement Learning Outcome and Practicum Chance in Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Vincentius Tjandra; Sutadji, Eddy; Widiyanti

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine: (1) the differences in learning outcome between Blended Learning based on Schoology and Problem-Based Learning, (2) the differences in learning outcome between students with prior knowledge of high, medium, and low, and (3) the interaction between Blended Learning based on Schoology and prior knowledge to…

  9. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  10. Effects of help-seeking in a blended high school Biology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguzman, Paolo

    Distance learning provides an opportunity for students to learn valuable information through technology and interactive media. Distance learning additionally offers educational institutions the flexibility of synchronous and asynchronous instruction while increasing enrollment and lowering cost. However, distance education has not been well documented within the context of urban high schools. Distance learning may allow high school students to understand material at an individualized pace for either enrichment or remediation. A successful high school student who participates in distance learning should exhibit high self regulatory skills. However, most urban high school students have not been exposed to distance learning and should be introduced to proper self regulatory strategies that should increase the likelihood of understanding the material. To help facilitate a move into distance learning, a blended distance learning model, the combination of distance learning and traditional learning, will be used. According to O'Neil's (in preparation) revised problem solving model, self regulation is a component of problem solving. Within the Blended Biology course, urban high school students will be trained in help-seeking strategies to further their understanding of genetics and Punnett Square problem solving. This study investigated the effects of help-seeking in a blended high school Biology course. The main study consisted of a help-seeking group (n=55) and a control group (n=53). Both the help-seeking group and the control group were taught by one teacher for two weeks. The help-seeking group had access to Blended Biology with Help-Seeking while the control group only had access to Blended Biology. The main study used a pretest and posttest to measure Genetics Content Understanding, Punnett Square Problem Solving, Adaptive Help-Seeking, Maladaptive Help-Seeking, and Self Regulation. The analysis showed no significant difference in any of the measures in terms of

  11. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Canter, Christina E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartley, Damon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Searcy, Erin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for both the 2015 SOT (Hartley et al., 2015; ANL, 2016; DOE, 2016) and the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for both the 2015 SOT (Tan et al., 2015a) and the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015b). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. In the SCSA, the 2015 SOT case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015b), uses the 2015 SOT feedstock blend of pulpwood, wood residue, and construction and demolition waste (C&D). Moreover, the 2022 design case for the conversion process, as described in Tan et al. (2015a), uses the 2017 design case blend of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and C&D. The performance characteristics of this blend are consistent with those of a single woody feedstock (e.g., pine or poplar). We also examined the influence of using a single feedstock type on SCSA results for the design case. These single feedstock scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results given that the different components of the feedstock blend have varying energy and material demands for production and logistics.

  12. Facile Synthesis of Uniform Zinc-blende ZnS Nanospheres with Excellent Photocatalytic Activity toward Methylene Blue Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Si-Yan; YANG Liu-Sai; LV Ying-Ying; YU Le-Shu; HUANG Hai-Jin; WU Li-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Uniform and well-dispersed ZnS nanospheres have been successfully synthesized via a facile chemical route.The crystal structure,morphology,surface area and photocatalytic properties of the sample were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum.The results of characterizations indicate that the products are identified as mesoporous zinc-blende ZnS nanospheres with an average diameter of 200 nm,which are comprised of nanoparticles with the crystallite size of about 3.2 nm calculated by XRD.Very importantly,photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB)shows that the as-prepared ZnS nanospheres exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity with nearly 100% of MB decomposed after UV-light irradiation for 25 min.The excellent photocatalytic activity of ZnS nanospheres can be ascribed to the large specific surface area and hierarchical mesoporous structure.

  13. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  14. High-performance ternary blend polymer solar cells involving both energy transfer and hole relay processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Luyao; Chen, Wei; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping

    2015-01-01

    The integration of multiple materials with complementary absorptions into a single junction device is regarded as an efficient way to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells (OSCs). However, because of increased complexity with one more component, only limited high-performance ternary systems have been demonstrated previously. Here we report an efficient ternary blend OSC with a PCE of 9.2%. We show that the third component can reduce surface trap densities in the...

  15. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  16. Properties, degradation and high temperature fuel cell test of different types of PBI and PBI blend membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, Hans Christian; Chromik, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) with synthetically modified structures and their blends with a partially fluorinated sulfonated aromatic polyether have been prepared and characterized for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Significant improvement in the polymer chemical stability...

  17. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepfer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  18. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Canter, Christina E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartley, Damon S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) aims at developing and deploying technologies to transform renewable biomass resources into commercially viable, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower through public and private partnerships (DOE, 2015). BETO also performs a supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA). This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. The 2017 design case for feedstock logistics demonstrated a delivered feedstock cost of $80 per dry U.S. short ton by the year 2017 (INL, 2014). The 2022 design case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015), uses the feedstock 2017 design case blend of biomass feedstocks consisting of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and construction and demolition waste (C&D) with performance properties consistent with a sole woody feedstock type (e.g., pine or poplar). The HOG SCSA case considers the 2017 feedstock design case (the blend) as well as individual feedstock cases separately as alternative scenarios when the feedstock blend ratio varies as a result of a change in feedstock availability. These scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results because of distinctive requirements for energy and chemical inputs for the production and logistics of different components of the blend feedstocks.

  19. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Aoun, M; Barriga, P

    2004-01-01

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with ∼10 6 W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties

  20. Formulation of Zero-Trans Crystalized Fats Produced from Palm Stearin and High Oleic Safflower Oil Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydia E. Buitimea-Cantúa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High intake of trans fat is associated with several chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Fat blends, produced by direct blending process of palm stearin (PS with high oleic safflower oil (HOSO in different concentrations, were investigated. The effects of the PS addition (50, 70, or 90% and the rate of agitation (RA (1000, 2000, or 3000 rpm on physical properties, fatty acid profile (FAP, trans fatty acids (TFA, crystal structure, and consistency were researched. The blend containing 50% of each sort of oil (50% PS/50% HOSO showed that melting point and features were similar to the control shortening. The saturated fatty acids (SFA were higher followed by monounsaturated (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. Significant differences in the content of palmitic and oleic acids among blends were observed. The 50% PS/50% HOSO blend contained higher oleic acid (42.9% whereas the 90% PS/10% HOSO was higher in palmitic acid (56.9%. The blending of PS/HOSO promoted the β crystal polymorphic forms. The direct blending process of equal amounts of PS and HOSO was an adequate strategy to formulate a new zero-trans crystallized vegetable fats with characteristics similar to commercial counterparts with well-balanced fats rich in both omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids.

  1. Direct Creation of Highly Conductive Laser-Induced Graphene Nanocomposites from Polymer Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Alireza Zehtab; Navas, Ivonne Otero; Abouelmagd, Ahmed; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2017-09-01

    The current state-of-the-art mixing strategies of nanoparticles with insulating polymeric components have only partially utilized the unique electrical conductivity of graphene in nanocomposite systems. Herein, this paper reports a nonmixing method of direct creation of polymer/graphene nanocomposites from polymer blends via laser irradiation. Polycarbonate-laser-induced graphene (PC-LIG) nanocomposite is produced from a PC/polyetherimide (PC/PEI) blend after exposure to commercially available laser scribing with a power of ≈6 W and a speed of ≈2 cm s -1 . Extremely high electrical conductivities are obtained for the PC-LIG nanocomposites, ranging from 26 to 400 S m -1 , depending on the vol% of the starting PEI phase in the blend. To the authors' knowledge, these conductivity values are at least one order of magnitude higher than the values that are previously reported for conductive polymer/graphene nanocomposites prepared via mixing strategies. The comprehensive microscopy and spectroscopy characterizations reveal a complete graphitization of the PEI phase with columnar microstructure embedded in the PC phase. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceresoli, M; Palermo, M; Ferrarese Lupi, F; Seguini, G; Perego, M; Zuccheri, G; Phadatare, S D; Antonioli, D; Gianotti, V; Sparnacci, K; Laus, M

    2015-01-01

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ∼ 16000 g mol"−"1) were grafted on SiO_2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t < 600 s) thermal treatments. The resulting brush layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO_2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO_2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO_2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO_2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition. (paper)

  3. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multicathode, broad-beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred kiloelectronvolts because of the ion charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amps peak pulsed and several tens of milliamps time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line of sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. (orig)

  4. Polarization behaviour of polyvinylidenefluoride-polysulfone (PVDF: PSF) blends under high field and high temperature condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivas, Sandhya; Patel, Swarnim; Dubey, R. K.; Keller, J. M.

    2018-05-01

    Thermally stimulated discharge currents of PVDF: PSF blend samples in ratio 80:20 and 95:05 prepared by the solution cast technique have been studied as a function of polarizing field and polarizing temperature, the temperature corresponding to a peak in TSDC is found to be independent of polarizing field but dependent on the polarizing temperature.

  5. High temperature aircraft research furnace facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James E., Jr.; Cashon, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Focus is on the design, fabrication, and development of the High Temperature Aircraft Research Furnace Facilities (HTARFF). The HTARFF was developed to process electrically conductive materials with high melting points in a low gravity environment. The basic principle of operation is to accurately translate a high temperature arc-plasma gas front as it orbits around a cylindrical sample, thereby making it possible to precisely traverse the entire surface of a sample. The furnace utilizes the gas-tungsten-arc-welding (GTAW) process, also commonly referred to as Tungsten-Inert-Gas (TIG). The HTARFF was developed to further research efforts in the areas of directional solidification, float-zone processing, welding in a low-gravity environment, and segregation effects in metals. The furnace is intended for use aboard the NASA-JSC Reduced Gravity Program KC-135A Aircraft.

  6. An Analysis of High Impact Scholarship and Publication Trends in Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Lisa R.; Graham, Charles R.; Spring, Kristian J.; Drysdale, Jeffery S.

    2012-01-01

    Blended learning is a diverse and expanding area of design and inquiry that combines face-to-face and online modalities. As blended learning research matures, numerous voices enter the conversation. This study begins the search for the center of this emerging area of study by finding the most cited scholarship on blended learning. Using Harzing's…

  7. Laser safety at high profile laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Laser safety has been an active concern of laser users since the invention of the laser. Formal standards were developed in the early 1970's and still continue to be developed and refined. The goal of these standards is to give users guidance on the use of laser and consistent safety guidance and requirements for laser manufacturers. Laser safety in the typical research setting (government laboratory or university) is the greatest challenge to the laser user and laser safety officer. This is due to two factors. First, the very nature of research can put the user at risk; consider active manipulation of laser optics and beam paths, and user work with energized systems. Second, a laser safety culture that seems to accept laser injuries as part of the graduate student educational process. The fact is, laser safety at research settings, laboratories and universities still has long way to go. Major laser facilities have taken a more rigid and serious view of laser safety, its controls and procedures. Part of the rationale for this is that these facilities draw users from all around the world presenting the facility with a work force of users coming from a wide mix of laser safety cultures. Another factor is funding sources do not like bad publicity which can come from laser accidents and a poor safety record. The fact is that injuries, equipment damage and lost staff time slow down progress. Hence high profile/large laser projects need to adapt a higher safety regimen both from an engineering and administrative point of view. This presentation will discuss all these points and present examples. Acknowledgement. This work has been supported by the University of California, Director, Office of Science.

  8. Highly toughened polypropylene/ethylene–propylene-diene monomer/zinc dimethacrylate ternary blends prepared via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yukun, E-mail: cyk@scut.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering, Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xu, Chuanhui [College of Material Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Cao, Liming [The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering, Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Cao, Xiaodong [College of Material Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Polypropylene (PP)/ethylene–propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) blends with remarkable toughness and extensibility were successfully prepared via peroxide dynamical vulcanization. A unique structure with the EPDM particles surrounded by a transition zone containing numerous polymerized ZDMA (PZDMA) nano-particles was observed for the first time by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination, which contributed to the dramatically increase of Izod impact strength. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed that the possible PZDMA graft products resulted from peroxide dynamical vulcanization improved the compatibility between EPDM and PP phases. The specific morphology of the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blends indicated that ZDMA can lead to size reduction and good distribution uniformity of the crosslinked rubber particles and the increase of adhesion between PP matrix and EPDM phases during deformation. The synergic effect of the increase in the effective volume of the EPDM phase, the improved compatibility and adhesion between EPDM and PP phases and the deformation of those fine rubber particles is believed to result in the remarkable high toughness and extensibility of the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blends. Particularly for the PP/EPDM ratio of 70/30, the PP/EPDM/ZDMA (70/30/9, w/w/w) ternary blends with the Izod impact strength nearly 2 times higher than PP/EPDM (70/30, w/w) binary blends and 15–20 times higher than PP are achieved; besides, the elongation at break of PP/EPDM/ZDMA ternary blends is 4–5 times higher than that of PP/EPDM binary blends. - Highlights: ► ZDMA largely toughen peroxide dynamically vulcanized PP/EPDM blend. ► PZDMA graft products improved the compatibility and adhesion between EPDM and PP. ► Size reduction and good distribution uniformity of crosslinked rubber particles.

  9. Highly toughened polypropylene/ethylene–propylene-diene monomer/zinc dimethacrylate ternary blends prepared via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Liming; Cao, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/ethylene–propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) blends with remarkable toughness and extensibility were successfully prepared via peroxide dynamical vulcanization. A unique structure with the EPDM particles surrounded by a transition zone containing numerous polymerized ZDMA (PZDMA) nano-particles was observed for the first time by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination, which contributed to the dramatically increase of Izod impact strength. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed that the possible PZDMA graft products resulted from peroxide dynamical vulcanization improved the compatibility between EPDM and PP phases. The specific morphology of the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blends indicated that ZDMA can lead to size reduction and good distribution uniformity of the crosslinked rubber particles and the increase of adhesion between PP matrix and EPDM phases during deformation. The synergic effect of the increase in the effective volume of the EPDM phase, the improved compatibility and adhesion between EPDM and PP phases and the deformation of those fine rubber particles is believed to result in the remarkable high toughness and extensibility of the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blends. Particularly for the PP/EPDM ratio of 70/30, the PP/EPDM/ZDMA (70/30/9, w/w/w) ternary blends with the Izod impact strength nearly 2 times higher than PP/EPDM (70/30, w/w) binary blends and 15–20 times higher than PP are achieved; besides, the elongation at break of PP/EPDM/ZDMA ternary blends is 4–5 times higher than that of PP/EPDM binary blends. - Highlights: ► ZDMA largely toughen peroxide dynamically vulcanized PP/EPDM blend. ► PZDMA graft products improved the compatibility and adhesion between EPDM and PP. ► Size reduction and good distribution uniformity of crosslinked rubber particles

  10. High resolution VUV facility at INDUS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurty, G.; Saraswathy, P.; Rao, P.M.R.; Mishra, A.P.; Kartha, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) generated in the electron storage rings is an unique source for the study of atomic and molecular spectroscopy especially in the vacuum ultra violet region. Realizing the potential of this light source, efforts are in progress to develop a beamline facility at INDUS-1 to carry out high resolution atomic and molecular spectroscopy. This beam line consists of a fore-optic which is a combination of three cylindrical mirrors. The mirrors are so chosen that SR beam having a 60 mrad (horizontal) x 6 mrad (vertical) divergence is focussed onto a slit of a 6.65 metre off-plane spectrometer in Eagle Mount equipped with horizontal slit and vertical dispersion. The design of the various components of the beam line is completed. It is decided to build the spectrometer as per the requirements of the user community. Details of the various aspects of the beam line will be presented. (author). 3 figs

  11. A High Intensity Hadron Facility, AGS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.Y.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1988-01-01

    We have present one of several possibilities for the evolution of the AGS complex into a high intensity hadron facility. One could consider other alternatives, such as using the AGS as the Collector and constructing a new 9-30 GeV machine. We believe the most responsible scenario must minimize the cost and downtime to the ongoing physics program. With a stepwise approach, starting with the Booster, the physics program can evolve without a single major commitment in funds. At each step an evaluation of the funds versus physics merit can be made. As a final aside, each upgrade at the AGS and Booster is presently being implemented to support an interleaved operation of both protons and ions. 1 fig., 6 tabs

  12. Experimental Facilities at the High Energy Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main theme of the lectures covered the experimental work at hadron colliders, with a clear focus on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on the roadmap that led finally to the discovery of the Higgs boson. The lectures were not a systematic course on machine and detector technologies, but rather tried to give a physics-motivated overview of many experimental aspects that were all relevant for making the discovery. The actual lectures covered a much broader scope than what is documented here in this write- up. The successful concepts for the experiments at the LHC have benefitted from the experience gained with previous generations of detectors at lower- energy machines. The lectures included also an outlook to the future experimental programme at the LHC, with its machine and experiments upgrades, as well as a short discussion of possible facilities at the high energy frontier beyond LHC.

  13. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100 0 F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system. The experimental capabilities and test conand presents the results that have been obtained. The study has been conducted using a four-phase approach. The first phase develops the solution to the steady-state radon-diffusion equation in one-dimensieered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent f water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations in the sediments which were above detection limits ranged from 0.10 t 51.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.53. A group of high uranium concentrations occurs near the junctions of quadrangles AB, AC, BB, a 200 mK. In case 2), x-ray studies of isotopic phase separation in 3 He-- 4 He bcc solids were carried out by B. A. Fraass

  14. Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-05-01

    High-melting-temperature poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was successfully introduced into wood plastic composites through a two-step reactive extrusion technology. Wood flour was added into pre-prepared PET/high density polyethylene (HDPE) microfibrillar blends (MFBs) in the second extrusion at the temperature for processing HDPE. Addition of 25% in situ formed PET microfibers obviously increased the mechanical properties of HDPE, and more significant enhancement by the in situ formed recycled PET microfibers was observed for the recycled HDPE. Adding 2% E-GMA improved the compatibility between matrix and microfibers in MFBs, resulting further enhanced mechanical properties. The subsequent addition of 40% wood flour did not influence the size and morphology of PET microfibers, and improved the comprehensive mechanical properties of MFBs. The wood flour increased the crystallinity level of HDPE in the compatibilized MFB in which PET phase did not crystallize. The storage modulus of MFB was greatly improved by wood flour. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Biodegradability Study of the Blend Film of High Density Polyethylene and Poly(lactic acid Disposable Packages Flake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Baghi Neirizi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major concerns of using a non-biodegradable polymer product is its disposal at the end of its life cycle. Development of biodegradable plastics promises an alternative solution to combat this problem. Blending of poly(lactic acid with non-biodegradable polymers is a practical and economical method for modifying the biodegradability properties of non-biodegradable polymers. In this study, soil biodegradability of the blends of high density polyethylene (HDPE and variable amounts of recycled poly(lactic acid (r-PLA plastic flakes at 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt% was studied. The behavior of the force-elongation profile of the blends having r-PLA content of lower than 30 wt% was approximately the same as that of pure HDPE while, it was completely different for the other blends. Tearing force and elongation-at-yield-point of the blends films with the 20 to 50 wt% r-PLA were decreased significantly after 60 days of soil biodegradability test. Morphological study showed that biodegradability of the blend films at surface of the samples (deep pores and grooves was increased with extended biodegradability time and higher r-PLA content, while, this variation was significant for the blend films of more than 20 wt% r-PLA content. Thermal properties evaluation by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC curves indicated that the glass transition temperature and enthalpy peaks during the heating stage were eliminated with increasing the biodegradability testing time. Also, reduction in the crystallinity degree of the r-PLA component with increasing the biodegradability testing time coincided with the earlier results.

  16. High molecular weight poly(L-lactide) and poly(ethylene oxide) blends : Thermal characterization and physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, AJ; Colstee, E; Grijpma, DW; Pennings, AJ

    1996-01-01

    The miscibility of high molecular weight poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) with high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEG) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Ail blends containing up to 50 weight% PEO showed single glass transition temperatures. The PLLA and PEO melting temperatures were

  17. Human norovirus surrogate reduction in milk and juice blends by high pressure homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horm, Katie Marie; Harte, Federico Miguel; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2012-11-01

    Novel processing technologies such as high pressure homogenization (HPH) for the inactivation of foodborne viruses in fluids that retain nutritional attributes are in high demand. The objectives of this research were (i) to determine the effects of HPH alone or with an emulsifier (lecithin) on human norovirus surrogates-murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV-F9)-in skim milk and orange juice, and (ii) to determine HPH effects on FCV-F9 and MNV-1 in orange and pomegranate juice blends. Experiments were conducted in duplicate at 0, 100, 200, 250, and 300 MPa for PFU/ml at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively, and ≥4- and ∼1-log PFU/ml reductions were obtained in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. In orange juice or milk combined with lecithin, FCV-F9 was reduced to nondetectable levels at 300 MPa, and by 1.77 and 0.78 log PFU/ml at 250 MPa. MNV-1 in milk was reduced by ∼1.3 log PFU/ml only at 300 MPa, and by ∼0.8 and ∼0.4 log PFU/ml in orange juice at 300 and 250 MPa, respectively. MNV-1 in milk or orange juice containing lecithin at 300 MPa showed 1.32- and 2.5-log PFU/ml reductions, respectively. In the pomegranate-orange juice blend, FCV-F9 was completely reduced, and MNV-1 was reduced by 1.04 and 1.78 log PFU/ml at 250 and 300 MPa, respectively. These results show that HPH has potential for commercial use to inactivate foodborne virus surrogates in juices.

  18. Characterization of the lubricity of bio-oil/diesel fuel blends by high frequency reciprocating test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yufu; Wang, Qiongjie; Hu, Xianguo; Li, Chuan; Zhu, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    The diesel fuel was mixed with the rice husk bio-oil using some emulsifiers based on the theory of Hydrophile-Lipophile Balance (HLB). The lubricity of the bio-oil/diesel fuel blend was studied on a High Frequency Reciprocating Test Rig (HFRR) according to ASTM D 6079-2004. The microscopic topography and chemical composition on the worn surface were analyzed respectively using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The profile and surface roughness of the rubbed trace were measured using a profilometer. The chemical group and composition were studied by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results showed that the lubrication ability of the present fuel blend was better than that of the Chinese conventional diesel fuel (number zero). However, the anti-corrosion and anti-wear properties of the fuel blend were not satisfactory in comparison with those of conventional diesel fuel.

  19. A novel wood flour-filled composite based on microfibrillar high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/Nylon-6 blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhi; Yao, Fei; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-05-01

    A novel wood flour (WF)-filled composite based on the microfibrillar high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Nylon-6 co-blend, in which both in situ formed Nylon-6 microfibrils and WF acted as reinforcing elements, was successfully developed using a two-step extrusion method. At the 30wt.% WF loading level, WF-filled composite based on the microfibrillized HDPE/Nylon-6 blend exhibited higher strengths and moduli than the corresponding HDPE-based composite. The incorporation of WF reduced short-term creep response of HDPE matrix and the presence of Nylon-6 microfibrils further contributed to the creep reduction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of structural transformation in zinc blende GaN under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, Fei; Zu, X.T.; Weber, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure induced zinc blende to rocksalt phase transition in GaN has been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics method to characterize the transformation mechanism at the atomic level. It was shown that at 100 GPa GaN passes through tetragonal and monoclinic states before rocksalt structure is formed. The transformation mechanism is consistent with that for other zinc blende semiconductors obtained from the same method. Detailed structural analysis showed that there is no bond breaking involved in the phase transition.

  1. Exploring Teachers' Blended Learning Experiences in a Rural Alabama High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Aslean Madison

    2017-01-01

    The use of blended learning is fast becoming a practice used in public schools to address 21st century learning challenges. However, despite the growing use of instructional delivery models that blend online learning platforms with traditional instruction in brick and mortar classrooms, little is known about teachers' experiences with the…

  2. An Interview with Michael Horn: Blending Education for High-Octane Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blended learning holds the potential of improving the way we educate students and of making them more motivated. Blended education--the melding of information technology based distance learning with school attendance--is perhaps the best way to educate students for 21st century skills, says Michael Horn in a "Kappan" interview. Horn points out…

  3. Mutual interaction between high and low stereo-regularity components for crystallization and melting behaviors of polypropylene blend fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kouya; Kohri, Youhei; Takarada, Wataru; Takebe, Tomoaki; Kanai, Toshitaka; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization and melting behaviors of blend fibers of two types of polypropylene (PP), i.e. high stereo-regularity/high molecular weight PP (HPP) and low stereo-regularity/low molecular weight PP (LPP), was investigated. Blend fibers consisting of various HPP/LPP compositions were prepared through the melt spinning process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analysis were applied for clarifying the crystallization and melting behaviors of individual components. In the DSC measurement of blend fibers with high LPP composition, continuous endothermic heat was detected between the melting peaks of LPP at around 40 °C and that of HPP at around 160 °C. Such endothermic heat was more distinct for the blend fibers with higher LPP composition indicating that the melting of LPP in the heating process was hindered because of the presence of HPP crystals. On the other hand, heat of crystallization was detected at around 90 °C in the case of blend fibers with LPP content of 30 to 70 wt%, indicating that the crystallization of HPP component was taking place during the heating of as-spun blend fibers in the DSC measurement. Through the TMDSC analysis, re-organization of the crystalline structure through the simultaneous melting and re-crystallization was detected in the cases of HPP and blend fibers, whereas re-crystallization was not detected during the melting of LPP fibers. In the WAXD analysis during the heating of fibers, amount of a-form crystal was almost constant up to the melting in the case of single component HPP fibers, whereas there was a distinct increase of the intensity of crystalline reflections from around 100 °C, right after the melting of LPP in the case of blend fibers. These results suggested that the crystallization of HPP in the spinning process as well as during the conditioning process after spinning was hindered by the presence of LPP.

  4. Mutual interaction between high and low stereo-regularity components for crystallization and melting behaviors of polypropylene blend fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Kouya; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi; Kohri, Youhei; Takebe, Tomoaki; Kanai, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization and melting behaviors of blend fibers of two types of polypropylene (PP), i.e. high stereo-regularity/high molecular weight PP (HPP) and low stereo-regularity/low molecular weight PP (LPP), was investigated. Blend fibers consisting of various HPP/LPP compositions were prepared through the melt spinning process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analysis were applied for clarifying the crystallization and melting behaviors of individual components. In the DSC measurement of blend fibers with high LPP composition, continuous endothermic heat was detected between the melting peaks of LPP at around 40 °C and that of HPP at around 160 °C. Such endothermic heat was more distinct for the blend fibers with higher LPP composition indicating that the melting of LPP in the heating process was hindered because of the presence of HPP crystals. On the other hand, heat of crystallization was detected at around 90 °C in the case of blend fibers with LPP content of 30 to 70 wt%, indicating that the crystallization of HPP component was taking place during the heating of as-spun blend fibers in the DSC measurement. Through the TMDSC analysis, re-organization of the crystalline structure through the simultaneous melting and re-crystallization was detected in the cases of HPP and blend fibers, whereas re-crystallization was not detected during the melting of LPP fibers. In the WAXD analysis during the heating of fibers, amount of a-form crystal was almost constant up to the melting in the case of single component HPP fibers, whereas there was a distinct increase of the intensity of crystalline reflections from around 100 °C, right after the melting of LPP in the case of blend fibers. These results suggested that the crystallization of HPP in the spinning process as well as during the conditioning process after spinning was hindered by the presence of LPP.

  5. Mutual interaction between high and low stereo-regularity components for crystallization and melting behaviors of polypropylene blend fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Kouya; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi, E-mail: kikutani.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Kohri, Youhei; Takebe, Tomoaki [Performance Materials Laboratories, Idemitsu Kosan Co.,Ltd. (Japan); Kanai, Toshitaka [KT Polymer (Japan)

    2016-03-09

    Crystallization and melting behaviors of blend fibers of two types of polypropylene (PP), i.e. high stereo-regularity/high molecular weight PP (HPP) and low stereo-regularity/low molecular weight PP (LPP), was investigated. Blend fibers consisting of various HPP/LPP compositions were prepared through the melt spinning process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analysis were applied for clarifying the crystallization and melting behaviors of individual components. In the DSC measurement of blend fibers with high LPP composition, continuous endothermic heat was detected between the melting peaks of LPP at around 40 °C and that of HPP at around 160 °C. Such endothermic heat was more distinct for the blend fibers with higher LPP composition indicating that the melting of LPP in the heating process was hindered because of the presence of HPP crystals. On the other hand, heat of crystallization was detected at around 90 °C in the case of blend fibers with LPP content of 30 to 70 wt%, indicating that the crystallization of HPP component was taking place during the heating of as-spun blend fibers in the DSC measurement. Through the TMDSC analysis, re-organization of the crystalline structure through the simultaneous melting and re-crystallization was detected in the cases of HPP and blend fibers, whereas re-crystallization was not detected during the melting of LPP fibers. In the WAXD analysis during the heating of fibers, amount of a-form crystal was almost constant up to the melting in the case of single component HPP fibers, whereas there was a distinct increase of the intensity of crystalline reflections from around 100 °C, right after the melting of LPP in the case of blend fibers. These results suggested that the crystallization of HPP in the spinning process as well as during the conditioning process after spinning was hindered by the presence of LPP.

  6. Matrimid®/polysulfone blend mixed matrix membranes containing ZIF-8 nanoparticles for high pressure stability in natural gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, S.; Nijmeijer, K.

    2017-01-01

    Plasticization is of important concern in high pressure natural gas separation. Majority of the pure polymers and MOF-MMM systems suffer from plasticization at low pressures. Combination of polymer blending and MMM approach could lead to plasticization resistant membranes with improved membrane

  7. River Protection Project Mission Analysis Waste Blending Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuford, D.H.; Stegen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation for blending Hanford site waste with the objective of minimizing the amount of high-level waste (HLW) glass volumes without major changes to the overall waste retrieval and processing sequences currently planned. The evaluation utilizes simplified spreadsheet models developed to allow screening type comparisons of blending options without the need to use the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model. The blending scenarios evaluated are expected to increase tank farm operation costs due to increased waste transfers. Benefit would be derived from shorter operating time period for tank waste processing facilities, reduced onsite storage of immobilized HLW, and reduced offsite transportation and disposal costs for the immobilized HLW.

  8. Development of foams from linear polypropylene (PP) and high melt strength polypropylene (HMSPP) polymeric blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Elisabeth Carvalho Leite

    2009-01-01

    Foamed polymers are future materials, with a comprehensive application field. They can be used in order to improve appearance of insulation structures, for example, or to reduce costs involving materials. This work address to Isotactic Polypropylene / High Melt Strength Polypropylene blends, for foams production. Rheological behavior of polymer melt, especially referring to viscosity in processing temperature, plays a decisive role in applications where dominates extensional flow, as in case of foaming. If the viscosity is very low, it will correspond to a low melt strength, as in case of linear homopolymer (Isotact PP), and the foam will be prejudiced, due to the impossibility of expansion. Otherwise, if the viscosity is very high, with a high melt strength, the foam will collapse immediately after its formation. In order to get foams with an homogeneous and defined cellular structure, there were accomplished blends, 50% in weight, between linear homopolymer (isotactic PP) and HMSPP, from PP modified as per gamma radiation, in acetylene environment and at a 12.5 kGy doses. Extrusion process used a soluble foaming methodology, according to a processing/dissolution principle, which involves the dissolution of a Physical Blowing Agent (PBA), under 30 bar pressure, homogeneously mixed with polymeric melt. Extrusion conditions, that generally involve temperature, pressure and viscoelastic material flow control were experimentally investigated to define prevalent characteristics for producing foams. Nitrogen was the used PBA and process extrusion parameters were adapted to PP, HMSPP and their 50% in weight mixtures thereof. Major PP and HMSPP characteristics were obtained via melt Index and melt strength and thermal analyses (DSC/TGA), in order to make viable and to reproduce foaming as per extrusion process. Foams cellular morphology of PP, HMSPP and their 50% in weight mixtures thereof was investigated, with and without talc addition, as nucleating agent, by using

  9. A one pot solution blending method for highly conductive poly (methyl methacrylate)-highly reduced graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniyan, R.; Pham, Viet Hung; Jang, Jinhee; Hur, Seung Hyun; Chung, Jin Suk

    2013-11-01

    PMMA-HRG (Poly (methyl methacrylate)-highly reduced graphene) nanocomposites were prepared by a solution blending method, and the effect of HRG loading on the electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the materials was studied. PMMA-HRG nanocomposites achieved a percolation threshold of 0.37 vol.% (0.039 S/m) and a maximum electrical conductivity as high as 85 S/m at a loading of 2.7 vol. %. The homogeneous dispersion of HRG sheets overcame aggregation in solution and gave a uniformly distributed single layer graphene in the PMMA matrix. The T g of PMMA-HRG increased by 19°C with a loading of 0.27 vol. %, and the storage modulus of the nanocomposites increased by 37% in the glassy region with a loading of 2.7 vol. %.

  10. Development of Kinetics and Mathematical Models for High Pressure Gasification of Lignite-Switchgrass Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Pradeep K. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2016-12-20

    The overall objective of the current project was to investigate the high pressure gasification characteristics of a feed containing both coal and biomass. The two feed types differ in their ash contents and ash composition, particularly the alkali content. Gasification of a combined feed of coal and biomass has the potential for considerable synergies that might lead to a dramatic improvement in process economics and flexibility. The proposed study aimed to develop a detailed understanding of the chemistry, kinetics, and transport effects during high pressure gasification of coal-biomass blend feed. Specifically, we studied to develop: (a) an understanding of the catalytic effect of alkali and other inorganic species present in the biomass and coal, (b) an understanding of processing conditions under which synergistic effects of the blending of coal and biomass might be observed. This included the role of particle size, residence time, and proximity of the two feed types, (c) kinetics of high pressure gasification of individual feeds as well as the blends, and (d) development of mathematical models that incorporate kinetics and transport models to enable prediction of gasification rate at a given set of operating conditions, and (e) protocols to extend the results to other feed resources. The goal was to provide a fundamental understanding of the gasification process and guide in optimizing the configurations and design of the next generation of gasifiers. The approach undertaken was centered on two basic premises: (1) the gasification for small particles without internal mass transfer limitations can be treated as the sum of two processes in series (pyrolysis and char gasification) , and (2) the reactivity of the char generated during pyrolysis not only depends on the pressure and temperature but is also affected by the heating rates. Thus low heating rates (10-50 °C/min) typical of PTGA fail to produce char that would typically be formed at high heating rates

  11. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Park, Ki-Bong

    2015-09-07

    High-calcium fly ash (FH) is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  12. Blended Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Baaren, John

    2009-01-01

    Van der Baaren, J. (2009). Blended Learning. Presentation given at the Mini symposium 'Blended Learning the way to go?'. November, 5, 2009, The Hague, The Netherlands: Netherlands Defence Academy (NDLA).

  13. Summary of High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiss, Timothy J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Alleman, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brooker, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fioroni, Gina [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huff, Shean P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Caley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kass, Michael D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leiby, Paul Newsome [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, Rocio Uria [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McCormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moriarty, Kristi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, Emily [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Oladosu, Gbadebo A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Szybist, James P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thomas, John F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); West, Brian H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of light-duty vehicles are pursuing a broad portfolio of technologies to reduce CO2 emissions and improve fuel economy. Central to this effort is higher efficiency spark ignition (SI) engines, including technologies reliant on higher compression ratios and fuels with improved anti-knock properties, such as gasoline with significantly increased octane numbers. Ethanol has an inherently high octane number and would be an ideal octane booster for lower-octane petroleum blendstocks. In fact, recently published data from Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories (Splitter and Szybist, 2014a, 2014b; Szybist, 2010; Szybist and West, 2013) and OEMs (Anderson, 2013) and discussions with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggest the potential of a new high octane fuel (HOF) with 25–40 vol % of ethanol to assist in reaching Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions goals. This mid-level ethanol content fuel, with a research octane number (RON) of about 100, appears to enable efficiency improvements in a suitably calibrated and designed engine/vehicle system that are sufficient to offset its lower energy density (Jung, 2013; Thomas, et al, 2015). This efficiency improvement would offset the tank mileage (range) loss typically seen for ethanol blends in conventional gasoline and flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The prospects for such a fuel are additionally attractive because it can be used legally in over 18 million FFVs currently on the road. Thus the legacy FFV fleet can serve as a bridge by providing a market for the new fuel immediately, so that future vehicles will have improved efficiency as the new fuel becomes widespread. In this way, HOF can simultaneously help improve fuel economy while expanding the ethanol market in the United States via a growing market for an ethanol blend higher than E10. The DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office initiated a collaborative research program

  14. Co-combustion characteristics and blending optimization of tobacco stem and high-sulfur bituminous coal based on thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Kai; Cao, Yan; Pan, Wei-ping

    2013-03-01

    Despite much research on co-combustion of tobacco stem and high-sulfur coal, their blending optimization has not been effectively found. This study investigated the combustion profiles of tobacco stem, high-sulfur bituminous coal and their blends by thermogravimetric analysis. Ignition and burnout performances, heat release performances, and gaseous pollutant emissions were also studied by thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry analyses. The results indicated that combustion of tobacco stem was more complicated than that of high-sulfur bituminous coal, mainly shown as fixed carbon in it was divided into two portions with one early burning and the other delay burning. Ignition and burnout performances, heat release performances, and gaseous pollutant emissions of the blends present variable trends with the increase of tobacco stem content. Taking into account the above three factors, a blending ratio of 0–20% tobacco stem content is conservatively proposed as optimum amount for blending. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An outline of research facilities of high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  16. Blended Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerová, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on a new approach of education called blended learning. The history and developement of Blended Learning is described in the first part. Then the methods and tools of Blended Learning are evaluated and compared to the traditional methods of education. At the final part an efficient developement of the educational programs is emphasized.

  17. Strategies for cell manipulation and skeletal tissue engineering using high-throughput polymer blend formulation and microarray techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ferdous; Tare, Rahul S; Kanczler, Janos M; Oreffo, Richard O C; Bradley, Mark

    2010-03-01

    A combination of high-throughput material formulation and microarray techniques were synergistically applied for the efficient analysis of the biological functionality of 135 binary polymer blends. This allowed the identification of cell-compatible biopolymers permissive for human skeletal stem cell growth in both in vitro and in vivo applications. The blended polymeric materials were developed from commercially available, inexpensive and well characterised biodegradable polymers, which on their own lacked both the structural requirements of a scaffold material and, critically, the ability to facilitate cell growth. Blends identified here proved excellent templates for cell attachment, and in addition, a number of blends displayed remarkable bone-like architecture and facilitated bone regeneration by providing 3D biomimetic scaffolds for skeletal cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. This study demonstrates a unique strategy to generate and identify innovative materials with widespread application in cell biology as well as offering a new reparative platform strategy applicable to skeletal tissues. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

    1995-05-02

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

  19. Effects of High Octane Ethanol Blends on Four Legacy Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and a Turbocharged GDI Vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, John F [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Brian H [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huff, Shean P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today’s FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance

  20. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  1. Morphology stabilization of heterogeneous blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A heterogeneous elastomer blend is described, consisting of at least two elastomer components which are cross-linkable by irradiation and having a stabilized morphology formed by subjecting the blend to high energy radiation to a point from below to slightly above the gel dose of the blend. (author)

  2. Design issues for a laboratory high gain fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In an inertial fusion laboratory high gain facility, experiments will be carried out with up to 1000 MJ of thermonuclear yield. The experiment area of such a facility will include many systems and structures that will have to operate successfully in the difficult environment created by the sudden large energy release. This paper estimates many of the nuclear effects that will occur, discusses the implied design issues and suggests possible solutions so that a useful experimental facility can be built. 4 figs

  3. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  4. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications

  5. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  6. Guided Inquiry Facilitated Blended Learning to Improve Metacognitive and Learning Outcome of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwono, H.; Susanti, S.; Lestari, U.

    2017-04-01

    the modules is limited. It is suggested that for the better utilisation of the online activities, students should be present at every meeting of the activities, so as to make all the students participate actively. It is also suggested that school set up facilities to support blended learning.

  7. High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.

    1981-06-01

    High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described, with special emphasis on their use for equation of state investigations using laser-generated shockwaves. Shock wave diagnostics now in use are described. Future Laboratory facilities are also discussed

  8. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  9. Orientation and properties of the blends on high-molecular mass polyacrylonitrile with trihydroxyethylenedimethacrylate under electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomonosova, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular orientation of the drawn blends of high- molecular-mass poly(acrylonitrile) containing 5-50 wt % of trihydroxyethylenedimethacrylate and a change in the orientation of the drawn samples upon irradiation with accelerated electrons was studied by methods of birefringence, isometric heating, and IR dichroism. The degree of orientation of the unirradiated blends containing certain amounts of oligomer exceed that of the individual polymer. In the region of large drawing ratios, the differential degree of orientation of the polymer matrix is not affected by the irradiation, while the orientation of the oligomer component increase. High values of the strength (600-730 MPa) and the modulus (18-22 GPa) of the compositions are due to the presence of a crystalline skeleton formed by unfolded chains of the polymer matrix stabilized by the electron irradiation induced cross-linking

  10. Simultaneous Delivery of Highly Diverse Bioactive Compounds from Blend Electrospun Fibers for Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, Priscilla; Lim, Natalie Sheng Jie; Blocki, Anna; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Park, Heyjin Chris; Liao, Susan; Chan, Casey; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-07-15

    Blend emulsion electrospinning is widely perceived to destroy the bioactivity of proteins, and a blend emulsion of water-soluble and nonsoluble molecules is believed to be thermodynamically unstable to electrospin smoothly. Here we demonstrate a method to retain the bioactivity of disparate fragile biomolecules when electrospun. Using bovine serum albumin as a carrier protein; water-soluble vitamin C, fat soluble vitamin D3, steroid hormone hydrocortisone, peptide hormone insulin, thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), and peptide epidermal growth factor (EGF) were simultaneously blend-spun into PLGA-collagen nanofibers. Upon release, vitamin C maintained the ability to facilitate Type I collagen secretion by fibroblasts, EGF stimulated skin fibroblast proliferation, and insulin potentiated adipogenic differentiation. Transgenic cell reporter assays confirmed the bioactivity of vitamin D3, T3, and hydrocortisone. These factors concertedly increased keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation while maintaining keratinocyte basal state. This method presents an elegant solution to simultaneously deliver disparate bioactive biomolecules for wound healing applications.

  11. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  12. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  13. High Explosives Research and Development (HERD) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to provide high explosive formulation, chemical analysis, safety and performance testing, processing, X-ray, quality control and loading support for...

  14. Blending into the mix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.G.; Gibb, W.H.; Majid, K.A. [Power Technology (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    Successful coal blending requires finding a careful balance between fuel costs and plant performance. A recent study of a Malaysian power plant shows how the utility (Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB)) could reduce fuel costs while avoiding boiler operating problems normally associated with firing low-grade coals. TNB`s Kaper 2220 MW power station in Selangor needed an improved method of coal blending for two new 500 MW units and for two existing 300 MW units. UK`s Power Technology was commissioned to identify what coal blends the boiler could tolerate. A Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) analysis of the effect of different coals and coal blends on combustion performance and economics, and a performance analysis of coal yard handling facility was made to determine whether the accuracy of the required blend could be achieved (using a Coal Handling Simulation, CHAS, software package). The CQIM study showed that the proportion of cheaper coals could be increased from 20% to 50% provided each shipment was adequately sampled. The CHAS study showed that use of a flat back reclaimer or modifications to the dry coal stove would allow accurate blending. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite with reduced graphene oxide through facile blending and its photocatalytic behavior for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Fuyun; Liu, Yingliang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shengping; Xu, Shengang, E-mail: xusg@zzu.edu.cn; Cao, Shaokui, E-mail: caoshaokui@zzu.edu.cn

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TRG-COOH nanocomposite as a photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution is prepared. • The reduction of graphene oxide reconstructs a part of conjugated structure. • The band gap is red-shifted due to the reconstruction of conjugated structure. • RG-COOH covered and anchored by P25 blocks the aggregation and the stacking. • The photocatalytic efficiency of TRG-COOH was increased under 500 W Xenon lamp. - Abstract: TRG-COOH nanocomposite is prepared as a photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution by blending TiO{sub 2} with reduced graphene oxide (RG-COOH). TRG-COOH is characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and photoluminescent spectra. XPS result shows the reduction of monolayer graphene oxide (GO). The band gap is red-shifted from 3.25 eV for P25, which consists of 20% rutile and 80% anatase, to 2.95 eV for TGO and then to 2.80 eV for TRG-COOH due to the introduction of GO and the reconstruction of conjugated structure. TEM image illustrates that RG-COOH in TRG-COOH is covered and anchored by P25, which blocks the aggregation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and the stacking of monolayer graphene. This allows RG-COOH to take a good role of electron-sink and electron-transporting bridge. The photocatalytic efficiency of TRG-COOH is respectively increased under Xenon lamp about 8.9 and 2.7 times compared to P25 and TGO.

  16. Polymer blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Naik, Sanjeev

    2017-08-22

    The present invention provides, among other things, extruded blends of aliphatic polycarbonates and polyolefins. In one aspect, provided blends comprise aliphatic polycarbonates such as poly(propylene carbonate) and a lesser amount of a crystalline or semicrystalline polymer. In certain embodiments, provided blends are characterized in that they exhibit unexpected improvements in their elongation properties. In another aspect, the invention provides methods of making such materials and applications of the materials in applications such as the manufacture of consumer packaging materials.

  17. Lecithin blended polyamide-6 high aspect ratio nanofiber scaffolds via electrospinning for human osteoblast cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nirmala, R. [Bio-nano System Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye-Min [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); Navamathavan, R. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyung-Sub [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561 756 (Korea, Republic of); El-Newehy, Mohamed H. [Petrochemical Research Chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kim, Hak Yong, E-mail: khy@jbnu.ac.kr [Petrochemical Research Chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Center for Healthcare Technology and Development, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561 756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-12

    In this study, we focused on the preparation and characterization of lecithin blended polyamide-6 nanofibers via an electrospinning process for human osteoblastic (HOB) cell culture applications. The morphological, structural characterizations and thermal properties of polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers were determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). SEM images revealed that the nanofibers were well-oriented with good incorporation of lecithin. FT-IR results indicated the presence of amino groups of lecithin in the blended nanofibers. TGA analysis revealed that the onset degradation temperature decreased with increasing lecithin content in the blended nanofibers. The morphological features of cells attached on polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers were confirmed by SEM. The adhesion, viability and proliferation properties of osteoblast cells on the polyamide-6/lecithin blended nanofibers were analyzed by in vitro cell compatibility test. This study demonstrated the non-cytotoxic behavior of electrospun polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers for the osteoblast cell culture.

  18. Lecithin blended polyamide-6 high aspect ratio nanofiber scaffolds via electrospinning for human osteoblast cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmala, R.; Park, Hye-Min; Navamathavan, R.; Kang, Hyung-Sub; El-Newehy, Mohamed H.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we focused on the preparation and characterization of lecithin blended polyamide-6 nanofibers via an electrospinning process for human osteoblastic (HOB) cell culture applications. The morphological, structural characterizations and thermal properties of polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers were determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). SEM images revealed that the nanofibers were well-oriented with good incorporation of lecithin. FT-IR results indicated the presence of amino groups of lecithin in the blended nanofibers. TGA analysis revealed that the onset degradation temperature decreased with increasing lecithin content in the blended nanofibers. The morphological features of cells attached on polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers were confirmed by SEM. The adhesion, viability and proliferation properties of osteoblast cells on the polyamide-6/lecithin blended nanofibers were analyzed by in vitro cell compatibility test. This study demonstrated the non-cytotoxic behavior of electrospun polyamide-6/lecithin nanofibers for the osteoblast cell culture.

  19. High flux polyethersulfone-polyimide blend hollow fiber membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapantaidakis, G.; Koops, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the preparation of gas separation hollow fibers based on polyethersulfone Sumikaexcel (PES) and polyimide Matrimid 5218 (PI) blends, for three different compositions (i.e. PES/PI: 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt.%), is reported. The dry/wet spinning process has been applied to prepare

  20. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  1. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  2. Biosecurity measures in 48 isolation facilities managing highly infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puro, Vincenzo; Fusco, Francesco M; Schilling, Stefan; Thomson, Gail; De Iaco, Giuseppina; Brouqui, Philippe; Maltezou, Helena C; Bannister, Barbara; Gottschalk, René; Brodt, Hans-Rheinhard; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Biosecurity measures are traditionally applied to laboratories, but they may also be usefully applied in highly specialized clinical settings, such as the isolation facilities for the management of patients with highly infectious diseases (eg, viral hemorrhagic fevers, SARS, smallpox, potentially severe pandemic flu, and MDR- and XDR-tuberculosis). In 2009 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a survey in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries to determine biosecurity measures for access control to the facility. Security personnel are present in 39 facilities (81%). In 35 facilities (73%), entrance to the isolation area is restricted; control methods include electronic keys, a PIN system, closed-circuit TV, and guards at the doors. In 25 facilities (52%), identification and registration of all staff entering and exiting the isolation area are required. Access control is used in most surveyed centers, but specific lacks exist in some facilities. Further data are needed to assess other biosecurity aspects, such as the security measures during the transportation of potentially contaminated materials and measures to address the risk of an "insider attack."

  3. Storage facility for highly radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Shozo

    1996-01-01

    A heat insulation plate is disposed at an intermediate portion between a ceiling wall of a storage chamber and an upper plate of a storage pit in parallel with them. A large number of highly radioactive solid wastes contained in canisters are contained in the storage pit. Cooling air is introduced from an air suction port, passes a channel on the upper side of the heat insulation plate formed by the ceiling of the storage chamber and the heat insulation plate, and flows from a flow channel on the side of the wall of the storage chamber to the lower portion of the storage pit. Afterheat is removed by the air flown from the lower portion to ventilation tubes at the outer side of container tubes. The air heated to a high temperature through the flow channel on the lower side of the heat insulation plate between the heat insulation plate and the upper plate of the storage pit, and is exhausted to an exhaustion port. Further, a portion of a heat insulation plate as a boundary between the cooling air and a high temperature air formed on the upper portion of the storage pit is formed as a heat transfer plate, so that the heat of the high temperature air is removed by the cooling air flowing the upper flow channel. This can prevent heating of the ceiling wall of the storage chamber. (I.N.)

  4. Radiation monitoring in high energy research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro

    1975-01-01

    In High Energy Physics Research Laboratory, construction of high energy proton accelerator is in progress. The accelerator is a cascaded machine comprising Cockcroft type (50 keV), linac (20 MeV), booster synchrotron (500 MeV), and synchrotron (8-12 GeV). Its proton beam intensity is 1x10 13 photons/pulse, and acceleration is carried out at the rate of every 2 minutes. The essential problems of radiation control in high energy accelerators are those of various radiations generated secondarily by proton beam and a number of induced radiations simultaneously originated with such secondary particles. In the Laboratory, controlled areas are divided into color-coded four regions, red, orange, yellow and green, based on each dose-rate. BF 3 counters covered with thick paraffin are used as neutron detectors, and side-window GM tubes, NaI (Tl) scintillators and ionization chambers as γ-detectors. In red region, however, ionization chambers are applied to induced radiation detection, and neutrons are not monitored. NIM standards are adopted for the circuits of all above monitors considering easy maintenance, economy and interchangeability. Notwithstanding the above described systems, these monitors are not sufficient to complete the measurement of whole radiations over wide energy region radiated from the accelerators. Hence separate radiation field measurement is required periodically. An example of the monitoring systems in National Accelerator Laboratory (U.S.) is referred at the last section. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Effects of butanol-diesel fuel blends on the performance and emissions of a high-speed DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, D.C.; Rakopoulos, C.D.; Giakoumis, E.G.; Dimaratos, A.M.; Kyritsis, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted to evaluate the effects of using blends of n-butanol (normal butanol) with conventional diesel fuel, with 8%, 16% and 24% (by volume) n-butanol, on the performance and exhaust emissions of a standard, fully instrumented, four-stroke, high-speed, direct injection (DI), Ricardo/Cussons 'Hydra' diesel engine located at the authors' laboratory. The tests are conducted using each of the above fuel blends or neat diesel fuel, with the engine working at a speed of 2000 rpm and at three different loads. In each test, fuel consumption, exhaust smokiness and exhaust regulated gas emissions such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and total unburned hydrocarbons are measured. The differences in the measured performance and exhaust emission parameters of the three butanol-diesel fuel blends from the baseline operation of the diesel engine, i.e., when working with neat diesel fuel, are determined and compared. It is revealed that this fuel, which can be produced from biomass (bio-butanol), forms a challenging and promising bio-fuel for diesel engines. The differing physical and chemical properties of butanol against those for the diesel fuel are used to aid the correct interpretation of the observed engine behavior.

  6. Charge versus Energy Transfer Effects in High-Performance Perylene Diimide Photovoltaic Blend Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranbir; Shivanna, Ravichandran; Iosifidis, Agathaggelos; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George; Narayan, K S; Keivanidis, Panagiotis E

    2015-11-11

    Perylene diimide (PDI)-based organic photovoltaic devices can potentially deliver high power conversion efficiency values provided the photon energy absorbed is utilized efficiently in charge transfer (CT) reactions instead of being consumed in nonradiative energy transfer (ET) steps. Hitherto, it remains unclear whether ET or CT primarily drives the photoluminescence (PL) quenching of the PDI excimer state in PDI-based blend films. Here, we affirm the key role of the thermally assisted PDI excimer diffusion and subsequent CT reaction in the process of PDI excimer PL deactivation. For our study we perform PL quenching experiments in the model PDI-based composite made of poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-(4-(2-ethylhexanoyl)-thieno[3,4-b]thiophene)-2-6-diyl] (PBDTTT-CT) polymeric donor mixed with the N,N'-bis(1-ethylpropyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) acceptor. Despite the strong spectral overlap between the PDI excimer PL emission and UV-vis absorption of PBDTTT-CT, two main observations indicate that no significant ET component operates in the overall PL quenching: the PL intensity of the PDI excimer (i) increases with decreasing temperature and (ii) remains unaffected even in the presence of 10 wt % content of the PBDTTT-CT quencher. Temperature-dependent wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments further indicate that nonradiative resonance ET is highly improbable due to the large size of PDI domains. The dominance of the CT over the ET process is verified by the high performance of devices with an optimum composition of 30:70 PBDTTT-CT:PDI. By adding 0.4 vol % of 1,8-diiodooctane we verify the plasticization of the polymer side chains that balances the charge transport properties of the PBDTTT-CT:PDI composite and results in additional improvement in the device efficiency. The temperature-dependent spectral width of the PDI excimer PL band suggests the presence of energetic disorder in the

  7. The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toran, L.E.; Hopper, C.M.; Naney, M.T.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities can be concentrated by hydrogeochemical processes to permit nuclear criticality. A team of experts in hydrology, geology, geochemistry, soil chemistry, and criticality safety was formed to develop achievable scenarios for hydrogeochemical increases in concentration of special nuclear material (SNM), and to use these scenarios to aid in evaluating the potential for nuclear criticality. The team's approach was to perform simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies to (1) identify some achievable scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration increase via sorption or precipitation of uranium, and (3) evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality resulting from potential increases in uranium concentration over disposal limits. The analysis of SNM was restricted to 235 U in the present scope of work. The outcome of the work indicates that criticality is possible given established regulatory limits on SNM disposal. However, a review based on actual disposal records of an existing site operation indicates that the potential for criticality is not a concern under current burial practices

  8. The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toran, L.E.; Hopper, C.M.; Naney, M.T. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities can be concentrated by hydrogeochemical processes to permit nuclear criticality. A team of experts in hydrology, geology, geochemistry, soil chemistry, and criticality safety was formed to develop achievable scenarios for hydrogeochemical increases in concentration of special nuclear material (SNM), and to use these scenarios to aid in evaluating the potential for nuclear criticality. The team`s approach was to perform simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies to (1) identify some achievable scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration increase via sorption or precipitation of uranium, and (3) evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality resulting from potential increases in uranium concentration over disposal limits. The analysis of SNM was restricted to {sup 235}U in the present scope of work. The outcome of the work indicates that criticality is possible given established regulatory limits on SNM disposal. However, a review based on actual disposal records of an existing site operation indicates that the potential for criticality is not a concern under current burial practices.

  9. Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics and Wing Pressure Distributions of a Blended-Wing-Body Configuration at Low and High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Force balance and wing pressure data were obtained on a 0.017-Scale Model of a blended-wing-body configuration (without a simulated propulsion system installation) to validate the capability of computational fluid dynamic codes to predict the performance of such thick sectioned subsonic transport configurations. The tests were conducted in the National Transonic Facility of the Langley Research Center at Reynolds numbers from 3.5 to 25.0 million at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.86. Data were obtained in the pitch plane only at angles of attack from -1 to 8 deg at Mach numbers greater than 0.25. A configuration with winglets was tested at a Reynolds number of 25.0 million at Mach numbers from 0.83 to 0.86.

  10. Blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Forsøg på at indkredse begrebet blended learning i forbindelse med forberedelsen af projekt FlexVid.......Forsøg på at indkredse begrebet blended learning i forbindelse med forberedelsen af projekt FlexVid....

  11. Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriale, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers always have been and always will be the essential element in the classroom. They can create magic inside four walls, but they have never been able to create learning environments outside the classroom like they can today, thanks to blended learning. Blended learning allows students and teachers to break free of the isolation of the…

  12. Blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Blended Learning has been implemented, evaluated and researched for the last decades within different educational areas and levels. Blended learning has been coupled with different epistemological understandings and learning theories, but the fundamental character and dimensions of learning...... in blended learning are still insufficient. Moreover, blended learning is a misleading concept described as learning, despite the fact that it fundamentally is an instructional and didactic approach (Oliver & Trigwell, 2005) addressing the learning environment (Inglis, Palipoana, Trenhom & Ward, 2011......) instead of the learning processes behind. Much of the existing research within the field seems to miss this perspective. The consequence is a lack of acknowledgement of the driven forces behind the context and the instructional design limiting the knowledge foundation of learning in blended learning. Thus...

  13. Digital games and Blended Learning in language learning: a case study with high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Teixeira da Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary language teaching can turn to a tool provided by the development of digital technologies - digital games. This resource is used by the vast majority of students, and its attractive features allow for meaningful learning. This method can be classified as Blended Learning since students use games to learn without the physical presence of the teacher, but still favor face-to-face learning. To verify digital games as a tool for teaching languages and for Blended Learning, a questionnaire created in Google Forms was shared with 67 interviewees with four questions related to the theme. It is a quantitative research supported by the contributions of Kenski (2007, Mattar (2011, Mendes (2011, Prensky (2012, and Tori (2010. among others.

  14. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, K.; Abu-Ramadan, E.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources are currently being investigated for their reliability, efficiency, and applicability. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives to conventional diesel fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reported on a study that compared pure biodiesel, pure diesel and blended fuels using a comprehensive multicomponent droplet vaporization model. The model considers the difference in the gas phase diffusivity of diesel and biodiesel vapors. The paper presented the vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50). The model successfully predicted the vaporization history of a multicomponent droplet. The modeling study revealed that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of relatively low vapor pressure. As such, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel will result in an increase in the evaporation time of diesel fuel to some extent. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  15. High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. A. Lopez

    1999-01-01

    A ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a compliance date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of the high-level waste in a High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility based on the assumption that no more New Waste Calcining Facility campaigns will be conducted after June 2000. Under this option, the sodium-bearing waste remaining in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm, and newly generated liquid waste produced between now and the start of 2013, will be processed using a different option, such as a Cesium Ion Exchange Facility. The cesium-saturated waste from this other option will be sent to the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities to be mixed with existing calcine. The calcine and cesium-saturated waste will be processed in the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility by the end of calendar year 2035. In addition, the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility will process all newly-generated liquid waste produced between 2013 and the end of 2035. Vitrification of this waste is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the waste and pouring it into stainless-steel canisters that will be ready for shipment out of Idaho to a disposal facility by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from the end of 2015 through 2035

  16. High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Lopez

    1999-08-01

    A ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all radioactive high-level waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a compliance date of 2035. This report investigates vitrification treatment of the high-level waste in a High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility based on the assumption that no more New Waste Calcining Facility campaigns will be conducted after June 2000. Under this option, the sodium-bearing waste remaining in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm, and newly generated liquid waste produced between now and the start of 2013, will be processed using a different option, such as a Cesium Ion Exchange Facility. The cesium-saturated waste from this other option will be sent to the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities to be mixed with existing calcine. The calcine and cesium-saturated waste will be processed in the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility by the end of calendar year 2035. In addition, the High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility will process all newly-generated liquid waste produced between 2013 and the end of 2035. Vitrification of this waste is an acceptable treatment method for complying with the Settlement Agreement. This method involves vitrifying the waste and pouring it into stainless-steel canisters that will be ready for shipment out of Idaho to a disposal facility by 2035. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for vitrification treatment will be from the end of 2015 through 2035.

  17. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  18. High-pressure lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of zinc-blende BN from first-principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huanyou; Xu Hui; Wang Xianchun; Jiang Chunzhi

    2009-01-01

    The density function perturbation theory (DFPT) is employed to study the lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties (with quasiharmonic approximation) of zinc-blende BN. First we discuss the structural properties and compare the phonon spectrum with available Raman scattering experiments. Thereafter using the calculated phonon dispersions we obtain the PTV equation of state from the free energy. Our results for the above properties are generally speaking in good agreement with experiments and with similar theoretical calculations. Owing to the anharmonic effect at high temperature, the calculated linear thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) are low to experimental data.

  19. High level radioactive waste management facility design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, N.A.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the engineering systems for the structural design of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At the DWPF, high level radioactive liquids will be mixed with glass particles and heated in a melter. This molten glass will then be poured into stainless steel canisters where it will harden. This process will transform the high level waste into a more stable, manageable substance. This paper discuss the structural design requirements for this unique one of a kind facility. A special emphasis will be concentrated on the design criteria pertaining to earthquake, wind and tornado, and flooding

  20. Implementation of high-dose chemical dosimetry for industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, Cirilo Cezar Sant'Anna da

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of methodology for high dose measurements using chemical dosimeters in liquid phase, traceable to the international metrology system, and make available in the country, the standard of high-dose to industrial irradiation facilities and research irradiators, trough the quality program with comparative measurements and direct use of the standard dosimeters in routine. The use of these low cost dosimetry systems in industrial irradiation facilities, assists to the certification requirements and it can reduce the costs with dosimetry for approximately 20% of the total dosimetry costs, using these systems in routine measurements and validation process, largely substituting the imported PMMA dosimeters, among others. (author)

  1. Thermo-aeraulics of high level waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrave, Herve; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Franck; Ranc, Guillaume; Duret, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the research undertaken in response to axis 3 of the 1991 radioactive waste management act, and possible solutions concerning the processes under consideration for conditioning and long-term interim storage of long-lived radioactive waste. The notion of 'long-term' is evaluated with respect to the usual operating lifetime of a basic nuclear installation, about 50 years. In this context, 'long-term' is defined on a secular time scale: the lifetime of the facility could be as long as 300 years. The waste package taken into account is characterized notably by its high thermal power release. Studies were carried out in dedicated facilities for vitrified waste and for spent UOX and MOX fuel. The latter are not considered as wastes, owing to the value of the reusable material they contain. Three primary objectives have guided the design of these long-term interim storage facilities: - ensure radionuclide containment at all times; - permit retrieval of the containers at any time; - minimize surveillance; - maintenance costs. The CEA has also investigated surface and subsurface facilities. It was decided to work on generic sites with a reasonable set of parameters values that should be applicable at most sites in France. All the studies and demonstrations to date lead to the conclusion that long-term interim storage is technically feasible. The paper addresses the following items: - Long-term interim storage concepts for high-level waste; - Design principles and options for the interim storage facilities; - General architecture; - Research topics, Storage facility ventilation, Dimensioning of the facility; - Thermo-aeraulics of a surface interim storage facility; - VALIDA surface loop, VALIDA single container test campaign, Continuation of the VALIDA program; - Thermo-aeraulics of a network of subsurface interim storage galleries; - SIGAL subsurface loop; - PROMETHEE subsurface loop; - Temperature behaviour of the concrete structures; - GALATEE

  2. Thermo-aeraulics of high level waste storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrave, Herve; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Franck; Ranc, Guillaume [CEA/Valrho, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Duret, Bernard [CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses the research undertaken in response to axis 3 of the 1991 radioactive waste management act, and possible solutions concerning the processes under consideration for conditioning and long-term interim storage of long-lived radioactive waste. The notion of 'long-term' is evaluated with respect to the usual operating lifetime of a basic nuclear installation, about 50 years. In this context, 'long-term' is defined on a secular time scale: the lifetime of the facility could be as long as 300 years. The waste package taken into account is characterized notably by its high thermal power release. Studies were carried out in dedicated facilities for vitrified waste and for spent UOX and MOX fuel. The latter are not considered as wastes, owing to the value of the reusable material they contain. Three primary objectives have guided the design of these long-term interim storage facilities: - ensure radionuclide containment at all times; - permit retrieval of the containers at any time; - minimize surveillance; - maintenance costs. The CEA has also investigated surface and subsurface facilities. It was decided to work on generic sites with a reasonable set of parameters values that should be applicable at most sites in France. All the studies and demonstrations to date lead to the conclusion that long-term interim storage is technically feasible. The paper addresses the following items: - Long-term interim storage concepts for high-level waste; - Design principles and options for the interim storage facilities; - General architecture; - Research topics, Storage facility ventilation, Dimensioning of the facility; - Thermo-aeraulics of a surface interim storage facility; - VALIDA surface loop, VALIDA single container test campaign, Continuation of the VALIDA program; - Thermo-aeraulics of a network of subsurface interim storage galleries; - SIGAL subsurface loop; - PROMETHEE subsurface loop; - Temperature behaviour of the concrete

  3. Hypervelocity Expansion Facility for Fundamental High-Enthalpy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    ii Final Technical Report of Contract ONR N00014-15-1-2260 Entitled: HYPERVELOCITY EXPANSION FACILITY FOR FUNDAMENTAL HIGH-ENTHALPY...previous DoD investments in high-energy pulsed laser diagnostics for instantaneous planar velocimetry and thermometry to perform scientific studies of...capability for fundamental and applied studies of hypervelocity high enthalpy flows. In this document, we report on the progress over the 18-month

  4. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  5. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  6. A high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Glossop, B.H.

    1981-06-01

    Commissioning tests involving deformation studies and tests to destruction as well as neutron diffraction measurements of a standard sample have been carried out on the SERC high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering studies. A detailed description of the pressurising equipment is given. (author)

  7. High performance Ti-6Al-4V + TiC alloy by blended elemental powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Horiya, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    The blended elemental powder metallurgy (BE) of titanium alloys is one of the most cost saving technologies, in which the blending of titanium powder and alloying element powders (or master alloy powders), precise compaction at room temperature, and consolidation are conducted in turn. In addition to some economical and material saving advantages, the BE has a noteworthy feature, that is, the synthesis of special alloy systems which are difficult to be produced by the ingot metallurgy. A particle or fiber reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) is one of the examples, and the addition of TiC particles to the extensively used Ti-6Al 4V has succeeded in obtaining higher tensile strength, Young's modulus, and elevated temperature properties. However, the raising up of some properties sometimes deteriorates other ones in MMC, and it often prevents the practical use. In this research work, the improvement of tensile ductility and fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V+TiC alloys without lowering other mechanical properties is aimed through the microstructural control

  8. Creation of a small high-throughput screening facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flak, Tod

    2009-01-01

    The creation of a high-throughput screening facility within an organization is a difficult task, requiring a substantial investment of time, money, and organizational effort. Major issues to consider include the selection of equipment, the establishment of data analysis methodologies, and the formation of a group having the necessary competencies. If done properly, it is possible to build a screening system in incremental steps, adding new pieces of equipment and data analysis modules as the need grows. Based upon our experience with the creation of a small screening service, we present some guidelines to consider in planning a screening facility.

  9. Overview of high intensity proton accelerator facility, J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The J-PARC project of high intensity proton accelerator research complex, conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK, has been completed with demonstration of all beam productions in 2009 as the facility construction phase, and the operation started to offer the secondary beams of neutron, muon, kaon, and neutrino, to the advanced scientific experimental research aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. This text describes the overview of the J-PARC present status with emphasis of a performance toward to 1MW power as user facilities. (author)

  10. Adjusted Framework of M-Learning in Blended Learning System for Mathematics Study Field of Junior High School Level VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyanta, Lipur; Sukardjo, Moch.

    2018-04-01

    The 2013 curriculum requires teachers to be more productive, creative, and innovative in encouraging students to be more independent by strengthening attitudes, skills and knowledge. Teachers are given the options to create lesson plan according to the environment and conditions of their students. At the junior level, Core Competence (KI) and Basic Competence (KD) have been completely designed. In addition, there had already guidebooks, both for teacher manuals (Master’s Books) and for learners (Student Books). The lesson plan and guidebooks which already exist are intended only for learning in the classroom/in-school. Many alternative classrooms and alternatives learning models opened up using educational technology. The advance of educational technology opened opportunity for combination of class interaction using mobile learning applications. Mobile learning has rapidly evolved in education for the last ten years and many initiatives have been conducted worldwide. However, few of these efforts have produced any lasting outcomes. It is evident that mobile education applications are complex and hence, will not become sustainable. Long-term sustainability remains a risk. Long-term sustainability usually was resulted from continuous adaptation to changing conditions [4]. Frameworks are therefore required to avoid sustainability pitfalls. The implementation should start from simple environment then gradually become complex through adaptation steps. Therefore, our paper developed the framework of mobile learning (m-learning) adaptation for grade 7th (junior high school). The environment setup was blended mobile learning (not full mobile learning) and emphasize on Algebra. The research is done by R&D method (research and development). Results of the framework includes requirements and adaptation steps. The adjusted m-learning framework is designed to be a guidance for teachers to adopt m-learning to support blended learning environments. During mock-up prototype, the

  11. Production of palm and Calophyllum inophyllum based biodiesel and investigation of blend performance and exhaust emission in an unmodified diesel engine at high idling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.M. Ashrafur; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Abedin, M.J.; Sanjid, A.; Sajjad, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biodiesel produced from palm and Calophyllum oil using trans-esterification process. • Produced biodiesels properties were compared with ASTM D6751 standards. • Engine performance and exhaust emissions were evaluated at high idling conditions. • Idling CO and HC emission was reduced using biodiesel–diesel blends. • For low percentages of biodiesel–diesel blends NO X emission increased negligibly. - Abstract: Rapid depletion of fossil fuels, increasing fossil-fuel price, carbon price, and the quest of low carbon fuel for cleaner environment – these are the reason researchers are looking for alternatives of fossil fuels. Renewable, non-flammable, biodegradable, and non-toxic are some reasons that are making biodiesel as a suitable candidate to replace fossil-fuel in near future. In recent years, in many countries of the world production and use of biodiesel has gained popularity. In this research, biodiesel from palm and Calophyllum inophyllum oil has been produced using the trans-esterification process. Properties of the produced biodiesels were compared with the ASTM D6751 standard: biodiesel standard and testing methods. Density, kinematic viscosity, flash point, cloud point, pour point and calorific value, these are the six main physicochemical properties that were investigated. Both palm biodiesel and Calophyllum biodiesel were within the standard limits, so they both can be used as the alternative of diesel fuel. Furthermore, engine performance and emission parameters of a diesel engine run by both palm biodiesel–diesel and Calophyllum biodiesel–diesel blends were evaluated at high idling conditions. Brake specific fuel consumption increased for both the biodiesel–diesel blends compared to pure diesel fuel; however, at highest idling condition, this increase was almost negligible. Exhaust gas temperatures decreased as blend percentages increased for both the biodiesel–diesel blends. For low blend percentages increase in NO

  12. Supercritical CO2 foaming of radiation crosslinked polypropylene/high-density polyethylene blend: Cell structure and tensile property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenguang; Xing, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxing; Zhao, Quan; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-12-01

    A blend of isotactic polypropylene (PP) with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in different PP/HDPE ratios was irradiated by γ-ray to induce cross-linking and then foamed using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a blowing agent. Radiation effect on the melting point and crystallinity were analyzed in detail. The average cell diameter and cell density were compared for PP/HDPE foams prepared under different conditions. The optimum absorbed dose for the scCO2 foaming of PP/HDPE in terms of foaming ability and cell structure was 20 kGy. Tensile measurements showed that the elongation at break and tensile strength at break of the crosslinked PP/HDPE foams were higher than the non-crosslinked ones. Of particular interest was the increase in the foaming temperature window from 4 ℃ for pristine PP to 8-12 ℃ for the radiation crosslinked PP/HDPE blends. This implies much easier handling of scCO2 foaming of crosslinked PP with the addition of HDPE.

  13. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  14. High quality zinc-blende CdSe nanocrystals synthesized in a hexadecylamine-oleic acid-paraffin liquid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lan, E-mail: lwang322@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Sun Xiudong, E-mail: xdsun@hit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu Wenjing [Department of Astronautic Science and Mechanics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu Bingyi [Laboratory Center for the School of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Safe, common, and low-cost compounds were used as solvents for the non-tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) synthesis of high quality CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) in open air. In oleic acid-paraffin liquid system, CdSe nanocrystals in the less common zinc-blende (ZB, cubic) crystal structure have been obtained. The effects of adding n-hexadecylamine (HDA) to different solutions were discussed. Stable, highly homogeneous and luminescent CdSe nanocrystals were formed by adding n-hexadecylamine to Cd solution rather than to Se solution. Without any size sorting, the size distribution of the nanocrystals can be readily controlled and the highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency (QE) of the nanocrystals was up to 20-30%.

  15. High quality zinc-blende CdSe nanocrystals synthesized in a hexadecylamine-oleic acid-paraffin liquid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lan; Sun Xiudong; Liu Wenjing; Liu Bingyi

    2010-01-01

    Safe, common, and low-cost compounds were used as solvents for the non-tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) synthesis of high quality CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) in open air. In oleic acid-paraffin liquid system, CdSe nanocrystals in the less common zinc-blende (ZB, cubic) crystal structure have been obtained. The effects of adding n-hexadecylamine (HDA) to different solutions were discussed. Stable, highly homogeneous and luminescent CdSe nanocrystals were formed by adding n-hexadecylamine to Cd solution rather than to Se solution. Without any size sorting, the size distribution of the nanocrystals can be readily controlled and the highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency (QE) of the nanocrystals was up to 20-30%.

  16. High-phase-purity zinc-blende InN on r-plane sapphire substrate with controlled nitridation pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, C.-L.; Wu, C.-T.; Hsu, H.-C.; Hsu, G.-M.; Chen, L.-C.; Liu, T.-W.; Shiao, W.-Y.; Yang, C. C.; Gaellstroem, Andreas; Holtz, Per-Olof; Chen, C.-C.; Chen, K.-H.

    2008-01-01

    High-phase-purity zinc-blende (zb) InN thin film has been grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire substrate pretreated with nitridation. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the phase of the InN films changes from wurtzite (w) InN to a mixture of w-InN and zb-InN, to zb-InN with increasing nitridation time. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals an ultrathin crystallized interlayer produced by substrate nitridation, which plays an important role in controlling the InN phase. Photoluminescence emission of zb-InN measured at 20 K shows a peak at a very low energy, 0.636 eV, and an absorption edge at ∼0.62 eV is observed at 2 K, which is the lowest bandgap reported to date among the III-nitride semiconductors

  17. High-Trust Leadership and Blended Learning in the Age of Disruptive Innovation: Strategic Thinking for Colleges and Schools of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce diverse definitions of leadership and its evolutionary history and then we integrate this idea network: strategic thinking, high-trust leadership, blended learning, and disruptive innovation. Following the lead of Marx's (2014) model of Teaching Leadership and Strategy and Rehm's (2014) model of High School Student Leadership…

  18. Quality assurance system for sitting high risk facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Aymee; Peralta, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    The paper shows how we have conceived and designed the quality assurance system for the site selection process of an area for sitting the facility of high risk in correspondence with the approved methodology. The results obtained in the implementation of the system have permitted the satisfactory performance of each one the expected stage, defining the most favorable sectors in order to continue the studies of the repository site for the disposal of low and intermedium. (author)

  19. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Aoun, M [Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth (Australia); Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)] [and others

    2004-03-07

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with {approx}10{sup 6} W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties.

  20. Ion beams from high-current PF facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, M [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed beams of fast deuterons and impurity or admixture ions emitted from high-current PF-type facilities operated in different laboratories are dealt with. A short comparative analysis of time-integrated and time-resolved studies is presented. Particular attention is paid to the microstructure of such ion beams, and to the verification of some theoretical models. (author). 5 figs., 19 refs.

  1. Controlling Blend Morphology for Ultra-High Current Density in Non-Fullerene Acceptor Based Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xin; Gasparini, Nicola; Ye, Long; Yao, Huifeng; Hou, Jianhui; Ade, Harald; Baran, Derya

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high absorption coefficient and modulated band gap of non-fullerene small molecule acceptors (NFAs), photons can be utilized more efficiently in near-infrared (NIR) range. In this report, we highlight a system with a well-known polymer donor (PTB7-Th) blended with a narrow bandgap non-fullerene acceptor (IEICO-4F) as active layer and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as the solvent additive. The optimization of the photoactive layer nanomorphology yields short-circuit current density value (Jsc) of 27.3 mA/cm2, one of the highest value in OSCs reported to date, which competes with other types of solution processed solar cells such as perovskite or quantum dot devices. Along with decent open-circuit voltage (0.71V) and fill factor values (66%), a power conversion efficiency of 12.8% is achieved for the champion devices. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) patterns and resonant soft X-ray scattering (R-SoXS) elucidate that the origin of this high photocurrent is mainly due to increased π-π coherence length of the acceptor, the domain spacing as well as the mean-square composition variation of the blend. Optoelectronic measurements confirm a balanced hole and electron mobility and reduced trap-assisted recombination for the best devices. These findings unveil the relevant solvent processing-nanostructure-electronic properties correlation in low band gap non-fullerene based solar cells, which provide a helpful guide for maximizing photocurrent that can pave the way for high efficiency organic solar cells.

  2. Controlling Blend Morphology for Ultra-High Current Density in Non-Fullerene Acceptor Based Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xin

    2018-01-23

    Due to the high absorption coefficient and modulated band gap of non-fullerene small molecule acceptors (NFAs), photons can be utilized more efficiently in near-infrared (NIR) range. In this report, we highlight a system with a well-known polymer donor (PTB7-Th) blended with a narrow bandgap non-fullerene acceptor (IEICO-4F) as active layer and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as the solvent additive. The optimization of the photoactive layer nanomorphology yields short-circuit current density value (Jsc) of 27.3 mA/cm2, one of the highest value in OSCs reported to date, which competes with other types of solution processed solar cells such as perovskite or quantum dot devices. Along with decent open-circuit voltage (0.71V) and fill factor values (66%), a power conversion efficiency of 12.8% is achieved for the champion devices. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) patterns and resonant soft X-ray scattering (R-SoXS) elucidate that the origin of this high photocurrent is mainly due to increased π-π coherence length of the acceptor, the domain spacing as well as the mean-square composition variation of the blend. Optoelectronic measurements confirm a balanced hole and electron mobility and reduced trap-assisted recombination for the best devices. These findings unveil the relevant solvent processing-nanostructure-electronic properties correlation in low band gap non-fullerene based solar cells, which provide a helpful guide for maximizing photocurrent that can pave the way for high efficiency organic solar cells.

  3. Impact of a Diesel High Pressure Common Rail Fuel System and Onboard Vehicle Storage on B20 Biodiesel Blend Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Earl; McCormick, Robert L.; Sigelko, Jenny; Johnson, Stuart; Zickmann, Stefan; Lopes, Shailesh; Gault, Roger; Slade, David

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of high-pressure common-rail (HPCR) fuel systems, which subject diesel fuels to higher temperatures and pressures, has brought into question the efficacy of ASTM International specifications for biodiesel and biodiesel blend oxidation stability, as well as the lack of any stability parameter for diesel fuel. A controlled experiment was developed to investigate the impact of a light-duty diesel HPCR fuel system on the stability of 20% biodiesel (B20) blends under conditions of intermittent use and long-term storage in a relatively hot and dry climate. B20 samples with Rancimat induction periods (IPs) near the current 6.0-hour minimum specification (6.5 hr) and roughly double the ASTM specification (13.5 hr) were prepared from a conventional diesel and a highly unsaturated biodiesel. Four 2011 model year Volkswagen Passats equipped with HPCR fuel injection systems were utilized: one on B0, two on B20-6.5 hr, and one on B20-13.5 hr. Each vehicle was operated over a one-hour drive cycle in a hot running loss test cell to initially stress the fuel. The cars were then kept at Volkswagen's Arizona Proving Ground for two (35 degrees C average daily maximum) to six months (26 degrees C average daily maximum). The fuel was then stressed again by running a portion of the one-hour dynamometer drive cycle (limited by the amount of fuel in the tank). Fuel rail and fuel tank samples were analyzed for IP, acid number, peroxide content, polymer content, and ester profile. The HPCR fuel pumps were removed, dismantled, and inspected for deposits or abnormal wear. Analysis of fuels collected during initial dynamometer tests showed no impact of exposure to HPCR conditions. Long-term storage with intermittent use showed that IP remained above 3 hours, acid number below 0.3 mg KOH/g, peroxides low, no change in ester profile, and no production of polymers. Final dynamometer tests produced only small changes in fuel properties. Inspection of the HPCR fuel pumps revealed no

  4. Is Blended e-Learning as Measured by an Achievement Test and Self-Assessment Better than Traditional Classroom Learning for Vocational High School Students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Cheng Chang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of blended e-learning on electrical machinery performance (achievement test and self-assessment. Participants were two classes of 11th graders majoring in electrical engineering and taking the electrical machinery class at a vocational high school in Taiwan. The participants were randomly selected and assigned to either the experimental group (n = 33 which studied through blended e-learning or the control group (n = 32 which studied through traditional classroom learning. The experiment lasted for five weeks. The results showed that (a there were no significant differences in achievement test scores between blended e-learning and traditional learning; (b students in the experimental group obtained significantly higher scores on self-assessment than students in the control group; (c students’ scores on self-assessment were significantly higher after studying through blended e-learning than before. Overall, blended e-learning did not significantly affect students’ achievement test scores, but significantly affected their self-assessment scores.

  5. Ternary Blends of High Aluminate Cement, Fly ash and Blast-furnace slag for Sewerage Lining Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, L. C.; Kuo, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    High aluminate cement (HAC), fly ash (FA) and blast-furnace slag (BFS) have been treated sustainable materials for the use of cement products for wastewater infrastructure due to their capabilities of corrosion resistance. The purpose of this study is to optimize a ternary blend of above mentioned materials for a special type of mortar for sewerage lining. By the using of Taguchi method, four control parameters including water/cementitious material ratio, mix water content, fly ash content and blast-furnace slag content were considered in nine trial mix designs in this study. By evaluating target properties including (1) maximization of compressive strength, (2) maximization of electricity resistance and (3) minimization of water absorption rate, the best possible levels for each control parameter were determined and the optimal mix proportions were verified. Through the implementation of the study, a practical and completed idea for designing corrosion resistive mortar comprising HAC, FA and BSF is provided.

  6. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J.; Djekic, S.; Haeffner, H.; Hermanspahn, N.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Moore, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J.; Weber, C.; Werth, G.

    2001-01-01

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy

  7. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  8. High temperature combustion facility: present capabilities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The high-temperature combustion facility constructed and operated by the Department of Advanced Technology of Brookhaven National Laboratory to support and promote research in the area of hydrogen combustion phenomena in mixtures prototypical to light-water reactor containment atmospheres under potential severe accident conditions is reported. The facility can accommodate combustion research activities encompassing the fields of detonation physics, flame acceleration, and low-speed deflagration in a wide range of combustible gas mixtures at initial temperatures up to 700 K and post-combustion pressures up to 100 atmospheres. Some preliminary test results are presented that provide further evidence that the effect of temperature is to increase the sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation [ru

  9. The high-energy dual-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletta, D.

    1984-07-01

    This proposal presents a new experimental facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) to study the effects of irradiation on the first wall and blanket materials of a fusion reactor. A special effort is made to demonstrate the advantages of the Dual Beam Technique (DBT) as a future research tool for materials development within the European Fusion Technology Programme. The Dual-Beam-Technique allows the production both of helium and of damage in thick metal and ceramic specimens by simultaneous irradiation with high energy alpha particles and protons produced by the two KfK cyclotrons. The proposal describes the Dual Beam Technique the planned experimental activities and the design features of the Dual Beam Facility presently under construction. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of the High-Energy Electron Beam Irradiation on the Morphology and Mechanical Properties of PE/EVA Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi Aghjeh, M. K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study the effect of electron beam irradiation on the morphology and mechanical properties of PE/EVA blends. The melt compounding of the blends were carried out in an internal mixer. The small amount of the prepared blend samples were rapidly quenched in liquid nitrogen and the remained were compression molded into sheets. Sheets and quenched samples were then irradiated by a 10 MeV electron beam accelerator using different dose levels. The morphological studies for both, sheeted and quenched blends were performed on cryogenically fractured surfaces by using SEM technique. The mechanical properties of the sheeted samples were evaluated according to ASTM D638. The results of mechanical properties showed that, increasing in irradiation dose increases the tensile strength and decreases the elongation at break in all blend compositions. On the other hand, it was found that, for PE/EVA blends the extent of tensile strength increase, and elongation at break decrease, are more appreciable in compare to the neat PE and EVA. These results suggest that, the blend interface is more susceptible for irradiation induced crosslinking. This is because of more affinity of PE and EVA macroradicals to termination with together in compare to own macroradicals.The results of morphological studies showed that, irradiation can stabilize the blend morphology especially in co-continues regions, where the morphology is more unstable due to the heat coarsening

  11. Thermoset Blends of an Epoxy Resin and Polydicyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Brian J.; Le, Kim Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan L.

    2016-12-13

    The mechanical properties of two chemically distinct and complementary thermoset polymers were manipulated through development of thermoset blends. The thermoset blend system was composed of an anhydride-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin, contributing high tensile strength and modulus, and polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD), which has a higher toughness and impact strength as compared to other thermoset polymers. Ultra-small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis explored the morphology of concurrently cured thermoset blends, revealing a macroscopically phase separated system with a surface fractal structure across blended systems of varying composition. The epoxy resin rich and PDCPD rich phases exhibited distinct glass transitions (Tg’s): the Tg observed at higher temperature was associated with the epoxy resin rich phase and was largely unaffected by the presence of PDCPD, whereas the PDCPD rich phase Tg systematically decreased with increasing epoxy resin content due to inhibition of dicyclopentadiene ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The mechanical properties of these phase-separated blends were in reasonable agreement with predictions by the rule of mixtures for the blend tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the tensile and fracture specimen fracture surfaces showed an increase in energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crazing, shear banding, and surface roughness, as the fraction of the more ductile component, PDPCD, increased. These results present a facile method to tune the mechanical properties of a toughened thermoset network, in which the high modulus and tensile strength of the epoxy resin can be largely retained at high epoxy resin content in the blend, while increasing the fracture toughness.

  12. Calibration of high-dose radiation facilities (Handbook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.; Bhat, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    In India at present several high intensity radiation sources are used. There are 135 teletheraphy machines and 65 high intensity cobalt-60 sources in the form of gamma chambers (2.5 Ci) and PANBIT (50 Ci). Several food irradiation facilities and a medical sterilization plant ISOMED are also in operation. The application of these high intensity sources involve a wide variation of dose from 10 Gy to 100 kGy. Accurate and reproducible radiation dosimetry is essential in the use of these sources. This handbook is especially compiled for calibration of high-dose radiation facilities. The first few chapters discuss such topics as interaction of radiation with matter, radiation chemistry, radiation processing, commonly used high intensity radiation sources and their special features, radiation units and dosimetry principles. In the chapters which follow, chemical dosimeters are discussed in detail. This discussion covers Fricke dosimeter, FBX dosimeter, ceric sulphate dosimeter, free radical dosimetry, coloured indicators for irrdiation verification. A final chapter is devoted to practical hints to be followed in calibration work. (author)

  13. Is Blended e-Learning as Measured by an Achievement Test and Self-Assessment Better than Traditional Classroom Learning for Vocational High School Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Shu, Kuen-Ming; Liang, Chaoyun; Tseng, Ju-Shih; Hsu, Yu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of blended e-learning on electrical machinery performance (achievement test and self-assessment). Participants were two classes of 11th graders majoring in electrical engineering and taking the electrical machinery class at a vocational high school in Taiwan. The participants were randomly…

  14. Design and screening of synergistic blends of SiO2 nanoparticles and surfactants for enhanced oil recovery in high-temperature reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Nhu Y Thi; Pham, Duy Khanh; Le, Kim Hung; Nguyen, Phuong Tung

    2011-01-01

    SiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the sol–gel method in an ultrasound reactor and monodispersed NPs with an average particle size of 10–12 nm were obtained. The synergy occurring in blending NPs and anionic surfactant solutions was identified by ultra-low interfacial tension (IFT) reduction measured by a spinning drop tensiometer (Temco500). The oil displacement efficiency of the synergistic blends and surfactant solutions at Dragon South-East (DSE) reservoir temperature was evaluated using contact angle measurement (Dataphysics OCA 20). It was found that SiO 2 /surfactant synergistic blends displace oil as well as their original surfactant solutions at the same 1000 ppm total concentration. Abundant slag appearing in the SiO 2 /surfactant medium during oil displacement could be attributed to an adsorption of surfactants onto the NPs. The results indicate that at a concentration of 1000 ppm in total, the original surfactant SS16-47A and its blend with SiO 2 NPs in the ratio of 8:2 exhibited an IFT reduction as high as fourfold of the IFT recorded for the DSE oil–brine interface and very high speed of oil displacement. Therefore, it could potentially be applicable to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in high-temperature reservoirs with high hardness-injection-brine, like the one at DSE. This opens up a new direction for developing effective EOR compositions, which require less surfactant and are environmentally safer

  15. Preparation and properties of banana fiber-reinforced composites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/Nylon-6 blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Wu, Q; Zhang, Q

    2009-12-01

    Banana fiber (BaF)-filled composites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/Nylon-6 blends were prepared via a two-step extrusion method. Maleic anhydride grafted styrene/ethylene-butylene/styrene triblock polymer (SEBS-g-MA) and maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (PE-g-MA) were used to enhance impact performance and interfacial bonding between BaF and the resins. Mechanical, crystallization/melting, thermal stability, water absorption, and morphological properties of the composites were investigated. In the presence of SEBS-g-MA, better strengths and moduli were found for HDPE/Nylon-6 based composites compared with corresponding HDPE based composites. At a fixed weight ratio of PE-g-MA to BaF, an increase of BaF loading up to 48.2 wt.% led to a continuous improvement in moduli and flexural strength of final composites, while impact toughness was lowered gradually. Predicted tensile modulus by the Hones-Paul model for three-dimensional random fiber orientation agreed well with experimental data at the BaF loading of 29.3 wt.%. However, the randomly-oriented fiber models underestimated experimental data at higher fiber levels. It was found that the presence of SEBS-g-MA had a positive influence on reinforcing effect of the Nylon-6 component in the composites. Thermal analysis results showed that fractionated crystallization of the Nylon-6 component in the composites was induced by the addition of both SEBS-g-MA and PE-g-MA. Thermal stability of both composite systems differed slightly, except an additional decomposition peak related to the minor Nylon-6 for the composites from the HDPE/Nylon-6 blends. In the presence of SEBS-g-MA, the addition of Nylon-6 and increased BaF loading level led to an increase in the water absorption value of the composites.

  16. Well-to-Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emission Analysis of High-Octane Fuels with Ethanol Blending: Phase II Analysis with Refinery Investment Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; DiVita, Vincent [Jacobs Consultancy Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Higher-octane gasoline can enable increases in an internal combustion engine’s energy efficiency and a vehicle’s fuel economy by allowing an increase in the engine compression ratio and/or by enabling downspeeding and downsizing. Producing high-octane fuel (HOF) with the current level of ethanol blending (E10) could increase the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity of the fuel product from refinery operations. Alternatively, increasing the ethanol blending level in final gasoline products could be a promising solution to HOF production because of the high octane rating and potentially low blended Reid vapor pressure (RVP) of ethanol at 25% and higher of the ethanol blending level by volume. In our previous HOF well-to-wheels (WTW) report (the so-called phase I report of the HOF WTW analysis), we conducted WTW analysis of HOF with different ethanol blending levels (i.e., E10, E25, and E40) and a range of vehicle efficiency gains with detailed petroleum refinery linear programming (LP) modeling by Jacobs Consultancy and showed that the overall WTW GHG emission changes associated with HOFVs were dominated by the positive impact associated with vehicle efficiency gains and ethanol blending levels, while the refining operations to produce gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (BOB) for various HOF blend levels had a much smaller impact on WTW GHG emissions (Han et al. 2015). The scope of the previous phase I study, however, was limited to evaluating PADDs 2 and 3 operation changes with various HOF market share scenarios and ethanol blending levels. Also, the study used three typical configuration models of refineries (cracking, light coking, and heavy coking) in each PADD, which may not be representative of the aggregate response of all refineries in each PADD to various ethanol blending levels and HOF market scenarios. Lastly, the phase I study assumed no new refinery expansion in the existing refineries, which limited E10 HOF production to the

  17. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodochigov, N.G.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Sukharev, Y.P.; Chudin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the characteristics of the experimental facilities and experiments in the Russian Federation: the HTGR neutron-physical investigation facilities ASTRA and GROG; facilities for fuel, graphite and other elements irradiation; and thermal hydraulics experimental facilities. The overview is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets

  18. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques

  19. Catalytic phosphonation of high performance polymers and POSS. Novel components for polymer blend and nanocomposite fuel cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, T.R.

    2006-10-15

    Aim of this thesis was the preparation and evaluation of phosphonated high performance (HP) polyelectrolytes and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) for polyelectrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) application. Brominated derivatives of the commercial high performance (HP) polymers poly(ethersulfone) (PES), poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), poly(phenylsulfone) (PPSu), poly(sulfone) (PSU) and of octaphenyl-POSS of own production were phosphonated by Ni-catalysed Arbuzov reaction. Phosphonated PSU was cast into pure and blend films with sulfonated PEEK (s-PEEK) to investigate H+-conductivity, water uptake and film morphology. Blend films' properties were referenced to films containing unmodified blend partners. Solution-compounding of phosphonated octaphenyl-POSS and s-PEEK was used to produce novel nanocomposite films. An in-situ zirconisation method was assessed as convenient strategy for novel ionically crosslinked membranes of enhanced swelling resistance. Dibromo isocyanuric acid (DBI) and N-bromo succinimide (NBS) as brominating agents allowed polymer analogous preparation of the novel brominated PES and PEEK with precise reaction control. A random distribution of functional groups, i.e. polyelectrolytes' microstructural homogeneity was revealed as decisive factor concerning solubility of phosphonated PSU. Brominated phT8 was prepared with Br2 by a high temperature approach in tetrachloroethane (TCE). Brominated polymers were phosphonated by Ni-catalysis in non-coordinating high temperature solvents, such as diphenylether, benzophenone and diphenylsulfone without notable solvent influence. The lack of solvent - catalyst complexes and high reaction temperatures of 180-200 C led to halogen-free phosphonates with unprecedented high functionalities. Polymer analogous application of P(OSiMe3)3 offered a novel direct access to easily cleavable disilyl ester derivatives. These were obtained from PEEK and PSU in near quantitative yields at NiCl2-loads as

  20. Highly durable and low permeable concrete for LLW facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagibashi, Kunio; Saito, Toshio; Odagawa, Masaro.

    1997-01-01

    Concrete used for LLW facilities is required to be highly durable. The authors evaluated concrete containing glycol ether derivatives and silica fume as admixtures. Compressive strength, diffusion coefficient of water, depth of accelerated carbonation, drying shrinkage, depth of chlorides penetration and resistance to freezing and thawing were investigated using concrete specimens. Compressive strength, depth of accelerated carbonation, diffusion coefficient of 137 Cs were investigated using mortar specimens before and after irradiation of gamma rays. Results showed that using glycol ether derivatives and silica fume was effective in improving the durability. (author)

  1. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  2. Radiation effects on the immiscible polymer blend of nylon1010 and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) I: Gel/dose curves, mathematical expectation theorem and thermal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, W.; Zhang, W.; Chen, G.; Liu, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies the radiation properties of the immiscible blend of nylon1010 and HIPS. The gel fraction increased with increasing radiation dose. The network was found mostly in nylon1010, the networks were also found in both nylon1010 and HIPS when the dose reaches 0.85 MGy or more. We used the equation and the modified Zhang-Sun-Qian equation to simulate the relationship with the dose and the sol fraction. The latter equation fits well with these polymer blends and the relationship used by it showed better linearity than the one by the equation. We also studied the conditions of formation of the network by the mathematical expectation theorem for the binary system. Thermal properties of polymer blend were observed by DSC curves. The crystallization temperature decreases with increasing dose because the cross-linking reaction inhibited the crystallization procession and destroyed the crystals. The melting temperature also reduced with increasing radiation dose. The dual melting peak gradually shifted to single peak and the high melting peak disappeared at high radiation dose. However, the radiation-induced crystallization was observed by the heat of fusion increasing at low radiation dose. On the other hand, the crystal will be damaged by radiation. A similar conclusion may be drawn by the DSC traces when the polymer blends were crystallized. When the radiation dose increases, the heat of fusion reduces dramatically and so does the heat of crystallization. (author)

  3. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  4. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  5. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation

  6. Blend or not to blend: a study investigating faculty members perceptions of blended teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Ocak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined faculty members’ perceptions of blended teaching from several perspectives. A total of 73 faculty members in Turkish Higher Education context participated in the study by completing an online survey that combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Based on a data analysis, the faculty members’ perceptions were sorted into six categories: (a satisfaction with blended teaching, (b perceived impact on the role of the faculty, (c perceived impact on student learning, (d perceived impact on student motivation, (e advantages of blended teaching, and (f disadvantages of blended teaching. Findings indicated that faculty members were likely to agree that blended teaching provides a high degree of satisfaction and that it requires more time and commitment from the faculty. The faculty members perceived that blended teaching improves student learning and, to some extent, improves motivation. The faculty members also emphasized the importance of institutional support and the use of technology to mitigate student problems. This study presents these faculty members’ perceptions, which are helpful for those planning to implement a blended teaching approach, and makes suggestions for trouble-shooting and taking advantage of the opportunities in a blended environment successfully.

  7. Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility

  8. Melting and crystallization behavior of partially miscible high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (HDPE/EVA) blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang; Zou, Huawei, E-mail: hwzou@163.com; Liang, Mei, E-mail: liangmeiww@163.com; Cao, Ya

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • HDPE/EVA blends undergo phase separation, making it an interesting topic to investigate the relationships between miscibility and crystallization. • Influences from blending on the crystallization kinetics were successfully evaluated by Friedman's and Khanna's method. • X-ray diffraction studies revealed that blending with EVA the unit length of the unit cell of the HDPE increases. • Thermal fractionation method was successfully used to characterize the co-crystallization in HDPE/EVA blends. - Abstract: Crystallization studies on HDPE/EVA blends and the individual components were performed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). Influences of blending on the crystallization kinetics of each component in HDPE/EVA mixture were evaluated by Friedman's activation energy and Khanna's crystallization rate coefficient (CRC). The addition of more HDPE into the EVA matrix causes more heterogeneous nucleation while the addition of EVA would hinder the nucleation of HDPE at the beginning of cooling process. Inter-molecular interaction in the melt facilitated the crystallization of both EVA and HDPE components. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that HDPE and EVA have orthorhombic unit cell. Blending with EVA did not affect the crystalline structure of HDPE. In addition, a little shift of (1 1 0), (2 0 0) and (0 2 0) crystalline peaks toward lower 2θ values of samples indicating a little increase of unit cell parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell of polyethylene. Thermal fractionation results showed that co-crystallization took place in the HDPE/EVA blend. All those results indicated that the polymer pair we choose was partially miscible.

  9. Managing highly flexible facilities: an essential complementary asset at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, Robert; Tierney, R.; Groen, Arend J.; Harms, Rainer; Luizink, M.; Hetherington, D.; Steward, H.; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Linton, Jonathan; Linton, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they require an expensive new type of fabrication facility. Multiple technology production facilities (MTPF) have

  10. Introducing blended e-learning course design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyamfi, Samuel Adu; Ryberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the face of diminishing education budgets in higher education, blended learning has been found to be a viable and effective approach to deliver high-quality, up-to-date, on-demand solutions to developing cross-curricular skills of undergraduates. However, research has also shown that blended...... learning solutions do not often live up to the potential of the approach or fail to produce the intended results because the students are not always equipped to handle the technical, psychological and organisational challenges of blended learning approaches. This project surveyed seventy-five first year...... the students’ e-readiness for an implementation of a blend-ed course design....

  11. Evaluation of a high-level waste radiological maintenance facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation''s first and world''s largest high level waste vitrification facility. DWPF began, operations in March 1996 to process radioactive waste, consisting of a matrixed predominantly 137 Cs precipitate and a predominately 90 Sr and alpha emitting sludge, into boro-silicate glass for long term storage. Presently, DWPF is processing only sludge waste and is preparing to process a combination of sludge and precipitate waste. During precipitate operations, canister dose rates are expected to exceed 10 Sv hr -1 (1000 rem hr -1 ). In sludge-only operations, canister contact gamma dose rates are approximately 15 mSv hr -1 (1500 mrem hr -1 ). Transferable contamination levels have been greater than 10 mSv hr -1 (100 cm 2 ) -1 for beta-gamma emitters and into the millions of Bq (100 cm 2 ) -1 for the alpha emitting radionuclides. This paper presents an evaluation of the radiological maintenance areas and their ability to support radiological work

  12. The effect of high non-hydrostatic pressure on III-V semiconductors: zinc blende to wurtzite structural phase transition and multiphase generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizani, P S; Jasinevicius, R G

    2014-01-01

    Raman scattering was employed to study structural phase transitions of InSb, GaSb and GaAs induced by highly non-hydrostatic pressures applied by mechanical impact, in which high compression/decompression rates are imposed to the sample. The results showed that is possible to produce several structural phases localized in different micrometric regions of the same sample: the zinc blende to possibly wurtzite structural phase transition and the generation of a multiphase state.

  13. High level waste facilities - Continuing operation or orderly shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, L.A.

    1998-04-01

    Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed

  14. Preparation of High Density Polyethylene/Waste Polyurethane Blends Compatibilized with Polyethylene-Graft-Maleic Anhydride by Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Seok Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane (PU is a very popular polymer that is used in a variety of applications due to its good mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties. However, PU recycling has received significant attention due to environmental issues. In this study, we developed a recycling method for waste PU that utilizes the radiation grafting technique. Grafting of waste PU was carried out using a radiation technique with polyethylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PE-g-MA. The PE-g-MA-grafted PU/high density polyethylene (HDPE composite was prepared by melt-blending at various concentrations (0–10 phr of PE-g-MA-grafted PU. The composites were characterized using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and their surface morphology and thermal/mechanical properties are reported. For 1 phr PU, the PU could be easily introduced to the HDPE during the melt processing in the blender after the radiation-induced grafting of PU with PE-g-MA. PE-g-MA was easily reacted with PU according to the increasing radiation dose and was located at the interface between the PU and the HDPE during the melt processing in the blender, which improved the interfacial interactions and the mechanical properties of the resultant composites. However, the elongation at break for a PU content >2 phr was drastically decreased.

  15. The influence of n-butanol blending on the ignition delay times of gasoline and its surrogate at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Agbro, Edirin

    2016-09-24

    The influence of blending n-butanol at 20% by volume on the ignition delay times for a reference gasoline was studied in a rapid compression machine (RCM) for stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures at 20 bar and 678-858 K. Delay times for the blend lay between those of stoichiometric gasoline and stoichiometric n-butanol across the temperature range studied. At lower temperatures, delays for the blend were however, much closer to those of n-butanol than gasoline despite n-butanol being only 20% of the mixture. Under these conditions n-butanol acted as an octane enhancer over and above what might be expected from a simple linear blending law. The ability of a gasoline surrogate, based on a toluene reference fuel (TRF), to capture the main trends of the gasoline/n-butanol blending behaviour was also tested within the RCM. The 3-component TRF based on a mixture of toluene, n-heptane and iso-octane was able to capture the trends well across the temperature range studied. Simulations of ignition delay times were also performed using a detailed blended n-butanol/TRF mechanism based on the adiabatic core assumption and volume histories from the experimental data. Overall, the model captured the main features of the blending behaviour, although at the lowest temperatures, predicted ignition delays for stoichiometric n-butanol were longer than those observed. A brute-force local sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the main chemical processes driving the ignition behaviour of the TRF, n-butanol and blended fuels. The reactions of fuel + OH dominated the sensitivities at lower temperatures, with H abstraction from n-butanol from a and 7 sites being key for both the n-butanol and the blend. At higher temperatures the decomposition of H2O2 and reactions of HO2 and that of formaldehyde with OH became critical, in common with the ignition behaviour of other fiiels. Remaining uncertainties in the rates of these key reactions are discussed. Crown Copyright (C) 2016 Published

  16. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment 2015: Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ashley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bland, Arthur S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Gary, Jeff D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Hack, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; McNally, Stephen T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Rogers, James H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Straatsma, T. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Thach, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Tichenor, Suzy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Wells, Jack C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    2016-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to surpass its operational target goals: supporting users; delivering fast, reliable systems; creating innovative solutions for high-performance computing (HPC) needs; and managing risks, safety, and security aspects associated with operating one of the most powerful computers in the world. The results can be seen in the cutting-edge science delivered by users and the praise from the research community. Calendar year (CY) 2015 was filled with outstanding operational results and accomplishments: a very high rating from users on overall satisfaction that ties the highest-ever mark set in CY 2014; the greatest number of core-hours delivered to research projects; the largest percentage of capability usage since the OLCF began tracking the metric in 2009; and success in delivering on the allocation of 60, 30, and 10% of core hours offered for the INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment), ALCC (Advanced Scientific Computing Research Leadership Computing Challenge), and Director’s Discretionary programs, respectively. These accomplishments, coupled with the extremely high utilization rate, represent the fulfillment of the promise of Titan: maximum use by maximum-size simulations. The impact of all of these successes and more is reflected in the accomplishments of OLCF users, with publications this year in notable journals Nature, Nature Materials, Nature Chemistry, Nature Physics, Nature Climate Change, ACS Nano, Journal of the American Chemical Society, and Physical Review Letters, as well as many others. The achievements included in the 2015 OLCF Operational Assessment Report reflect first-ever or largest simulations in their communities; for example Titan enabled engineers in Los Angeles and the surrounding region to design and begin building improved critical infrastructure by enabling the highest-resolution Cybershake map for Southern

  17. Influence of dispersing additives and blend composition on stability of marine high-viscosity fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Н. Митусова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a definition of the stability of marine high-viscosity fuel from the point of view of the colloid-chemical concept of oil dispersed systems. The necessity and importance of the inclusion in the current regulatory requirements of this quality parameter of high-viscosity marine fuel is indicated. The objects of the research are high-viscosity marine fuels, the basic components of which are heavy oil residues: fuel oil that is the atmospheric residue of oil refining and viscosity breaking residue that is the product of light thermal cracking of fuel oil. As a thinning agent or distillate component, a light gas oil was taken from the catalytic cracking unit. The stability of the obtained samples was determined through the xylene equivalent index, which characterizes the stability of marine high-viscosity fuel to lamination during storage, transportation and operation processes. To improve performance, the resulting base compositions of high-viscosity marine fuels were modified by introducing small concentrations (0.05 % by weight of stabilizing additives based on oxyethylated amines of domestic origin and alkyl naphthalenes of foreign origin.

  18. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools

  19. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  20. Techniques to determine ignition, flame stability and burnout of blended coals in p.f. power station boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, S.; Pohl, J.H.; Holcombe, D.; Hart, J.A. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    The blending of coals has become popular to improve the performance of coals, to meet specifications of power plants and to reduce the cost of coals. This article reviews the results and provides new information on ignition, flame stability, and carbon burnout studies of blended coals. The reviewed studies were conducted in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale facilities. The new information was taken in pilot-scale studies. The results generally show that blending a high-volatile coal with a low-volatile coal or anthracite can improve the ignition, flame stability and burnout of the blends. This paper discusses two general methods to predict the performance of blended coals: (1) experiment; and (2) indices. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests, at least, provide a relative ranking of the combustion performance of coal/blends in power station boilers. Several indices, volatile matter content, heating value and a maceral index, can be used to predict the relative ranking of ignitability and flame stability of coals and blends. The maceral index, fuel ratio, and vitrinite reflectance can also be used to predict the absolute carbon burnout of coal and blends within limits. 59 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Development of high integrity, maximum durability concrete structures for LLW disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.P.

    1992-01-01

    A number of disposal facilities for Low-Level Radioactive Wastes have been planned for the Savannah River Site. Design has been completed for disposal vaults for several waste classifications and construction is nearly complete or well underway on some facilities. Specific design criteria varies somewhat for each waste classification. All disposal units have been designed as below-grade concrete vaults, although the majority will be above ground for many years before being encapsulated with earth at final closure. Some classes of vaults have a minimum required service life of 100 years. All vaults utilize a unique blend of cement, blast furnace slag and pozzolan. The design synthesizes the properties of the concrete mix with carefully planned design details and construction methodologies to (1) eliminate uncontrolled cracking; (2) minimize leakage potential; and (3) maximize durability. The first of these vaults will become operational in 1992. 9 refs

  2. High Shear Homogenization of Lignin to Nanolignin and Thermal Stability of Nanolignin-Polyvinyl Alcohol Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep S. Nair; Sudhir Sharma; Yunqiao Pu; Qining Sun; Shaobo Pan; J.Y. Zhu; Yulin Deng; Art J. Ragauskas

    2014-01-01

    A new method to prepare nanolignin using a simple high shear homogenizer is presented. The kraft lignin particles with a broad distribution ranging from large micron- to nano-sized particles were completely homogenized to nanolignin particles with sizes less than 100 nm after 4 h of mechanical shearing. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)...

  3. Blending crystalline/liquid crystalline small molecule semiconductors: A strategy towards high performance organic thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; He, Yaowu; Li, Aiyuan; Zhang, Dongwei; Meng, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Solution processed small molecule polycrystalline thin films often suffer from the problems of inhomogeneity and discontinuity. Here, we describe a strategy to solve these problems through deposition of the active layer from a blended solution of crystalline (2-phenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene, Ph-BTBT) and liquid crystalline (2-(4-dodecylphenyl) [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene, C12-Ph-BTBT) small molecule semiconductors with the hot spin-coating method. Organic thin film transistors with average hole mobility approaching 1 cm2/V s, much higher than that of single component devices, have been demonstrated, mainly due to the improved uniformity, continuity, crystallinity, and stronger intermolecular π-π stacking in blend thin films. Our results indicate that the crystalline/liquid crystalline semiconductor blend method is an effective way to enhance the performance of organic transistors.

  4. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  5. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO 3 , quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite

  6. High-performance porous polylactide stereocomplex crystallite scaffolds prepared by solution blending and salt leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Lan, Xiao-Rong; Bao, Rui-Ying; Lei, Yang; Cao, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Ming-Bo; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yun-Bing

    2018-09-01

    Biodegradable stereocomplex crystallite polylactide (SC-PLA) porous scaffolds with well-defined pore structures, high heat resistance, mechanical strength, and solvent resistance together with good biocompatibility, were obtained through solution casting of mixed poly(l-lactide) and poly(d-lactide) solution and subsequent leaching of sodium chloride particles. The pore structure of the SC-PLA scaffolds can be perfectly maintained after a high-pressure sterilization treatment at 121 °C, owing to the extensive formation of stereocomplex crystallites in the scaffolds. In vivo pilot study demonstrates that the fibroblasts of rats can infiltrate into the SC-PLA scaffolds well through the open pores. Degradation tests in phosphate-buffered saline solution reveal that the structure of SC-PLA scaffolds was quite stable due to the enhanced hydrolysis-resistance and improved mechanical properties of the scaffolds. These results reveal that SC-PLA scaffolds with good biocompatibility are potentially to be used as implanted biomaterials for the regeneration and restoration of tissues or organs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-temperature performance of mortars and concretes based on alkali-activated slag/metakaolin blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the performance of mortars and concretes based on alkali activated granulated blastfurnace slag (GBFS/metakaolin (MK blends when exposed to high temperatures. High stability of mortars with contents of MK up to 60 wt.% when exposed to 600 °C is identified, with residual strengths of 20 MPa following exposure to this temperature. On the other hand, exposure to higher temperatures leads to cracking of the concretes, as a consequence of the high shrinkage of the binder matrix and the restraining effects of the aggregate, especially in those specimens with binders containing high MK content. A significant difference is identified between the water absorption properties of mortars and concretes, and this is able to be correlated with divergences in their performance after exposure to high temperatures. This indicates that the performance at high temperatures of alkali-activated mortars is not completely transferable to concrete, because the systems differ in permeability. The differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between the binder matrix and the coarse aggregates contribute to the macrocracking of the material, and the consequent reduction of mechanical properties.

    Este artículo evalúa el desempeño de morteros y hormigones basados en mezclas de escoria siderúrgica (GBFS/metacaolín (MK, activadas alcalinamente expuestos a temperaturas altas. Se identifica una elevada estabilidad en morteros con contenidos de MK de hasta un 60% cuando se exponen a temperaturas de 600 ºC, con una resistencia residual de 20 MPa posterior a la exposición a esta temperatura. Por otra parte, la exposición a temperaturas más elevadas conduce al agrietamiento de los hormigones como consecuencia de una elevada contracción de la matriz cementante y las restricciones por efecto de los áridos, especialmente en aquellos especímenes con cementantes que contienen altos contenidos de MK. Se identifican diferencias significativas en

  8. Combining thermodynamic modeling and 3D printing of elemental powder blends for high-throughput investigation of high-entropy alloys – Towards rapid alloy screening and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, Christian; Tang, Florian; Wilms, Markus B.; Weisheit, Andreas; Hallstedt, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    High-entropy alloys have gained high interest of both academia and industry in recent years due to their excellent properties and large variety of possible alloy systems. However, so far prediction of phase constitution and stability is based on empirical rules that can only be applied to selected alloy systems. In the current study, we introduce a methodology that enables high-throughput theoretical and experimental alloy screening and design. As a basis for thorough thermodynamic calculations, a new database was compiled for the Co–Cr–Fe–Mn–Ni system and used for Calphad and Scheil simulations. For bulk sample production, laser metal deposition (LMD) of an elemental powder blend was applied to build up the equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi Cantor alloy as a first demonstrator. This production approach allows high flexibility in varying the chemical composition and, thus, renders itself suitable for high-throughput alloy production. The microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the material processed were characterized using optical microscopy, EBSD, EDX, XRD, hardness and compression testing. The LMD-produced alloy revealed full density, strongly reduced segregation compared to conventionally cast material, pronounced texture, and excellent mechanical properties. Phase constitution and elemental distribution were correctly predicted by simulations. The applicability of the introduced methodology to high-entropy alloys and extension to compositionally complex alloys is discussed.

  9. Combining thermodynamic modeling and 3D printing of elemental powder blends for high-throughput investigation of high-entropy alloys – Towards rapid alloy screening and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Christian, E-mail: christian.haase@iehk.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Tang, Florian [Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Wilms, Markus B.; Weisheit, Andreas [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hallstedt, Bengt [Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-03-14

    High-entropy alloys have gained high interest of both academia and industry in recent years due to their excellent properties and large variety of possible alloy systems. However, so far prediction of phase constitution and stability is based on empirical rules that can only be applied to selected alloy systems. In the current study, we introduce a methodology that enables high-throughput theoretical and experimental alloy screening and design. As a basis for thorough thermodynamic calculations, a new database was compiled for the Co–Cr–Fe–Mn–Ni system and used for Calphad and Scheil simulations. For bulk sample production, laser metal deposition (LMD) of an elemental powder blend was applied to build up the equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi Cantor alloy as a first demonstrator. This production approach allows high flexibility in varying the chemical composition and, thus, renders itself suitable for high-throughput alloy production. The microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the material processed were characterized using optical microscopy, EBSD, EDX, XRD, hardness and compression testing. The LMD-produced alloy revealed full density, strongly reduced segregation compared to conventionally cast material, pronounced texture, and excellent mechanical properties. Phase constitution and elemental distribution were correctly predicted by simulations. The applicability of the introduced methodology to high-entropy alloys and extension to compositionally complex alloys is discussed.

  10. Combustion characteristics and retention-emission of selenium during co-firing of torrefied biomass and its blends with high ash coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Habib; Liu, Guijian; Yousaf, Balal; Ali, Muhammad Ubaid; Abbas, Qumber; Zhou, Chuncai

    2017-12-01

    The combustion characteristics, kinetic analysis and selenium retention-emission behavior during co-combustion of high ash coal (HAC) with pine wood (PW) biomass and torrefied pine wood (TPW) were investigated through a combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and laboratory-based circulating fluidized bed combustion experiment. Improved ignition behavior and thermal reactivity of HAC were observed through the addition of a suitable proportion of biomass and torrefied. During combustion of blends, higher values of relative enrichment factors in fly ash revealed the maximum content of condensing volatile selenium on fly ash particles, and depleted level in bottom ash. Selenium emission in blends decreased by the increasing ratio of both PW and TPW. Higher reductions in the total Se volatilization were found for HAC/TPW than individual HAC sample, recommending that TPW have the best potential of selenium retention. The interaction amongst selenium and fly ash particles may cause the retention of selenium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and Properties of High Strength Thin Film Composites of Poly(ethylene Oxide and PEO-PMMA Blend with Cetylpyridinium Chloride Modified Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saleem Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion-conducting thin film composites of polymer electrolytes were prepared by mixing high MW poly(ethylene oxide (PEO, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as a polymer matrix, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC modified MMT as filler, and different content of LiClO4 by using solution cast method. The crystallinity, ionic conductivity (σ, and mechanical properties of the composite electrolytes and blend composites were evaluated by using XRD, AC impedance, and UTM studies, respectively. The modification of clay by CPC showed enhancement in the d-spacing. The loading of clay has effect on crystallinity of PEO systems. Blend composites showed better mechanical properties. Young’s modulus and elongation at break values showed increase with salt and clay incorporation in pure PEO. The optimum composition composite of PEO with 3.5 wt% of salt and 3.3 wt% of CPMMT exhibited better performance.

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and

  13. A blended approach to analyze staple and high-value crops using remote sensing with radiative transfer and crop models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davitt, A. W. D.; Winter, J.; McDonald, K. C.; Escobar, V. M.; Steiner, N.

    2017-12-01

    The monitoring of staple and high-value crops is important for maintaining food security. The recent launch of numerous remote sensing satellites has created the ability to monitor vast amounts of crop lands, continuously and in a timely manner. This monitoring provides users with a wealth of information on various crop types over different regions of the world. However, a challenge still remains on how to best quantify and interpret the crop and surface characteristics that are measured by visible, near-infrared, and active and passive microwave radar. Currently, two NASA funded projects are examining the ability to monitor different types of crops in California with different remote sensing platforms. The goal of both projects is to develop a cost-effective monitoring tool for use by vineyard and crop managers. The first project is designed to examine the capability to monitor vineyard water management and soil moisture in Sonoma County using Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), Sentinel-1A and -2, and Landsat-8. The combined mission products create thorough and robust measurements of surface and vineyard characteristics that can potentially improve the ability to monitor vineyard health. Incorporating the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS), a radiative transfer model, enables us to better understand surface and vineyard features that influence radar measurements from Sentinel-1A. The second project is a blended approach to analyze corn, rice, and wheat growth using Sentinel-1A products with Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) and MIMICS models. This project aims to characterize the crop structures that influence Sentinel-1A radar measurements. Preliminary results have revealed the corn, rice, and wheat structures that influence radar measurements during a growing season. The potential of this monitoring tool can be used for maintaining food security. This includes supporting sustainable irrigation practices, identifying crop

  14. High calcium fly ash geopolymer stabilized lateritic soil and granulated blast furnace slag blends as a pavement base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phummiphan, Itthikorn; Horpibulsuk, Suksun; Rachan, Runglawan; Arulrajah, Arul; Shen, Shui-Long; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2018-01-05

    Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) was used as a replacement material in marginal lateritic soil (LS) while class C Fly Ash (FA) was used as a precursor for the geopolymerization process to develop a low-carbon pavement base material at ambient temperature. Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) tests were performed to investigate the strength development of geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis were undertaken to examine the role of the various influencing factors on UCS development. The influencing factors studied included GBFS content, Na 2 SiO 3 :NaOH ratio (NS:NH) and curing time. The 7-day soaked UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at various NS:NH ratios tested was found to satisfy the specifications of the Thailand national road authorities. The GBFS replacement was found to be insignificant for the improvement of the UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at low NS:NH ratio of 50:50. Microstructural analysis indicated the coexistence of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) and Sodium Alumino Silicate Hydrate products in FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. This research enables GBFS, which is traditionally considered as a waste material, to be used as a replacement and partially reactive material in FA geopolymer pavement applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of wet-dry reversible reverse osmosis membrane with high performance from cellulose acetate and cellulose triactate blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasarhelyi, K.; Ronner, J.A.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-dry reversible membrane were prepared bt a two-step coagulation procedure. A cast film containing a blend of cellulose triacetate as polymers, dioxane and acetone as solvents and maleic acid and methanol as additives was immersed consecutively in two aqueous coagulation baths, the first bath

  16. Being the Bridge: The Lived Experience of Educating with Online Courseware in the High School Blended Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Anna Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the lived experiences of educators who teach in flex model blended learning settings using online, vendor-provided courseware. The tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology grounds this inquiry (Heidegger, 1927/2008). Phenomenological research activities designed by van Manen (1990, 2002) provide the methodological…

  17. The durability of concrete containing a high-level of fly ash or a ternary blend of supplementary cementing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Christine M.

    The research for this study was conducted in two distinct phases as follows: Phase 1: The objective was to determine the effect of fly ash on the carbonation of concrete. The specimens made for this phase of the study were larger in size than those normally used in carbonation studies and were are meant to more accurately reflect real field conditions. The results from early age carbonation testing indicate that the larger size specimens do not have a measured depth of carbonation as great as that of the smaller specimens typically used in carbonation studies at the same age and under the same conditions. Phase 2: The objective was to evaluate the performance of ternary concrete mixes containing a ternary cement blend consisting of Portland cement, slag and Type C fly ash. It was found that concrete mixtures containing the fly ash with the lower calcium (CaO) content (in binary or ternary blends) provided superior durability performance and resistance to ASR compared to that of the fly ash with the higher CaO content. Ternary blends (regardless of the CaO content of the fly ash) provided better overall durability performance than binary blends of cementing materials or the control.

  18. The influence of n-butanol blending on the ignition delay times of gasoline and its surrogate at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Agbro, Edirin; Tomlin, Alison S.; Lawes, Malcolm; Park, Sungwoo; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    between those of stoichiometric gasoline and stoichiometric n-butanol across the temperature range studied. At lower temperatures, delays for the blend were however, much closer to those of n-butanol than gasoline despite n-butanol being only 20

  19. Synthesizing optimal waste blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, V.; Diwekar, W.M.; Hoza, M.

    1996-01-01

    Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. Process and storage economics show that minimizing the total number of glass logs produced is the key to keeping cost as low as possible. The amount of glass produced can be reduced by blending of the wastes. The optimal way to combine the tanks to minimize the vole of glass can be determined from a discrete blend calculation. However, this problem results in a combinatorial explosion as the number of tanks increases. Moreover, the property constraints make this problem highly nonconvex where many algorithms get trapped in local minima. In this paper the authors examine the use of different combinatorial optimization approaches to solve this problem. A two-stage approach using a combination of simulated annealing and nonlinear programming (NLP) is developed. The results of different methods such as the heuristics approach based on human knowledge and judgment, the mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) approach with GAMS, and branch and bound with lower bound derived from the structure of the given blending problem are compared with this coupled simulated annealing and NLP approach

  20. The forced flow high field test facility SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of the 8 Tesla, 1 m bore Test Facility SULTAN - I, a common action of ENEA (I-Frascati), ECN (NL-Petten) and SIN (CH-Villigen), is completed. Results on assembly, cooldown and the first operation of the whole system are presented. The SULTAN facility provides a wide range of capability of parameter variations (field, current, cooling) for the investigation of steady state performance and stability of technical superconductors unders nominal and limiting conditions

  1. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  2. The effect of high curing temperature on the reaction kinetics in MK/lime and MK-blended cement matrices at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Moises Frias; Sanchez de Rojas, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the pozzolanic reaction between metakaolin (MK) and calcium hydroxide produces CSH, C 2 ASH 8 (stratlingite), C 4 AH 13 and C 3 ASH 6 (hydrogarnet). However, the presence or absence of these hydrated phases depends on different parameters, such as curing temperature, matrix used, etc. This paper shows the results of a study in order to know the effect of high curing temperature (60 deg. C) on the kinetics of the pozzolanic reaction in different matrices. MK/lime (calcium hydroxide) and MK-blended cement matrices were studied in samples stored and cured at 60 deg. C and up to 123 days of hydration. The nature, sequence and crystallinity of the hydrated phases were analysed using differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Results showed that the sequence and formation of the hydrated phases was different in both matrices cured at 60 deg. C. In an MK/lime matrix, C 2 ASH 8 , C 4 AH 13 and C 3 ASH 6 were the main hydrated phases; while in an MK-blended cement, stratlingite was the sole hydrated phase issued from pozzolanic reaction. The DTA and XRD data also reveal an important fact: there is no evidence of the presence of hydrogarnet in blended cements

  3. Facilities for High Resolution Imaging of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Lühe, Oskar

    2018-04-01

    The Sun is the only star where physical processes can be observed at their intrinsic spatial scales. Even though the Sun in a mere 150 million km from Earth, it is difficult to resolve fundamental processes in the solar atmosphere, because they occur at scales of the order of the kilometer. They can be observed only with telescopes which have apertures of several meters. The current state-of-the-art are solar telescopes with apertures of 1.5 m which resolve 50 km on the solar surface, soon to be superseded by telescopes with 4 m apertures with 20 km resolution. The US American 4 m DSI Solar Telescope is currently constructed on Maui, Hawaii, and is expected to have first light in 2020. The European solar community collaborates intensively to pursue the 4 m European Solar Telescope with a construction start in the Canaries early in the next decade. Solar telescopes with slightly smaller are also in the planning by the Russian, Indian and Chinese communities. In order to achieve a resolution which approaches the diffraction limit, all modern solar telescopes use adaptive optics which compensates virtually any scene on the solar disk. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics designed to compensate fields of the order on one minute of arc have been demonstrated and will become a facility feature of the new telescopes. The requirements for high precision spectro-polarimetry – about one part in 104 – makes continuous monitoring of (MC)AO performance and post-processing image reconstruction methods a necessity.

  4. The Blend Down Monitoring System Demonstration at the Padijcah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, J.; Close, D.; Johnson, W. Jr.; Kerr, P.; March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Moss, C.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, R.; Wright, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    Agreements between the governments of the US and the Russian Federation for the US purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons calls for the establishment of transparency measures to provide confidence that nuclear nonproliferation goals are being met. To meet these transparency goals, the agreements call for the installation of nonintrusive US instruments to monitor the down blending of HEU to LEU. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor 235 U enrichments and mass flow rates at Russian blending facilities. Prior to its installation in Russian facilities, the BDMS was installed and operated in a UF 6 flow loop in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant simulating flow and enrichment conditions expected in a typical down-blending facility. A Russian delegation to the US witnessed the equipment demonstration in June, 1998. To conduct the demonstration in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the BDMS was required to meet stringent Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing, safety and operational requirements. The Paducah demonstration was an important milestone in achieving the operational certification for the BDMS use in Russian facilities

  5. Combustion and emissions characteristics of high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend in a heavy-duty diesel engine and EGR impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Wu, Zhenkuo; Liu, Jingping; Lee, Chiafon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of EGR on high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend (Bu40) were investigated and compared with neat diesel (Bu00). • Bu40 has higher NOx due to wider combustion high-temperature region. • Bu40 has lower soot due to local lower equivalence ratio distribution. • Bu40 has higher CO due to lower gas temperature in the late expansion process. • For Bu40, EGR reduces NOx emissions dramatically with no obvious influence on soot. - Abstract: In this work, the combustion and emission fundamentals of high n-butanol/diesel ratio blend with 40% butanol (i.e., Bu40) in a heavy-duty diesel engine were investigated by experiment and simulation at constant engine speed of 1400 rpm and an IMEP of 1.0 MPa. Additionally, the impact of EGR was evaluated experimentally and compared with neat diesel fuel (i.e., Bu00). The results show that Bu40 has higher cylinder pressure, longer ignition delay, and faster burning rate than Bu00. Compared with Bu00, moreover, Bu40 has higher NOx due to wider combustion high-temperature region, lower soot due to local lower equivalence ratio distribution, and higher CO due to lower gas temperature in the late expansion process. For Bu40, EGR reduces NOx emissions dramatically with no obvious influence on soot. Meanwhile, there is no significant change in HC and CO emissions and indicated thermal efficiency (ITE) with EGR until EGR threshold is reached. When EGR rate exceeds the threshold level, HC and CO emissions increase dramatically, and ITE decreases markedly. Compared with Bu00, the threshold of Bu40 appears at lower EGR rate. Consequently, combining high butanol/diesel ratio blend with medium EGR has the potential to achieve ultra-low NOx and soot emissions simultaneously while maintaining high thermal efficiency level

  6. Mechanical properties of irradiated rubber-blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, G.M.; Madani, M.

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made on blend ratios of natural rubber (NR) and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) that are loaded with general purpose furnace (GPE) carbon black and irradiated at different gamma radiation doses. It was fount that the mechanical properties of such blend are highly affected by γ- irradiation dose and the composition ratios of its constituents. The elongation at break for blends was found to increase slightly with increasing NBR loafing which is mainly due to the stiffness of blending matrix formation between NR and GPF carbon black particles. The hysteresis loss, extension ratio and shape factor have been calculated for the different un-irradiated and irradiated samples

  7. Preparation and Properties of Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxanes/Polymers Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blanski, Rusty

    2000-01-01

    ... (polycarbonate, SB rubber, etc.) resulting in a clear blend. We also report that aliphatic POSS compounds are also dispersible in high density polyethylene. The synthesis of POSS/polymer blends as well as some physical properties will be discussed.

  8. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Effect of two-stage injection on combustion and emissions under high EGR rate on a diesel engine by fueling blends of diesel/gasoline, diesel/n-butanol, diesel/gasoline/n-butanol and pure diesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Zunqing; Yue, Lang; Liu, Haifeng; Zhu, Yuxuan; Zhong, Xiaofan; Yao, Mingfa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-stage injection using diesel blended fuel at high EGR (46%) was studied. • Blending fuels induce retarded pilot heat release and have less effect on MPRR. • Effects of injection parameters of blended fuels on emissions are similar to diesel. • Different fuels have little influence on post combustion heat release. • Small quantity post injection close to main results in better efficiency and emissions. - Abstract: The effect of two-stage injection on combustion and emission characteristics under high EGR (46%) condition were experimentally investigated. Four different fuels including pure diesel and blended fuels of diesel/gasoline, diesel/n-butanol, diesel/gasoline/n-butanol were tested. Results show that blending gasoline or/and n-butanol in diesel improves smoke emissions while induces increase in maximum pressure rise rate (MPRR). Adopting pilot injection close to main injection can effectively reduce the peak of premixed heat release rate and MPRR. However, for fuels blends with high percentage of low cetane number fuel, the effect of pilot fuel on ignition can be neglected and the improvement of MPRR is not that obvious. Pilot-main interval presents more obvious effect on smoke than pilot injection rate does, and the smoke emissions decrease with increasing pilot-main interval. A longer main-post interval results in a lower post heat release rate and prolonged combustion duration. While post injection rate has little effect on the start of ignition for post injection. The variation in fuel properties caused by blending gasoline or/and n-butanol into diesel does not impose obvious influence on post combustion. The smoke emission increases first and then declines with retard of post injection timing. Compared to diesel, the smoke emissions of blended fuels are more sensitive to the variation of post injection strategy

  10. Certification of U.S. instrumentation in Russian nuclear processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, D.H.; Sumner, J.N.

    2000-01-01

    Agreements between the United States (U.S.) and the Russian Federation (R.F.) require the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian Federation nuclear weapons. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) was jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor the enrichments and flow rates in the HEU blending operations at the R.F. facilities. A significant requirement of the implementation of the BDMS equipment in R.F. facilities concerned the certification of the BDMS equipment for use in a Russian nuclear facility. This paper discusses the certification of the BDMS for installation in R.F. facilities, and summarizes the lessons learned from the process that can be applied to the installation of other U.S. equipment in Russian nuclear facilities

  11. Development and manufacture of a Nb3Sn superconductor for the high-field test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Cornish, D.N.; Spencer, C.R.; Gregory, E.; Adam, E.

    1981-01-01

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) project has two primary goals. The first is to establish manufacturing capability for a Nb 3 Sn conductor suitable for use in a mirror fusion coil. The second is to provide a test facility for evaluating other fusion conductor designs at high fields. This paper describes some of the problems encountered and the solutions devised in working toward the first goal. Construction of the test facility coils will be described in a subsequent paper

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL; Hudson, Douglas L [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation

  13. The SWARF high energy flash X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.F.; Dove, E.W.D.

    1976-06-01

    A description is presented of the SWARF flash radiography facility at AWRE Foulness, which is stated to be the most powerful flash x-ray system available, in the U.K. The machine consists essentially of a Marx generator, a coaxial Blumlein system and an x-ray tube. The voltage output from the Marx generator (about 2.5 MV from an 80 kV input) is applied to a large re-entrant Blumlein pulse-forming line. Near maximum voltage, an adjustable oil switch short-circuits one end of the Blumlein generator and so applies a square voltage pulse of 65 ns duration to the x-ray tube. The x-rays are produced from a tantalum target which forms the anode of a vacuum field emission diode. The facility consists of two field machines positioned so that radiographs can be obtained from different angles. The description is given under the following heads: modus operandi; constructional details; oil installation; electrical details; commissioning, calibration and electrical data; flash radiography in explosives research; operational control of facility, film packs; radiographic results; further developments; overall performance. (U.K.)

  14. THORS: a high-temperature sodium test facility rated at 2.0 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnadt, P.A.; Anderson, A.H.; Clapp, N.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Collins, C.W.; Stulting, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Thermal--Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility at Oak Ridge Naitonal Laboratory (ORNL) is a high-temperature sodium test facility operated for the United States Breeder Reactor Safety Program. The facility is primarily used for testing large simulated Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel subassemblies. The facility has recently been upgraded to provide a 2.0-MW test bundle power input and heat removal capability. A new test section, which will be capable of operating at 980 0 C and which will accommodate a 217-pin bundle, has also been added. A 61-pin bundle is currently under test in the facility. A description of the test facility is presented, along with a brief summary of the 8-year operating history of this safety-related test facility

  15. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-01-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100–300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating–cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase. - Highlights: • Binary blends of HDPE/NBR have been irradiated with 5 MeV accelerated electrons. • Increase of NBR content and irradiation dose improves cross-linking efficiency. • Thermo-shrinkage and residual stresses are investigated for oriented specimens. • Cross-linked HDPE/NBR composites can be successfully used as thermos-shrinkable materials.

  16. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  17. The CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility: applications and latest developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silari, Marco; Pozzi, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The CERF facility at CERN provides an almost unique high-energy workplace reference radiation field for the calibration and test of radiation protection instrumentation employed at high-energy accelerator facilities and for aircraft and space dosimetry. This paper describes the main features of the facility and supplies a non-exhaustive list of recent (as of 2005) applications for which CERF is used. Upgrade work started in 2015 to provide the scientific and industrial communities with a state-of-the-art reference facility is also discussed.

  18. Association Between Treatment at High-Volume Facilities and Improved Overall Survival in Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venigalla, Sriram; Nead, Kevin T; Sebro, Ronnie; Guttmann, David M; Sharma, Sonam; Simone, Charles B; Levin, William P; Wilson, Robert J; Weber, Kristy L; Shabason, Jacob E

    2018-03-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignancies that require complex multidisciplinary management. Therefore, facilities with high sarcoma case volume may demonstrate superior outcomes. We hypothesized that STS treatment at high-volume (HV) facilities would be associated with improved overall survival (OS). Patients aged ≥18 years with nonmetastatic STS treated with surgery and radiation therapy at a single facility from 2004 through 2013 were identified from the National Cancer Database. Facilities were dichotomized into HV and low-volume (LV) cohorts based on total case volume over the study period. OS was assessed using multivariable Cox regression with propensity score-matching. Patterns of care were assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 9025 total patients, 1578 (17%) and 7447 (83%) were treated at HV and LV facilities, respectively. On multivariable analysis, high educational attainment, larger tumor size, higher grade, and negative surgical margins were statistically significantly associated with treatment at HV facilities; conversely, black race and non-metropolitan residence were negative predictors of treatment at HV facilities. On propensity score-matched multivariable analysis, treatment at HV facilities versus LV facilities was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.95; P = .001). Older age, lack of insurance, greater comorbidity, larger tumor size, higher tumor grade, and positive surgical margins were associated with statistically significantly worse OS. In this observational cohort study using the National Cancer Database, receipt of surgery and radiation therapy at HV facilities was associated with improved OS in patients with STS. Potential sociodemographic disparities limit access to care at HV facilities for certain populations. Our findings highlight the importance of receipt of care at HV facilities for patients with STS and warrant further study into improving access to

  19. Effects of blend ratio between high density polyethylene and biomass on co-gasification behavior in a two-stage gasification system

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Jae Hyun

    2016-08-12

    The co-gasification of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with a biomass has been carried out in a two-stage gasification system which comprises an oxidative pyrolysis reactor and a thermal plasma reactor. The equivalence ratio was changed from 0.38 to 0.85 according to the variation of blend ratio between HDPE and biomass. The highest production yield was achieved to be 71.4 mol/h, when the equivalence ratio was 0.47. A large amount of hydrocarbons was produced from the oxidative pyrolysis reactor as decreasing equivalence ratio below 0.41, while the CO2 concentration significantly increased with a high equivalence ratio over 0.65. The production yield was improved by the thermal plasma reactor due to the conversion of hydrocarbons into syngas in a high temperature region of thermal plasma. At the equivalence ratio of 0.47, conversion selectivities of CO and H2 from hydrocarbons were calculated to be 74% and 44%, respectively. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC.

  20. Mixing of low-dose cohesive drug and overcoming of pre-blending step using a new gentle-wing high-shear mixer granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulays, Bader B; Fayed, Mohamed H; Alalaiwe, Ahmed; Alshahrani, Saad M; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Alshehri, Sultan M; Alanazi, Fars K

    2018-05-16

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of drug amount and mixing time on the homogeneity and content uniformity of a low-dose drug formulation during the dry mixing step using a new gentle-wing high-shear mixer. Moreover, the study investigated the influence of drug incorporation mode on the content uniformity of tablets manufactured by different methods. Albuterol sulfate was selected as a model drug and was blended with the other excipients at two different levels, 1% w/w and 5% w/w at impeller speed of 300 rpm and chopper speed of 3000 rpm for 30 min. Utilizing a 1 ml unit side-sampling thief probe, triplicate samples were taken from nine different positions in the mixer bowl at selected time points. Two methods were used for manufacturing of tablets, direct compression and wet granulation. The produced tablets were sampled at the beginning, middle, and end of the compression cycle. An analysis of variance analysis indicated the significant effect (p drug amount on the content uniformity of the powder blend and the corresponding tablets. For 1% w/w and 5% w/w formulations, incorporation of the drug in the granulating fluid provided tablets with excellent content uniformity and very low relative standard deviation (∼0.61%) during the whole tableting cycle compared to direct compression and granulation method with dry incorporation mode of the drug. Overall, gentle-wing mixer is a good candidate for mixing of low-dose cohesive drug and provides tablets with acceptable content uniformity with no need for pre-blending step.

  1. "Comfort" as a Critical Success Factor in Blended Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Linda S.; deNoyelles, Aimee; Thompson, Kelvin; Howard, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial quantitative research and anecdotal reports on blended learning and blended learning courses. However, few research studies focus on what happens at the classroom level. This research study aims to consider the highly contextual environment of effective blended learning courses by identifying the strategies instructors use to…

  2. High-throughput preparation of complex multi-scale patterns from block copolymer/homopolymer blend films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungmin; Kim, Jae-Up; Park, Soojin

    2012-02-01

    A simple, straightforward process for fabricating multi-scale micro- and nanostructured patterns from polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) homopolymer in a preferential solvent for PS and PMMA is demonstrated. When the PS-b-P2VP/PMMA blend films were spin-coated onto a silicon wafer, PS-b-P2VP micellar arrays consisting of a PS corona and a P2VP core were formed, while the PMMA macrodomains were isolated, due to the macrophase separation caused by the incompatibility between block copolymer micelles and PMMA homopolymer during the spin-coating process. With an increase of PMMA composition, the size of PMMA macrodomains increased. Moreover, the P2VP blocks have a strong interaction with a native oxide of the surface of the silicon wafer, so that the P2VP wetting layer was first formed during spin-coating, and PS nanoclusters were observed on the PMMA macrodomains beneath. Whereas when a silicon surface was modified with a PS brush layer, the PS nanoclusters underlying PMMA domains were not formed. The multi-scale patterns prepared from copolymer micelle/homopolymer blend films are used as templates for the fabrication of gold nanoparticle arrays by incorporating the gold precursor into the P2VP chains. The combination of nanostructures prepared from block copolymer micellar arrays and macrostructures induced by incompatibility between the copolymer and the homopolymer leads to the formation of complex, multi-scale surface patterns by a simple casting process.A simple, straightforward process for fabricating multi-scale micro- and nanostructured patterns from polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) homopolymer in a preferential solvent for PS and PMMA is demonstrated. When the PS-b-P2VP/PMMA blend films were spin-coated onto a silicon wafer, PS-b-P2VP micellar arrays consisting of a PS corona and a P2VP core were formed, while the PMMA macrodomains were isolated, due to the

  3. Heat shrinkable behavior, physico-mechanical and structure properties of electron beam cross-linked blends of high-density polyethylene with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholds, Ingars; Kalkis, Valdis; Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Grigalovica, Agnese

    2016-03-01

    In this study, heat-shrinkable composites of electron beam irradiated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) were investigated. HDPE/NBR blends at a ratio of components 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50 and 20/80 wt% were prepared using a two-roll mill. The compression molded films were irradiated high-energy (5 MeV) accelerated electrons up to irradiation absorbed doses of 100-300 kGy. The effect of electron beam induced cross-linking was evaluated by the changes of mechanical properties, gel content and by the differences of thermal properties, detected by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermo-shrinkage forces were determined as the kinetics of thermorelaxation and the residual shrinkage stresses of previously oriented (stretched up to 100% at above melting temperature of HDPE and followed by cooling to room temperature) specimens of irradiated HDPE/NBR blends under isometric heating-cooling mode. The compatibility between the both components was enhanced due to the formation of cross-linked sites at amorphous interphase. The results showed increase of mechanical stiffness of composites with increase of irradiation dose. The values of gel fraction compared to thermorelaxation stresses increased with the growth of irradiation dose level, as a result of formation cross-linked sites in amorphous PP/NBR interphase.

  4. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  5. Sodium and cover gas chemistry in the high temperature sodium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Duncan, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The equipment and procedures used in following sodium and cover gas chemistry changes in the High Temperature Sodium Facility are presented. The methods of analysis and results obtained are given. Impurity trends which have been measured during the facility operations are discussed

  6. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  7. High efficiency combined heat and power facilities - benefits and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are important linkages between the economy, energy production, the environment and our health. Where thermal energy is needed, distributed Combined Heat and Power facilities, using gas turbines, reciprocating engines and future fuel cells can provide significant improvements to our long term mix of energy production. Local generation can also have benefits in security of energy supply and economic savings. This paper is intended to discuss the relevant air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from modem CHP plants, the emission prevention and reduction methods available, and their operating experience and cost-effectiveness. Mention is made of recently constructed industrial and commercial plants, and institutional barriers to further development. Solutions described for these barriers include the need for more awareness of opportunities, improved access to the electricity grid, the proper design balance between thermal and electric for CHP systems rather than large combined cycles, improved corporate taxation incentives, and the assessment of all environmental and economic benefits when considering such cleaner sources in a restructured energy market. (author)

  8. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 10 17 to 10 18 cm -3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO 2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  9. Recovery of spent high intensity neutron sources in Atalante Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, P.; Boyer Deslys, V.; Millet, A.; Solinhac, I.; Donnet, L.; Maillard, C.; Paillard, S.; Ranchoux, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Atalante facility is required by law to recover both neutron and gamma sources with activity levels exceeding 300 mCi. Most of the neutron sources consist of mixtures of alpha-emitters (238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am or 244Cm) and beryllium. Several processes now under consideration are based on routine chemical separation techniques (selective precipitation, extraction chromatography, ion exchange). The treatment produces an actinide oxide (which is used later for R and D studies) and solid beryllium nitrate, which is considered as a waste and transferred to a surface interim storage site if the overall activity of the package after 300 years is less than 50 MBq (ANDRA specifications). The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory of Atalante validate the residual alpha activity in the waste. The techniques used include alpha spectrometry and L-line X-ray fluorescence for alpha emitters, and plasma torch measurements (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) for beryllium analysis. Specific equipment for transport (B type cask), storage and treatment (hot shielded cells) are used for this activity. (Author)

  10. Development of High-Level Safety Requirements for a Pyroprocessing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Jun; Jo, Woo Jin; You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Ho Hee; Kim, Hyun Min; Jeon, Hong Rae; Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Hyo Jik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a pyroproceesing technology to reduce the waste volume and recycle some elements. The pyroprocessing includes several treatment processes which are related with not only radiological and physical but also chemical and electrochemical properties. Thus, it is of importance to establish safety design requirements considering all the aspects of those properties for a reliable pyroprocessing facility. In this study, high-level requirements are presented in terms of not only radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, and seismic safety but also confinement and chemical safety for the unique characteristics of a pyroprocessing facility. Several high-level safety design requirements such as radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, seismic, confinement, and chemical processing were presented for a pyroprocessing facility. The requirements must fulfill domestic and international safety technology standards for a nuclear facility. Furthermore, additional requirements should be considered for the unique electrochemical treatments in a pyroprocessing facility.

  11. High-adiabat high-foot inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-07

    This Letter reports on a series of high-adiabat implosions of cryogenic layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser drive pulse at the National Ignition Facility. High-foot implosions have high ablation velocities and large density gradient scale lengths and are more resistant to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot. Indeed, the observed hot spot mix in these implosions was low and the measured neutron yields were typically 50% (or higher) of the yields predicted by simulation. On one high performing shot (N130812), 1.7 MJ of laser energy at a peak power of 350 TW was used to obtain a peak hohlraum radiation temperature of ∼300  eV. The resulting experimental neutron yield was (2.4±0.05)×10(15) DT, the fuel ρR was (0.86±0.063)  g/cm2, and the measured Tion was (4.2±0.16)  keV, corresponding to 8 kJ of fusion yield, with ∼1/3 of the yield caused by self-heating of the fuel by α particles emitted in the initial reactions. The generalized Lawson criteria, an ignition metric, was 0.43 and the neutron yield was ∼70% of the value predicted by simulations that include α-particle self-heating.

  12. Material-related issues at high-power and high-energy ion beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    When solids are exposed to energetic ions (MeV-GeV), their physical and chemical structure can be severely modified. The change is governed by ultrafast dynamical processes starting from the deposition of large energy densities, electronic excitation and ionization processes, and finally damage creation in the atomic lattice system. In many materials, each projectile creates a cylindrical track with a few nanometers in diameter and up to many μm in length. To study and monitor the creation of damage, the GSI irradiation facility dedicated to materials science provides different in-situ and on-line techniques such as high resolution microscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, thermal imaging and residual gas analysis. The irradiation experiments can be performed under various gas atmospheres and under cryogenic or elevated temperature.

  13. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10 7 photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 (micro)m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials

  14. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL Presentation to: IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science...Conference C. J. Keane Director, NIF User Office June 21, 2013 1491978-1-4673-5168-3/13/$31.00 ©2013 IEEE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. Thermocouple calibration facility for 2900 deg C high temperature and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1991-01-01

    The construction and the performance characteristic of a 2900 deg C high temperature thermocouple calibration facility are described. The calibration error analysis is made. The test results of the calibration characteristics of high temperature thermocouples Mo/Nb, W-3Re/W-25Re, and W-1Mo/W-25Mo are given. The test result of temperature dependent resistivity of BeO made by this facility is given

  16. The high pressure gas Cerenkov counter at the Omega Facility.

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The high-pressure gas Cerenkov was used to measure reactions as pion (or kaon)- hydrogen --> forward proton - X. It was built by the Ecole Polytechnique (Palaiseu). Here Peter Sonderegger and Patrick Fleury,

  17. Sludge Stabilization Campaign blend plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    This sludge stabilization blend plan documents the material to be processed and the order of processing for the FY95 Sludge Stabilization Campaign. The primary mission of this process is to reduce the inventory of unstable plutonium bearing sludge. The source of the sludge is residual and glovebox floor sweepings from the production of material at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The reactive sludge is currently being stored in various gloveboxes at PFP. There are two types of the plutonium bearing material that will be thermally stabilized in the muffle furnace: Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) sludge and Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line material

  18. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  19. High-current Rhodotron for X-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezu, Toru; Tsujiura, Yuichiro; Bol, Jean Louis

    2009-01-01

    The Rhodotron is a widely employed high-power industrial accelerator developed and exclusively distributed by IBA. Most early examples of the accelerator were optimized to operate at 10 MeV. A new Rhodotron configuration recently advanced produces a lower-energy higher-current beam dedicated with x-ray to sterilize and enhancement materials. Core elements of this system's evolution include a higher performance RF electron gun (operating range, response control, and cathode lifetime). This operational machine is now producing 100 mA at 7 MeV (700 kW of beam) and treat medical devices, thick cable and pipes with a high efficiency. (author)

  20. A New High-intensity Proton Irradiation Facility at the CERN PS East Area

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, B; Lima, P; Matli, E; Moll, M; Ravotti, F

    2014-01-01

    and IRRAD2), were heavily and successfully used for irradiation of particle detectors, electronic components and materials since 1992. These facilities operated with particle bursts - protons with momentum of 24GeV/c - delivered from the PS accelerator in “spills” of about 400ms (slow extraction). With the increasing demand of irradiation experiments, these facilities suffered from a number of restrictions such as the space availability, the maximum achievable particle flux and several access constraints. In the framework of the AIDA project, an upgrade of these facilities has been realized during the CERN long shutdown (LS1). While the new proton facility (IRRAD) will continue to be mainly devoted to the radiation hardness studies for the High Energy Physics (HEP) experimental community, the new mixed-field facility (CHARM) will mainly host irradiation experiments for the validation of electronic systems used in a...

  1. Facile fabrication of highly flexible graphene paper for photocatalytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    potential as a carbon-based catalyst in high-performance flexible catalytic ... resultant GOs/PAA/Au composite paper was applied as a catalytic material ... Graphene, as closely packed into two-dimensional (2D) ... only display the properties of metal nanoparticles and ... the morphology and the size of AuNPs, respectively.

  2. High-intensity, subkilovolt x-ray calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckuck, R.W.; Gaines, J.L.; Ernst, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    A high-intensity subkilovolt x-ray calibration source utilizing proton-induced inner-shell atomic fluorescence of low-Z elements is described. The high photon yields and low bremsstrahlung background associated with this phenomenon are ideally suited to provide intense, nearly monoenergetic x-ray beams. The proton accelerator is a 3 mA, 300 kV Cockroft-Walton using a conventional rf hydrogen ion source. Seven remotely-selectable targets capable of heat dissipation of 5 kW/cm 2 are used to provide characteristic x-rays with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. Source strengths are of the order of 10 13 to 10 14 photons/sec. Methods of reducing spectral contamination due to hydrocarbon build-up on the target are discussed. Typical x-ray spectra (Cu-L, C-K and B-K) are shown

  3. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  4. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  5. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval from Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Lee Orville; Mohr, Charles Milton; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak concentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  6. High power generation and COD removal in a microbial fuel cell operated by a novel sulfonated PES/PES blend proton exchange membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinadini, S.; Zinatizadeh, A.A.; Rahimi, M.; Vatanpour, V.; Rahimi, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, firstly sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) was synthesized from polyethersulfone (PES) with sulfonation by chlorosulfonic acid as a sulfonating agent dissolved in concentrated sulfuric acid. PES/SPES blend proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared at four different compositions with the non-solvent induced phase separation technique as alternative materials to Nafion membrane for application in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The prepared PEMs were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, AFM, SEM, contact angle, water uptake and oxygen permeability. Performances of the fabricated PEMs and commercial Nafion 117 were evaluated in a dual chamber MFC for treating of wastewater and electricity generation. Maximum generated power and current of the fabricated membranes were 58.726 mWm −2  at current density of 317.111 mAm −2 , while it was 45.512 mWm −2  at 228.673 mAm −2 for Nafion 117 at the similar experimental condition. The observed properties of low biofouling, low oxygen permeability, high power generation, high COD removal and coulombic efficiency (CE) indicated that the SPES membrane has potential to improve significantly the productivity of MFCs. - Highlights: • Sulfonated PES (SPES) was synthesized by chlorosulfonic acid in concentrated H 2 SO 4 . • PES/SPES blend proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared for use in MFC. • Performance of PEMs and commercial Nafion 117 were tested to treat of wastewater. • Maximum generated power and current of SPES membrane was higher than Nafion 117.

  7. The pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 at high pressure: a mechanism for the zinc blende to cinnabar reconstructive phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlenko, D P; Ehm, L; Hull, S; Savenko, B N; Shchennikov, V V; Voronin, V I

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the pseudo-binary mercury chalcogenide alloy HgSe sub 0 sub . sub 7 S sub 0 sub . sub 3 has been studied by x-ray and neutron powder diffraction at pressures up to 8.5 GPa. A phase transition from the cubic zinc blende structure to the hexagonal cinnabar structure was observed at P approx 1 GPa. A phenomenological model of this reconstructive phase transition based on a displacement mechanism is proposed. Analysis of the geometrical relationship between the zinc blende and the cinnabar phases has shown that the possible order parameter for the zinc blende-cinnabar structural transformation is the spontaneous strain e sub 4. This assignment agrees with the previously observed high pressure behaviour of the elastic constants of some mercury chalcogenides.

  8. Present status of high quality beam facility at Waseda University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, M.; Kawai, H.; Hama, Y.; Kudo, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Kuribayasi, T.; Kawaguchi, M.; Kuroda, R.; Maeda, K.; Nagasawa, F.; Ueyama, D.; Hizume, K.; Wang, X.J.; Hayano, H.; Urakawa, J.; Kashiwagi, S.

    2004-01-01

    A research project named High-Tech Research Center Project has been conducted at Waseda University. In this project, an RF gun system has been used for production of low emittance and short bunched electron beam. The experiments for the electron beam quality measurement have been carried out by slit scan techniques, etc. Short pulsed x-ray with the energy range of so-called water window has been generation by the inverse compton scattering. Further, the pulse radiolysis system has been constructed, and the stroboscopic pulse radiolysis has been applied for the detection of hydrated electron in picosecond time region. (author)

  9. High-Gain Shock Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K.; Bailey, D.; Lambert, M.; MacKinnon, A.; Blackfield, D.; Comley, A.; Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P.; Anderson, K.; Theobald, W.; Schmitt, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility for a near-term test of high-gain ICF on the NIF at less than 1MJ drive energy and with day-1 laser hardware. We will summarize the status of target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the R&D program to be performed in order to test the potential of a shock-ignited target on NIF. In shock ignition, compressed fuel is separately ignited by a late-time laser-driven shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, simulations indicate that fusion energy gains of 60 may be achievable at laser energies around 0.5MJ. Like fast ignition, shock ignition offers high gain but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and focusing requirements. Conventional symmetry and stability constraints apply, thus a key immediate step towards attempting shock ignition on NIF is to demonstrate adequacy of low-mode uniformity and shock symmetry under polar drive

  10. Investigation on the effects of pilot injection on low temperature combustion in high-speed diesel engine fueled with n-butanol–diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haozhong; Liu, Qingsheng; Yang, Ruzhi; Zhu, Tianru; Zhao, Ruiqing; Wang, Yaodong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of pre-injected timing and pre-injected mass were studied in CI engine. • The addition of n-butanol consumed OH free radicals, which delayed the ignition time. • With the increase of n-butanol, the BSFC and MPRR increased, NO_x and soot decreased. • With the advance of pilot injection timing, the BSFC increased, NO_x and soot decreased. • With the increase of pilot injection mass, NO_x increased, soot decreased then increased. - Abstract: The effect of pilot injection timing and pilot injection mass on combustion and emission characteristics under medium exhaust gas recirculation (EGR (25%)) condition were experimentally investigated in high-speed diesel engine. Diesel fuel (B0), two blends of butanol and diesel fuel denoted as B20 (20% butanol and 80% diesel in volume), and B30 (30% butanol and 70% diesel in volume) were tested. The results show that, for all fuels, when advancing the pilot injection timing, the peak value of heat release rate decreases for pre-injection fuel, but increases slightly for the main-injection fuel. Moreover, the in-cylinder pressure peak value reduces with the rise of maximum pressure rise rate (MPRR), while NO_x and soot emissions reduce. Increasing the pilot injection fuel mass, the peak value of heat release rate for pre-injected fuel increases, but for the main-injection, the peak descends, and the in-cylinder pressure peak value and NO_x emissions increase, while soot emission decreases at first and then increases. Blending n-butanol in diesel improves soot emissions. When pilot injection is adopted, the increase of n-butanol ratio causes the MPRR increasing and the crank angle location for 50% cumulative heat release (CA50) advancing, as well as NO_x and soot emissions decreasing. The simulation of the combustion of n-butanol–diesel fuel blends, which was based on the n-heptane–n-butanol–PAH–toluene mixing mechanism, demonstrated that the addition of n-butanol consumed OH free radicals

  11. Conceptual design of a 6-10 MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion would require low yield (≅200-500 MJ), high gain (≥80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development off such targets would reqiure a 5-10 year research program utilizing one or more dedicated nuclear facilities with drivers capable of delivering on-target pulses of 6-10 MJ at the rate of several shots per day. The ''Target Development Facility'' (TDF) is the light ion driven version of such a facility. A TDF driver concept based upon reasonable extrapolation from present-day technology is described in this paper

  12. Conceptual design of a 10-MJ driver for a high gain target development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial application of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) will require inexpensive, high gain (>80) fusion targets. It is thought that the development of such targets will require a 5 to 10 year search effort utilizing a dedicated nuclear research facility with a driver capable of providing a 10 MJ, 300 to 1000 TW pulse of on-target energy. The Terget Development Facility (TDF) is a light ion driven concept for such a facility. A TDF driver based upon extrapolations from present-day pulsed power technology is described in the present paper

  13. Field test of radioactive high efficiency filter and filter exchange techniques of fuel cycle examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Chun, Young Bum; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Chu, Yong Sun; Kim, Eun Ka.

    1997-12-01

    The development of high efficiency filter was started to protect human beings from the contamination of radioactive particles, toxic gases and bacillus, and its gradual performance increment led to the fabrication of Ultra Low Penetration Air Filter (ULPA) today. The application field of ULPA has been spread not only to the air conditioning of nuclear power facilities, semiconductor industries, life science, optics, medical care and general facilities but also to the core of ultra-precision facilities. Periodic performance test on the filters is essential to extend its life-time through effective maintenance. Especially, the bank test on HEPA filter of nuclear facilities handling radioactive materials is required for environmental safety. Nowadays, the bank test technology has been reached to the utilization of a minimized portable detecting instruments and the evaluation techniques can provide high confidence in the area of particle distribution and leakage test efficiency. (author). 16 refs., 13 tabs., 14 figs

  14. Dairy fat blends high in α-linolenic acid are superior to n-3 fatty-acid-enriched palm oil blends for increasing DHA levels in the brains of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qin; Martin, Jean-Charles; Agnani, Genevieve; Pages, Nicole; Leruyet, Pascale; Carayon, Pierre; Delplanque, Bernadette

    2012-12-01

    Achieving an appropriate docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status in the neonatal brain is an important goal of neonatal nutrition. We evaluated how different dietary fat matrices improved DHA content in the brains of both male and female rats. Forty rats of each gender were born from dams fed over gestation and lactation with a low α-linolenic acid (ALA) diet (0.4% of fatty acids) and subjected for 6 weeks after weaning to a palm oil blend-based diet (10% by weight) that provided either 1.5% ALA or 1.5% ALA and 0.12% DHA with 0.4% arachidonic acid or to an anhydrous dairy fat blend that provided 1.5% or 2.3% ALA. Fatty acids in the plasma, red blood cells (RBCs) and whole brain were determined by gas chromatography. The 1.5% ALA dairy fat was superior to both the 1.5% ALA palm oil blends for increasing brain DHA (14.4% increase, PDHA due to a gender-to-diet interaction, with dairy fats attenuating the gender effect. Brain DHA was predicted with a better accuracy by some plasma and RBC fatty acids when used in combination (R(2) of 0.6) than when used individually (R(2)=0.47 for RBC n-3 docosapentaenoic acid at best). In conclusion, dairy fat blends enriched with ALA appear to be an interesting strategy for achieving optimal DHA levels in the brain of postweaning rats. Human applications are worth considering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Decentralized Blended Acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of blending and deblending is reviewed, making use of traditional and dispersed source arrays. The network concept of distributed blended acquisition is introduced. A million-trace robot system is proposed, illustrating that decentralization may bring about a revolution in the way we

  16. Investigation of diesel-ethanol blended fuel properties with palm methyl ester as co-solvent and blends enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Taib Norhidayah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine is known as the most efficient engine with high efficiency and power but always reported as high fuel emission. Malaysia National Automotive Policy (NAP was targeting to improve competitive regional focusing on green technology development in reducing the emission of the engine. Therefore, ethanol was introduced to reduce the emission of the engine and while increasing its performance, Palm methyl ester was introduced as blend enhancer to improve engine performance and improve diesel-ethanol blends stability. This paper aimed to study the characteristics of the blends and to prove the ability of palm-methyl-ester as co-solvent in ethanol-diesel blends. Stability and thermophysical test were carried out for different fuel compositions. The stability of diesel-ethanol blended was proved to be improved with the addition of PME at the longer period and the stability of the blends changed depending on temperature and ethanol content. Density and viscosity of diesel-ethanol-PME blends also give higher result than diesel-ethanol blends and it's proved that PME is able to increase density and viscosity of blends. Besides, heating value of the blends also increases with the increasing PME in diesel-ethanol blends.

  17. High temperature engineering research facilities and experiments in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuanhui; Liu, Meisheng; Yao, Huizhong; Ju, Huaiming

    1998-01-01

    June 14, 1995, the construction of a pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) started in China. It is a test reactor with 10 MW thermal power output (termed HTR- 10). The test reactor is located on the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in the northwest suburb of Beijing, about 40 km away from the city. Design of the HTR-10 test reactor represents the features of HTR-Modular design: 'side-by-side' arrangement, spherical fuel elements with 'multi-pass' loading scheme, completely passive decay heat removal, reactor shutdown systems in the side reflector, etc. However, in the HTR-10 design some modifications from the HTR-Module were made to satisfy Chinese conditions. For example, the steam generator is composed of a number of modular helical tubes with small diameter, pulse pneumatic discharging apparatus are used in the fuel handling system and step motor driving control rods are designed. These modifications would cause some uncertainty in our design. It is necessary to do engineering experiments to prove these new or modified ideas. Therefore, a program of engineering experiments for HTR-10 key technologies is being conducted at INET. The main aims of these engineering experiments are to verify the designed characteristics and performance of the components and systems, to feedback on design and to obtain operational experiences. Those engineering experiments are depressurization test of the hot gas duct at room temperature and operating pressure, performance test of the hot gas duct at operating helium temperature and pressure, performance test of the pulse pneumatic fuel handling system, test of the control rods driving apparatus, two phase flow stability test for the once through steam generator and cross mixture test at the bottom of the reactor core

  18. Efficient handling of high-level radioactive cell waste in a vitrification facility analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.W.; Collins, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina, is the world''s largest and the United State''s first high level waste vitrification facility. For the past 1.5 years, DWPF has been vitrifying high level radioactive liquid waste left over from the Cold War. The vitrification process involves the stabilization of high level radioactive liquid waste into borosilicate glass. The glass is contained in stainless steel canisters. DWPF has filled more than 200 canisters 3.05 meters (10 feet) long and 0.61 meters (2 foot) diameter. Since operations began at DWPF in March of 1996, high level radioactive solid waste continues to be generated due to operating the facility''s analytical laboratory. The waste is referred to as cell waste and is routinely removed from the analytical laboratories. Through facility design, engineering controls, and administrative controls, DWPF has established efficient methods of handling the high level waste generated in its laboratory facility. These methods have resulted in the prevention of undue radiation exposure, wasted man-hours, expenses due to waste disposal, and the spread of contamination. This level of efficiency was not reached overnight, but it involved the collaboration of Radiological Control Operations and Laboratory personnel working together to devise methods that best benefited the facility. This paper discusses the methods that have been incorporated at DWPF for the handling of cell waste. The objective of this paper is to provide insight to good radiological and safety practices that were incorporated to handle high level radioactive waste in a laboratory setting

  19. Ignition characteristics of coal blends in an entrained flow furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Faundez; B. Arias; F. Rubiera; A. Arenillas; X. Garcia; A.L. Gordon; J.J. Pis [Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile)

    2007-09-15

    Ignition tests were carried out on blends of three coals of different rank - subbituminous, high volatile and low volatile bituminous - in two entrained flow reactors. The ignition temperatures were determined from the gas evolution profiles (CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 2}), while the mechanism of ignition was elucidated from these profiles and corroborated by high-speed video recording. Under the experimental conditions of high carbon loading, clear interactive effects were observed for all the blends. Ignition of the lower rank coals (subbituminous, high volatile bituminous) enhanced the ignition of the higher rank coal (low volatile bituminous) in the blends. The ignition temperatures of the blends of the low rank coals (subbituminous-high volatile bituminous) were additive. However, for the rest of the blends the ignition temperatures were always closer to the lower rank coal in the blend. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Features of the design for highly hazardous facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telichenko Valeriy Ivanovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the part 1 of the article 48.1 of the town planning code of the Russian Federation we can find a list of objects that are especially dangerous. Article 2 paragraph 59 of the contract system establishes the responsibility of the customer to conduct electronic auction, provided that the purchase of goods, works, services is included in the list established by the Government of the Russian Federation, or in an additional list approved by the highest body of the Executive power of the subject of the Russian Federation. By order of the Government of the Russian Federation dated 31.10.2013 no. 2019-r there was approved a list of goods and services, in case of procurement of which the customer is obligated to conduct an auction in electronic form. The list included "Building works", related to the code 45 (excluding code 45.12 according to the all-Russian classifier of products by economic activity (OKPD OK 034-2007. The exception is the construction, reconstruction, overhaul of high-risk, technically complex objects of capital construction, provided that the cost of the purchase contract for the State needs is more than 150 million rubles; to provide municipal - 50 million rubles. Thus, the customer is obliged to conduct electronic auction in the case of procurement of construction works (code 45 OKPD OK 034-20071, besides the works relating to the code of 45.12 (drilling, if the initial (maximal cost of purchase for State needs does not exeed 150 million rubles, for municipal needs - 50 million rubles. Here is an example. In St. Petersburg, three competitions were announced by the customer on the site for the construction of four underground stations with total value of 940 million rubles. How to place an order-public audition with limited participation? The results of the audit conducted by the OFAS around St. Petersburg, led to the cancellation of the tender. In particular, due to an incorrect choice of customer ways to purchase. According to

  1. High contrast high intensity petawatt J-KAREN-P laser facility at QST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Sakaki, Hironao; Dover, Nicholas P.; Kondo, Kotaro; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Sagisaka, Akito; Fukuda, Yuji; Nishitani, Keita; Miyahara, Takumi; Ogura, Koichi; Alkhimova, Mariya A.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Faenov, Anatoly Y.; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Koga, James; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori

    2017-05-01

    We report on the J-KAREN-P laser facility at QST, which can provide PW peak power at 0.1 Hz on target. The system can deliver short pulses with an energy of 30 J and pulse duration of 30 fs after compression with a contrast level of better than 1012. Such performance in high field science will give rise to the birth of new applications and breakthroughs, which include relativistic particle acceleration, bright x-ray source generation, and nuclear activation. The current achieved laser intensity on target is up to > 9x1021 Wcm-2 with an energy of 9 J on target. The interaction with a 3 to 5- μm stainless steel tape target provides us electrons with a typical temperature of more than 10 MeV and energetic proton beams with typical maximum energies of > 40 MeV with good reproducibility. The protons are accelerated in the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime, which is suitable for many applications including as an injector into a beamline for medical use, which is one of our objectives.

  2. Jet A and low sulphur diesel production and blending experience in a synthetic crude-rich environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Sunoco Sarnia Refinery has produced large volumes of high quality Jet A and Low Sulphur Diesel without major capital investment. They have done this by blending the synergy between hydrocracked and synthetic-based distillate stocks. The Sunoco Sarnia Refinery has two crude units, a Catalytic Cracker, a Hydrocracker and a Hydrogen unit, two reformers, Alkylation and BTX units. It also has the usual facilities such as gas plants, gasoline treater, and a naphtha pre-treater for former feed and an amine sulphur unit. Refinery distillate products, crudes used, components used for blending the distillate products, cost of the facilities and average production of each product were reviewed. A schematic of the Sarnia Refinery Distillate Production Facility was provided. 1 tab., 1 fig

  3. Electron beam irradiation facility for low to high dose irradiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petwal, V.C.; Wanmode, Yashwant; Verma, Vijay Pal; Bhisikar, Abhay; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Shrivastava, P.; Gupta, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam based irradiation facilities are becoming more and more popular over the conventional irradiator facilities due to many inherent advantages such as tunability of beam energy, availability of radiation both in electron mode and X-ray mode, wide range of the dose rate, control of radiation from a ON-OFF switch and other safety related merits. A prototype experimental facility based on electron accelerator has been set-up at RRCAT to meet the low-dose, medium dose and high-dose requirements for radiation processing of food, agricultural and medical products. The facility can be operated in the energy range from 7-10 MeV at variable power level from 0.05-3 kW to meet the dose rate requirement of 100 Gy to kGy. The facility is also equipped with a Bremsstrahlung converter optimized for X-ray irradiation at 7.5 MV. Availability of dose delivery in wide range with precision control and measurement has made the facility an excellent tool for researchers interested in electron/X-ray beam irradiation. A precision dosimetry lab based on alanine EPR and radiochromic film dosimetry system have been established to characterize the radiation field and precise dose measurements. Electron beam scattering technique has been developed to achieve low dose requirement for EB irradiation of various seeds such as groundnut, wheat, soybeans, moong beans, black gram etc. for mutation related studies. This paper describes various features of the facility together with the dosimetric measurements carried out for qualification of the facility and recent irradiation experiments carried out using this facility. (author)

  4. High Energy Ion Bombardment Simulation Facility at the University of Pittsburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGruer, J.N.; Choyke, W.J.; Doyle, N.J.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The High Energy Ion Bombardment Simulation (HEIBS) Facility located at the University of Pittsburgh is now operational. The E-22 tandem accelerator of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, fitted with a UNIS source, provides the heavy high energy ions. An auxiliary Van de Graaff accelerator is used for the simultaneous production of He ions. Special features of the simulation laboratory are reported

  5. High Solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) Wastes Stabilization with Ceramicrete and Super Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    High Solids ash and scrubber solution waste streams were generated at the incinerator facility at SRS by burning radioactive diatomaceous filter rolls which contained small amounts of uranium, and listed solvents (F and U). This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) technologies with the High Solids waste streams

  6. Facile Synthesis of Gold Nanorice Enclosed by High- Index Facets and Its Application for CO Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Tao, J.; Liu, H.; Zeng, J.; Yu, T.; Ma, Y.; Moran, C.; Wu, L.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A facile method for generating Au nanorice enclosed by high-index facets in high purity. The nanorice shows much higher catalytic activity for CO oxidation than multiply twinned particles of Au enclosed by {111} facets at temperatures below 300 C.

  7. Overview of new, upgraded, or proposed high energy physics facilities in the United States and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews six new, proposed, or upgraded accelerator facilities in the United States and Canada. All of the accelerators that are presented here in one form or fashion challenge the validity of the Standard Model of high energy physics which ''currently explains'' all experimentally know phenomena. These facilities include the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia, the Kaon Factory at TRIUMF in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, the Asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in Palo Alto, California, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, the injector upgrade project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois, and the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in Waxachachie, Texas

  8. Radiation protection of the operation of accelerator facilities. On high energy proton and electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kenjiro

    1997-01-01

    Problems in the radiation protection raised by accelerated particles with energy higher than several hundreds MeV in strong accelerator facilities were discussed in comparison with those with lower energy in middle- and small-scale facilities. The characteristics in the protection in such strong accelerator facilities are derived from the qualitative changes in the interaction between the high energy particles and materials and from quantitative one due to the beam strength. In the former which is dependent on the emitting mechanism of the radiation, neutron with broad energy spectrum and muon are important in the protection, and in the latter, levels of radiation and radioactivity which are proportional to the beam strength are important. The author described details of the interaction between high energy particles and materials: leading to the conclusion that in the electron accelerator facilities, shielding against high energy-blemsstrahlung radiation and -neutron is important and in the proton acceleration, shielding against neutron is important. The characteristics of the radiation field in the strong accelerator facilities: among neutron, ionized particles and electromagnetic wave, neutron is most important in shielding since it has small cross sections relative to other two. Considerations for neutron are necessary in the management of exposure. Multiplicity of radionuclides produced: which is a result of nuclear spallation reaction due to high energy particles, especially to proton. Radioactivation of the accelerator equipment is a serious problem. Other problems: the interlock systems, radiation protection for experimenters and maintenance of the equipment by remote systems. (K.H.). 11 refs

  9. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon

    2014-01-01

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar

  10. Beam Test for Evaluating Applicabillity of High - Strength Reinforcement in Structure of Nuclear Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Sangjun; Lee, Byungsoo; Bang, Changjoon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The high-strength rebar which has high yield strength can reduce the amount of rebar in concrete and widen its spacing so that it has better workability and higher economic benefits for the structure. However, the maximum yield strength of rebar is limited to 420MPa in the design criteria for structure of nuclear facility in Korea and USA. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power is progressing research to revise the limitation in the yield strength of rebar, which is suggested in the criteria of KEPIC and ACI, in order to apply 550 MPa high-strength rebar for the construction of a nuclear facility. This study is to review the applicability of high strength rebar in structure of a nuclear facility through a model beam test. After reviewing the shear capacity and reinforcement yield to assess the applicability of high-strength reinforcement in the structure of a nuclear facility, we make the following conclusions. When using high shear reinforcement with wider spacing, it has a similar shear capacity to normal reinforcement with narrower spacing. This means better workability and economic benefits can be achieved by widening the rebar spacing without brittle fracture in the elements. For future plans, the results of this test and supplementary test will be submitted to ACI349 committee as backup data to revise the standard for yield strength of high-strength rebar.

  11. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  12. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P; Barton, M; Blair, D G

    2005-01-01

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with ∼200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented

  13. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  14. Summary of informal meeting on ''facilities for atomic physics research with highly ionized atoms''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocke, C.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature

  15. Final report of the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] irradiation facilities improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987

  16. Entanglement in miscible blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    The entanglement length Le of polymer chains (corresponding to the entanglement molecular weight Me) is not an intrinsic material parameter but changes with the interaction with surrounding chains. For miscible blends of cis-polyisoprene (PI) and poly(tert-butyl styrene) (PtBS), changes of Le on blending was examined. It turned out that the Le averaged over the number fractions of the Kuhn segments of the components (PI and PtBS) satisfactorily describes the viscoelastic behavior of pseudo-monodisperse blends in which the terminal relaxation time is the same for PI and PtBS.

  17. Performance evaluation of gamma irradiated SiR-EPDM blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepalaxmi, R., E-mail: deepalaxmivaithi@gmail.com; Rajini, V.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The effects of gamma irradiation on SiR-EPDM blend are examined. • Cross-linking reaction is dominant in blends C, D and E, due to higher EPDM content. • The tensile strength and hardness of blend E is improved by gamma irradiation. • The blend C and EPDM rich blends (D, E) are found to have superior performance. • Among C, D and E, suitable blend can be selected for a particular NPP application. - Abstract: Cable insulation materials (CIM) should perform their safety functions throughout their installed life in nuclear power plants (NPP). The CIM will be exposed to gamma irradiation at the installed locations. In order to forecast long-term performance of CIM, the short time accelerated testing was carried out. Due to its good mechanical strength, ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) is widely used as CIM. Silicone rubber (SiR) is used in high temperature environments, due to its good di-electric properties/hydrophobicity. The blending of these two polymers may result in the improvement in their specific properties. This paper analyses the effects of gamma irradiation on the five different compositions (90-10; 70-30; 50-50; 30-70; 10-90) of SiR-EPDM blends. The blends were exposed to four different doses (25 Mrad, 100 Mrad, 200 Mrad and 250 Mrad) of gamma irradiation. The electrical and mechanical parameters like volume resistivity (VRY), surface resistivity (SRY), tensile strength (TS), elongation at break (EB), hardness (H) of the virgin and gamma irradiated blends were determined as per ASTM/IEC standards. The nature of degradation was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The simultaneous occurrence of cross-linking and chain scission is found to be the mechanism for ageing in SiR-EPDM blends. The electrical parameters such as volume resistivity and surface resistivity of all the blends are found to improve for all doses of gamma irradiation. To validate the influence of cross-linking reaction of the Si

  18. Simplified static method for determining seismic loads on equipment in moderate and high hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.A.; Holmes, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified static analysis methodology is presented for qualifying equipment in moderate and high-hazard facility-use category structures, where the facility use is defined in Design and Evaluation Guidelines for Department of Energy Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards, UCRL-15910. Currently there are no equivalent simplified static methods for determining seismic loads on equipment in these facility use categories without completing dynamic analysis of the facility to obtain local floor accelerations or spectra. The requirements of UCRL-15910 specify the use of open-quotes dynamicclose quotes analysis methods, consistent with Seismic Design Guidelines for Essential Buildings, Chapter 6, open-quotes Nonstructural Elements,close quotes TM5-809-10-1, be used for determining seismic loads on mechanical equipment and components. Chapter 6 assumes that the dynamic analysis of the facility has generated either floor response spectra or model floor accelerations. These in turn are utilized with the dynamic modification factor and the actual demand and capacity ratios to determine equipment loading. This complex methodology may be necessary to determine more exacting loads for hard to qualify equipment but does not provide a simple conservative loading methodology for equipment with ample structural capacity

  19. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  20. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolopko, Andrew N; Sullivan, John P; Erickson, Sean D; Wrobel, David; Chiang, Su L; Rudnicki, Katrina; Rudnicki, Stewart; Nale, Jennifer; Selfors, Laura M; Greenhouse, Dara; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Shamu, Caroline E

    2010-05-18

    Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  1. Tank 21 and Tank 24 Blend and Feed Study: Blending Times, Settling Times, and Transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 (micro)m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion ( 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  2. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multi-level, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data, through typical transformations and correlations, in under 30 sec. The throughput for such a facility, assuming five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600

  3. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-05-01

    A proposal has been made at LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multilevel, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data through typical transformations and correlations in under 30 s. The throughput for such a facility, for five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600. 3 figures

  4. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  5. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  6. Design and operation of off-gas cleaning systems at high level liquid waste conditioning facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The immobilization of high level liquid wastes from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels is of great interest and serious efforts are being undertaken to find a satisfactory technical solution. Volatilization of fission product elements during immobilization poses the potential for the release of radioactive substances to the environment and necessitates effective off-gas cleaning systems. This report describes typical off-gas cleaning systems used in the most advanced high level liquid waste immobilization plants and considers most of the equipment and components which can be used for the efficient retention of the aerosols and volatile contaminants. In the case of a nuclear facility consisting of several different facilities, release limits are generally prescribed for the nuclear facility as a whole. Since high level liquid waste conditioning (calcination, vitrification, etc.) facilities are usually located at fuel reprocessing sites (where the majority of the high level liquid wastes originates), the off-gas cleaning system should be designed so that the airborne radioactivity discharge of the whole site, including the emission of the waste conditioning facility, can be kept below the permitted limits. This report deals with the sources and composition of different kinds of high level liquid wastes and describes briefly the main high level liquid waste solidification processes examining the sources and characteristics of the off-gas contaminants to be retained by the off-gas cleaning system. The equipment and components of typical off-gas systems used in the most advanced (large pilot or industrial scale) high level liquid waste solidification plants are described. Safety considerations for the design and safe operation of the off-gas systems are discussed. 60 refs, 31 figs, 17 tabs

  7. Qualification test for ITER HCCR-TBS mockups with high heat flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon, E-mail: skkim93@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated. • A thermo-hydraulic analysis was performed using a high heat flux test facility by using electron beam. • The plan for qualification tests was developed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization. - Abstract: The test mockups for ITER HCCR (Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector) TBS (Test Blanket System) in Korea were designed and fabricated, and an integrity and thermo-hydraulic performance test should be completed under the same or similar operation conditions of ITER. The test plan for a thermo-hydraulic analysis was developed by using a high heat flux test facility, called the Korean heat load test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB). This facility is utilized for a qualification test of the plasma facing component (PFC) for the ITER first wall and DEMO divertor, and for the thermo-hydraulic experiments. In this work, KoHLT-EB will be used for the plan of the performance qualification test of the ITER HCCR-TBS mockups. This qualification tests should be performed to evaluate the thermo-hydraulic efficiency in accordance with the requirements of the ITER Organization (IO), which describe the specifications and qualifications of the heat flux test facility and test procedure for ITER PFC.

  8. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  9. MOOC Blended learning ontwikkelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verjans, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie over het ontwerpen van leeractiviteiten (learning design) tijdens de zesde live sessie van de MOOC Blended learning ontwikkelen. Met gebruikmaking van presentatiematerialen van Diana Laurillard, Grainne Conole, Helen Beetham, Jos Fransen, Pieter Swager, Helen Keegan, Corinne Weisgerber.

  10. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  11. Canada's directory of ethanol-blended fuel retailers (December 1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This publication serves as a directory of ethanol-blended gasoline retailers in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, and the Yukon. The listings include the name and address of the retailer. The listing is organized by province and cities, beginning with the Yukon in the west and proceeding east to Quebec. A list of bulk purchase facilities of ethanol-blended fuels is also included. As of December 1998, there were a total of 929 retail outlets for ethanol blended gasoline in Canada

  12. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1965-06-01

    This report contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procedures are presented in another report.

  13. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report

  14. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  15. The high current test facility injector operation to 40 mA dc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungrin, J.; Ormrod, J.H.; Michel, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The high current test facility injector is a 750 keV proton accelerator designed to investigate the problems involved in the acceleration of intense dc proton beams. The performance of the injector and the experience gained in operation with dc beams up to 40 mA are described. (author)

  16. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  17. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  18. A High-Throughput Biological Calorimetry Core: Steps to Startup, Run, and Maintain a Multiuser Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennawar, Neela H; Fecko, Julia A; Showalter, Scott A; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    Many labs have conventional calorimeters where denaturation and binding experiments are setup and run one at a time. While these systems are highly informative to biopolymer folding and ligand interaction, they require considerable manual intervention for cleaning and setup. As such, the throughput for such setups is limited typically to a few runs a day. With a large number of experimental parameters to explore including different buffers, macromolecule concentrations, temperatures, ligands, mutants, controls, replicates, and instrument tests, the need for high-throughput automated calorimeters is on the rise. Lower sample volume requirements and reduced user intervention time compared to the manual instruments have improved turnover of calorimetry experiments in a high-throughput format where 25 or more runs can be conducted per day. The cost and efforts to maintain high-throughput equipment typically demands that these instruments be housed in a multiuser core facility. We describe here the steps taken to successfully start and run an automated biological calorimetry facility at Pennsylvania State University. Scientists from various departments at Penn State including Chemistry, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bioengineering, Biology, Food Science, and Chemical Engineering are benefiting from this core facility. Samples studied include proteins, nucleic acids, sugars, lipids, synthetic polymers, small molecules, natural products, and virus capsids. This facility has led to higher throughput of data, which has been leveraged into grant support, attracting new faculty hire and has led to some exciting publications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

    2010-07-01

    High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

  20. Shielding analysis of high level waste water storage facilities using MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuta, Naohiro [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The neutron and gamma-ray transport analysis for the facility as a reprocessing facility with large buildings having thick shielding was made. Radiation shielding analysis consists of a deep transmission calculation for the concrete wall and a skyshine calculation for the space out of the buildings. An efficient analysis with a short running time and high accuracy needs a variance reduction technique suitable for all the calculation regions and structures. In this report, the shielding analysis using MCNP and a discrete ordinate transport code is explained and the idea and procedure of decision of variance reduction parameter is completed. (J.P.N.)

  1. Systems engineering applied to integrated safety management for high consequence facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, R; Morais, B.

    1998-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management is a concept that is being actively promoted by the U.S. Department of Energy as a means of assuring safe operation of its facilities. The concept involves the integration of safety precepts into work planning rather than adjusting for safe operations after defining the work activity. The system engineering techniques used to design an integrated safety management system for a high consequence research facility are described. An example is given to show how the concepts evolved with the system design

  2. Cyanoresin, cyanoresin/cellulose triacetate blends for thin film, dielectric capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Lewis, Carol R. (Inventor); Cygan, Peter J. (Inventor); Jow, T. Richard (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Non brittle dielectric films are formed by blending a cyanoresin such as cyanoethyl, hydroxyethyl cellulose (CRE) with a compatible, more crystalline resin such as cellulose triacetate. The electrical breakdown strength of the blend is increased by orienting the films by uniaxial or biaxial stretching. Blends of high molecular weight CRE with high molecular weight cyanoethyl cellulose (CRC) provide films with high dielectric constants.

  3. Estudo do efeito do tipo de polipropileno na fotodegradação da blenda polipropileno/poliestireno de alto impacto Influence of the type of polypropylene on the photodegradation of blends of polypropylene/high impact polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio L. Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visa avaliar a influência do tipo de polipropileno no comportamento da blenda polipropileno/poliestireno de alto impacto (PP/HIPS quando exposta à radiação UV. Foram usados uma resina virgem de PP (PPv e outra reprocessada (PPrep. Inicialmente, avaliou-se o comportamento individual dos componentes da blenda, HIPS, PPv e PPrep, quando submetidos à radiação UV por até 15 semanas de exposição. As técnicas de caracterização utilizadas para monitorar o desempenho tanto das resinas individualmente quanto das blendas submetidas à radiação UV foram: propriedades mecânicas (tração e impacto, medidas de índice de fluidez (MFI, análise térmica (DSC, espectroscopia no infravermelho (FTIR e microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. A partir dos resultados com essas técnicas verificou-se que o PPv foi a resina mais afetada pela radiação e consequentemente as blendas preparadas com esse PP também foram mais sensíveis à fotodegradação do que as demais. Em termos de fotoestabilização este resultado mostra-se interessante, já que as blendas PP/HIPS preparadas com uma resina previamente degradada necessitariam de menores teores de aditivos do que esse mesmo tipo de blenda preparada com resina virgem.The influence from the type of polypropylene on the photodegradation resistance of blends of polypropylene/high impact polystyrene (PP/HIPS was studied. A virgin polypropylene (PPv and another sample that suffered prior thermo-mechanical degradation (PPrep were used. All materials, components of the blends and blends were exposed to UV radiation for up to 15 weeks. They were characterized as a function of time of UV exposure using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The mechanical (tensile and impact properties and melt flow indexes of the materials were also evaluated. The experimental results revealed that PPv resin and its blends were more sensitive

  4. High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections

  5. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  6. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  7. A conceptual subsurface facility design for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.G., III; Bhattacharyya, K.K.; Segrest, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for the design, construction, operation and closure of a repository in which to permanently dispose of the nation's high level nuclear waste. In addition to the objective of safely isolating the waste inventory, the repository must provide a safe working environment for its workforce, and protect the public. The conceptual design for this facility is currently being developed. Tunnel Boring Machine will be used to excavate 228 kilometers of tunneling to construct the facility over a 30 year period. The excavation operations will be physically separated from the waste emplacement operations, and each operation will have its own dedicated ventilation system. The facility is being designed to remain open for 150 years

  8. Protection of High Ceiling Nuclear Facilities Using Photoelectric Sensors and Infrared Fire Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadoud, A.A.; El Eissawi, H.M.; Saleh, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of different security systems and components are commercially available and widely used. Before implementing a security system, it is important to understand the characteristics and requirements of the facility area to be protected. Technology and manufacturers of security devices are rapidly changing. It is necessary to use optimal security equipment suitable for the surrounding environment of the facility to be protected. Several security sensors can be used to protect the nuclear facilities, such as passive infrared detectors and glass breakage sensors, vibration detectors, and microwave sensors. This work introduces technical specifications, operation and method of installation for these detectors in nuclear facilities. Also a comparative study of different security sensors or equipment is provided. The photoelectric detectors and infrared fire beam smoke detectors are reliable, suitable and advanced security equipment. They can be used in special cases because of their advantages, this includes their long ranges and accuracy in performance. This paper presents a new concept for adapting the use infrared optical fire beam smoke detector as intrusion detection equipment in high ceiling buildings or towering height facilities. This is in addition to their main function, namely fire detection.The paper also provides a study for their types and installation method. Focus is made on the installation and operation method for two advanced security systems, and wireless control circuit for the overall system operation

  9. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  10. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor critical facility for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Noriyuki

    1985-01-01

    The outline of the critical facility, its construction, the results of the basic studies and experiments on the graphite material, and the results obtained from the test conducted on the overall functions of the critical facility were reported. With the completion of the critical facility, it has been made possible to demonstrate the establishment of the manufacturing techniques and product-quality guarantee for extremely pure isotropic graphite in addition to the reliability of the structural design and analytical techniques for the main unit of the critical facility. It is expected that the present facility will prove instrumental in the verification of the nuclear safety of the very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor and in the acquisition of experimental data on the reactor physics pertaining to the improvement of the reactor characteristics. The tasks which remain to be accomplished hereafter are the improvements of the performance and quality features with regard to the oxidization of graphite, the heat-resisting structural materials, and the welded structures. (Kubozono, M.)

  11. High-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DEFIN) for spherical irradiation of thermonuclear targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Danilov, A.E.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kruglov, B.V.; Mikhailov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.; Fedorov, A.N.

    This paper describes a high-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DELFIN) intended for high-temperature heating of thermonuclear targets with spherical symmetry. The facility includes a neodymium-glass laser with the ultimate radiation energy of 10 kJ, a pulse length of approximately 10 -10 to 10 -9 s, beam divergence of 5 x 10 -4 radians, a vacuum chamber in which laser radiation interacts with the plasma, and a system of diagnostic instrumentation for the observation of laser beam and plasma parameters. Described are the optical scheme and construction details of the laser facility. Presented is an analysis of focusing schemes for target irradiation and described is the focusing scheme of the DELFIN facility, which is capable of attaining a high degree of spherical symmetry in irradiating targets with maximum beam intensity at the target surface of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2 . This paper examines the most important problems connected with the physical investigations of thermonuclear laser plasma and the basic diagnostic problems involved in their solution

  12. Enteral High Fat-Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Blend Alters the Pathogen Composition of the Intestinal Microbiome in Premature Infants with an Enterostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younge, Noelle; Yang, Qing; Seed, Patrick C

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect of enteral fish oil and safflower oil supplementation on the intestinal microbiome in infants with an enterostomy born premature. Infants with an enterostomy born premature were randomized to receive early enteral supplementation with a high-fat polyunsaturated fatty acid (HF-PUFA) blend of fish oil and safflower oil vs standard nutritional therapy. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing for longitudinal profiling of the microbiome from the time of study entry until bowel reanastomosis. We used weighted gene coexpression network analysis to identify microbial community modules that differed between study groups over time. We performed imputed metagenomic analysis to determine metabolic pathways associated with the microbial genes. Sixteen infants were randomized to receive enteral HF-PUFA supplementation, and 16 infants received standard care. The intestinal microbiota of infants in the treatment group differed from those in the control group, with greater bacterial diversity and lower abundance of Streptococcus, Clostridium, and many pathogenic genera within the Enterobacteriaceae family. We identified 4 microbial community modules with significant differences between groups over time. Imputed metagenomic analysis of the microbial genes revealed metabolic pathways that differed between groups, including metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and secondary bile acid synthesis. Enteral HF-PUFA supplementation was associated with decreased abundance of pathogenic bacteria, greater bacterial diversity, and shifts in the potential metabolic functions of intestinal microbiota. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01306838. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of biodiesel and biodiesel-petrodiesel blends by high performance thin layer chromatography combined with easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Livia S; Abdelnur, Patricia V; Passero, Alan; de Sa, Gilberto F; Daroda, Romeu J; de Souza, Vanderlea; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2009-08-01

    High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) combined with on-spot detection and characterization via easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) is applied to the analysis of biodiesel (B100) and biodiesel-petrodiesel blends (BX). HPTLC provides chromatographic resolution of major components whereas EASI-MS allows on-spot characterization performed directly on the HPTLC surface at ambient conditions. Constituents (M) are detected by EASI-MS in a one component-one ion fashion as either [M + Na](+) or [M + H](+). For both B100 and BX samples, typical profiles of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) detected as [FAME + Na](+) ions allow biodiesel typification. The spectrum of the petrodiesel spot displays a homologous series of protonated alkyl pyridines which are characteristic for petrofuels (natural markers). The spectrum for residual or admixture oil spots is characterized by sodiated triglycerides [TAG + Na](+). The application of HPTLC to analyze B100 and BX samples and its combination with EASI-MS for on-spot characterization and quality control is demonstrated.

  14. A High Antioxidant Spice Blend Attenuates Postprandial Insulin and Triglyceride Responses and Increases Some Plasma Measures of Antioxidant Activity in Healthy, Overweight Men123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulas-Ray, Ann C.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Teeter, Danette L.; Chen, C-Y. Oliver; Vanden Heuvel, John P.; West, Sheila G.

    2011-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential of dietary antioxidants to attenuate in vivo oxidative stress, but little characterization of the time course of plasma effects exists. Culinary spices have demonstrated potent in vitro antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to examine whether adding 14 g of a high antioxidant spice blend to a 5060-kJ (1200 kcal) meal exerted significant postprandial effects on markers of plasma antioxidant status and metabolism. Healthy overweight men (n = 6) consumed a control and spiced meal in a randomized crossover design with 1 wk between testing sessions. Blood was sampled prior to the meal and at 30-min intervals for 3.5 h (total of 8 samples). Mixed linear models demonstrated a treatment × time interaction (P spiced meal, respectively. Adding spices to the meal significantly increased the ferric reducing antioxidant power, such that postprandial increases following the spiced meal were 2-fold greater than after the control meal (P = 0.009). The hydrophilic oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of plasma also was increased by spices (P = 0.02). There were no treatment differences in glucose, total thiols, lipophilic ORAC, or total ORAC. The incorporation of spices into the diet may help normalize postprandial insulin and TG and enhance antioxidant defenses. PMID:21697300

  15. Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in the aqueous solution of Diethanolamine (DEA) blended with 1-Butyl-1-Methylpyrrolidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate [BmPyrr][OTf] at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, S. N.; Salleh, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    Solubility data of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous Diethanolamine (DEA) blended with 1-Butyl-1-Methylpyrrolidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate [Bmpyrr][OTf] were measured at temperature 313.15K, 323.15K, 333.15K and pressure from 500psi up to 700 psi. The experiments covered over the concentration range of 0-10wt% for [Bmpyrr][OTf] and 30-40wt% for DEA. The solubility of CO2 was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop in high pressure stirred absorption cell reactor. The experimental results showed that CO2 loading in all DEA-[BmPyrr][OTf] mixtures studied increases with increasing of CO2 partial pressure and temperature. It was also found that the CO2 loading capacity increase significantly as the concentration of [Bmpyrr][OTf] increases. Jou and Mather model was used to predict the solubility of CO2 in the mixtures where the experimental data were correlated as a function of temperature and CO2 partial pressure. It was found that the model was successful in predicting the solubility behavior of the aqueous DEA-[Bmpyrr][OTf] systems considered in this study.

  16. Acid esterification of a high free fatty acid crude palm oil and crude rubber seed oil blend: Optimization and parametric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Modhar A.; Yusup, Suzana; Ahmad, Murni M. [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Chemical Engineering, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Free fatty acids content plays an important role in selecting the appropriate route for biodiesel production. Oils with high content of free fatty acids can be treated by acid esterification where an alcohol reacts with the given oil in the presence of acid catalyst. In the current study, an equivolume blend of crude rubber seed oil and crude palm oil is fed to the reaction with methanol as the alcohol of choice and sulfuric acid. Selected reaction parameters were optimized, using Taguchi method for design of experiments, to yield the lowest free fatty acid content in the final product. The investigated parameters include alcohol to oil ratio, temperature and amount of catalyst. The effect and significance of each parameter were then studied based on the fractional factorial design and verified by additional experiments. The optimum conditions for acid esterification which could reduce the free fatty acid content in the feedstock to lower than 0.6% (95% reduction) were 65 C, 15:1 methanol to oil ratio (by mole) and 0.5 wt% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} after 3 h of reaction time. Temperature had been found to have the most effect on the reduction of free fatty acids followed by reactants ratio while increasing catalyst amount had nominal effect. (author)

  17. Highly antifouling and antibacterial performance of poly (vinylidene fluoride) ultrafiltration membranes blending with copper oxide and graphene oxide nanofillers for effective wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuanqi; Lv, Jinling; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhang, Guoquan; Yang, Yuesuo; Yang, Fenglin

    2017-11-01

    Innovation and effective wastewater treatment technology is still in great demand given the emerging contaminants frequently spotted from the aqueous environment. By blending with poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), the strong hydrophilic graphene oxide (GO) and antibacterial copper oxide (Cu x O) were used as nanofillers to develop the novel, highly antifouling composite membranes via phase inversion process in our latest work. The existence and dispersion of GO and Cu x O posed a significant role on morphologies, structures, surface composition and hydrophilicity of the developed composite membranes, confirmed by SEM, TEM, FTIR and XPS in depth characterization. The SEM images showed that the modified membranes presented a lower resistant structure with developed finger-like macrovoids and thin-walled even interconnected sponge-like pores after adding nanofillers, much encouraging membrane permeation. The XPS results revealed that Cu x O contained Cu 2 O and CuO in the developed membrane and the Cu 2 O nanoparticles were dominant accounting for about 79.3%; thus the modified membrane specifically exhibited an efficient antibacterial capacity. Due to the hydrophilic and bactericidal membrane surface, the composite membranes demonstrated an excellent antifouling performance, including higher flux recovery rate, more resistant against accumulated contaminants and lower filtration resistance, especially lower irreversible resistance. The antifouling property, especially anti-irreversible fouling, was significantly improved, showing a significant engineering potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  19. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  20. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  1. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  2. Annual evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an annual evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied

  3. Blending effects on coal burnout and NO emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Arias; R. Backreedy; A. Arenillas; J.M. Jones; F. Rubiera; M. Pourkashanian; A. Williams; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    In this work, the combustion behaviour of individual coals of different rank and their blends was evaluated. The study was focused on burnout and NO emissions during blend combustion. Preliminary combustion tests of the coals and their blends were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). Some characteristic temperatures were obtained to evaluate the combustibility of the samples. These temperatures indicate an improvement in the combustibility of the less reactive coal when it is blended. An entrained flow reactor (EFR) was employed to study the behaviour of the samples at high heating rates and short residence times. Burnout and NO emissions were measured during EFR combustion tests. In some blends the results can be predicted from the weighted average of the values of the individual coals. However, other blends show an increase, from the averaged values, in burnout and especially in NO emissions. 14 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Use of base isolation techniques for the design of high-level waste storage facility enclosure at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallenas, J.M.; Wong, Chun K.; Beer, M.J.

    1993-08-01

    Current Department of Energy criteria for facilities subjected to natural hazards provide guidelines to place facilities or portions of facilities into usage categories. Usage categories are based on characteristics such as mission dependence, type of hazardous materials involved, and performance goals. Seismic requirements are significantly more stringent for facilities falling into higher ''hazard facility use categories''. A special problem arises in cases where a facility or portion of a facility is dependent on another facility of lower ''hazard facility use category'' for support or protection. Creative solutions can minimize the cost Unpact of ensuring that the lower category item does not compromise the performance of the higher category item. In this paper, a base isolation solution is provided for a ''low hazard facility use category'' weather enclosure designed so it will not collapse onto a ''high hazard facility use category'' high level waste storage facility at INEL. This solution is compared to other more conventional procedures. Details, practical limitations, licensing and regulatory considerations, and cost comparisons are provided

  5. An instrumentation and control philosophy for high-level nuclear waste processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigle, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an instrumentation and control philosophy which may be applied to high-level nuclear waste processing facilities. This philosophy describes the recommended criteria for automatic/manual control, remote/local control, remote/local display, diagnostic instrumentation, interlocks, alarm levels, and redundancy. Due to the hazardous nature of the process constituents of a high-level nuclear waste processing facility, it is imperative that safety and control features required for accident-free operation and maintenance be incorporated. A well-instrumented and controlled process, while initially more expensive in capital and design costs, is generally safer and less expensive to operate. When the long term cost savings of a well designed process is coupled with the high savings enjoyed by accident avoidance, the benefits far outweigh the initial capital and design costs

  6. Transcript of the workshop to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Following the ''First International Conference on Radioactive Nuclear Beams'' in Berkeley, a workshop was held on October 19, 1989 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to discuss plans for a National High Intensity Radioactive Nuclear Beam (RNB) Facility. The purpose of the workshop was -- after having discussed during the conference the physics question that can be addressed with RNBs -- to evaluate more concretely the possibilities for actually constructing such a facility in this country. It is becoming increasingly apparent that facility producing beams of radioactive nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is of high scientific interest and technically feasible. It would allow the study of nuclear structure and astrophysical reactions very far from the line of stable nuclei, and could provide new possibilities of reaching the long-sought island of stability of superheavy nuclei. Such facilities are under advanced consideration in Japan and at CERN in Europe. This paper contains a slightly edited transcript of the tape recording that was made of the workshop

  7. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made.

  8. Disentangling overlapping high-field EPR spectra of organic radicals: Identification of light-induced polarons in the record fullerene-free solar cell blend PBDB-T:ITIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Melissa; Maes, Wouter; Goovaerts, Etienne; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2018-03-01

    We present a combined high-field EPR and DFT study of light-induced radicals in the bulk heterojunction blend of PBDB-T:ITIC, currently one of the highest efficiency non-fullerene donor:acceptor combinations in organic photovoltaics. We demonstrate two different approaches for disentangling the strongly overlapping high-field EPR spectra of the positive and negative polarons after charge separation: (1) relaxation-filtered field-swept EPR based on the difference in T1 spin-relaxation times and (2) field-swept EDNMR-induced EPR by exploiting the presence of 14N hyperfine couplings in only one of the radical species, the small molecule acceptor radical. The approach is validated by light-induced EPR spectra on related blends and the spectral assignment is underpinned by DFT computations. The broader applicability of the spectral disentangling methods is discussed.

  9. Disentangling overlapping high-field EPR spectra of organic radicals: Identification of light-induced polarons in the record fullerene-free solar cell blend PBDB-T:ITIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Melissa; Maes, Wouter; Goovaerts, Etienne; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2018-03-01

    We present a combined high-field EPR and DFT study of light-induced radicals in the bulk heterojunction blend of PBDB-T:ITIC, currently one of the highest efficiency non-fullerene donor:acceptor combinations in organic photovoltaics. We demonstrate two different approaches for disentangling the strongly overlapping high-field EPR spectra of the positive and negative polarons after charge separation: (1) relaxation-filtered field-swept EPR based on the difference in T 1 spin-relaxation times and (2) field-swept EDNMR-induced EPR by exploiting the presence of 14 N hyperfine couplings in only one of the radical species, the small molecule acceptor radical. The approach is validated by light-induced EPR spectra on related blends and the spectral assignment is underpinned by DFT computations. The broader applicability of the spectral disentangling methods is discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Compression Ratio on High Load Performance and Knock Behavior for Gasoline Port-Fuel Injection, Natural Gas Direct Injection and Blended Operation in a Spark Ignition Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamminger, Michael; Sevik, James; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Wallner, Thomas; Hall, Carrie

    2017-03-28

    Natural Gas (NG) is an alternative fuel which has attracted a lot of attention recently, in particular in the US due to shale gas availability. The higher hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, compared to gasoline, allows for decreasing carbon dioxide emissions throughout the entire engine map. Furthermore, the high knock resistance of NG allows increasing the efficiency at high engine loads compared to fuels with lower knock resistance. NG direct injection (DI) allows for fuel to be added after intake valve closing (IVC) resulting in an increase in power density compared to an injection before IVC. Steady-state engine tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine equipped with gasoline (E10) port-fuel injection (PFI) and NG DI to allow for in-cylinder blending of both fuels. Knock investigations were performed at two discrete compression ratios (CR), 10.5 and 12.5. Operating conditions span mid-load, wide-open-throttle and boosted conditions, depending on the knock response of the fuel blend. Blended operation was performed using E10 gasoline and NG. An additional gasoline type fuel (E85) with higher knock resistance than E10 was used as a high-octane reference fuel, since the octane rating of E10-NG fuel blends is unknown. Spark timing was varied at different loads under stoichiometric conditions in order to study the knock response as well as the effects on performance and efficiency. As anticipated, results suggest that the knock resistance can be increased significantly by increasing the NG amount. Comparing the engine operation with the least knock resistant fuel, E10 PFI, and the fuel blend with the highest knock resistance, 75% NG DI, shows an increase in indicated mean effective pressure of about 9 bar at CR 12.5. The usage of reference fuels with known knock characteristics allowed an assessment of knock characteristic of intermediate E10-NG blend levels. Mathematical correlations were developed allowing characterizing the occurrence of knocking

  11. A Unique Blend of 2-Fluorenyl-2-anthracene and 2-Anthryl-2-anthracence Showing White Emission and High Charge Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengyun; Zhao, Yang; Yan, Lijia; Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Yanan; Murtaza, Imran; He, Gufeng; Meng, Hong; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-16

    White-light-emitting materials with high mobility are necessary for organic white-light-emitting transistors, which can be used for self-driven OLED displays or OLED lighting. In this study, we combined two materials with similar structures-2-fluorenyl-2-anthracene (FlAnt) with blue emission and 2-anthryl-2-anthracence (2A) with greenish-yellow emission-to fabricate OLED devices, which showed unusual solid-state white-light emission with the CIE coordinates (0.33, 0.34) at 10 V. The similar crystal structures ensured that the OTFTs based on mixed FlAnt and 2A showed high mobility of 1.56 cm 2  V -1  s -1 . This simple method provides new insight into the design of high-performance white-emitting transistor materials and structures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO)

  13. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  14. Facile approach to fabricate waterborne polyaniline nanocomposites with environmental benignity and high physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haihua; Wen, Huan; Hu, Bin; Fei, Guiqiang; Shen, Yiding; Sun, Liyu; Yang, Dong

    2017-03-01

    Waterborne polyaniline (PANI) dispersion has got extensive attention due to its environmental friendliness and good processability, whereas the storage stability and mechanical property have been the challenge for the waterborne PANI composites. Here we prepare for waterborne PANI dispersion through the chemical graft polymerisation of PANI into epichlorohydrin modified poly (vinyl alcohol) (EPVA). In comparison with waterborne PANI dispersion prepared through physical blend and in situ polymerisation, the storage stability of PANI-g-EPVA dispersion is greatly improved and the dispersion keeps stable for one year. In addition, the as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA film displays more uniform and smooth morphology, as well as enhanced phase compatibility. PANI is homogeneously distributed in the EPVA matrix on the nanoscale. PANI-g-EPVA displays different morphology at different aniline content. The electrical conductivity corresponds to 7.3 S/cm when only 30% PANI is incorporated into the composites, and then increases up to 20.83 S/cm with further increase in the aniline content. Simultaneously, the tensile strength increases from 35 MPa to 64 MPa. The as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA dispersion can be directly used as the conductive ink or coatings for cellulose fibre paper to prepare flexible conductive paper with high conductivity and mechanical property, which is also suitable for large scalable production.

  15. Outline of facility for studying high level radioactive materials (CPF) and study programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Motoi

    1983-01-01

    The Chemical Processing Facility for studying high level radioactive materials in Tokai Works of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. is a facility for fundamental studies centering around hot cells, necessary for the development of fuel recycle techniques for fast breeder reactors, an important point of nuclear fuel cycle, and of the techniques for processing and disposing high level radioactive liquid wastes. The operation of the facility was started in 1982, for both the system A (the test of fuel recycle for fast breeder reactors) and the system B (the test of vitrification of high level liquid wastes). In this report, the outline of the facility, the contents of testings and the reflection of the results are described. For the fuel recycle test, the hot test of the spent fuel pins of JOYO MK-1 core was started, and now the uranium and plutonium extraction test is underway. The scheduled tests are fuel solubility, the confirmation of residual properties in fuel melting, the confirmation of extracting conditions, the electrolytic reduction of plutonium, off-gas behaviour and the test of material reliability. For the test of vitrification of high level liquid wastes, the fundamental test on the solidifying techniques for the actual high level wastes eluted from the Tokai reprocessing plant has been started, and the following tests are programmed: Assessment of the properties of actual liquid wastes, denitration and concentration test, vitrification test, off-gas treatment test, the test of evaluating solidified wastes, and the test of storing solidified wastes. These test results are programmed to be reflected to the safety deliberation and the demonstration operation of a vitrification pilot plant. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Bagheera: A new experimental facility at Cea / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for 'Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box'. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single 10 m long, 3 m high and 1.5 m large glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). A unique highly automated system drives all devices. The overall architecture of the facility takes into account the useful ability to carry out symmetrical and reverse experiments with the gas gun, that is actinide to actinide impact and actinide to inert material impact. Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications

  17. Particle size-controllable microwave-assisted solvothermal synthesis of the high-voltage cathode material LiCoPO4 using water/ethylene glycol solvent blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jennifer; Haering, Dominik; Doeff, Marca M.; Nilges, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Particle size-tuned platelets of the high-voltage cathode material LiCoPO4 for Li-ion batteries have been synthesized by a simple one-step microwave-assisted solvothermal process using an array of water/ethylene glycol (EG) solvent mixtures. Particle size control was achieved by altering the concentration of the EG co-solvent in the mixture between 0 and 100 vol%, with amounts of 0-80 vol% EG producing single phase, olivine-type LiCoPO4. The particle sizes of the olivine materials were significantly reduced from about 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm × 500 nm (0 vol% EG) to 200 nm × 100 nm × 50 nm (80 vol% EG) with increasing EG content, while specific surface areas increased from 2 to 13 m2 g-1. The particle size reduction could mainly be attributed to the modified viscosities of the solvent blends. Owing to the soft template effect of EG, the crystals exhibited the smallest dimensions along the [010] direction of the Li diffusion pathways in the olivine crystal structure, resulting in enhanced lithium diffusion properties. The relationship between the synthesis, crystal properties and electrochemical performance was further elucidated, indicating that the electrochemical performances of the as-prepared materials mainly depend on the solvent composition and the respective particle size range. LiCoPO4 products obtained from reaction media with low and high EG contents exhibited good electrochemical performances (initial discharge capacities of 87-124 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C), whereas materials made from medium EG concentrations (40-60 vol% EG) showed the highest capacities and gravimetric energy densities (up to 137 mAh g-1 and 658 Wh kg-1 at 0.1 C), excellent rate capabilities, and cycle life.

  18. Supporting School Leaders in Blended Learning with Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Lauren; Gibson, Theresa; Mangum, Nancy; Wolf, Mary Ann; Kellogg, Shaun; Branon, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a mixed-methods case-study design evaluation of the Leadership in Blended Learning (LBL) program. The LBL program uses blended approaches, including face-to-face and online, to prepare school leaders to implement blended learning initiatives in their schools. This evaluation found that the program designers effectively…

  19. Blended Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise

    2015-01-01

    University College Lillebaelt has decided that 30 percent of all educational elements must be generated as blended learning by the end of the year 2015 as part of a modernization addressing following educational needs: 1. Blended learning can help match the expectations of the future students who...... learning. 4. Blended learning can contribute to supporting and improving efficiency of educational efforts. This can for instance be done through programmes for several classes by using video conferencing, allocating traditional face to face teaching to synchronous and asynchronous study activities produce...... digital materials which can be employed didactically and reused by the teachers. This can also mean that the particular competencies which teaches have in Svendborg can be used at other locations in UCL and disseminated to a larger group of students without further costs. Educational Innovation...

  20. Interplay of Interfacial Layers and Blend Composition To Reduce Thermal Degradation of Polymer Solar Cells at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Dkhil, Sadok; Pfannmöller, Martin; Schröder, Rasmus R; Alkarsifi, Riva; Gaceur, Meriem; Köntges, Wolfgang; Heidari, Hamed; Bals, Sara; Margeat, Olivier; Ackermann, Jörg; Videlot-Ackermann, Christine

    2018-01-31

    The thermal stability of printed polymer solar cells at elevated temperatures needs to be improved to achieve high-throughput fabrication including annealing steps as well as long-term stability. During device processing, thermal annealing impacts both the organic photoactive layer, and the two interfacial layers make detailed studies of degradation mechanism delicate. A recently identified thermally stable poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  1. Observation of gaseous nitric acid production at a high-energy proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Y; Nakajima, H

    2005-01-01

    High-energy protons and neutrons produce a variety of radionuclides as well as noxious and oxidative gases, such as ozone and nitric acid, in the air mainly through the nuclear spallation of atmospheric elements. Samples were collected from the surfaces of magnets, walls, and floors in the neutrino beamline tunnel and the target station of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron facility by wiping surfaces with filter paper. Considerably good correlations were found between the amounts of nitrate and tritium and between those of nitrate and /sup 7/Be. This finding gives evidence that at high-energy proton facilities, nitric acid is produced in the radiolysis of air in beam- loss regions. Also, the nitric acid on the surfaces was found to be desorbed and tended to be more uniform throughout the tunnel due to air circulation. The magnitude of diminishing from the surfaces was in the order of tritium>nitrate>/sup 7/Be1).

  2. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  3. BAGHEERA: A new experimental facility at CEA / Valduc for actinides studies under high dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Lanier, G.; Lamalle, S.; Beaulieu, J.; Antoine, P.; Martinuzzi, P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper is a technical presentation about a new experimental facility recently developed at CEA/Valduc, BAGHEERA, a French acronym for “Hopkinson And High Speed Experiments Glove Box”. This facility is used since mid-2003 to characterize the physical and mechanical behaviour of actinides under high dynamic loadings. For this purpose, four basic experimental devices are confined inside a single glove box: a 50 mm bore diameter single stage light gas gun, two compression and torsion split Hopkinson bars (SHPB and TSHB respectively) and a Taylor test device (TTD). Design and technical data on the experimental equipment are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the gas gun specific features due to actinide applications.

  4. Development of Probabilistic Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for Moderate and High Hazard Facilities at INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, S. M.; Gorman, V. W.; Jensen, S. A.; Nitzel, M. E.; Russell, M. J.; Smith, R. P.

    2000-01-01

    Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) horizontal and vertical response spectra are developed for moderate and high hazard facilities or Performance Categories (PC) 3 and 4, respectively, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The probabilistic DBE response spectra will replace the deterministic DBE response spectra currently in the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Architectural Engineering Standards that govern seismic design criteria for several facility areas at the INEEL. Probabilistic DBE response spectra are recommended to DOE Naval Reactors for use at the Naval Reactor Facility at INEEL. The site-specific Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) developed by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde Federal Services are used as the basis for developing the DBE response spectra. In 1999, the UHS for all INEEL facility areas were recomputed using more appropriate attenuation relationships for the Basin and Range province. The revised UHS have lower ground motions than those produced in the 1996 INEEL site-wide probabilistic ground motion study. The DBE response spectra were developed by incorporating smoothed broadened regions of the peak accelerations, velocities, and displacements defined by the site-specific UHS. Portions of the DBE response spectra were adjusted to ensure conservatism for the structural design process

  5. Study on High energy efficiency photovoltaic facility agricultural system in tropical area of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Zhiwu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic facility agriculture is developing rapidly in recent years, but there are many problems brought out, even in some important demonstration projects, due to the lack of standards. In order to solve some of these problems, we set up a photovoltaic facilities agricultural system in Guilinyang University City, Haikou, China and make an in-depth study on the photovoltaic facility agricultural system and its related problems. In this paper we disclose some of the experimental results. We plant corianders under two kinds of solar cell panels and general double glass assembly already sold on the market. Experiments showed that the square format cell panels are much better than row type, and the next one is general double glass assembly sold on the market, the last is the case without any shelter. 30 days after planting, the height of coriander plants are 50mm, 30mm, 23mm and 20mm correspondingly. The two typical solar cell panels have gaps between cells, and can save much more energy and improve power generation efficiency, we arrange the panels at optimum tilted angle, and design the system as open structure to save more energy. The photovoltaic facilities agricultural system we set up in Guilinyang University City can achieve much high solar energy efficiency than others and has broad application prospects.

  6. AKRO/SF: Blend System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Blend was the system used by the NMFS Alaska Regional Office to monitor groundfish catch from 1991 until 2002. The Blend system combined data from industry...

  7. HELCZA-High heat flux test facility for testing ITER EU first wall components.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokůpek, J.; Samec, K.; Jílek, R.; Gavila, P.; Neufuss, S.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 187-190 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : HELCZA * High heat flux * Electron beam testing * Test facility * Plasma facing components * First wall * Divertora Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617302818

  8. Real time data acquisition system for the High Current Test Facility proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlais, C.E.; Erickson, P.D.; Caissie, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    A real time data acquisition system was developed to monitor and control the High Current Test Facility Proton Accelerator. It is a PDP-8/E computer system with virtual memory capability that is fully interrupt driven and operates under a real-time, multi-tasking executive. The application package includes mode selection to automatically modify programs and optimize operation under varying conditions. (U.S.)

  9. Fabrication and testing of the Nb3Sn superconductor for High-Field Test Facility (HFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, C.; Adam, E.; Gregory, E.; Marancik, W.; Sanger, P.; Scanlan, R.; Cornish, D.

    1979-01-01

    A 5000 A-12 T fully stable Nb 3 Sn superconductor has to be produced for the insert magnet of the high-field test facility being built at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A process is described which permits the fabrication of long lengths of large fully transposed monolithic superconductors containing in excess of 100,000 filaments of Nb 3 Sn. Measurements of critical current as a function of magnetic field and longitudinal strain on prototype samples are reported

  10. Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility high-resolution-spectrometer dipole magnets: a summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.; Madland, D.G.; Rolfe, R.; Smith, W.E.; Spencer, J.E.; Tanaka, N.; Thiessen, H.A.; Varghese, P.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1982-12-01

    This report explains the design, fabrication, measurement, optimization, and installation of two 122 metric ton electromagnets for the High Resolution Proton Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. These two magnets are the principal components of the proton spectrometer, which has an energy resolution of less than or equal to 10 - 4 FWHM. Many technical problems occurred during fabrication, measurement, and optimization, and the majority have been successfully solved. We hope that this report will help others planning similar projects

  11. Development of a high and low impedance diode testing facility at AWE Aldermaston

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, M.; Aedy, Ch.; Cooper, G.

    2005-01-01

    To meet the future resolution targets for radiography of hydrodynamic experiments is creating a dedicated Diode Research Facility. To perform low impedance diode research, the X-ray simulator Eros has been acquired. To drive the high impedance diodes the EMU machine will be co-located with Eros. The co-located of machines will facilitate the sharing of plasma and X-ray diagnostics [ru

  12. High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility(HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6...Report: High Pressure Combustion Experimental Facility (HPCEF) for Studies on Combustion in Reactive Flows The views, opinions and/or findings... contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so

  13. Control of the radiation environment and the worker in high-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The philosophy behind the prediction, measurement, monitoring and limitation by access control of the radiation hazard in high-energy accelerator facilities is compared with that which could be employed for controlling similar hazards due to cosmic radiation in civil aircraft flights. Special mention is made of computer simulations of the radiation environment as a means of predicting necessary control measures, of the reliability and integration of radiation measuring devices into control procedures and of the relevance of different access control procedures. (author)

  14. 16 CFR Figures 1 and 2 to Part 1204 - Suggested Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suggested Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility 1 Figures 1 and 2 to Part 1204 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility EC03OC91.008 ...

  15. Blended working: for whom it may (not work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico W Van Yperen

    Full Text Available Similarly to related developments such as blended learning and blended care, blended working is a pervasive and booming trend in modern societies. Blended working combines on-site and off-site working in an optimal way to improve workers' and organizations' outcomes. In this paper, we examine the degree to which workers feel that the two defining features of blended working (i.e., time-independent working and location-independent working enhance their own functioning in their jobs. Blended working, enabled through the continuing advance and improvement of high-tech ICT software, devices, and infrastructure, may be considered beneficial for workers' perceived effectiveness because it increases their job autonomy. However, because blended working may have downsides as well, it is important to know for whom blended working may (not work. As hypothesized, in a sample of 348 workers (51.7% women, representing a wide range of occupations and organizations, we found that the perceived personal effectiveness of blended working was contingent upon workers' psychological need strength. Specifically, the perceived effectiveness of both time-independent working and location-independent working was positively related to individuals' need for autonomy at work, and negatively related to their need for relatedness and need for structure at work.

  16. Shielding properties of protective thin film coatings and blended concrete compositions for high level waste storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Michael A.; Winfrey, Leigh; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured linear attenuation coefficients are the same for bare and coated steels. • Gamma mean free path is much larger than coating thickness; buildup is negligible. • ‘Concrete-6’ reduces exposure rate outside spent fuel cask significantly over ordinary concrete. - Abstract: Various thin film coatings have been proposed to protect stainless steel high level waste (HLW) containers from premature failure due to localized corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and mechanical wear. These coatings include TiN, ZrO 2 , MoS 2 , TiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 , to be deposited either in multiple layers or as a thicker, single-layer composite. Linear attenuation coefficients of these materials have been simulated using MicroShield and measured experimentally for various photon energies. Additionally, spent fuel casks with overpacks made of two different types of concrete were simulated to compare exposure rate at the cask surface. In the energy range that is significant for high level waste storage all coating materials possess very similar attenuation behavior. A specialty concrete, containing magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and lead oxide (PbO), reduces the exposure rate at the outer surface of the overpack by several orders of magnitude. The higher-Z elements not present in ordinary concrete greatly increase attenuation of intermediate-energy gammas (0.4–1.0 MeV). The thin film coatings do not affect the shielding capabilities of the HLW packaging, as their total proposed thickness is nearly three orders of magnitude less than the mean free path (MFP) of the primary photons of interest.

  17. Strategic Approach in Enhancing the Utilization of GGH Facilities Towards High Impact of Agrobiotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab

    2013-01-01

    Gamma greenhouse (GGH) is associates with chronic radiation activities in life organism. The facility is equipped with 137 Cs source with relatively high energy (t 1/2 =30.1 years). The energy associated with gamma radiation is high enough to break the molecular bonds and ionize atoms without affecting structure of the atomic nucleus (avoiding induction of radioactivity). Nuclear Malaysia is the only institute that provides the facility for Research and Development chronic mutagenesis activities in Malaysia. Chronic gamma irradiation is an exposure of ionizing radiation over an extended period (hours, weeks, months) depending on their nature, sensitivity and research requirements. The alteration by chronic irradiation is tremendous, resulting in physical appearance, changes in molecular structures and metabolism changes. These changes are randomly events, inheritable, and the stability depends on cell damages after irradiation at molecular level. In agrobiotechnology, chronic gamma irradiation produces a wider mutation spectrum and useful for minimizing radiation damages towards obtaining new improved traits for commercial values. Continuous expose at low dose of gamma irradiation resulting in considerably elevated somaclonal variation frequency without negative effects on natural response. However, there is still lack of users especially researchers in Malaysia to utilize the facility. Strategic approaches as seminars, public talk, direct connections and engagement through collaboration, research activities and road show approaches are expected to bring more consumers in conveying high impact activities at GGH. (author)

  18. The Effects of Self-Paced Blended Learning of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentyne, Phoebe; Varga, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As online and blended learning gain more popularity in education, it becomes more important to understand their effects on student learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of self-paced blended learning of mathematics on the attitudes and achievement of 26 high ability middle school students, and investigate the relationship…

  19. The Effect of Blended Learning in Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Chih-Lung; Chiang, Po-Jui

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of the digital age, traditional didactic teaching and online learning have been modified and gradually replaced by "Blended Learning." The purpose of this study was to explore the influences of blended learning pedagogy on junior high school student learning achievement and the students' attitudes toward mathematics. To…

  20. Evaluation of the ignition behaviour of coals and blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Faundez; F. Rubiera; X. Garcia; A. Arenillas; A.L. Gordon; J.J. Pis [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain). Department of Energy and Environment

    2003-07-01

    An experimental study about ignition of coals and blends was carried out by using an entrained flow reactor (EFR) with continuous feed. Seven coals of varying rank, from subbituminous to semianthracite, were tested and evolving gases (O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO) were measured. The ignition temperature was evaluated from the evolution profiles of these gases, and correlated inversely to the reactivity of coals, as reflected by increasing values of ignition temperatures in the sequence subbituminous, high volatile bituminous, low volatile bituminous and semianthracite coals. Mechanism of ignition varied from an heterogeneous mechanism (for subbituminous, low volatile bituminous and semianthracite coals) to an homogeneous mechanism (for high volatile bituminous coal). Experiments with coal blends showed that if a low volatile bituminous coal is blended with a high volatile bituminous coal, the latter determines the value of the ignition temperature and ignition mechanism of the blend, when its percentage in the blend is 50% or higher. For blends of subbituminous and high volatile bituminous coals, the ignition mechanism of the blend is determined by the ignition mechanism of the coal with a higher content in the blend. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of blending different rank coals on NOx emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Esteban, R.; Arenillas, A.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    A study was carried out to assess the NOx emissions when the fraction of high-volatile coals in blends with low-volatile coals, such as anthracitic and semianthracitic, was increased. Burnout and NO emissions were determined for individual coals and their blends. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiation crosslinked block copolymer blends with improved impact resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, F.L.; Pelletier, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    Polymer blends having high impact resistance after mechanical working are produced by blending together a non-elastomeric monovinylidene aromatic polymer such as polystyrene with an elastomeric copolymer, such as a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene, in the form of crosslinked, colloidal size particles

  3. Reinforcement of natural rubber/high density polyethylene blends with electron beam irradiated liquid natural rubber-coated rice husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, E.L.; Ahmad, Ishak [Polymer Research Center (PORCE), School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 4, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Dahlan, H.M. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Abdullah, Ibrahim, E-mail: dia@ukm.m [Polymer Research Center (PORCE), School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 4, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2010-08-15

    Coating of rice husk (RH) surface with liquid natural rubber (LNR) and exposure to electron beam irradiation in air were studied. FTIR analysis on the LNR-coated RH (RHR) exposed to electron beam (EB) showed a decrease in the double bonds and an increase in hydroxyl and hydrogen bonded carbonyl groups arising from the chemical interaction between the active groups on RH surface with LNR. The scanning electron micrograph showed that the LNR formed a coating on the RH particles which transformed to a fine and clear fibrous layer at 20 kGy irradiation. The LNR film appeared as patches at 50 kGy irradiation due to degradation of rubber. Composites of natural rubber (NR)/high density polyethylene (HDPE)/RHR showed an optimum at 20-30 kGy dosage with the maximum stress, tensile modulus and impact strength of 6.5, 79 and 13.2 kJ/m{sup 2}, respectively. The interfacial interaction between the modified RH and TPNR matrix had improved on exposure of RHR to e-beam at 20-30 kGy dosage.

  4. Crystallinity evaluation of polyhydroxybutyrate and polycaprolactone blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Maxwell P.; Rodrigues, Elton Jorge R.; Tavares, Maria Ines B.

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate, PHB, is a polymer obtained through bacterial or synthetic pathways. It has been used in the biomedical field as a matrix for drug delivery, medical implants and as scaffold material for tissue engineering. PHB has high structural organization, which makes it highly crystalline and brittle, making biodegradation difficult, reducing its employability. In order to enhance the mechanical and biological properties of PHB, blends with other polymers, biocompatible or not, are researched and produced. In this regard, blends of PHB and polycaprolactone, PCL, another biopolymer widely used in the biomedical industry, were obtained via solution casting and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR). Results have shown a dependence between PHB's crystallinity index and PCL quantity employed to obtain the blends.(author)

  5. Blended Learning over Two Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhonggen, Yu; Yuexiu, Zhejiang

    2015-01-01

    The 21st century has witnessed vast amounts of research into blended learning since the conception of online learning formed the possibility of blended learning in the early 1990s. The theme of this paper is blended learning in mainstream disciplinary communities. In particular, the paper reports on findings from the last two decades which looked…

  6. Locally restricted blending of Blobtrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Erwin; Wyvill, B.; Wetering, van de H.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Blobtrees are volume representations particularly useful for models which require smooth blending. When blending is applied to two or more Blobtree models, extra volume will be created in between the two surfaces to form a smooth connection. Although it is easy to apply blending, it is hard to

  7. Restabilization of the aging resistance of compatibilized blends of pre-aged low density polyethylene and high-impact polystyrene (LDPE/HIPS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálková, Danuše; Pospíšil, Jan; Fortelný, Ivan; Hromádková, Jiřina; Lednický, František; Schmidt, Pavel; Kruliš, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 9 (2009), s. 1486-1493 ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06097 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : blends with pre-aged LDPE * upgrading of impact strength * thermal restabilization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.154, year: 2009

  8. Making High Schools Work through Blended Instruction. A Vision and Plan for the Integration of Academic and Career and Technology Education in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    A team consisting of Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) staff, local educators, and other representatives developed an action plan to assist in advancing the blending of academic, career, and technology education. The team prepared a vision statement, set strategic directions, analyzed barriers, and developed recommendations and actions…

  9. Studies of PVC/ENR blends: blend compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantara Thevy Ratnam; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Nasir, M.; Baharin, A.

    2002-01-01

    Blends of poly(vinyl chloride/epoxidized natural rubber (PVC/ENR) were prepared by using Bra bender Plasticorder at compositions ranging from 0-100% PVC. They were blended at 150 degree C mixing temperature, 50 rpm rotor speed and 10 minutes mixing time. The blends were characterized for tensile strength , elongation at break, glass transition temperatures and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR). Results revealed that as the PVC content increases the blend behaviour changes from elastomeric to glassy. However the blends found to be compatible at all compositions. (Author)

  10. Implementation of flowsheet change to minimize hydrogen and ammonia generation during chemical processing of high level waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, Matthew S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Luther, Michelle C. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Brandenburg, Clayton H. [Univ.of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Testing was completed to develop a chemical processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), designed to vitrify and stabilize high level radioactive waste. DWPF processing uses a reducing acid (formic acid) and an oxidizing acid (nitric acid) to rheologically thin the slurry and complete the necessary acid base and reduction reactions (primarily mercury and manganese). Formic acid reduces mercuric oxide to elemental mercury, allowing the mercury to be removed during the boiling phase of processing through steam stripping. In runs with active catalysts, formic acid can decompose to hydrogen and nitrate can be reduced to ammonia, both flammable gases, due to rhodium and ruthenium catalysis. Replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid eliminates the generation of rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen and ammonia. In addition, mercury reduction is still effective with glycolic acid. Hydrogen, ammonia and mercury are discussed in the body of the report. Ten abbreviated tests were completed to develop the operating window for implementation of the flowsheet and determine the impact of changes in acid stoichiometry and the blend of nitric and glycolic acid as it impacts various processing variables over a wide processing region. Three full-length 4-L lab-scale simulations demonstrated the viability of the flowsheet under planned operating conditions. The flowsheet is planned for implementation in early 2017.

  11. Succession of Deferribacteres and Epsilonproteobacteria through a nitrate-treated high-temperature oil production facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Kofoed, Michael; Sørensen, Ketil B

    2012-01-01

    , Denmark) and aimed to assess their potential in souring control. Nitrate addition to deoxygenated seawater shifted the low-biomass seawater community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria closely affiliated with the genus Colwellia to a high-biomass community with significantly higher species richness....... Epsilonproteobacteria accounted for less than 1% of the total bacterial community in the nitrate-amended injection water and were most likely outcompeted by putative nitrate-reducing, methylotrophic Gammaproteobacteria of the genus Methylophaga. Reservoir passage and recovery of the oil resulted in a significant change...... abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria throughout the production facility suggested that the Deferribacteres play a major role in nitrate-induced souring control at high temperatures....

  12. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  13. On technology blending.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg N

    1986-01-01

    ILO pub-WEP pub. Working paper on the blending of traditional technology and technological change in developing countries - argues that choice of technology should be compatible with labour intensive requirements and local level management and economic conditions; considers employment creation and economic implications; concludes that technology transfer should be selective. References.

  14. Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, John; Cohen, Ron; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave; Lund, Steven; Sharp, Bill; Bieniosek, Frank; Ni, Pavel; Roy, Prabir; Henestroza, Enrique; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwan, Joe; Lee, Ed; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lidia, Steven; Logan, Grant; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Waldron, Will

    2009-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions offer a very attractive tool for fundamental research in high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy science. These applications build on the significant recent advances in the generation, compression and focusing of intense heavy ion beams in the presence of a neutralizing background plasma. Such beams can provide uniform volumetric heating of the target during a time-scale shorter than the hydrodynamic response time, thereby enabling a significant suite of experiments that will elucidate the underlying physics of dense, strongly-coupled plasma states, which have been heretofore poorly understood and inadequately diagnosed, particularly in the warm dense matter regime. The innovations, fundamental knowledge, and experimental capabilities developed in this basic research program is also expected to provide new research opportunities to study the physics of directly-driven ion targets, which can dramatically reduce the size of heavy ion beam drivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments examining the behavior of thin target foils heated to the warm dense matter regime began at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2008, using the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - I (NDCX-I) facility, and its associated target chamber and diagnostics. The upgrade of this facility, called NDCX-II, will enable an exciting set of scientific experiments that require highly uniform heating of the target, using Li + ions which enter the target with kinetic energy in the range of 3 MeV, slightly above the Bragg peak for energy deposition, and exit with energies slightly below the Bragg peak. This document briefly summarizes the wide range of fundamental scientific experiments that can be carried out on the NDCX-II facility, pertaining to the two charges presented to the 2008 Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee (FESAC) panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). These charges include: (1) Identify the

  15. Apparatus for blending small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.A.; Reese, C.R.; Sease, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus is described for blending small particles and uniformly loading the blended particles in a receptacle. Measured volumes of various particles are simultaneously fed into a funnel to accomplish radial blending and then directed onto the apex of a conical splitter which collects the blended particles in a multiplicity of equal subvolumes. Thereafter the apparatus sequentially discharges the subvolumes for loading in a receptacle. A system for blending nuclear fuel particles and loading them into fuel rod molds is described in a preferred embodiment

  16. On barrier performance of high compaction bentonite in facilities of disposing high level radioactive wastes in formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hidefumi; Komada, Hiroya

    1989-01-01

    As for the method of disposing high level radioactive wastes generated in the reprocessing of spent fuel, at present formation disposal is regarded as most promising. The most important point in this formation disposal is to prevent the leak of radioactive nuclides within the disposal facilities into bedrocks and their move to the zone of human life. As the method of formation disposal, the canisters containing high level radioactive wastes are placed in the horizontal or vertical holes for disposal dug from horizontal tunnels which are several hundreds m underground, and the tunnels and disposal holes are filled again. For this filling material, the barrier performance to prevent and retard the leak of radioactive nuclides out of the disposal facilities is expected, and the characteristics of low water permeability, the adsorption of nuclides and long term stability are required. However, due to the decay heat of wastes just after the disposal, high temperature and drying condition arises, and this must be taken in consideration. The characteristics required for filling materials and the selection of the materials, the features and classification of bentonite, the properties of high compaction bentonite, and the move of water, heat and nuclides in high compaction bentonite are reported.(Kako, I.)

  17. Comparison of Diesel Spray Combustion in Different High-temperature, High-pressure Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickett, Lyle M.; Genzale, Caroline L.; Bruneaux, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Diesel spray experimentation at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions is intended to provide a more fundamental understanding of diesel combustion than can be achieved in engine experiments. This level of understanding is needed to develop the high-fidelity multi-scale CFD models...... participants in the ECN. Thus, in addition to the presentation of a comparative study, this paper demonstrates steps that are needed for other interested groups to participate in ECN spray research. We expect that this collaborative effort will generate a high-quality dataset to be used for advanced...

  18. Viscoelastic properties of PLA/PCL blends compatibilized with different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Boo Young; Han, Do Hung

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe changes in the viscoelastic properties of PLA/PCL (80/20) blends produced using different compatibilization methods. Reactive extrusion and high-energy radiation methods were used for blend compatibilization. Storage and loss moduli, complex viscosity, transient stress relaxation modulus, and tan δ of blends were analyzed and blend morphologies were examined. All compatibilized PLA/PCL blends had smaller dispersed particle sizes than the non-compatibilized blend, and well compatibilized blends had finer morphologies than poorly compatibilized blends. Viscoelastic properties differentiated well compatibilized and poorly compatibilized blends. Well compatibilized blends had higher storage and loss moduli and complex viscosities than those calculated by the log-additive mixing rule due to strong interfacial adhesion, whereas poorly compatibilized blends showed negative deviations due to weak interfacial adhesion. Moreover, well compatibilized blends had much slower stress relaxation than poorly compatibilized blends and didn't show tan δ plateau region caused by slippage at the interface between continuous and dispersed phases.

  19. SYSTEM APPROACH TO THE BLENDED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Kukharenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, much attention is paid to the development of learning sour cream – a combination of traditional and distance (30-70% of training. Such training is sometimes called hybrid and referred to disruptive technologies. Purpose – to show that the use of systemic campaign in blended learning provides a high quality of education, and the technology can be devastating. The subject of the study – blended learning, object of study – Mixed learning process. The analysis results show that the combined training increases the motivation of students, qualification of teachers, personalized learning process. At the same time there are no reliable methods of assessing the quality of education and training standards. It is important that blended learning strategy to support the institutional goals and had an effective organizational model for support.

  20. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, S.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  1. Statistical methods for assessment of blend homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Camilla

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis the use of various statistical methods to address some of the problems related to assessment of the homogeneity of powder blends in tablet production is discussed. It is not straight forward to assess the homogeneity of a powder blend. The reason is partly that in bulk materials......, it is shown how to set up parametric acceptance criteria for the batch that gives a high confidence that future samples with a probability larger than a specified value will pass the USP threeclass criteria. Properties and robustness of proposed changes to the USP test for content uniformity are investigated...

  2. Radiation curable polymer blends for magnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosusso, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    Binder resins in magnetic coating formulations must fulfil a diverse set of requirements. These polymers must have the ability to accept high pigment loadings while maintaining good abrasion resistance, substrate adhesion, inherent lubricity and resistance to temperature and humidity effects. In addition, they must act as grinding aids in the dispersion of the magnetic pigment. In the thermally converted coatings now in use, these requirements are usually met by combining several polymers and crosslinking agents into an optimized blend. This approach is also effective in designing radiation curable binder systems. An overview of the methods employed to achieve such optimized blends will be discussed. (author)

  3. Binary blend Nanoparticles with defined morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazy, O.A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The word blend in linguistics means a word formed from two parts of two words. In polymer science polymer blends means polymer mixtures, a class of materials analogues to the metal alloys. Blending of polymers is a simple and economic way to create new materials meeting specific desired properties. The other alternative is to synthesize such materials eventually facing the organic chemistry design difficulties. The low entropy of mixing polymers makes the process thermodynamically unfavorable, unless there are some specific interactions between the mixed polymers. As a result, in thermal equilibrium typically a phase separation between the blend components takes place. The main challenge facing the blending of polymers is the control of the length scale of the phase separation. One of the most important applications, where the control of the phase separation is crucial for the performance is the organic solar cells. In organic solar cells a blend of an electron donating polymer and electron accepting one is formed. The dimensions of the phase separation between the two polymers should be in the range of the exciton diffusion length [1-3] (in semiconductors, exciton diffusion length is the average distance traveled by the electron-hole pair before recombination). Only under this condition the charge transfer at the interface between the two polymer layers can take place and the solar cell performs efficiently. The thin polymer blend layers for such applications are commonly deposited by spin coating from solution containing both polymers. The morphology of the thin layer prepared in this way is highly influenced by the preparation conditions such as the surface properties of the substrate, the solvent from which the blend was deposited, the temperature, and the annealing temperature [4-9]. Therefore controlling the length scale of phase separation in layers casted or spin coated from solutions is difficult and is a matter of trials and errors. Recently a novel

  4. Start-up of commercial high level waste vitrification facilities at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.; Jouan, A.; Fournier, W.; Alexandre, D.; Leroy, L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes industial experience gained in France for vitrification of fission products generated by spent fuel reprocessing. The continuous vitrification process developed by CEA, SGN and COGEMA is outlined and Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), with output results since start-up of hot operation in June 1978, briefly presented. Vitrification of high-level liquid waste has now entered an industrial phase at La Hague with R7 and T7 facilities. R7 and T7 have each been designed to process FP solutions generated by reprocessing LWR fuel with an initial enrichment of 3.5% and a discharge burn-up of 33,000 MWd/t. R7 active operations began on June, 1989. This facility is now vitrifying the backlog of fission products resulting from the existing UP2 reprocessing plant, which is being currently extended. Scheduled to start early in 1992, T7 will vitrify the fission products, dissolution fines and sodium-rich solutions issuing from UP3 plant

  5. Asymmetrically cut crystal pair as x-ray magnifier for imaging at high intensity laser facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Spring Circle, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Curry, J. J.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The potential of an x-ray magnifier prepared from a pair of asymmetrically cut crystals is studied to explore high energy x-ray imaging capabilities at high intensity laser facilities. OMEGA-EP and NIF when irradiating mid and high Z targets can be a source of high-energy x-rays whose production mechanisms and use as backlighters are a subject of active research. This paper studies the properties and potential of existing asymmetric cut crystal pairs from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) built in a new enclosure for imaging x-ray sources. The technique of the x-ray magnifier has been described previously. This new approach is aimed to find a design that could be used at laser facilities by magnifying the x-ray source into a screen far away from the target chamber center, with fixed magnification defined by the crystals' lattice spacing and the asymmetry angles. The magnified image is monochromatic and the imaging wavelength is set by crystal asymmetry and incidence angles. First laboratory results are presented and discussed.

  6. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  7. The defense waste processing facility: the final processing step for defense high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, S.P.; Sprecher, W.M.; Walton, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The policy of the U.S. Department of Energy is to pursue an aggressive and credible waste management program that advocates final disposal of government generated (defense) high-level nuclear wastes in a manner consistent with environmental, health, and safety responsibilities and requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is an essential component of the Department's program. It is the first project undertaken in the United States to immobilize government generated high-level nuclear wastes for geologic disposal. The DWPF will be built at the Department's Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. When construction is complete in 1989, the DWPF will begin processing the high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant into a borosilicate glass form, a highly insoluble and non-dispersable product, in easily handled canisters. The immobilized waste will be stored on site followed by transportation to and disposal in a Federal repository. The focus of this paper is on the DWPF. The paper discusses issues which justify the project, summarizes its technical attributes, analyzes relevant environmental and insitutional factors, describes the management approach followed in transforming technical and other concepts into concrete and steel, and concludes with observations about the future role of the facility

  8. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Malliakos, A.

    1995-01-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant product,s and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below

  9. Hydrogen detonation and detonation transition data from the High-Temperature Combustion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Finfrock, C.

    1996-01-01

    The BNL High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) is an experimental research tool capable of investigating the effects of initial thermodynamic state on the high-speed combustion characteristic of reactive gas mixtures. The overall experimental program has been designed to provide data to help characterize the influence of elevated gas-mixture temperature (and pressure) on the inherent sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation, on the potential for flames accelerating in these mixtures to transition into detonations, on the effects of gas venting on the flame-accelerating process, on the phenomena of initiation of detonations in these mixtures by jets of hot reactant products, and on the capability of detonations within a confined space to transmit into another, larger confined space. This paper presents results obtained from the completion of two of the overall test series that was designed to characterize high-speed combustion phenomena in initially high-temperature gas mixtures. These two test series are the intrinsic detonability test series and the deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) test series. A brief description of the facility is provided below

  10. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  11. High-energy x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Multi-keV x-ray microscopy will be an important laser-produced plasma diagnostic at future megajoule facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF).In preparation for the construction of this facility, we have investigated several instrumentation options in detail, and we conclude that near normal incidence single spherical or toroidal crystals may offer the best general solution for high-energy x-raymicroscopy at NIF and at similar large facilities. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes using multi-layer mirrors may also be good secondary options, particularly if apertures are used to increase the band-width limited field of view

  12. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  13. Potential of a newly developed high-speed near-infrared (NIR) camera (Compovision) in polymer industrial analyses: monitoring crystallinity and crystal evolution of polylactic acid (PLA) and concentration of PLA in PLA/Poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Daitaro; Nishii, Takashi; Mizuno, Fumiaki; Sato, Harumi; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate a new high-speed hyperspectral near-infrared (NIR) camera named Compovision. Quantitative analyses of the crystallinity and crystal evolution of biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA), and its concentration in PLA/poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) blends were investigated using near-infrared (NIR) imaging. This NIR camera can measure two-dimensional NIR spectral data in the 1000-2350 nm region obtaining images with wide field of view of 150 × 250 mm(2) (approximately 100  000 pixels) at high speeds (in less than 5 s). PLA with differing crystallinities between 0 and 50% blended samples with PHB in ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 40/60, 20/80, and pure films of 100% PLA and PHB were prepared. Compovision was used to collect respective NIR spectra in the 1000-2350 nm region and investigate the crystallinity of PLA and its concentration in the blends. The partial least squares (PLS) regression models for the crystallinity of PLA were developed using absorbance, second derivative, and standard normal variate (SNV) spectra from the most informative region of the spectra, between 1600 and 2000 nm. The predicted results of PLS models achieved using the absorbance and second derivative spectra were fairly good with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less than 6.1% and a determination of coefficient (R(2)) of more than 0.88 for PLS factor 1. The results obtained using the SNV spectra yielded the best prediction with the smallest RMSE of 2.93% and the highest R(2) of 0.976. Moreover, PLS models developed for estimating the concentration of PLA in the blend polymers using SNV spectra gave good predicted results where the RMSE was 4.94% and R(2) was 0.98. The SNV-based models provided the best-predicted results, since it can reduce the effects of the spectral changes induced by the inhomogeneity and the thickness of the samples. Wide area crystal evolution of PLA on a plate where a temperature slope of 70-105 °C had occurred was also

  14. Construction, characteristics and present status of high-fluence irradiation facility at University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Kouchi, Noriyuki.

    1989-01-01

    New ion accelerator facility (HIT Facility) was constructed at Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo. This facility, which was equipped with some special apparatus, has been mainly dedicated to the study of radiation effects of ion beams on materials. In this report, the construction, the characteristics and the present status of this facility are described. (author)

  15. A new high-temperature plasma ion source for the TRISTAN ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, A.; Gill, R.L.; McDonald, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    A vigorous program of ion-source development at TRISTAN has led to several types of ion sources that are especially suited to extended operation at a reactor-based ISOL facility. The latest of these is a high-temperature plasma ion source in which a 5-g /sup 235/U target is located in the cathode and can be heated to 2500 0 C. The ion source has a lifetime of > 1000 h and produces a wide array of elements, including palladium. Off-line investigations indicate that the source functions primarily in an electron impact mode of ionization and exhibits typical ionization efficiencies of > 30% for xenon

  16. New mass-spectrometric facility for the analysis of highly radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmack, R.J.; Landau, L.; Christie, W.H.; Carter, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new facility has been completed for the analysis of highly radioactive, gamma-emitting solid samples. A commercial spark-source mass spectrometer was adapted for remote handling and loading. Electrodes are prepared in a hot cell and transported to the adjacent lead-shielded source for analysis. The source was redesigned for ease of shielding, loading, and maintenance. Both solutions and residues from irradiated nuclear fuel dissolutions have been analyzed for elemental concentrations to < 1 ppM; isotopic data have also been obtained

  17. A new high-temperature plasma ion source for the TRISTAN ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, A.; Gill, R.L.; McDonald, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    A vigorous program of ion-source development at TRISTAN has led to several types of ion sources that are especially suited to extended operation at a reactor-based ISOL facility. The latest of these is a high-temperature plasma ion source in which a 5-g 235 U target is located in the cathode and can be heated to 2500 0 C. The ion source has a lifetime of >1000 h and produces a wide array of elements, including palladium. Off-line investigations indicate that the source functions primarily in an electron impact mode of ionization and exhibits typical ionization efficiencies of >30% for xenon. (orig.)

  18. New high temperature plasma ion source for the TRISTAN ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, A.; Gill, R.L.; McDonald, D.C.

    1986-08-01

    A vigorous program of ion source development at TRISTAN has led to several types of ion sources that are especially suited to extended operation at a reactor-based ISOL facility. The latest of these is a high temperature plasma ion source in which a 5 gm 235 U target is located in the cathode and can be heated to 2500 0 C. The ion source has a lifetime of >1000 hours and produces a wide array of elements, including Pd. Off-line investigations indicate that the source functions primarily in an electron impact mode of ionization and exhibits typical ionzation efficiencies of >30% for Xe

  19. Software systems for processing and analysis at the NOVA high-energy laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Montgomery, D.S.; McCauley, E.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    A typical laser interaction experiment at the NOVA high-energy laser facility produces in excess of 20 Mbytes of digitized data. Extensive processing and analysis of this raw data from a wide variety of instruments is necessary to produce results that can be readily used to interpret the experiment. Using VAX-based computer hardware, software systems have been set up to convert the digitized instrument output to physics quantities describing the experiment. A relational data-base management system is used to coordinate all levels of processing and analysis. Software development emphasizes structured design, flexibility, automation, and ease of use

  20. The global lambda visualization facility: An international ultra-high-definition wide-area visualization collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J.; Renambot, L.; Johnson, Aaron H.; Jeong, B.; Jagodic, R.; Schwarz, N.; Svistula, D.; Singh, R.; Aguilera, J.; Wang, X.; Vishwanath, V.; Lopez, B.; Sandin, D.; Peterka, T.; Girado, J.; Kooima, R.; Ge, J.; Long, L.; Verlo, A.; DeFanti, T.A.; Brown, M.; Cox, D.; Patterson, R.; Dorn, P.; Wefel, P.; Levy, S.; Talandis, J.; Reitzer, J.; Prudhomme, T.; Coffin, T.; Davis, B.; Wielinga, P.; Stolk, B.; Bum, Koo G.; Kim, J.; Han, S.; Corrie, B.; Zimmerman, T.; Boulanger, P.; Garcia, M.

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this paper marks an initial global cooperative effort between visualization and collaboration researchers to build a persistent virtual visualization facility linked by ultra-high-speed optical networks. The goal is to enable the comprehensive and synergistic research and development of the necessary hardware, software and interaction techniques to realize the next generation of end-user tools for scientists to collaborate on the global Lambda Grid. This paper outlines some of the visualization research projects that were demonstrated at the iGrid 2005 workshop in San Diego, California.

  1. Dynamic high energy density plasma environments at the National Ignition Facility for nuclear science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerjan, Ch J.; Bernstein, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cassata, W. S.; Brune, C. R.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G.; Hagmann, Chr; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Henry, E. A.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khater, H. Y.; Kim, Y.; Kritcher, A.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Merrill, F.; Moody, K.; Neumayer, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B.; Stoeffl, W.; Tommasini, R.; Yeamans, Ch; Velsko, C.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Zylstra, A.; Schneider, D.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of dynamic high energy density plasmas in the pico- to nano-second time domain at high-energy laser facilities affords unprecedented nuclear science research possibilities. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the primary goal of inertial confinement fusion research has led to the synergistic development of a unique high brightness neutron source, sophisticated nuclear diagnostic instrumentation, and versatile experimental platforms. These novel experimental capabilities provide a new path to investigate nuclear processes and structural effects in the time, mass and energy density domains relevant to astrophysical phenomena in a unique terrestrial environment. Some immediate applications include neutron capture cross-section evaluation, fission fragment production, and ion energy loss measurement in electron-degenerate plasmas. More generally, the NIF conditions provide a singular environment to investigate the interplay of atomic and nuclear processes such as plasma screening effects upon thermonuclear reactivity. Achieving enhanced understanding of many of these effects will also significantly advance fusion energy research and challenge existing theoretical models.

  2. Isolation facilities for highly infectious diseases in Europe--a cross-sectional analysis in 16 countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schilling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly Infectious Diseases (HIDs are (i easily transmissible form person to person; (ii cause a life-threatening illness with no or few treatment options; and (iii pose a threat for both personnel and the public. Hence, even suspected HID cases should be managed in specialised facilities minimizing infection risks but allowing state-of-the-art critical care. Consensus statements on the operational management of isolation facilities have been published recently. The study presented was set up to compare the operational management, resources, and technical equipment among European isolation facilities. Due to differences in geography, population density, and national response plans it was hypothesized that adherence to recommendations will vary. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Until mid of 2010 the European Network for Highly Infectious Diseases conducted a cross-sectional analysis of isolation facilities in Europe, recruiting 48 isolation facilities in 16 countries. Three checklists were disseminated, assessing 44 items and 148 specific questions. The median feedback rate for specific questions was 97.9% (n = 47/48 (range: n = 7/48 (14.6% to n = 48/48 (100%. Although all facilities enrolled were nominated specialised facilities' serving countries or regions, their design, equipment and personnel management varied. Eighteen facilities fulfilled the definition of a High Level Isolation Unit'. In contrast, 24 facilities could not operate independently from their co-located hospital, and five could not ensure access to equipment essential for infection control. Data presented are not representative for the EU in general, as only 16/27 (59.3% of all Member States agreed to participate. Another limitation of this study is the time elapsed between data collection and publication; e.g. in Germany one additional facility opened in the meantime. CONCLUSION: There are disparities both within and between European countries regarding the design

  3. Modification of combustion behaviour and NO emissions by coal blending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, Fernando; Arenillas, Ana; Arias, Borja; Pis, Jose J. [Department of Energy and Environment, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-06-20

    Combustion profiles determined by TGA and experiments in a laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) were used in this work to assess the relative combustion reactivities of different rank coals and their binary coal blends. The combustion behaviour of coal blends in TGA was greatly influenced by coal rank and the proportion of each component in the blend. Higher volatile coals exerted more influence in the low-temperature region and less reactive coals in the char combustion zone. The results in the EFR indicated that coal blends burnout and NO emissions show additivity in the case of similar nature coals. When one of the components was a high-rank coal, the burnout of the blend exhibited, in some cases, positive synergistic effects, while a clear deviation from linearity was found in NO emissions.

  4. Thin shell, high velocity inertial confinement fusion implosions on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Barrios, M A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Haan, S W; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; MacPhee, A G; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Celliers, P; Cerjan, C J; Church, J A; Dixit, S; Dylla-Spears, R; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Knauer, J; Kohut, T; Kozioziemski, B; Kritcher, A; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N B; Merrill, F E; Moody, J D; Nagel, S R; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Ralph, J E; Rosen, M D; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M B; Shaughnessy, D; Spears, B K; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-04-10

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165  μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Early results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  5. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulaitis, G [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Duchovskis, P [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Bliznikas, Z [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Breive, K [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ulinskaite, R [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Brazaityte, A [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Novickovas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zukauskas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2005-09-07

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated.

  6. HVPTF-The high voltage laboratory for the ITER Neutral Beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzi, A., E-mail: antonio.delorenzi@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Pilan, N.; Lotto, L.; Fincato, M. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Pesavento, G.; Gobbo, R. [DIE, Universita di Padova, Via Gradenigo 6A, I-35100 Padova (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In the MITICA research program for the construction of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector prototype, a Laboratory for the investigation on high voltage holding in vacuum has been set up. This Laboratory - HVPTF: High Voltage Padova Test Facility - is presently capable of experiments up to 300 kV dc, and planned for the upgrade to 800 kV. The specific mission for this ancillary lab is the support to the electrostatic design and construction of the MITICA accelerator and the development and testing of HV components to be installed inside the MITICA accelerator during its operation. The paper describes the structure of the lab, characterized by a high degree of automation and reports the results of the commissioning at 300 kV and the first results of voltage holding between test electrodes.

  7. HVPTF-The high voltage laboratory for the ITER Neutral Beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzi, A.; Pilan, N.; Lotto, L.; Fincato, M.; Pesavento, G.; Gobbo, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the MITICA research program for the construction of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector prototype, a Laboratory for the investigation on high voltage holding in vacuum has been set up. This Laboratory - HVPTF: High Voltage Padova Test Facility - is presently capable of experiments up to 300 kV dc, and planned for the upgrade to 800 kV. The specific mission for this ancillary lab is the support to the electrostatic design and construction of the MITICA accelerator and the development and testing of HV components to be installed inside the MITICA accelerator during its operation. The paper describes the structure of the lab, characterized by a high degree of automation and reports the results of the commissioning at 300 kV and the first results of voltage holding between test electrodes.

  8. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulaitis, G; Duchovskis, P; Bliznikas, Z; Breive, K; Ulinskaite, R; Brazaityte, A; Novickovas, A; Zukauskas, A

    2005-01-01

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated

  9. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  10. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Aberle, O.; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cornelis, K.; Dallocchio, A.; Deboy, D.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2014-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat) facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  11. Blended learning in anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    behind DBR is that new knowledge is generated through processes that simultaneously develop, test and improve a design, in this case, an educational design (1) The main principles used in the project is blended learning and flipped learning (2). …"I definitely learn best in practice, but the theory...... in working with the assignments in the classroom."... External assesor, observer and interviewer Based on the different evaluations, the conclusion are that the blended learning approach combined with the ‘flipped classroom’ is a very good way to learn and apply the anatomy, both for the students......The aim of the project was to bridge the gap between theory and practice by working more collaboratively, both peer-to-peer and between student and lecturer. Furthermore the aim was to create active learning environments. The methodology of the project is Design-Based Research (DBR). The idea...

  12. Theory of polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curro, J.G.; Schweizer, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    We have recently developed a new theoretical approach to the study of polymer liquids. The theory is based on the ''reference interaction site model'' (RISM theory) of Chandler and Andersen, which has been successful in describing the structure of small molecule liquids. We have recently extended our polymer RISM theory to the case of polymer blends. In the present investigation we have applied this theory to two special binary blends: (1) the athermal mixture where we isolate structural effects, and (2) the isotopic mixture in which structurally identical polymer chains interact with dissimilar attractive interactions. By studying these two special cases we are able to obtain insights into the molecular factors which control the miscibility in polymer mixtures. 18 refs., 2 figs

  13. Near-surface storage facilities for vitrified high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'ev, A.N.; Kulichenko, V.V.; Kryukov, I.I.; Krylova, N.V.; Paramoshkin, V.I.; Strakhov, M.V.

    1980-01-01

    Concurrently with the development of methods for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes, reliable and safe methods for the storage and disposal of solidified wastes are being devised in the USSR and other countries. One of the main factors affecting the choice of storage conditions for solidified wastes originating from the vitrification of high-level liquid wastes from fuel reprocessing plants is the problem of removing the heat produced by radioactive decay. In order to prevent the temperature of solidified wastes from exceeding the maximum permissible level for the material concerned, it is necessary to limit either the capacity of waste containers or the specific heat release of the wastes themselves. In order that disposal of high-level wastes in geological formations should be reliable and economic, solidified wastes undergo interim storage in near-surface storage facilities with engineered cooling systems. The paper demonstrates the relative influences of specific heat release, of the maximum permissible storage temperature for vitrified wastes and of the methods chosen for cooling wastes in order for the dimensions of waste containers to be reduced to the extent required. The effect of concentrating wastes to a given level in the vitrification process on the cost of storage in different types of storage facility is also examined. Calculations were performed for the amount of vitrified wastes produced by a reprocessing plant with a capacity of five tonnes of uranium per 24 hours. Fuel elements from reactors of the water-cooled, water-moderated type are sent for reprocessing after having been held for about two years. The dimensions of the storage facility are calculated on the assumption that it will take five years to fill

  14. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid

  15. Radiation safety program in high dose rate brachytherapy facility at INHS Asvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy concerns primarily the use of radioactive sealed sources which are inserted into catheters or applicators and placed directly into tissue either inside or very close to the target volume. The use of radiation in treatment of patients involves both benefits and risks. It has been reported that early radiation workers had developed radiation induced cancers. These incidents lead to continuous work for the improvement of radiation safety of patients and personnel The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy needs appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize the risks to both patients and medical staff. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control, quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program developedfor a high dose rate brachytherapy facility at our centre which may serve as a guideline for other centres intending to install a similar facility.

  16. The JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerator and overview of nuclear transmutation experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    A status of the JAERI/KEK joint project on High Intensity Proton Accelerator is overviewed. It is highlighted that Experimental facilities for development of the accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear transmutation technology is proposed under the project. (author)

  17. High throughput study of fuel cell proton exchange membranes: Poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic polyelectrolyte blends and nanocomposites with zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata B., Pedro Jose

    Sustainability is perhaps one of the most heard buzzwords in the post-20 th century society; nevertheless, it is not without a reason. Our present practices for energy supply are largely unsustainable if we consider their environmental and social impact. In view of this unfavorable panorama, alternative sustainable energy sources and conversion approaches have acquired noteworthy significance in recent years. Among these, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are being considered as a pivotal building block in the transition towards a sustainable energy economy in the 21st century. The polyelectrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane (PEM) is a vital component, as well as a performance-limiting factor, of the PEMFC. Consequently, the development of high-performance PEM materials is of utmost importance for the advance of the PEMFC field. In this work, alternative PEM materials based on semi-interpenetrated networks from blends of poly(vinyledene fluoride) (PVDF) (inert phase) and sulfonated crosslinked acrylic polyelectrolytes (PE) (proton-conducting phase), as well as tri-phase PVDF/PE/zirconium-based composites, are studied. To alleviate the burden resulting from the vast number of possible combinations of the different precursors utilized in the preparation of the membranes (PVDF: 5x, PE: 2x, Nanoparticle: 3x), custom high-throughput (HT) screening systems have been developed for their characterization. By coupling the data spaces obtained via these systems with the appropriate statistical and data analysis tools it was found that, despite not being directly involved in the proton transport process, the inert PVDF phase plays a major role on proton conductivity. Particularly, a univocal inverse correlation between the PVDF crystalline characteristics (i.e., crystallinity and crystallite size) and melt viscosity, and membrane proton conductivity was discovered. Membranes based on highly crystalline and viscous PVDF homopolymers exhibited reduced proton

  18. A Facile and General Approach to Recoverable High-Strain Multishape Shape Memory Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingjian; Pan, Yi; Zheng, Zhaohui; Ding, Xiaobin

    2018-03-01

    Fabricating a single polymer network with no need to design complex structures to achieve an ideal combination of tunable high-strain multiple-shape memory effects and highly recoverable shape memory property is a great challenge for the real applications of advanced shape memory devices. Here, a facile and general approach to recoverable high-strain multishape shape memory polymers is presented via a random copolymerization of acrylate monomers and a chain-extended multiblock copolymer crosslinker. As-prepared shape memory networks show a large width at the half-peak height of the glass transition, far wider than current classical multishape shape memory polymers. A combination of tunable high-strain multishape memory effect and as high as 1000% recoverable strain in a single chemical-crosslinking network can be obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first thermosetting material with a combination of highly recoverable strain and tunable high-strain multiple-shape memory effects. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Reactive modification of polyesters and their blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chen

    2004-12-01

    the desired rheological and structural characteristics of the final products for potential applications such as low density extrusion foaming or compatibilization of immiscible polymer blends. Important modification conditions through coagents are identified and reaction mechanisms are proposed. A high MW saturated polyester, PET, can also be rheologically modified in extruders through low MW multifunctional anhydride and epoxy compounds by chain extension/branching. Several such modifiers were successfully screened in terms of their reactivity towards PET under controlled reactive extrusion conditions. A dianhydride with medium reactivity was then successfully used in a one-step reactive modification/extrusion foaming process to produce low density foams. A similar process was successfully used to produce small cell size foams from a four component system containing PET, PP and lesser amounts of a low molecular weight multifunctional epoxy compound and an acid functionalized polyolefin, the latter acting as compatibilizers.

  20. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis of a High Air Pressure Compressor Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Ring, Robert W.; Cole, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) independent assessment conducted to support the refurbishment of the Compressor Station at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The paper discusses the methodologies used by the assessment team to derive the repair by replacement (RR) strategies to improve the reliability and availability of the Compressor Station (Ref.1). This includes a RAPTOR simulation model that was used to generate the statistical data analysis needed to derive a 15-year investment plan to support the refurbishment of the facility. To summarize, study results clearly indicate that the air compressors are well past their design life. The major failures of Compressors indicate that significant latent failure causes are present. Given the occurrence of these high-cost failures following compressor overhauls, future major failures should be anticipated if compressors are not replaced. Given the results from the RR analysis, the study team recommended a compressor replacement strategy. Based on the data analysis, the RR strategy will lead to sustainable operations through significant improvements in reliability, availability, and the probability of meeting the air demand with acceptable investment cost that should translate, in the long run, into major cost savings. For example, the probability of meeting air demand improved from 79.7 percent for the Base Case to 97.3 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in the probability of failing to meet demand (1 in 5 days to 1 in 37 days), the improvement is about 700 percent. Similarly, compressor replacement improved the operational availability of the facility from 97.5 percent to 99.8 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in system unavailability (1 in 40 to 1 in 500), the improvement is better than 1000 percent (an order of magnitude improvement). It is worthy to note that the methodologies, tools, and techniques used in the LaRC study can be used to evaluate

  1. Blended acquisition with dispersed source arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Blended source arrays are historically configured with equal source units, such as broadband vibrators (land) and broadband air-gun arrays (marine). I refer to this concept as homogeneous blending. I have proposed to extend the blending concept to inhomogeneous blending, meaning that a blended

  2. Ultra high vacuum activities and required modification at 14 UD BARC-TIFR pelletron accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Ninawe, N.G.; Ramjilal; Bhagwat, P.V.; Salvi, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 14 UD pelletron accelerator is working round the clock since 1989. The accelerator is housed inside a tank which is 6 meter in diameter and 25 meter long. The accelerator tank is pressurized with SF 6 at 80 to 100 PSIG in order to achieve 14MV. In pelletron, ions are extracted from SNICS are pre-accelerated up to 300 keV before being injected into low energy accelerator tube. In the terminal which is at high potential (4MV to 14 MV), the ion beam pass through the stripper and positive ions with high charge states are produced. The high energy beams are focussed and analyzed by 90 deg magnet. The analyzed beam is then transported to the various experimental ports. In order to achieve uniform ultra high vacuum (to reduce the loss of intensity and spread in the energy of ions beams) in more than 100 metre and 100 mm diameter beam lines including magnet chambers and various beam diagnostic devices, combination of getter-ion pumps and turbo pumps are being used at Pelletron Accelerator Facility. The 14 UD pelletron is equipped with a combination of foil and gas stripper in high voltage terminal section. The foil and gas stripper in the terminal section are mainly used for stripping of light and heavy ions respectively. The gas stripper plays a great role for stripping of heavy ions and its efficiency depends on gas stripper parameters and supporting pumps. The gas stripper is originally installed with getter pumps. These pumps required periodic replacement of titanium cartridges and slowly the pumping speed used to diminish with time. A new recirculation turbo molecular pumps based system is being designed to improve good beam transmission. Details of design will be presented. Proton beam of tens of MeV energy and μA range current is in demand to carry out specific radiochemistry experiments in this facility. It is proposed to built and accommodate a proton experimental setup in the tower area of the existing facility. Details of required UHV system for

  3. White Mountain Research Station: 25 years of high-altitude research. [organization and functions of test facility for high altitude research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    The organization and functions of a test facility for conducting research projects at high altitudes are discussed. The projects conducted at the facility include the following: (1) bird physiology, (2) cardiorespiratory physiology, (3) endocrinological studies, (4) neurological studies, (5) metabolic studies, and (6) geological studies.

  4. HPCAT: an integrated high-pressure synchrotron facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Guoyin; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Hans-Peter; Shebanova, Olga; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2008-01-01

    The high pressure collaborative access team (HPCAT) was established to advance cutting edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure (HP) science and technology using synchrotron radiation at sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The integrated HPCAT facility has established four operating beamlines in nine hutches. Two beamlines are split in energy space from the insertion device (16ID) line, whereas the other two are spatially divided into two fans from the bending magnet (16BM) line. An array of novel X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with HP and extreme temperature instrumentation at HPCAT. With a multidisciplinary approach and multi-institution collaborations, the HP program at the HPCAT has been enabling myriad scientific breakthroughs in HP physics, chemistry, materials, and Earth and planetary sciences.

  5. High-order dispersion control of 10-petawatt Ti:sapphire laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Xu, Yi; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Xingyan; Gan, Zebiao; Yu, Lianghong; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2017-07-24

    A grism pair is utilized to control the high-order dispersion of the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Lasers Facility, which is a large-scale project aimed at delivering 10-PW laser pulses. We briefly present the characteristics of the laser system and calculate the cumulative B-integral, which determines the nonlinear phase shift influence on material dispersion. Three parameters are selected, grism separation, angle of incidence and slant distance of grating compressor, to determine their optimal values through an iterative searching procedure. Both the numerical and experimental results confirm that the spectral phase distortion is controlled, and the recompressed pulse with a duration of 24 fs is obtained in the single-shot mode. The distributions and stabilities of the pulse duration at different positions of the recompressed beam are also investigated. This approach offers a new feasible solution for the high-order dispersion compensation of femtosecond petawatt laser systems.

  6. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Experimental Facility for Checking the Possibility to Obtain Super-High Temperature Due to Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M B; Sobolev, Yu G; Kostenko, B F

    2004-01-01

    An experimental facility developed for checking the possibility to obtain super-high temperature sufficient for thermonuclear reaction D($d, n$)$^{3}$He in an acoustic cavitation is described. The acoustic part of the instrumentation consists of a resonator and a system exciting high amplitude of the acoustic field within the resonator. The cavitation process is controlled with the use of fast neutron pulses. The instrument includes a system of pumping out solute gases from the liquid (acetone enriched with deuterium up to 99{\\%}) without losses of matter. Measuring of the field is based on the calibration procedure including observation of sonoluminescence. The system of detection and identification of D($d, n$)$^{3}$He reaction is based on a scintillation detector of fast neutrons and a system of measuring multiparameter events by the correlation technique with separation of the neutrons from the $\\gamma $-radiation background (pulse shape discrimination).

  8. High-energy Nd:glass laser facility for collisionless laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, C; Constantin, C G; Schaeffer, D B; Lucky, Z; Gekelman, W; Everson, E T; Tauschwitz, A; Weiland, T; Winske, D

    2012-01-01

    A kilojoule-class laser (Raptor) has recently been activated at the Phoenix-laser-facility at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) for an experimental program on laboratory astrophysics in conjunction with the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The unique combination of a high-energy laser system and the 18 meter long, highly-magnetized but current-free plasma will support a new class of plasma physics experiments, including the first laboratory simulations of quasi-parallel collisionless shocks, experiments on magnetic reconnection, or advanced laser-based diagnostics of basic plasmas. Here we present the parameter space accessible with this new instrument, results from a laser-driven magnetic piston experiment at reduced power, and a detailed description of the laser system and its performance.

  9. Homogeneity of blended nuclear fuel powders after pneumatic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeltzer, E.E.; Skriba, M.C.; Lyon, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the pneumatic transport of fine (approx. 1μm) cohesive nuclear fuel powders was conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the feasibility of this method of transport and to develop a design data base for use in a large scale nuclear fuel production facility. As part of this program, a considerable effort was directed at following the homogeneity of blended powders. Since different reactors require different enrichments, blending and subsequent transport are critical parts of the fabrication sequence. The various materials used represented analogs of a wide range of powders and blends that could be expected in a commercial mixed oxide fabrication facility. All UO 2 powders used were depleted and a co-precipitated master mix of (U, Th)O 2 was made specifically for this program, using thorium as an analog for plutonium. In order to determine the effect of pneumatic transport on a blended powder, samples were taken from a feeder vessel before each test, and from a receiver vessel and a few line sections after each transfer test. The average difference between the before and after degree of non-homogeneity was < 1%, for the 21 tests considered. This shows that overall, the pneumatic transport of blended, fine nuclear fuel powders is possible, with only minor unblending occurring

  10. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Ignition Facility (NIF, a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF and high-energy-density science (HEDS, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL. A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC, an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE. This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  11. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Storm, E.

    2013-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density science (HEDS), is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  12. Blending Biodiesel in Fishing Boat Fuels for Improved Fuel Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages, such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability, and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% if 25 wt.% biodiesel is blended. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt.% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt.% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1–4.5%.

  13. Blending Biodiesel in Fishing Boat Fuels for Improved Fuel Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan, E-mail: lin7108@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Marine Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages, such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability, and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% if 25 wt.% biodiesel is blended. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt.% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt.% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1–4.5%.

  14. The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. A., E-mail: hurricane1@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kervin, P.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    The “High-Foot” platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.3×10{sup 15}) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the “bootstrapping” associated with alpha-particle self-heating.

  15. 6 CFR 27.205 - Determination that a chemical facility “presents a high level of security risk.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination that a chemical facility âpresents... SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.205 Determination that a chemical facility “presents a high level of security risk.” (a...

  16. Distribution of Trauma Care Facilities in Oman in Relation to High-Incidence Road Traffic Injury Sites: Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sara M; Naiem, Ahmed A; Taqi, Kadhim M; Al-Gheiti, Najla M; Al-Toobi, Ikhtiyar S; Al-Busaidi, Nasra Q; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z; Taqi, Alaa M; Ba-Alawi, Sharif A; Al-Qadhi, Hani A

    2017-11-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are considered a major public health problem worldwide. In Oman, high numbers of RTIs and RTI-related deaths are frequently registered. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution of trauma care facilities in Oman with regards to their proximity to RTI-prevalent areas. This descriptive pilot study analysed RTI data recorded in the national Royal Oman Police registry from January to December 2014. The distribution of trauma care facilities was analysed by calculating distances between areas of peak RTI incidence and the closest trauma centre using Google Earth and Google Maps software (Google Inc., Googleplex, Mountain View, California, USA). A total of 32 trauma care facilities were identified. Four facilities (12.5%) were categorised as class V trauma centres. Of the facilities in Muscat, 42.9% were ranked as class IV or V. There were no class IV or V facilities in Musandam, Al-Wusta or Al-Buraimi. General surgery, orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery services were available in 68.8%, 59.3% and 12.5% of the centres, respectively. Emergency services were available in 75.0% of the facilities. Intensive care units were available in 11 facilities, with four located in Muscat. The mean distance between a RTI hotspot and the nearest trauma care facility was 34.7 km; however, the mean distance to the nearest class IV or V facility was 83.3 km. The distribution and quality of trauma care facilities in Oman needs modification. It is recommended that certain centres upgrade their levels of trauma care in order to reduce RTI-associated morbidity and mortality in Oman.

  17. Inkjet-Printed Organic Transistors Based on Organic Semiconductor/Insulating Polymer Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Jung; Park, Yeong Don; Lee, Wi Hyoung

    2016-08-02

    Recent advances in inkjet-printed organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on organic semiconductor/insulating polymer blends are reviewed in this article. Organic semiconductor/insulating polymer blends are attractive ink candidates for enhancing the jetting properties, inducing uniform film morphologies, and/or controlling crystallization behaviors of organic semiconductors. Representative studies using soluble acene/insulating polymer blends as an inkjet-printed active layer in OFETs are introduced with special attention paid to the phase separation characteristics of such blended films. In addition, inkjet-printed semiconducting/insulating polymer blends for fabricating high performance printed OFETs are reviewed.

  18. Inkjet-Printed Organic Transistors Based on Organic Semiconductor/Insulating Polymer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Jung; Park, Yeong Don; Lee, Wi Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in inkjet-printed organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on organic semiconductor/insulating polymer blends are reviewed in this article. Organic semiconductor/insulating polymer blends are attractive ink candidates for enhancing the jetting properties, inducing uniform film morphologies, and/or controlling crystallization behaviors of organic semiconductors. Representative studies using soluble acene/insulating polymer blends as an inkjet-printed active layer in OFETs are introduced with special attention paid to the phase separation characteristics of such blended films. In addition, inkjet-printed semiconducting/insulating polymer blends for fabricating high performance printed OFETs are reviewed. PMID:28773772

  19. A continuously self regenerating high-flux neutron-generator facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. M.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, A. X.; Daub, B. H.; Goldblum, B. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Leung, K.-N.; Renne, P. R.; Waltz, C.

    2013-10-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being constructed at UC Berkeley. The current generator, designed around two RF-driven multicusp deuterium ion sources, is capable of producing a neutron output of >1011 n/s. A specially designed titanium-coated copper target located between the ion sources accelerates D+ ions up to 150 keV, generating 2.45 MeV neutrons through the d(d,3He)n fusion reaction. Deuterium in the target is self loaded and regenerating through ion implantation, enabling stable and continuous long-term operation. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40Ar/39Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science research including statistical model studies of radiative-strength functions and level densities, and education. An overview of the facility and its unique capabilities as well as first measurements from the HFNG commissioning will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Development of high power CW and pulsed RF test facility based on 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Rao, J.N.; Tiwari, Ashish; Jain, Akhilesh; Lad, M.R.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    A high power 1 MW, 352.2 MHz RF Test facility having CW and Pulse capability is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for performance evaluation of various RF components, accelerating structures and related subsystems. Thales make 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier (TH 2089) will be employed in this high power test facility, which is thoroughly tested for its performance parameters at rated operating conditions. Auxiliary power supplies like filament, electromagnet, ion pump and mod anode power supply as well as 200 W solid state driver amplifier necessary for this high power test facility have been developed. A high voltage floating platform is created for floating filament and mod anode power supplies. Interconnection of various power supplies and other subsystems of this test facility are being carried out. A high voltage 100 kV, 25 Amp DC crowbar less power supply and low conductivity water (LCW) plant required for this klystron amplifier are in advanced stage of development. NI make cRIO 9081 real time (RT) controller based control and interlock system has been developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test facility. This RF test facility will provide confidence for development of RF System of future accelerators like SNS and ADSS. (author)

  1. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna, E-mail: malgrad@gmail.com; Woods, Brian G., E-mail: brian.woods@oregonstate.edu

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  2. Development of thermal mixing enhancement method for lower plenum of the High Temperature Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradecka, Malwina Joanna; Woods, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coolant mixing in lower plenum might be insufficient and pose operational issues. • Two mixing methods were developed to lower the coolant temperature variation. • The methods resulted with reduction of the temperature variation by 60% and 71%. - Abstract: The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the most mature Gen IV reactor concepts under development today. The High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University is a test facility that supports the R&D needs for HTGRs. This study focuses on the issue of helium mixing after the core section in the HTTF, the results of which are generally applicable in HTGRs. In the HTTF, hot helium jets at different temperatures are supposed to uniformly mix in the lower plenum (LP) chamber. However, the level of mixing is not sufficient to reduce the peak helium temperature before the hot jet impinges the LP structure, which can cause issues with structural materials and operational issues in the heat exchanger downstream. The maximum allowable temperature variation in the outlet duct connected to the lower plenum is defined as 40 K (±20 K from the average temperature), while the CFD simulations of this study indicate that the reference design suffers temperature variations in the duct as high as 100 K. To solve this issue, the installation of mixing-enhancing structures within the outlet duct were proposed and analyzed using CFD modeling. We show that using either an optimized “Kwiat” structure (developed in this study) or a motionless mixer installed in the outlet duct, the temperature variations can be brought dramatically, with acceptable increases in pressure drop. The optimal solution appears to be to install double motionless mixers with long blades in the outlet duct, which brings the temperature variation into the acceptable range (from 100 K down to 18 K), with a resulting pressure drop increase in the HTTF loop of 0.73 kPa (6% of total pressure drop).

  3. Microemulsions based on a sunflower lecithin-Tween 20 blend have high capacity for dissolving peppermint oil and stabilizing coenzyme Q10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaiqiong; Guan, Yongguang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-01-28

    The objectives of the present study were to improve the capability of microemulsions to dissolve peppermint oil by blending sunflower lecithin with Tween 20 and to study the possibility of codelivering lipophilic bioactive compounds. The oil loading in microemulsions with 20% (w/w) Tween 20 increased from 3% (w/w) to 20% (w/w) upon gradual supplementation of 6% (w/w) lecithin. All microemulsions had particles of lecithin. Therefore, natural surfactant lecithin can reduce the use of synthetic Tween 20 to dissolve peppermint oil and protect the degradation of dissolved lipophilic bioactive components in transparent products.

  4. 76 FR 35137 - Vulnerability and Threat Information for Facilities Storing Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... High-Level Radioactive Waste AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Public meeting... Nuclear Fuel, High-Level Radioactive Waste, and Reactor-Related Greater Than Class C Waste,'' and 73... Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) storage facilities. The draft regulatory...

  5. Facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis of a spherical covalent organic framework for high-resolution chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Cao, Yi-Meng; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-08-07

    A simple and facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis was developed to fabricate a spherical covalent organic framework with large surface area, good solvent stability and high thermostability for high-resolution chromatographic separation of diverse important industrial analytes including alkanes, cyclohexane and benzene, α-pinene and β-pinene, and alcohols with high column efficiency and good precision.

  6. Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by Using Organoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Mayu; Gersappe, Dilip; Zhang, Wenhua; Ade, Harald; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rudomen, Gregory; Schwartz, Bradley; Fisher, Robert

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the compatiblizing performance of organoclays on melt mixed binary and tertiary polymer blends, such as, PS/PMMA, PC/SAN, PS/PMMA/PVC and PS/PMMA/PE. These polymer blends were characterized by TEM, STXM, DSC and DMA. TEM and STXM photographs show that the addition of organoclays into polymer blends drastically reduces the average domain size of the component phases. And the organoclay goes to the interfacial region between the different polymers and effectively slows down the domain size increasing during high temperature annealing. DMA and DSC results show the effect of organoclays on the mechanical properties and glass transitions temperature, which indicates the compatibilization on the molecular level. The generalized compatibilization induced by the nanoscale fillers for blends can be explained in terms of mean field models where the reduction of interfacial tension induced by in-situ grafting is counterbalanced by the increased bending energy due to the rigidity of the filler. This in turn can be shown to be a function of the degree of exfoliation, aspect ratio, and polymer filler interactions. Supported by NSF funded MRSEC at Stony Brook

  7. The National Ignition Facility: Ushering in a new age for high energy density science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E. I.; Boyd, R. N.; Remington, B. A.; Keane, C. J.; Al-Ayat, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008); https://lasers.llnl.gov/], completed in March 2009, is the highest energy laser ever constructed. The high temperatures and densities achievable at NIF will enable a number of experiments in inertial confinement fusion and stockpile stewardship, as well as access to new regimes in a variety of experiments relevant to x-ray astronomy, laser-plasma interactions, hydrodynamic instabilities, nuclear astrophysics, and planetary science. The experiments will impact research on black holes and other accreting objects, the understanding of stellar evolution and explosions, nuclear reactions in dense plasmas relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis, properties of warm dense matter in planetary interiors, molecular cloud dynamics and star formation, and fusion energy generation.

  8. Study of measurement method of tritium induced in concrete of high-energy proton accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, N.; Ishihama, S.; Kunifuda, T.; Hayasaka, N.; Miura, T.

    2001-01-01

    Various long-loved radionuclides, 3 H, 7 Be, 22 Na, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 56 Co, 57 Co, 60 Co, 134 Cs, 152 Eu and 154 Eu, have been produced in the shielding concrete of high energy proton accelerator facility through both nuclear spallation reactions and thermal neutron capture reactions of concrete elements, during machine operation. Tritium is the most important nuclide from the radiation protection. There were, however, few measurements of tritium concentration induced in the shielding concrete. In this study, the conditions of measurement method of tritium concentration induced in shielding concrete have been investigated using the activated shielding concrete of the 12 GeV proton beam-line tunnel at KEK and the standard rock (JG-1) irradiated of thermal neutron at the reactor. And the depth profiles of tritium induced in the shielding concrete of slow extracted proton beam line at KEK were determined using this method. (author)

  9. Cryogenic Design of the New High Field Magnet Test Facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, V.; Pirotte, O.; De Rijk, G.; Bajko, M.; Craen, A. Vande; Perret, Ph.; Hanzelka, P.

    In the framework of the R&D program related to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) upgrades, a new High Field Magnet (HFM) vertical test bench is required. This facility located in the SM18 cryogenic test hall shall allow testing of up to 15 tons superconducting magnets with energy up to 10 MJ in a temperature range between 1.9 K and 4.5 K. The article describes the cryogenic architecture to be inserted in the general infrastructure of SM18 including the process and instrumentation diagram, the different operating phases including strategy for magnet cool down and warm up at controlled speed and quench management as well as the design of the main components.

  10. High-Strength Composite Fabric Tested at Structural Benchmark Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Large sheets of ultrahigh strength fabric were put to the test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Benchmark Test Facility. The material was stretched like a snare drum head until the last ounce of strength was reached, when it burst with a cacophonous release of tension. Along the way, the 3-ft square samples were also pulled, warped, tweaked, pinched, and yanked to predict the material's physical reactions to the many loads that it will experience during its proposed use. The material tested was a unique multi-ply composite fabric, reinforced with fibers that had a tensile strength eight times that of common carbon steel. The fiber plies were oriented at 0 and 90 to provide great membrane stiffness, as well as oriented at 45 to provide an unusually high resistance to shear distortion. The fabric's heritage is in astronaut space suits and other NASA programs.

  11. Hypothetical accidents at disposal facilities for high-level liquid radioactive wastes and pulps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabakchi, S.A.; Zagainov, V.A.; Lishnikov, A.A.; Nazin, E.R.

    1994-01-01

    Four accidents are postulated and analyzed for interim storage of high-level, liquid radioactive wastes at a fuel reprocessing facility. Normal waste storage operation is based on wastes stored in steel drums, partially buried in concrete canyons, and equipped with heat exchangers for cooling and ventilation systems for removal of explosive gases and vapors. The accident scenarios analyzed are: (1) shutdown of ventilation with open entrance and exit ventilation pipes, (2) shutdown of ventilation with closed entrance and exit ventilation pipes, (3) shutdown of the cooling system with normally functioning ventilation, and (4) simultaneous cooling and ventilation system failure (worst case). A mathematical model was developed and used to calculate radiation consequences of various accidents. Results are briefly presented for the worst case scenario and compared to an actual accident for model validation. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. CONCERT A high power proton accelerator driven multi-application facility concept

    CERN Document Server

    Laclare, J L

    2000-01-01

    A new generation of High Power Proton Accelerator (HPPA) is being made available. It opens new avenues to a long series of scientific applications in fundamental and applied research, which can make use of the boosted flux of secondary particles. Presently, in Europe, several disciplines are preparing their project of dedicated facility, based on the upgraded performances of HPPAs. Given the potential synergies between these different projects, for reasons of cost effectiveness, it was considered appropriate to look into the possibility to group a certain number of these applications around a single HPPA: CONCERT project left bracket 1 right bracket . The ensuing 2-year feasibility study organized in collaboration between the European Spallation Source and the CEA just started. EURISOL left bracket 2 right bracket project and CERN participate in the steering committee.

  13. Development of a High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Kraus, B.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, J.; Liedahl, D.; Macphee, A. G.; Le, H. P.; Thorn, D.; Nelson, D.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer has been designed, calibrated, and deployed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure plasma parameters for a Kr-doped surrogate capsule imploded at NIF conditions. Two conical crystals, each diffracting the He α and He β complexes respectively, focus the spectra onto a steak camera photocathode for time-resolved measurements with a temporal resolution of NIF experimental results will also be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Facile and High-Yielding Synthesis of TAM Biradicals and Monofunctional TAM Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhin, Dmitry V; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu; Troitskaya, Tatiana I; Vasiliev, Vladimir G; Bowman, Michael K; Tormyshev, Victor M

    2016-04-01

    Facile and high-yielding procedures for synthesis of monocarboxylic acid derivatives of triarylmethyl radicals (TAMs) were developed. Reaction of methyl thioglycolate with tris(2,3,5,6-tetrathiaaryl)methyl cation smoothly afforded the monosubstituted TAM derivative, which was hydrolyzed to a monocarboxylic acid, with the TAM moiety attached to thioglycolic acid via the sulfur atom. Alternatively, the diamagnetic tricarboxylic acid precursor of Finland trityl was transformed to a trimethyl ester and partially hydrolyzed under controlled conditions. The diester product was isolated and the remaining fractions were converted back to the trimethyl ester for production of more diester. The first representatives of TAM biradicals with different TAM cores and interspin distances were obtained by reaction of these new TAM monocaboxylic acids with N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine.

  15. Designs for highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Jacquet, L.; Loiseau, P.; Poujade, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Igumenshchev, I.; Chicanne, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present two designs relevant to ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008)]. The sensitivity of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability physics to ablation velocity is addressed with targets driven by indirect drive, with stronger ablative stabilization, and by direct drive, with weaker ablative stabilization. The indirect drive design demonstrates the potential to reach a two-dimensional bubble-merger regime with a 20 ns duration drive at moderate radiation temperature. The direct drive design achieves a 3 to 5 times increased acceleration distance for the sample in comparison to previous experiments allowing at least 2 more bubble generations when starting from a three-dimensional broadband spectrum.

  16. Intermediate storage facility for vitrified high level waste from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    An intermediate storage facility for vitrified high level waste is described. The design was made specifically for Swedish conditions but can due to modular design be applied also for other conditions. Most of the plant is located underground with a rock cover of about 30 m in order to provide protection against external forces such as acts of war and sabotage. The storage area consists of four caverns each with 150 pits. Each pit can take 10 waste cylinders of 0.4 m diameter and 1.5 m length containing 150 liters of glass. The capacity can be increased by adding additional caverns. Cooling is obtained by forced air convection. Reception areas, auxiliary systems and operation of the plant are also described

  17. Designs for highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Jacquet, L.; Loiseau, P.; Poujade, O. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Smalyuk, V. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Igumenshchev, I. [Laboratory of Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Chicanne, C. [CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-08-15

    We present two designs relevant to ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008)]. The sensitivity of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability physics to ablation velocity is addressed with targets driven by indirect drive, with stronger ablative stabilization, and by direct drive, with weaker ablative stabilization. The indirect drive design demonstrates the potential to reach a two-dimensional bubble-merger regime with a 20 ns duration drive at moderate radiation temperature. The direct drive design achieves a 3 to 5 times increased acceleration distance for the sample in comparison to previous experiments allowing at least 2 more bubble generations when starting from a three-dimensional broadband spectrum.

  18. High level waste vitrification at the SRP [Savannah River Plant] (DWPF [Defense Waste Processing Facility] summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, A.F.; Knight, J.R.; McIntosh, D.L.; Papouchado, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950's. Fuel and target elements are fabricated and irradiated to produce nuclear materials. After removal from the reactors, the fuel elements are processed to extract the products, and waste is stored. During the thirty years of operation including evaporation, about 30 million gallons of high level radioactive waste has accumulated. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) under construction at Savannah River will process this waste into a borosilicate glass for long-term geologic disposal. The construction of the DWPF is about 70% complete; this paper will describe the status of the project, including design demonstrations, with an emphasis on the melter system. 9 figs

  19. Radiation protection metrology at a high-energy neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Sherwin, A.G.; More, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A radiation protection survey has been carried out at a high-energy neutron therapy facility using a combination of different detectors and counters. Included in the survey were measurements with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a rem meter, a large volume ionisation chamber (LVI) and a Geiger counter. Dose equivalent rates, normalised to a proton beam current of 25 μA, of between 1 μSv.h -1 and 0.7 Sv.h -1 were recorded depending on the location. In general the results confirm the tendency of the rem meter to over-read in fields consisting mainly of low energy neutrons and illustrate the advantages of the diagnostic and gamma discriminating properties of the TEPC. The LVI-Geiger system was found to be the least favourable combination of dosemeters, substantially under-reading and being unable to estimate the neutron dose rate at levels below about 32 μGy.h -1 . (author)

  20. Blended Learning on Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a large-scale project implementing information and communication technology at Roskilde University, Denmark, this paper discusses ways of introducing technology-based blended learning in academic life. We examine some examples of use of systems for computer-mediated collabora......-tive learning and work in Danish Open University education as well as in courses on campus. We further suggest some possi-bilities for using technology in innovative ways, arguing that innovation is to be found, not in isolated instantiations of sys-tems, but in the form of a deliberate integration of all...... relevant ICT-features as a whole into the learning environment....